FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > National Assembly of the Republic of China
Politics - Politics portal
Republic of China (Taiwan)

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the Republic of China
Politics, sometimes defined as the art and science of government. ... The Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Simplified Chinese: 中华民国; Wade-Giles: Chung-hua Min-kuo, Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó) is a state that currently administers the island groups of Taiwan, the Pescadores, Quemoy, and the Matsu. ... Image File history File links Republic_of_China_National_Emblem. ... The Republic of China (ROC) currently has jurisdiction over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, and the Pescadores Islands (Penghu) and several smaller islands. ...

Fundamentals:

History - Civil War - 3 Principles
Constitution - National Assembly The Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Pinyin: Zhōng huá mín guó) succeeded the Qing Dynasty in 1912, ending 2,000 years of imperial rule. ... Combatants Chinese Nationalist Party Chinese Communist Party Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 3,600,000 circa June 1948 2,800,000 circa June 1948 The Chinese Civil War (Traditional Chinese: 國共内戰; Simplified Chinese: 国共内战; Hanyu Pinyin: ; literally Nationalist-Communist Civil War) was a conflict in China between the Kuomintang (Chinese... The Three Principles of the People (Traditional Chinese: 三民主義 ; Pinyin: Sān Mín ZhÇ”yì ; Wade-Giles: San-min Chu-i), also translated as Three Peoples Principles, or collectively San-min Doctrine, is a political philosophy developed by Sun Yat-sen as part of a program to make China...


Executives:
President: Chen Shui-bian
Premier: Su Tseng-chang The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ... Su Tseng-chang (蘇貞昌, pinyin: Sū Zhēnchāng; born July 28, 1947) is a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party. ...


Branches:
Executive - Legislative - Judicial
Control - Examination
The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... The Judicial Yuan (司法院) is one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei and serves as the highest judicial organ in Taiwan. ... The Control Yuan building The Control Yuan main entrance The Control Yuan (監察院; pinyin: Jiānchá Yùan), one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei, is a watchdog agency that monitors (controls) the government. ... The Examination Yuan (考試院) is one of five government branches of the Republic of China and is in charge of validating the qualification of civil servants. ...


Parties:
Political parties - Elections Political parties in Taiwan lists political parties in Taiwan (Republic of China). ... Elections in Taiwan gives information on election and election results in the Republic of China (Taiwan). ...


Status of Taiwan:
Political - Legal - Republic
Independence - Reunification
Taiwan Strait Area The political status of Taiwan is a controversy over whether Taiwan, including the Pescadores (Penghu), should remain the effective territory of the Republic of China (ROC), become unified with the territories now governed by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), or become the Republic of Taiwan. ... The legal question of which legal entity holds de jure sovereignty over Taiwan is a controversial issue. ... A flag for the proposed independent Taiwan designed in 1996. ... Chinese (re)unification (Template:Zh-addtsp) is a goal of ass Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of China under a single political entity. ...


Relations:
PRC relations - ROC relations - UN
Cross-Strait - 1 China - 2 systems The foreign relations of the Peoples Republic of China draws upon traditions extending back to China in the Qing dynasty and the Opium Wars, despite China having undergone some radicial upheavals over the past two centuries. ... The Republic of China, now on Taiwan is currently recognised only by 25 countries. ... Chinas seat in the United Nations has been occupied by the Peoples Republic of China since November 23, 1971. ... Taiwan Strait Cross-Strait Relations, or Relations across the Taiwan Strait, deals with the complex relationship and interactions between the Mainland China (which sits on the west of Taiwan_Strait) and Taiwan (which is located in the east of the Strait). ... One country, two systems (Simplified Chinese: 一国两制; Traditional Chinese: 一國兩制; pinyin: yì; guó liǎng zhì; Jyutping: jat1 gwok3 loeng5 zai3; Yale: yāt gwok leúhng jai), is an idea originally proposed by Deng Xiaoping, then Paramount Leader of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), for the unification of China. ...


