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Encyclopedia > Nathan Söderblom

Lars Olof Jonathan Söderblom, better known as Nathan Söderblom (January 15, 1866 - July 12, 1931), was a Swedish clergyman, and later Archbishop of the Church of Sweden and laureate of the Nobel Peace Prize. He was born in Helsingia to Jonas Söderblom, a Pietistic pastor, and Sophia (Blume) Söderblom, among whose ancestors there had once been a bishop of Oslo. January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... 1931 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Kingdom of Sweden (Swedish: Konungariket Sverige  listen) is a Nordic country in Scandinavia, in Northern Europe. ... The Church of Sweden, or Svenska kyrkan, is the national church of Sweden. ... The Nobel Peace Prize (where Nobel is pronounced with the stress on the second syllable) is one of five Nobel Prizes bequested by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Helsingia, or Hälsingland, is a historical Province or landskap in the north of Sweden. ... Pietism was a movement, in the Lutheran Church, lasting from the late-17th century to the mid-18th Century. ... Bishop (disambiguation). ... County Oslo NO-03 Landscape Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² 426 km² 0. ...

Contents

Education

As a student at Uppsala University, Söderblom won respect not only for his intellectual attainments but also for his personal charm, abundant vitality, and talent as a speaker. He took his bachelor's degree in 1886, with honors in Greek and competency in Hebrew, Arabic, and Latin. This admirable linguistic background equipped him for the exacting scholarship of the School of Theology at Uppsala where, for the next six years, he continued his wide-ranging studies in theology and the history of religion. Uppsala University Uppsala University (Swedish Uppsala universitet) is a public university in Uppsala, Sweden. ... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) Events January 18 _ Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... The Greek language (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of some 3,000 years. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... Arabic is a Semitic language, closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Latin - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... This article is about the modern city of Uppsala. ... Religion, a term sometimes used interchangeably with faith, is commonly defined as belief concerning the supernatural, sacred, or divine, and the moral codes, practices and institutions associated with such belief. ...


From its founding in 1888, Söderblom was the editor for five years of Meddelanden, the Student Missionary Association review, in whose pages he published the first piece in what was eventually to become a personal bibliography of 700 items. In 1890 he attended the Christian Student Conference in New England and there, after listening to a lecture by a visiting clergyman, wrote in his diary a sentence that was to prove prophetic, "Lord, give me humility and wisdom to serve the great cause of the free unity of thy church." 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Career

After being ordained a priest in 1893 and appointed chaplain to a mental hospital in Uppsala, he cast about for a post that would enable him to marry Anna Forsell, a gifted woman student - one of twenty among 1,700 men at Uppsala University - who was later to bear him thirteen children, as well as to collaborate in the preparation of many of his published works. He accepted a call to the Swedish Church and Embassy in Paris (France) from 1894-1901; that is, at the acme of the modernist crisis and the moment when the Separation Law between State and Churches was discussed, which would be enacted in 1905. The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The French Republic or France (French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. ... 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


For seven years, from 1894 to 1901, Söderblom preached in Paris, where his congregation included Alfred Nobel and August Strindberg, as well as Swedish and Norwegian painters, authors, businessmen, diplomats, and visitors to the city. Summers he spent in Calais in research and writing while also serving as chaplain to Swedish seamen in the area. Meanwhile he pursued graduate studies in theology, history of religions, and in languages predating those of the classical ages, and eventually became the first foreigner ever to earn a Doctor of Theology degree at the Protestant Faculty of the Sorbonne. He was called to San Remo in 1897 to conduct the memorial service for Alfred Nobel 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel  listen? ( October 21, 1833, Stockholm, Sweden – December 10, 1896, San Remo, Italy). ... August Strindberg, photographic selfportrait Johan August Strindberg  listen (Stockholm, January 22, 1849 - Stockholm, May 14, 1912) was a writer, playwright and painter of Sweden. ... Norway - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... This article is about the French city. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The Sorbonne today, from the same point of view The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... The name San Remo can refer to several different things: San Remo, Italy – a large town in Italy San Remo, Victoria – a town in Victoria, Australia The San Remo – an apartment building in New York City This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... Events January 1 - Brooklyn, New York merges with New York City. ... Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel  listen? ( October 21, 1833, Stockholm, Sweden – December 10, 1896, San Remo, Italy). ...


