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Encyclopedia > National Assembly of South Korea
National Assembly of South Korea
Hangul 국회
Hanja 國會
Revised Romanization Gukhoe
McCune-Reischauer Kukhoe

The National Assembly of South Korea is a 299-member[1] unicameral legislature. The latest parliamentary elections were held on April 9, 2008. Single-member constituencies comprise 243 of the National Assembly's seats, while the remaining 56 are allocated by proportional representation.[2] Members serve four-year terms. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Jamo redirects here. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... The Revised Romanization of Korean is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea. ... McCune-Reischauer romanization is one of the two most widely used Korean language romanization systems, along with the Revised Romanization of Korean, which replaced (a modified) McCune-Reischauer as the official romanization system in South Korea in 2000. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... Legislative elections were held in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) on April 15, 2004. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ...

The Gukhoe Building in Seoul
The Gukhoe Building in Seoul
South Korea

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
South Korea
Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 851 pixel, file size: 210 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): South Korea National Assembly Building Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 851 pixel, file size: 210 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): South Korea National Assembly Building Metadata... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... Image File history File links South_korea_COA.svg‎ Other versions Image:South korea coa. ... Politics of South Korea takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ...


Government

Sixth Republic
Constitution The Sixth Republic of South Korea is the countrys present-day government. ...

President
Lee Myung-bak The President is head of state of South Korea. ... Lee Myung-bak at the Cheonggyecheon restoration site This is a Korean name; the family name is Lee Lee Myung-bak (Korean: 이명박, Hanja: 李明博, born December 19, 1941 in Hirano, Osaka, Osaka, Japan) is a former mayor of Seoul, the Republic of Korea and is considered a major contender to succeed...


Prime Minister
Han Seung-soo The Prime Minister of South Korea is appointed by the President with the National Assemblys approval. ... Dr. Han Seung-soo, the President of the 56th General Assembly of the United Nations is a Korean politician and diplomat. ...


Ministries The most influential part of the executive of the South Korean government are the ministries. ...

National Assembly

Supreme Court
Chief Justice The Supreme Court of Korea is the highest court in South Korea. ... The Chief Justice of the Republic of Korea is the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Korea. ...

Elections

Presidential election
1997 - 2002 - 2007 Elections in South Korea provides an overview of the history of South Korean elections and their results. ... The 15th South Korean Presidential Election took place on December 18, 1997. ... The 16th South Korean Presidential Election took place in December 19, 2002. ... Presidential elections in South Korea are scheduled for December 19, 2007. ...


Parliamentary election
2000 - 2004 - 2008 Legislative elections were held in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) on April 15, 2004. ...

Political parties
UNP · GNP · DLP · LFP · CKP
Others

Korean reunification
Sunshine Policy
Administrative divisions
Human rights
Foreign relations
Political parties in South Korea lists political parties in South Korea. ... There are several political parties called the United Democratic Party. ... The Grand National Party is a conservative-leaning opposition political party in South Korea. ... The Democratic Labour Party(DLP) (Korean hangul: 민주노동당; hanja: 民主勞動黨; revised: Minju Nodong-dang; McCune-Reischauer: Minju Nodong-dang) is a political party in South Korea, established in January 2000. ... Korean reunification is a possible future reunification of North Korea and South Korea under a single government. ... The Sunshine Policy is the current South Korean doctrine towards North Korea. ... The situation of human rights in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) has changed significantly from the days of military dictatorship and reflects its status as a constitutional democracy governed by a president and a unicameral legislature. ... The foreign relations of South Korea are dominated by its relationships with its neighbors North Korea, China, Japan, and with the United States. ...


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The unicameral National Assembly consists, according to the Constitution, of at least 200 members. In 1990 the National Assembly had 299 seats, 224 of which were directly elected from single-member districts in the general elections of April 1988. Under applicable laws, the remaining seventy-five representatives were appointed by the political parties in accordance with a proportional formula based on the number of seats won in the election. By law, candidates for election to the National Assembly must be at least thirty years of age. As part of a political compromise in 1987, an earlier requirement that candidates have at least five years' continuous residency in the country was dropped to allow Kim Dae Jung, who had spent several years in exile in Japan and the United States during the 1980s, to return to political life. The National Assembly's term is four years. In a change from the more authoritarian Fourth Republic and Fifth Republic (1972–80 and 1980–87, respectively), under the Sixth Republic, the National Assembly cannot be dissolved by the president. Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


Legislators are immune from arrest or detention, except in cases of flagrante delicto, while the National Assembly is in session. If an arrest occurs before the National Assembly session begins, the legislator concerned must be released for the duration of the session. National Assembly members also enjoy legal immunity for statements made in that forum. Greater freedom of the media and independence of the courts, combined with the power of the opposition parties in the legislature, gave greater substance to this immunity during the first two years of the Sixth Republic than under the preceding government, when prosecutors and the courts did not honor such immunity.