Other issues:
Human rights - Localization
Chinese Taipei - Four-stage theory The human rights record of Taiwan is generally held to have experienced significant transformation over the last two decades. ... Localization (本土化, POJ: pún-thó·-hòa, Pinyin: Běntǔ huà) is a political term used by advocates of Taiwan independence to support their view of Taiwan as not part of China. ... The Four-stage Theory of the Republic of China or the Theory of the Four stages of the Republic of China (Chinese: 中華民國四階段論; pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó Sì Jiēduàn Lùn) is proposed by Chen Shui-bian, the 10th-and-11th(current)-term president of the Republic of...

The National Assembly (Traditional Chinese: 國民大會; Simplified Chinese: 国民大会; Pinyin: Guómín Dàhuì) refers to several parliamentary bodies that existed in the history of the Republic of China. The National Assembly was originally founded in 1913 as the first legislature in Chinese history, but was disbanded less than a year later as President Yuan Shikai assumed dictorial powers. During the warlord era, the National Assembly was resurrected and disbanded more than once as different warlords vied for power and legitimacy. The last continuous National Assembly was established under the framework of the 1947 Constitution of the Republic of China as a constitutional convention and electoral college and called into place in 1948. It was transplanted to Taiwan in 1949 after the Kuomintang lost mainland China in the Chinese Civil War. In the 1980s and 1990s, its parliamentary powers were gradually transferred to the Legislative Yuan before constitutional amendments made it a dormant body in 2000 and fully defunct in 2005. Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiÇŽntǐzì; also called 简化字/簡化字, jiÇŽnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; Traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音; Hanyu Pinyin: , lit. ... Insert non-formatted text hereInsert non-formatted text here:This article is about the legislative institution. ... The Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Pinyin: Zhōng huá mín guó) succeeded the Qing Dynasty in 1912, ending 2,000 years of imperial rule. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... Yuan Shikai in military uniform Yuan Shikai (Courtesy Weiting 慰亭; Pseudonym: Rongan 容庵 Traditional: 袁世凱; Simplified: 袁世凯; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Yüan Shih-kai) (September 16, 1859 – June 6, 1916) was a Chinese military official and politician during the late Qing Dynasty and the early Republic of China. ... The warlord era represents the period in the history of the Republic of China from 1916 to 1928 when the country was divided by various military cliques. ... The Constitution of the Republic of China (traditional Chinese: 中華民國憲法; Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó Xiànfǎ; Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó SiànFǎ) is currently the basic governing document for the areas controlled by the Republic of China, namely all of Taiwan Province, Taipei and Kaohsiung municipalities, and Kinmen county and part of... A constitutional convention is a gathering of delegates for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional Chinese: 中國國民黨; Simplified Chinese: 中国国民党; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung1-kuo2 Kuo2-min2-tang3; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhōngguó GuómíndÇŽng), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The highlighted area in the map is what is commonly known as mainland China. Mainland China (Simplified Chinese: 中国大陆; Traditional Chinese: 中國大陸; Hanyu Pinyin: , lit. ... Combatants Chinese Nationalist Party Chinese Communist Party Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 3,600,000 circa June 1948 2,800,000 circa June 1948 The Chinese Civil War (Traditional Chinese: 國共内戰; Simplified Chinese: 国共内战; Hanyu Pinyin: ; literally Nationalist-Communist Civil War) was a conflict in China between the Kuomintang (Chinese... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ...

