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Encyclopedia > Nathan Bedford Forrest
Nathaniel Bedford Forrest
July 13, 1821(1821-07-13)October 29, 1877 (aged 56)
Image:NathanBedfordForrest.jpg
Place of birth Chapel Hill, Tennessee
Place of death Memphis, Tennessee
Allegiance Confederate States of America
Service/branch Confederate States Army
Years of service 1861 – 1865
Rank Lieutenant General
Battles/wars American Civil War
Fort Donelson
Shiloh
First Murfreesboro
Chickamauga
Fort Pillow
Brice's Crossroads
Second Memphis
Nashville
Wilson's Raid

Nathaniel Bedford Forrest (July 13, 1821October 29, 1877) was a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. Perhaps the most highly regarded cavalry and partisan (guerrilla) leader in the war, Forrest is regarded by many military historians as that conflict's most innovative and successful general. His tactics of mobile warfare are still studied by modern soldiers. Forrest is also one of the war's most controversial figures. He was accused of war crimes at the Battle of Fort Pillow for having led Confederate soldiers in an alleged massacre of unarmed black Union troops. is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nathan Bedford Forrest (19th century photo) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Chapel Hill is a town located in Marshall County, Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Andrew H. Foote John B. Floyd Gideon J. Pillow Simon B. Buckner Strength 24,531 District of Cairo & Western Flotilla 16,171 Casualties 2,691 (507 killed, 1,976 wounded, 208 captured/missing) 13,846 (327 killed... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant, Don Carlos Buell Albert Sidney Johnston â€ , P.G.T. Beauregard Strength Army of West Tennessee (48,894), Army of the Ohio (17,918)[1] Army of Mississippi (44,699)[1] Casualties 13,047: 1,754 killed, 8... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Thomas Turpin Crittenden Nathan Bedford Forrest Strength 900 1,400 Casualties 890 150 The First Battle of Murfreesboro was fought on July 13, 1862, in Rutherford County, Tennessee, as part of the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William S. Rosecrans George H. Thomas Braxton Bragg James Longstreet Strength Army of the Cumberland (56,965) Army of Tennessee (70,000) Casualties 16,170 (1,657 killed, 9,756 wounded, 4,757 captured/missing) 18,454 (2,312 killed... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Lionel F. Booth William F. Bradford Nathan Bedford Forrest James R. Chalmers Strength Detachments from three units (approx. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Samuel D. Sturgis Nathan B. Forrest Strength Three-brigade division of infantry and a division of cavalry (about 8,500) cavalry corps (about 3,200) Casualties 2,610 492 Battle of Brices Crossroads was fought on June 10, 1864... The Second Battle of Memphis was a battle of the American Civil War, occurring on August 21, 1864 in Shelby County, Tennessee. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George H. Thomas John Bell Hood Strength IV Corps, XXIII Corps, detachment of Army of the Tennessee, provisional detachment, and Cavalry Corps Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,900 approximately 13,000 The Battle of Nashville was a two-day battle... Wilsons Raid was a cavalry operation through Alabama and Georgia in March-April 1865, late in the American Civil War. ... Nathan Bedford Forrest III (April 7, 1905 - June 13, 1943) was a Brigadier General of the United States Army Air Force, and a great-grandson of Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... Look up partisan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “Guerrilla” redirects here. ... The US M1A1 Abrams tank is a typical modern main battle tank. ... In the context of war, a war crime is a punishable offense under International Law, for violations of the laws of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Lionel F. Booth William F. Bradford Nathan Bedford Forrest James R. Chalmers Strength Detachments from three units (approx. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ...


After the war he participated in the founding of the Ku Klux Klan. Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ...

Contents

Early life

Nathan Bedford Forrest was born to a poor family in Chapel Hill, Tennessee. He was the first of blacksmith William Forrest's twelve children with Miriam "Maddie" Beck. After his father's death, Forrest became the head of the family at the age of 17, and, through hard work and determination, was able to pull himself and his family up from poverty. In 1841 (age 20), he went into business with his uncle in Hernando, Mississippi. His uncle was killed there during an argument with the Matlock brothers, but Forrest shot and killed two of them with his two shot pistol and wounded the two others with a knife someone threw to him. Ironically, one of the wounded men survived and served under Forrest during the Civil War.[1] Chapel Hill is a town located in Marshall County, Tennessee. ... Hernando is a city in DeSoto County, Mississippi, United States. ...