The position of the National Assembly in the Constitution is much stronger than it had been under the Fifth Republic. The annual session of the National Assembly was extended to 100 days. Extraordinary sessions of thirty days each might be called by as little as one-quarter of the membership (versus one-third in the 1980 constitution); and there was no limit on the number of such sessions that could be called each year. The power to investigate state affairs also was strengthened. The National Assembly now held the power to remove the prime minister or a cabinet minister at any time, rather than having to wait a year following appointment, as had been the case before. The consent of the National Assembly was required for the appointment of all Supreme Court justices, not just the chief justice. The National Assembly performed a tie-breaking function in presidential elections and was required to approve or to disapprove presidential emergency measures before they took effect, time permitting. Failure to obtain National Assembly approval would void the emergency measures. Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...

Contents

Latest election

2008 Election results (Total)
Main article: South Korean parliamentary election, 2008
e•d Summary of the 9 April 2008 National Assembly of South Korea election results
Parties Proportional Votes Proportional
Percentage
+/– District Seats Proportional
Repr. Seats
Total Seats +/–
Grand National Party 6,421,654 37.4 +1.6 131 22 153 +32
United Democratic Party 4,313,111 25.1 –20.3 66 15 81 –80
Park Geun-hye Coalition 2,258,726 13.1 +13.1 6 8 14 +14
Independents 1,391,392 8.1 +7.8 25 0 25 +22
Liberty Forward Party 1,173,452 6.8 +6.8 14 4 18 +18
Democratic Labour Party 973,394 5.6 –7.4 2 3 5 –5
Creative Korea Party 651,980 3.8 +3.8 1 2 3 +3
Total 17,183,709 100.0 245 54 299
Source: Adam Carr

      Conservative       Semi-Conservative       Liberal       Semi-Liberal       Social Democratic
is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Grand National Party is a conservative-leaning opposition political party in South Korea. ... Park Geun-hye. ... The Democratic Labour Party(DLP) (Korean hangul: 민주노동당; hanja: 民主勞動黨; revised: Minju Nodong-dang; McCune-Reischauer: Minju Nodong-dang) is a political party in South Korea, established in January 2000. ...


South Korean major parties

Seats prior to the 2008 election.
South Korean major parties
Name Ideology Seats Percentages Status Administration
Grand National Party Conservatism 153 51.17% Minority Govt.(2008.02.25~) Government
United Democratic Party Liberalism 81 27.09% Minority Govt.(2008.02.25~) Opposition
Minor parties / Independent 25 21.74% Other


As of 9 April 2008 The Grand National Party is a conservative-leaning opposition political party in South Korea. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... For minority governments in general, see dominant minority. ... There are several political parties called the United Democratic Party. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... For minority governments in general, see dominant minority. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


History

First Republic

See also: First Republic of South Korea

Elections for the National Assembly were held under UN supervision [3] on 10 May 1948. The First Republic of South Korea was established on 17 July 1948 [4] when the constitution of the First Republic was established by the Assembly. The Assembly also had the job of electing the President, and elected anti-communist Syngman Rhee as President on 10 May 1948. The First Republic of South Korea was South Koreas first independent government, ruling the country from 1948 to 1960. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The First Republic of South Korea was South Koreas first independent government, ruling the country from 1948 to 1960. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The President is head of state of South Korea. ... This is a Korean name; the family name is Rhee Syngman Rhee or Lee Seungman or Yee Sung-man (March 26, 1875 – July 19, 1965) was the first president of South Korea. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Second Republic

See also: Second Republic of South Korea

The Second Republic of South Korea was the government of South Korea for eight months in 1960 and 1961. ...

Third Republic

See also: Third Republic of South Korea

The Third Republic of South Korea was the government of South Korea from 1963 to 1972. ...

Fourth Republic

See also: Fourth Republic of South Korea

The Fourth Republic of South Korea was the government of the country from 1972 to 1979. ...

Fifth Republic

See also: Fifth Republic of South Korea

The Fifth Republic of South Korea was the government of the country from 1979 to 1987. ...

See also

Politics of South Korea takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... The politics of North Korea take place within a nominally democratic framework; in practice, North Korea functions as a single-party state. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The National Assembly is either a legislature, or the lower house of a bicameral legislature in some countries. ... The Korean National Assembly Building in Yeouido, Seoul The National Assembly Building (Korean: 국회의사당, 國會議事堂, Gukhoe-uisadang) is the building that serves as the location of the Assembly of the Republic of Korea, the legislative branch of the South Korean national government. ... This is a list of Wikipedia articles on Korea-related people, places, things, and concepts. ...

References

  1. ^ "299-member" is provided at the article 21 clause 1 in the law of election (Korean: 공직선거법) of South Korea.
  2. ^ The National Assembly of the Republic of Korea - http://korea.na.go.kr/int/org_03.jsp?leftid=AC
  3. ^ Setting the Stage
  4. ^ ICL - South Korea Index

 
 

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