Contents


History

Calls for a National Assembly were part of the platform of the revolutionaries who overthrew the Qing dynasty. In response, the Qing formed the first assembly in 1910 but it was virtually powerless and intended only as an advisory body. After the Xinhai Revolution, elections yielded the bicameral 1913 National Assembly but less than one percent voted due to gender, property, and literacy requirements. However, these elections had the participation of over 300 civic groups and were the most competitive nationwide elections in Chinese history. The election results gave a clear majority for the Nationalists but there was confusion as many candidates were members in several parties concurrently. The Republican, Unification, and Democratic (formerly Constitutionalist) parties later merged into the Progressive Party under Liang Qichao. The Tongmenghui (同盟會 Pinyin: Tóng Méng Huì, literal meaning: United Allegiance Society), also known as the United League or the Revolutionary Alliance, was organized by Sun Yat-sen and Sung Chiao-jen in Tokyo, Japan on August 20, 1905. ... The Qing Dynasty (Manchu: daiching gurun(warrior country in Mongolian language); Chinese: 清朝; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: ching chao), sometimes known as the Manchu Dynasty, was a dynasty founded by the Manchu - a nomadic nation of over two million people. ... -1... The Xinhai Revolution or Hsinhai Revolution (Chinese: 辛亥革命; Pinyin: ), also known as the 1911 Revolution, was a republican revolution which overthrew Chinas ruling Qing Dynasty, which was also known as the Manchu Dynasty, and the establishment of the Republic of China. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Portrait of Liang Qichao (Tung Wah News, 17 April 1901) Liang Qichao (Chinese: 梁啟超, Liáng Qǐchāo; Courtesy: Zhuoru, 卓如; Pseudonym: Rengong, 任公) (February 23, 1873–January 19, 1929) was a Chinese scholar, journalist, philosopher and reformist during the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911) who inspired Chinese scholars with his writings and...


Kuomintang leader Sung Chiao-jen was expected to become premier but he was assassinated on March 20. An investigation linked the crime to Premier Zhao Bingjun and possibly the provisional president, Yuan Shikai. The assembly convened for the first time on April 8 amid heated debate over the assassination. The Kuomintang was divided over solutions on how to deal with Yuan. Sun Yat-sen led a faction to rebel against Yuan on July 12 but was completely defeated within two months. The National Assembly members were compromised by threats and bribes from Yuan. He confined them and forced them to elect him formal president. Next, he outlawed the Kuomintang and expelled them from the assembly. Without a quorum, it could not convene so Yuan disbanded it on 10 January 1914. Sung Chiao-jen Sung Chiao-jen (Chinese characters: 宋教仁, Pinyin: Sòng Jiàorén) (April 5, 1882–March 22, 1913) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader. ... This is a list of the Premiers of China since 1911. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866–March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader who had a significant role in the overthrow of the Qing Dynasty. ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... In law, a quorum is the minimum number of members of a deliberative body necessary to conduct the business of that group. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


After Yuan died, the National Assembly reconvened on 1 August 1916 under the pretext that its three year term was suspended not expired, but President Li Yuanhong was forced to disband it due to military pressure on 13 June 1917. Many members (mostly Kuomintang) moved to Guangzhou where they held an "extraordinary session" on 25 August under a rival government led by Sun Yat-sen. Lacking a quorum, they selected new members in 1919. August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January-February January 1 - The Royal Army Medical Corps first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. ... Li Yüan-hung Li Yuanhong Sun Yat-sen and Li Yuanhong at Wuchang, China in April 1912 Li Yuanhong (黎元洪 Pinyin: Lí Yuánhóng, courtesy Songqing 宋卿, 1864 - June 3, 1928) was a Chinese general and political figure during the Qing dynasty and the republican era. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Location within China Canton, China redirects here. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