Forrest was to become a businessman, an owner of several plantations and a slave trader based on Adams Street in Memphis. In 1858 Forrest (a registered Democrat) was elected as a Memphis city alderman.[2] Forrest provided financially for his mother, put his younger brothers through college, and, by the time the Civil War broke out in 1861, he had become a millionaire and one of the richest men in the American South. Fundamentally, a plantation is usually a large farm or estate, especially in a tropical or semitropical country, on which cotton, tobacco, coffee, sugar cane, or trees and the like is cultivated, usually by resident laborers. ... Slave redirects here. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... An alderman is a member of a municipal assembly or council in many jurisdictions. ...


Military career

After war broke out, Forrest returned to Tennessee and enlisted as a private in the Confederate States Army. On July 14, 1861, he joined Captain J.S. White's Company "Q", Tennessee Mounted Rifles.[3] Upon seeing how badly equipped the CSA was, Forrest made an offer to buy horses and equipment for a regiment of Tennessee volunteer soldiers with his own money. A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ...


His superior officers and the state governor, surprised that someone of Forrest's wealth and prominence had enlisted as a soldier of the lowest rank, commissioned him as a colonel. In October of 1861 he was given command of his own regiment, "Forrest's Tennessee Cavalry Battalion". Forrest had no prior formalized military training or experience. He applied himself diligently to learn, and having an innate sense of successful tactics and strong leadership abilities, Forrest soon became an exemplary soldier. In Tennessee, there was much public debate concerning the state's decision to join the Confederacy, and both the CSA and the Union armies were actively seeking Tennessean recruits.[4] Forrest sought men eager for battle, promising them that they would have "ample opportunity to kill Yankees." For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Military tactics (Greek: Taktikē, the art of organizing an army) are the collective name for methods for engaging and defeating an enemy in battle. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ...


Forrest was also physically imposing—six-foot, two-inches tall (1.88 m), 210 pounds (95 kg) —very large for the day, and as such could be very intimidating. He also used to great effect his skills as a hard rider and fierce swordsman. (He was known to sharpen both the top and bottom edges of his heavy saber.) The Saber (spanish/portuguese: knowledge) currency is an educational sectoral currency in Brazil that is handed out by the ministry of education. ...


It has been surmised from contemporaneous records that Forrest may have personally killed more than thirty men with saber, pistol and shotgun.


Cavalry command

Forrest first distinguished himself at the Battle of Fort Donelson in February 1862, where his cavalry captured a Union artillery battery and then had to break out of a Union Army siege headed by Ulysses S. Grant. During a meeting with superiors, Forrest found them intransigently opposed to his idea of getting his soldiers out of the fort across the Cumberland River. Forrest angrily walked out, declaring that he had not led his men into battle to surrender. He proved his point when he rallied nearly 4,000 troops and led them across the river, sparing their lives so they could fight again. A few days later, with the fall of Nashville imminent, Forrest took command of the city, which was the home for millions of dollars in heavy machinery used to make Confederate weapons. He had the machinery and several important government officials hastily transported out. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Andrew H. Foote John B. Floyd Gideon J. Pillow Simon B. Buckner Strength 24,531 District of Cairo & Western Flotilla 16,171 Casualties 2,691 (507 killed, 1,976 wounded, 208 captured/missing) 13,846 (327 killed... Remains of a battery of English cannon from Youghal, County Cork. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: , Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ...


A month later, Forrest was back in action at the Battle of Shiloh (April 6 to April 7, 1862). Once again he found himself in command of the Confederate rear guard after a lost battle, and again he distinguished himself. Late in the battle, in an incident itself called Fallen Timbers, he charged and drove through the Union skirmish line. Finding himself in the midst of the enemy without any of his own troops around him, he first emptied his pistols and then pulled out his saber. A Union infantryman on the ground beside him fired at Forrest, hitting him in the side with a rifle shot that lifted him out of his saddle. The ball went through his pelvis and lodged near his spine. Steadying himself and his mount, he used one arm to lift the Union soldier by the shirt collar and then wielded him as a human shield before casting his body aside. Forrest is acknowledged to have been the last man wounded at the Battle of Shiloh. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant, Don Carlos Buell Albert Sidney Johnston â€ , P.G.T. Beauregard Strength Army of West Tennessee (48,894), Army of the Ohio (17,918)[1] Army of Mississippi (44,699)[1] Casualties 13,047: 1,754 killed, 8... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... This article is about 1862 . ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant, Don Carlos Buell Albert Sidney Johnston â€ , P.G.T. Beauregard Strength Army of West Tennessee (48,894), Army of the Ohio (17,918)[1] Army of Mississippi (44,699)[1] Casualties 13,047: 1,754 killed, 8... Skirmishers are infantry soldiers who are stationed ahead or to the sides of a larger body of friendly troops. ...