At that time the School of Paris, the college of Protestant theology, results from the turn-over of the faculty of theology from Strasbourg has around 20 years. Education for the Lutheran and Reformed theologians is given in only one school, a union led by Auguste Sabatier and Etienne Mennegoz. Söderblom's experience in France strengthened his youthful resolve to promote "free unity" among Christian churches. One of his biographers, Charles J. Curtis, points out that fluency in French and understanding of French and Parisian culture gave him an international outlook, that the theological currents of France merging with those from his native land solidified his theological liberalism, and that social work among the Scandinavians in France convinced him that in the life of the church right action was as important as right belief, as demonstrated by the Practical Christianity of Wilfred Monod, pastor in Petit-Quevilly, a suburb near Rouen in France. City motto: – City proper ( commune) Région Alsace Département Bas-Rhin (67) Mayor Fabienne Keller ( UMP) (since 2001) Area 78. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Reform can refer to: Reform (think tank) Reform, Alabama Reform Judaism Reform movement Reform Party (disambiguation page) See also: Reformation, Reformed This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Louis Auguste Sabatier (October 22, 1839 _ April 12, 1901), French Protestant theologian, was born at Vallon (Ardèche), in the Cévennes, and was educaled at the Protestant theological faculty of Montauban and the universities of Tübingen and Heidelberg. ... Location within France Rouen (pronounced in French, sometimes also ) is the historical capital city of Normandy, in northern France, and presently the capital of the Upper Normandy région. ...


From 1901 to 1914, Söderblom occupied a chair in the School of Theology at Uppsala University and concurrently, from 1912 to 1914, a chair at the Leipzig University. In these productive years he wrote a series of books on religious history, religious psychology, and religious philosophy. With a group of brilliant colleagues and students at Uppsala, Söderblom led a theological revival in Sweden, giving stature to the field of comparative religion, pursuing the theme of the uniqueness of Christianity in the historical and personal character of Revelation, incorporating the study of non-Christian religions into the discipline of Christianity, and stimulating intense studies in the life and thought of Martin Luther. 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1912 is a leap year starting on Monday. ... 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The University of Leipzig is one of the oldest universities in Europe. ... Christianity is an Abrahamic religion based on the life, teachings, death by crucifixion, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth as described in the New Testament. ... Martin Luther (originally Martin Luder or Martinus Luther) (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German theologian and an Augustinian monk whose teachings inspired the Protestant Reformation and deeply influenced the doctrines of Lutheran, Protestant and other Christian traditions (a broad movement composed of many congregations and church bodies). ...


Söderblom's election in 1914 as Archbishop of Uppsala, and, in consequence, primate of the Church of Sweden, was a surprise. Customarily, the king chose the first name on a slate of the three who topped the list in the voting in the sixteen electoral colleges. In first and second place were two distinguished bishops who split eighty-two percent of the electoral vote almost evenly; in third place was Söderblom, a priest and professor, with eighteen percent of the vote. Not since 1670 had the bishops been passed over. Söderblom, a Lutheran in a church that had retained the historic episcopate, valued the liturgy and devotional tradition of traditional Catholic worship, while seeing much of worth in the writings of liberal Protestant scholars. He believed it his duty to work for a united Christendom, both catholic and protestant, and saw practical cooperation on social issues as a promising first step. His trend, at this period, is unionism. 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Uppsala Cathedral seen from the other side of the river. ... The Church of Sweden, or Svenska kyrkan, is the national church of Sweden. ... Events January 21 – Highwayman Claude Duval is executed in Tyburn, Middlesex April - Pope Clement X is elected. ... The episcopate is the status of a bishop. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may be refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), a daily... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... Christendom, in the widest sense, refers to Christianity as a territorial phenomenon: those countries where most people are Christians, or nominal Christians, are part of Christendom. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Unionism is a movement based on the ideal of syndicalism and support for the trade union movement, but which exists within the framework of a open capitalist society as an independent participatory private entity. ...


During the next, and last, seventeen years of his life, Söderblom administered the duties of the head of the ecclesiastical establishment: visiting churches throughout the nation, raising funds to reopen old churches and build new ones, reviving the elaborate ecclesiastical rituals of the past, imbuing the work of the church with evangelistic fervor, directing conferences, advising the administration of Uppsala University as ex officio pro-chancellor -- and all the while carrying on with his own research and writing. As Archbishop of Sweden, he was concerned with deepening the channels of communication between the Church and the laboring masses, and also between the Church and the intellectuals.