In Beijing, Premier Duan Qirui formed a new assembly dominated by his Anhui clique's political wing, the Anfu Club, on 12 August 1918 to elect Xu Shichang to the presidency. This assembly met until 30 August 1920 when the Anhui clique was defeated by the Zhili clique. Xu held national elections in 1921 but only eleven provinces responded so that assembly never convened. (help· info) (IPA peiË© tɕɪŋ˦), a city in northern China, is the capital of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Duan Qirui. ... Anhui (Chinese: 安徽; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: An-hui; Postal System Pinyin: Ngan-hui, Anhwei or An-hwei) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Xú Shìchāng (Pinyin) (Chinese: 徐世昌,Courtesy name Ju-ren 菊人) or Hsü Shih-chang (Wade-Giles) (1855-1939) was a prominent figure of the Beiyang Army warlords and President of the Republic of China (Beijing government) from October 10, 1918 to June 2, 1922. ... August 30 is the 242nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (243rd in leap years), with 123 days remaining. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... Not to be confused with the unrelated province of Hubei Hebei (Chinese: 河北; pinyin: Hébĕi; Wade-Giles: Ho-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hopeh), is a northern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1922, Li Yuanhong was brought back to the Beijing presidency and he recalled the 1913 one again minus the 1919 "extraordinary" additions under the same pretext that its three years are not finished. Because Sun's Guangzhou regime was in disarray due to Chen Jiongming's rebellion, most members returned to Beijing for its August 1 session. The assembly was thoroughly discredited when it elected Cao Kun president after being bribed in 1923. To cover its shame, the assembly hastily finished the constitution it was working on for a decade. It was finally dissolved after Feng Yuxiang's coup on 24 November 1924. This assembly's three year term was spread out over eleven years and was marked by corruption, factionalism, absences, and endless debate. 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... Tsao Kun (曹錕 Pinyin: Cáo Kūn) (1862-1938) was a commander in the Beiyang Army and through bribery became president of the Republic of China (on Beijing) from October 1, 1923 to November 2, 1924. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Feng Yü-hsiang (Traditional Chinese:馮玉祥, Simplified Chinese: 冯玉祥, pinyin: Féng Yùxíang; 1882-1948) was a warlord during the early years of the Republic of China. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1947, the Kuomintang promulgated a new constitution and its first National Assembly met in 1948 on the then-Chinese capital of Nanking (Nanjing). Shortly afterwards in 1949, the Mainland fell to the Communists in the Chinese Civil War, and the National Assembly (along with the entire ROC government) was transplanted to Taipei. 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional Chinese: 中國國民黨; Simplified Chinese: 中国国民党; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung1-kuo2 Kuo2-min2-tang3; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhōngguó GuómíndÇŽng), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Numerous cities have been the capital of China during the course of history. ... Nanjing (Chinese: 南京; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Nan-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Nanking), is the capital of Chinas Jiangsu Province and a city with a prominent place in Chinese history and culture. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... The highlighted area in the map is what is commonly known as mainland China. Mainland China (Simplified Chinese: 中国大陆; Traditional Chinese: 中國大陸; Hanyu Pinyin: , lit. ... The Communist Party of China (CPC) (official name) or Chinese Communist Party (CCP) (Simplified Chinese: 中国共产党; Traditional Chinese: 中國共産黨; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Combatants Chinese Nationalist Party Chinese Communist Party Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 3,600,000 circa June 1948 2,800,000 circa June 1948 The Chinese Civil War (Traditional Chinese: 國共内戰; Simplified Chinese: 国共内战; Hanyu Pinyin: ; literally Nationalist-Communist Civil War) was a conflict in China between the Kuomintang (Chinese... City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ...


The first National Assembly was to have been elected for a period of only seven years. However, according to the Kuomintang (KMT) leadership, the fall of the Mainland made it impossible to hold new elections, as all Mainland provinces were undergoing "Communist rebellion". As a result, the Judicial Yuan decided that the original members of the National Assembly would continue to hold office until the Communists could be defeated on the Mainland and legitimate ROC rule of all of China restored. The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional Chinese: 中國國民黨; Simplified Chinese: 中国国民党; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung1-kuo2 Kuo2-min2-tang3; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhōngguó GuómíndÇŽng), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The Judicial Yuan (司法院) is one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei and serves as the highest judicial organ in Taiwan. ... The Communist Party of China (CPC) (official name) or Chinese Communist Party (CCP) (Simplified Chinese: 中国共产党; Traditional Chinese: 中國共産黨; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Reforms in the 1990s

As a result of this decision, the same National Assembly, elected in 1947, remained until 1991, when as part of a constitutional ruling a Second National Assembly was elected. 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Originally, the National Assembly elected the President and Vice President of the Republic of China. A subsequent constitutional amendment abolished this role and established direct popular elections for the two offices. Most of its other former functions, such as hearing the president's State of the Nation Address and approving the president's nominations of the grand justices and the heads of the Examination and Control Yuan, are now the functions of the Legislative Yuan. The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ...