Forrest recovered from the injury soon enough to be back in the saddle by early summer to command a new brigade of green cavalry regiments. In July, he led them back into middle Tennessee after receiving an order from the commanding general, Braxton Bragg, to launch a cavalry raid. It proved another stunning success. On Forrest's birthday, July 13, 1862, his men descended on the Union-held city of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and, in the First Battle of Murfreesboro, defeated and captured a force of twice their number. Braxton Bragg Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army, a principal commander in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Thomas Turpin Crittenden Nathan Bedford Forrest Strength 900 1,400 Casualties 890 150 The First Battle of Murfreesboro was fought on July 13, 1862, in Rutherford County, Tennessee, as part of the American Civil War. ...


The raid into Murfreesboro, which was undertaken to rescue civilians taken hostage and scheduled to be executed in retaliation for Union military casualties, included some of the armed Black Southerners who rode with Forrest. This was documented in the official report of the Union commander:


"The forces attacking my camp were the First Regiment Texas Rangers [8th Texas Cavalry, Terry's Texas Rangers, ed.], Colonel Wharton, and a battalion of the First Georgia Rangers, Colonel Morrison, and a large number of citizens of Rutherford County, many of whom had recently taken the oath of allegiance to the United States Government. There were also quite a number of negroes attached to the Texas and Georgia troops, who were armed and equipped, and took part in the several engagements with my forces during the day." - Federal Official Records, Series I, Vol XVI Part I, pg. 805, Lt. Col. Parkhurst's Report (Ninth Michigan Infantry) on General Forrest's attack at Murfreesboro, Tenn, July 13, 1862


Murfreesboro proved to be just the first of many victories Forrest would win; he remained undefeated in battle until the final days of the war, when he faced overwhelming numbers. But he and Bragg could not get along, and the Confederate high command did not realize the degree of Forrest's talent until far too late in the war. In their postwar writings, both Confederate President Jefferson Davis and General Robert E. Lee lamented this oversight. For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... // This article is about the Confederate general. ...


Forrest's early successes gained a promotion (July) to brigadier general, and he was given command of a Confederate cavalry brigade. In battle, he was quick to take the offensive, using speedy deployment of horse cavalry to position his troops, where they would often dismount and fight. He usually sought to circle the enemy flank and cut off their rear guard support. These tactics foreshadowed the mechanized infantry tactics used in World War II and had little relationship to the formal cavalry traditions of reconnaissance, screening, and mounted assaults with sabers. A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ...


Mobile cavalry warfare

In December 1862, Forrest's veteran troopers were reassigned by Bragg to another officer, against his protest, and he was forced to recruit a new brigade, this one composed of about 2,000 inexperienced recruits, most of whom lacked even weapons with which to fight. Again, Bragg ordered a raid, this one into west Tennessee to disrupt the communications of the Union forces under General Grant, threatening the city of Vicksburg, Mississippi. Vicksburg is a city in Warren County, Mississippi. ...


Forrest protested that to send these untrained men behind enemy lines was suicidal, but Bragg insisted, and Forrest obeyed his orders. On the ensuing raid, he again showed his brilliance, leading thousands of Union soldiers in west Tennessee on a "wild goose chase" trying to locate his fast-moving forces. Forrest never stayed in one place long enough to be located, raided as far north as the banks of the Ohio River in southwest Kentucky, and came back to his base in Mississippi with more men than he had started with, and all of them fully armed with captured Union weapons. As a result, Grant was forced to revise and delay the strategy of his Vicksburg Campaign significantly. View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Lithograph of the Mississippi River Squadron running the Confederate blockade at Vicksburg on April 16, 1863. ...


Forrest continued to lead his men in smaller-scale operations until April of 1863, when the Confederate army dispatched him into the backcountry of northern Alabama and west Georgia to deal with an attack of 3,000 Union cavalrymen under the command of Col. Abel Streight. Streight had orders to cut the Confederate railroad south of Chattanooga, Tennessee, which would have cut off Bragg's supply line and forced him to retreat into Georgia. Forrest chased Streight's men for 16 days, harassing them all the way, until Streight's lone objective became simply to escape his relentless pursuer. Finally, on May 3, Forrest caught up with Streight at Rome, Georgia, and took 1,700 prisoners. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Abel Streight (b. ... “Chattanooga” redirects here. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Aerial view of downtown Rome Location of Rome and major highways Nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, Rome is the largest city in and the county seat of Floyd County, Georgia, United States. ...