International

At Stockholm in 1925, he organized the Universal Christian Council on Life and Work. Meanwhile, a chiefly Anglican group had formed an inter-denominational Conference on Faith and Order. In 1948 the two groups merged to form the World Council of Churches under the impulse of Wilhem A. Visser't Hooft. Internationally, he is best known, however, as the architect of the ecumenical movement of the twentieth century. However he has no biographical notice in 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica nor his name in Unitatis Redintegratio which began the Catholic Ecumenism. Stockholm [, ] is the capital and the largest City of Sweden. ... Events January-May January 3 - Benito Mussolini announces he is taking dictatorial powers over Italy. ... The term Anglican (from the Angles or English) describes those people and churches following the religious traditions developed by the established Church of England. ... 1948 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The World Council of Churches (or WCC) is the principal international Christian ecumenical organization. ... The word ecumenism is derived from the Greek oikoumene, which means the inhabited world. The term is usually used with regard to movements toward religious unity. ... (Redirected from 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica) The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The Vatican II Decree on Ecumenism, Unitatis Redintegratio was passed by a vote of 2,137 to 11 of the bishops assembled and was promulgated by Pope Paul VI on November 21, 1964. ...


He had already begun to move toward intercommunion between the Swedish Church and the Church of England as early as 1909; in 1920 he arranged to have Bishop Woods of Peterborough, England, participate in the consecration of two Swedish bishops; the following year Woods welcomed Söderblom's «Life and Work» movement to Peterborough. In a narrow sense, intercommunion is the same thing as open communion: the practice of serving communion to all Christians rather than only to those of ones own denomination. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion...


Söderblom found that the ecumenical movement was hampered during this period for various reasons: the French, German, and American church officials were conservative, the Archbishop of Canterbury cautious, the patriarchs of the Eastern Orthodox churches just emerging from isolation, the Roman Catholic Church decidedly opposed, and the proponents usually men without power. Rome was a constant opponent as can be seen in Mortalium Animos 1928 encyclical Letter form Pope Benedict XV and Cardinal Armido Gasparini. 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Pope Benedict XV Benedict XV, né Giacomo della Chiesa (November 21, 1854-January 22, 1922), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1914 to 1922; he succeeded Pope Saint Pius X. He was born in Genoa, Italy, of a noble family. ...


The Stockholm Conference in 1925, which brought together Anglican, Protestant, and Orthodox Christians, was the culminating event in Söderblom's ecumenical efforts. Catholicism is not represented and in his opening address, Söderblom regretted the absence of the «Apostle Peter». The Conference, described in detail in Söderblom's book Stockholm 1925, laid the basis for a future ecumenical creed, emphasized the need to reconcile the competing philosophies of subjective spirituality and of objective social action, and sought to find unity in appealing for world peace. Events January-May January 3 - Benito Mussolini announces he is taking dictatorial powers over Italy. ... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ...


Söderblom was proud of his election to the Swedish Academy in 1921, of his Nobel Peace Prize in 1930, and of his invitation to deliver the Gifford Lectures in Edinburgh in 1931. For this famous lectureship he planned a great scholarly effort - one series of lectures to be delivered in 1931 and another in 1932, both series to be published in two volumes. He delivered the first series of ten lectures between May 19 and June 8, 1931. An appropriate title for his book eluded him, but on the last day of his life, July 12, he found it: The Living God The Swedish Academy or Svenska Akademien, founded in 1786 by King Gustav III, is one of the Royal Academies of Sweden. ... 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Nobel Peace Prize (where Nobel is pronounced with the stress on the second syllable) is one of five Nobel Prizes bequested by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ...


See also


The World Council of Churches (or WCC) is the principal international Christian ecumenical organization. ... The word ecumenism is derived from the Greek oikoumene, which means the inhabited world. The term is usually used with regard to movements toward religious unity. ...

Preceded by:
Johan August Ekman
Archbishop of Uppsala
1914–1931
Succeeded by:
Erling Eidem
Preceded by:
Waldemar Rudin
Swedish Academy,
Chair No 16

1921-1932
Succeeded by:
Tor Andræ


Uppsala Cathedral seen from the other side of the river. ... The Swedish Academy or Svenska Akademien, founded in 1786 by King Gustav III, is one of the Royal Academies of Sweden. ... This is a list of members of the Swedish Academy by seat number. ...


 
 

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