After the 1991 passage of constitutional reforms, there was strong objection to the new form of the Assembly, which had essentially become a permanent constitutional convention. Because of this, in 2000 the National Assembly was suspended. From 2000 to 2005, the 300 assembly members were selected ad hoc on the basis of proportional representation by a special election within six months of proposal by the Legislative Yuan to amend the Constitution, impeach the president or vice president, or change national borders. 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ad hoc is a Latin phrase which means for this [purpose]. It generally signifies a solution that has been tailored to a specific purpose, such as a tailor-made suit, a handcrafted network protocol, and specific-purpose equation and things like that. ... Proportional representation, also known as full representation, is an electoral system in which the overall votes are reflected in the overall outcome of the body or bodies of representatives. ...


Steps towards abolition

On August 23, 2004, the Legislative Yuan passed a series of amendments that included abolishing the National Assembly. Based on these proposals, amendments are to be approved from three-fourths of the quorum of members of the Legislative Yuan. This quorum requires at least three-fourths of all members of the Legislature. After a mandatory 180-day promulgation period, the amendments are then to be ratified by at least fifty percent of all eligible voters of the ROC irrespective of voter turnout. A Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) proposal authorizing citizens initiative rights to propose constitutional amendments was withdrawn after it became clear that such a proposal would not pass the Legislative Yuan. Opponents of such constitutional reforms argued that by eliminating the 3/4 legislative vote requirement, a relatively small number of voters could force a referendum on Taiwan independence which would trigger a crisis with the People's Republic of China. By contrast, keeping the 3/4 legislative vote requirement would mean that any constitutional amendment would require a consensus among both the pan-green coalition and pan-blue coalition to be considered. The requirement that a majority of all voters approve the amendment allows for a party to block an amendment by boycotting the vote as was done with the referendums voted on the March 2004 ROC Presidential elections. August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... It has been designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) 2004 World Health Day topic was Road Safety (by World Health Organization) Year of the Monkey (by the Chinese calendar) See the world in... Democratic Progressive Party Emblem The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Taiwan independence (Traditional Chinese: 台灣獨立; Pinyin: , Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands currently administered by the... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ...


Under the Constitution, the National Assembly must then be activated to ratify these amendments. Such ratification of the constitutional amendments was originally considered to be a formality, a number of unexpected complications occurred in 2005. The first was the poor showing of the People's First Party (PFP) in the 2004 Legislative Yuan election. The PFP was widely expected to merge with the KMT, but PFP Chairman James Soong became disenchanted by the idea. The second was the reluctance of the Taiwan Solidarity Union to pass the amendments. These amendments were seen by some Taiwan independence supporters as a prelude to a later declaration of independence, but the results of the 2004 election made this very unlikely. Faced with this outcome, the TSU became very reluctant to support a reform that would make elections by small parties, such as itself harder. The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Election for the 6th Legislative Yuan (第六屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China on Taiwan was held on December 11, 2004. ... Soong Chu-yu James Chu-yu Soong (宋楚瑜 Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; pinyin: Sòng ChÇ”yú; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ...


One final unexpected outcome occurred which gave the National Assembly elections on May 14, 2005 more significance that was originally intended. The National Assembly election was lined up immediately after trips to mainland China by KMT Chairman Lien Chan and PFP Chairman James Soong. This had the effect of turning the May 14 elections into an opinion poll on relations with mainland China which was undesired by the Democratic Progressive Party, though the DPP subsequently gained a plurality in the elections. May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (135th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An election for the National Assembly will be held in the Republic of China on Taiwan on Saturday 2005-05-14, from 07:30 to 16:00 local time. ... The highlighted area in the map is what is commonly known as mainland China. Mainland China (Simplified Chinese: 中国大陆; Traditional Chinese: 中國大陸; Hanyu Pinyin: , lit. ... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... Soong Chu-yu James Chu-yu Soong (宋楚瑜 Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; pinyin: Sòng Chǔyú; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ...


On June 7, 2005 the 300 delegates voted (by a majority of 249 to 48) the constitutional amendments into effect, and so permanently abolished the National Assembly. June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also: politics of the Republic of China The Republic of China (ROC) currently has jurisdiction over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, and the Pescadores Islands (Penghu) and several smaller islands. ...


External link

  • Official National Assembly website

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m