Forrest served with the main army at the Battle of Chickamauga (September 18 to September 20, 1863), where he pursued the retreating Union army and took hundreds of prisoners. Like several others under Bragg's command, he urged an immediate follow-up attack to recapture Chattanooga, which had fallen a few weeks before. Bragg failed to do so, and not long after, Forrest and Bragg had a confrontation (including death threats against Bragg) that resulted in Forrest's re-assignment to an independent command in Mississippi. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William S. Rosecrans George H. Thomas Braxton Bragg James Longstreet Strength Army of the Cumberland (56,965) Army of Tennessee (70,000) Casualties 16,170 (1,657 killed, 9,756 wounded, 4,757 captured/missing) 18,454 (2,312 killed... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Battle of Fort Pillow

Forrest went to work and soon raised a 6,000-man force of his own, which he led back into west Tennessee. He did not have the resources to retake the area and hold it, but he did have enough force to render it useless to the Union army. He led several more raids into the area, from Paducah, Kentucky, on March 25, 1864, to the controversial Battle of Fort Pillow on April 12, 1864. In that battle, Forrest demanded unconditional surrender, or else he would "put every man to the sword", language he frequently used to expedite a surrender. The battle's details remain disputed and controversial to this day. What is known is that Forrest's men stormed the lightly guarded fort, inflicting heavy casualties on its defenders who quickly fell into disarray as the Union command—already short several officers—collapsed. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Paducah is a city in McCracken County, Kentucky at the confluence of the Tennessee River and the Ohio River. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Lionel F. Booth William F. Bradford Nathan Bedford Forrest James R. Chalmers Strength Detachments from three units (approx. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Union commanders at Ft. Pillow had sheltered the white troops in "bombproofs" - dugout pits shielded with heavy timbers and earth - while placing the Colored Troops on the walls where they would bear the brunt of the assault and casualties. Only when the Colored Troops had been overrun and the fighting fell to white Union troops did the Union forces break and stream to the riverbanks and the support of Union river gunboats.


Conflicting reports of what happened next are the source of controversy. Some alleged that the Confederates targeted several hundred African-American soldiers inside the fort, though one battle account says the killing was indiscriminate and another said that the deaths were directly ordered by Gen. Forrest. Only 90 out of approximately 262 blacks survived the battle. Casualties were also high among white defenders of the fort, with 205 out of about 500 surviving. After the battle, reports surfaced of captured soldiers being subjected to brutality, including allegations that they were crucified on tent frames and burnt alive. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


Forrest's men were alleged to have set fire to Union barracks with wounded Union soldiers inside, but the report of Union LT Daniel Van Horn (Numbers 16. Report of Lieutenant Daniel Van Horn, Sixth U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery, of the capture of Fort Pillow - Federal Official Records, Series I, Vol. 32, Part 1, pp. 569-570) credited that act to orders carried out by Union LT John D. Hill.


LT Van Horn also reported that, "There never was a surrender of the fort, both officers and men declaring they never would surrender or ask for quarter."


His entry in the American National Biography says: "The congressional committee investigating the battle concluded that Forrest had taken advantage of a truce to reposition his forces and that he had allowed his troops to commit the slaughter. The committee heard testimony that some wounded Union troops were intentionally burned in their barracks, while other wounded were buried alive." The American National Biography is a 24 volume set containing approximately 17,400 entries[1] and 20 million words. ...


Following the cessation of hostilities Forrest transferred the 14 most seriously wounded United States Colored Troops (USCT) to the U.S. Steamer Silver Cloud. He also forwarded 39 USCT taken as prisoners to higher command.


An investigation by Union general William T. Sherman did not find any fault with Forrest. However, the United States Congress Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War concluded that Forrest's men did in fact fire on men who had surrendered.[citation needed] Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. ... The Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War was a United States Congressional investigating committee created to handle issues surrounding the American Civil War. ...


Brice's Crossroad

The battle at Brice's Crossroads is favored as one of Forrest's greatest accomplishments. Forrest set up a position for an attack to repulse a pursuing force commanded by General Samuel D. Sturgis. Sturgis had been sent specifically to impede Forrest from destroying Union supplies and fortifications. When Sturgis' Federal army came upon the crossroad they were ambushed by Forrest's elite cavalry. In a desperate movement, Sturgis ordered his infantry to advance to the front line to counteract the cavalry. The infantry, tired and weary from the march to the front, were quickly broken and sent into mass retreat. Forrest, seizing the opportunity, sent a full charge after the retreating army and thus caused one of most embarrassing and costly retreats for the Union side, capturing 16 artillery pieces, 176 wagons and 1,500 stands of small arms. In all, the maneuver had cost Forrest 96 men killed and 396 wounded, however the day was far worse for his enemy with 223 killed, 394 wounded and 1,623 men missing. This had been an especially deep blow to the black regiment under Sturgis' command, who had in the hasty retreat, stripped off commemorative badges that read "Remember Fort Pillow" to hold from further aggravating the Confederate force pursuing them. Samuel Davis Sturgis (June 11, 1822-September 28, 1889) was an American military officer who served as a Union general in the American Civil War. ...


Conclusion of the war

Forrest's greatest victory came on June 10, 1864, when his 3,500-man force clashed with 8,500 men commanded by General Samuel D. Sturgis at the Battle of Brice's Crossroads. Here, his mobility of force and superior tactics won a remarkable victory, inflicting 2,500 casualties against a loss of 492, and sweeping the Union forces completely from a large expanse of southwest Tennessee and northern Mississippi. is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Samuel Davis Sturgis (June 11, 1822-September 28, 1889) was an American military officer who served as a Union general in the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Samuel D. Sturgis Nathan B. Forrest Strength Three-brigade division of infantry and a division of cavalry (about 8,500) cavalry corps (about 3,200) Casualties 2,610 492 Battle of Brices Crossroads was fought on June 10, 1864...


Forrest led other raids that summer and fall, including a famous one into Union-held downtown Memphis in August 1864 (the Second Battle of Memphis), and another on a huge Union supply depot at Johnsonville, Tennessee, on October 3, 1864, causing millions of dollars in damage. In December, he fought alongside the Confederate Army of Tennessee in the disastrous Franklin-Nashville Campaign. He once again fought bitterly with his superior officer, demanding permission from John Bell Hood to cross the river at Franklin and cut off John M. Schofield's Union army's escape route. After the bloody defeat at Franklin, Hood continued to Nashville while Forrest led an independent raid against the Murfreesboro garrison. Forrest engaged Union forces near Murfreesboro on December 5, 1864 and was soundly defeated at what would be known as the Battle of the Cedars. After Hood's Army of Tennessee was all but destroyed at the Battle of Nashville, Forrest again distinguished himself by commanding the Confederate rear-guard in a series of actions that allowed what was left of the army to escape from the disastrous Battle of Nashville. For this, he earned promotion to the rank of lieutenant general. The Second Battle of Memphis was a battle of the American Civil War, occurring on August 21, 1864 in Shelby County, Tennessee. ... New Johnsonville is a city in Humphreys County, Tennessee, United States. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Army of Tennessee can refer to either of two American Civil War armies: Army of Tennessee, the Confederate army named after the state of Tennessee. ... Western Theater campaigns of 1864–65 The Franklin-Nashville Campaign, also known as Hoods Tennessee Campaign, was a series of battles in the Western Theater, fought in the fall of 1864 in Alabama, Tennessee, and northwestern Georgia during the American Civil War. ... John Bell Hood (June 1[1] or June 29[2], 1831 – August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War and an old friend of Lt. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders John McAllister Schofield John Bell Hood Strength IV and XXIII Corps (Army of the Ohio and Army of the Cumberland) Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,326 6,261 Franklin-Nashville Campaign Allatoona – Decatur – Johnsonville – Columbia – Spring Hill – 2nd Franklin – 3rd... Portrait of John Schofield during the Civil War John McAllister Schofield (September 29, 1831 – March 4, 1906) was an American soldier who held major commands during the Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George H. Thomas John Bell Hood Strength IV Corps, XXIII Corps, detachment of Army of the Tennessee, provisional detachment, and Cavalry Corps Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,900 approximately 13,000 The Battle of Nashville was a two-day battle... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George H. Thomas John Bell Hood Strength IV Corps, XXIII Corps, detachment of Army of the Tennessee, provisional detachment, and Cavalry Corps Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,900 approximately 13,000 The Battle of Nashville was a two-day battle... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ...


In 1865, Forrest attempted, without success, to defend the state of Alabama against the destructive Wilson's Raid. His opponent, Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson, was one of the few Union generals ever to defeat Forrest in battle. He still had an army in the field in April, when news of Lee's surrender reached him. He was urged to flee to Mexico, but chose to share the fate of his men, and surrendered. On May 9, 1865, at Gainesville Forrest read his farewell address to his troops.[5] He was later cleared of any violations of the rules of war in regard to the alleged massacre at Fort Pillow, and was allowed to return to private life. Wilsons Raid was a cavalry operation through Alabama and Georgia in March-April 1865, late in the American Civil War. ... Portrait of James Wilson during the Civil War James Harrison Wilson (September 2, 1837 – February 23, 1925) was a U.S. Army topographic engineer, a Union Army general in the American Civil War and later wars, a railroad executive, and author. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Gainesville is a town located in Sumter County, Alabama. ... The two parts of the laws of war (or Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC)): Law concerning acceptable practices while engaged in war, like the Geneva Conventions, is called jus in bello; while law concerning allowable justifications for armed force is called jus ad bellum. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Lionel F. Booth William F. Bradford Nathan Bedford Forrest James R. Chalmers Strength Detachments from three units (approx. ...


In the four years of the war, reputedly a total of 30 horses were shot out from under Forrest and he may have personally killed 31 people. "I was a horse ahead at the end," he said.


N.B. Forrest's Farewell Address To His Troops, May 9, 1865

The following text is excerpted from General Forrest's farewell address to his troops. It is a particularly sobering prelude to the experiences the South had during Reconstruction.

Civil war, such as you have just passed through naturally engenders feelings of animosity, hatred, and revenge. It is our duty to divest ourselves of all such feelings; and as far as it is in our power to do so, to cultivate friendly feelings towards those with whom we have so long contended, and heretofore so widely, but honestly, differed. Neighborhood feuds, personal animosities, and private differences should be blotted out; and, when you return home, a manly, straightforward course of conduct will secure the respect of your enemies. Whatever your responsibilities may be to Government, to society, or to individuals meet them like men.


The attempt made to establish a separate and independent Confederation has failed; but the consciousness of having done your duty faithfully, and to the end, will, in some measure, repay for the hardships you have undergone. In bidding you farewell, rest assured that you carry with you my best wishes for your future welfare and happiness. Without, in any way, referring to the merits of the Cause in which we have been engaged, your courage and determination, as exhibited on many hard-fought fields, has elicited the respect and admiration of friend and foe. And I now cheerfully and gratefully acknowledge my indebtedness to the officers and men of my command whose zeal, fidelity and unflinching bravery have been the great source of my past success in arms.


I have never, on the field of battle, sent you where I was unwilling to go myself; nor would I now advise you to a course which I felt myself unwilling to pursue. You have been good soldiers, you can be good citizens. Obey the laws, preserve your honor, and the Government to which you have surrendered can afford to be, and will be, magnanimous.


N.B. Forrest, Lieut.-General
Headquarters, Forrest's Cavalry Corps
Gainesville, Alabama
May 9, 1865

War record and promotions

Nathan Bedford Forrest Park in Memphis, Tennessee
Nathan Bedford Forrest Park in Memphis, Tennessee

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1473x1931, 1658 KB) Summary Picture of Nathan Bedford Forrest Park taken across Union Avenue on February 27, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1473x1931, 1658 KB) Summary Picture of Nathan Bedford Forrest Park taken across Union Avenue on February 27, 2006. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Andrew H. Foote John B. Floyd Gideon J. Pillow Simon B. Buckner Strength 24,531 District of Cairo & Western Flotilla 16,171 Casualties 2,691 (507 killed, 1,976 wounded, 208 captured/missing) 13,846 (327 killed... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant, Don Carlos Buell Albert Sidney Johnston â€ , P.G.T. Beauregard Strength Army of West Tennessee (48,894), Army of the Ohio (17,918)[1] Army of Mississippi (44,699)[1] Casualties 13,047: 1,754 killed, 8... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Thomas Turpin Crittenden Nathan Bedford Forrest Strength 900 1,400 Casualties 890 150 The First Battle of Murfreesboro was fought on July 13, 1862, in Rutherford County, Tennessee, as part of the American Civil War. ... Battle of Days Gap Conflict American Civil War (Streights Raid) Date April 30, 1863 Place Cullman County, Alabama Result Union victory in this first battle, but the raid ultimately failed and surrendered. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William S. Rosecrans George H. Thomas Braxton Bragg James Longstreet Strength Army of the Cumberland (56,965) Army of Tennessee (70,000) Casualties 16,170 (1,657 killed, 9,756 wounded, 4,757 captured/missing) 18,454 (2,312 killed... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Battle of Paducah was fought on March 25, 1864 between Union and Confederate forces. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Lionel F. Booth William F. Bradford Nathan Bedford Forrest James R. Chalmers Strength Detachments from three units (approx. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Samuel D. Sturgis Nathan B. Forrest Strength Three-brigade division of infantry and a division of cavalry (about 8,500) cavalry corps (about 3,200) Casualties 2,610 492 Battle of Brices Crossroads was fought on June 10, 1864... Battle of Spring Hill Conflict American Civil War Date November 29, 1864 Place Maury County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Spring Hill was a battle of the American Civil War, occurring on November 29, 1864 in Maury County, Tennessee. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders John McAllister Schofield John Bell Hood Strength IV and XXIII Corps (Army of the Ohio and Army of the Cumberland) Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,326 6,261 Franklin-Nashville Campaign Allatoona – Decatur – Johnsonville – Columbia – Spring Hill – 2nd Franklin – 3rd... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George H. Thomas John Bell Hood Strength IV Corps, XXIII Corps, detachment of Army of the Tennessee, provisional detachment, and Cavalry Corps Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,900 approximately 13,000 The Battle of Nashville was a two-day battle... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...

Impact of Forrest's doctrines

Forrest was one of the first men to grasp the doctrines of "mobile warfare" that became prevalent in the 20th century. Paramount in his strategy was fast movement, even if it meant pushing his horses at a killing pace, which he did more than once. Noted Civil War scholar Bruce Catton writes: Bruce Catton (October 9, 1899 — August 28, 1978) was a journalist and a notable historian of the American Civil War. ...

Forrest ... used his horsemen as a modern general would use motorized infantry. He liked horses because he liked fast movement, and his mounted men could get from here to there much faster than any infantry could; but when they reached the field they usually tied their horses to trees and fought on foot, and they were as good as the very best infantry. Not for nothing did Forrest say the essence of strategy was "to git thar fust with the most men."[6]

Forrest is often erroneously quoted as saying his strategy was to "git thar fustest with the mostest," but this quote first appeared in print in a New York Times story in 1917, written to provide colorful comments in reaction to European interest in Civil War generals. Bruce Catton writes, "Do not, under any circumstances whatever, quote Forrest as saying 'fustest' and 'mostest.' He did not say it that way, and nobody who knows anything about him imagines that he did." [7] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Forrest became well-known for his early use of "guerrilla" tactics as applied to a mobile horse cavalry deployment. He sought to constantly harass the enemy in fast-moving raids, and to disrupt supply trains and enemy communications by destroying railroad track and cutting telegraph lines, as he wheeled around the Union Army's flank. His success in doing so is reported to have driven Ulysses S. Grant to fits of anger. Telegraph and Telegram redirect here. ...


Many students of warfare have come to appreciate Forrest's somewhat novel approach to cavalry deployment and quick hit-and-run tactics, both of which have influenced mobile tactics in the modern mechanized era. A report on the Battle of Paducah stated that Forrest led a mounted cavalry of 2,500 troopers 100 miles (160 km) in only 50 hours. The Battle of Paducah was fought on March 25, 1864 between Union and Confederate forces. ...


One of Forrest's most famous quotes is "War means fightin', and fightin' means killin'."


Postwar years and Ku Klux Klan

For more details on this topic, see Ku Klux Klan.

After the war, Forrest settled in Memphis, Tennessee, building a house on a bank of the Mississippi River. With slavery abolished, the former slave trader suffered a major financial setback. He later found employment at the Selma-based Marion & Memphis Railroad and eventually became the company president. He was not as successful in railroad promoting as in war, and under his direction the company went bankrupt. Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Selma is the name of a number of places: in the United States of America: Selma, Alabama Selma, Arkansas Selma, California Selma, Colorado Selma, Indiana Selma, Iowa Selma, Kansas Selma, Louisiana Selma, Michigan Selma, Mississippi Selma, Missouri Selma, North Carolina Selma, Ohio Selma, Oregon Selma, South Carolina Selma, Texas Selma...


It was during this time that he became the nexus of the nascent Ku Klux Klan movement. Upon learning of the Klan and its goals of removing Northerners and reinstating the "true" Southern leaders, Forrest remarked, "That's a good thing; that's a damn good thing. We can use that to keep the niggers in their place."[7] Delegates at an 1867 KKK convention in Nashville acclaimed him and named him the organization's honorary first Grand Wizard, or leader-in-chief. There has been no proof that Forrest willingly participated or accepted this acclamation or that he actually functioned as a member of the Klan at any level. For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... Grand Wizard was the title used by the overall leader of earliest form of the Ku Klux Klan, during Reconstruction in the South. ...


In an 1868 newspaper interview, Forrest boasted that the Klan was a nationwide organization of 550,000 men, and that although he himself was not a member, he was "in sympathy" and would "cooperate" with them, and could himself muster 40,000 Klansmen with only five days' notice in reference to what some at the time saw as an impending conflict between the Unionist Reconstruction militia controlling voting and the civilian population. He stated that the Klan did not see its enemy as blacks so much as "carpetbaggers" (Northerners who came south after the war ended) and "scalawags" (white Republican Southerners). American usage In the United States, the negative term carpetbagger was used to refer to a Northerner who traveled to the South after the American Civil War, through the late 1860s and the 1870s, during Reconstruction. ... The term scalawag or scallywag traces its origin to the post-Civil War era in the South of the United States. ...


In the interview Forrest described the Klan as "a protective political military organization...The members are sworn to recognize the government of the United States...Its objects originally were protection against Loyal Leagues and the Grand Army of the Republic..."


He also stated that "There were some foolish young men who put masks on their faces and rode over the country, frightening negroes, but orders have been issued to stop that, and it has ceased."

Wikisource has the Text of an 1868 interview with Nathan Bedford Forrest.

Because of Forrest's prominence, the organization grew rapidly through making use of his name. The primary original mission of the Klan was to counter with force the terror tactics being used by groups in Tennessee such as the Union League which were directed by Unionist Tennesseeans against former Confederates and secessionist Tennesseeans under the blanket abuses of state Reconstructionist governments. In addition to aiding Confederate widows and orphans of the war, some members of the new group began to use force to prevent blacks from voting and to resist Reconstruction. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ...


In 1869, Forrest, disagreeing with its increasingly violent tactics and specifically disagreeing with violent acts against Blacks, ordered the Klan to disband, stating that it was "being perverted from its original honorable and patriotic purposes, becoming injurious instead of subservient to the public peace." Many of its groups in other parts of the country ignored the order and continued to function.


When Forrest testified before a Congressional investigation in 1871 ("The reports of Committees, House of Representatives, second session, forty-second congress," P. 7-449) the committee concluded that Forrest's involvement with the Klan was to attempt to order it to disband. They found no evidence that he had founded the Klan, that he had led the Klan or that he had acted to advise it other than to make efforts to have it disband.


Nearly ruined as the result of the failure of the Marion & Memphis Railroad in the early 1870s, Forrest spent his final days running a prison work farm on President's Island in the Mississippi River, his health in steady decline. He and his wife lived in a log cabin they had salvaged from his plantation.


On July 5, 1875, Forrest became the first white man to speak to the Independent Order of Pole-Bearers Association, a civil rights group whose members were former slaves. Although his speech was short, he expressed the opinion that blacks had the right to vote for any candidates they wanted and that the role of blacks should be elevated. He ended the speech by kissing the cheek of one of the daughters of one of the Pole-Bearer members.[1][2] is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Forrest died in October 1877, reportedly from acute complications of diabetes, in Memphis and was buried at Elmwood Cemetery. In 1904 his remains were disinterred and moved to Forrest Park, a Memphis city park. This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... Elmwood Cemetery is the oldest active cemetery in Memphis, Tennessee. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Posthumous legacy

Forrest has a mixed legacy.


For many Tennesseans, Forrest remains a hero, a sentiment reflected in numerous memorials. Obelisks in his memory have been placed at his birthplace in Chapel Hill and at Nathan Bedford Forrest State Park near Camden. A statue of Forrest as a general stands in Memphis's Nathan Bedford Forrest Park, while a bust of him sculpted by Jane Baxendale is on display at the state capitol building in Nashville. He is also the namesake of Camp Forrest, a World War II Army base in Tullahoma, Tennessee that is now the site of the Arnold Engineering Development Center. Perhaps most interesting is the spot just off Interstate 65 south of Nashville where a massive but strange statue of Forrest on horseback continues to stand. Here his face takes on a comical growl, and his oversized silver body sits atop an undersized bronze mount. Both detractors and admirers of Forrest dislike this rendering with such intensity that in 2002 someone finally shot at it. Tennessee has also dedicated thirty-two Nathan Bedford Forrest state historical markers. Even though the state claims three Presidents of the United States of America as its own—Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, and Andrew Johnson—Forrest has more markers and monuments in his honor than these three presidents combined.[citation needed] Tennessee state law requires the governor to declare July 13 as "Nathan Bedford Forrest Day."[8] For the obelisk punctuation mark, see dagger (typography). ... Chapel Hill is a town located in Marshall County, Tennessee. ... Nathan Bedford Forrest State Park is a state park in western Tennessee. ... Camp Forrest, located near Tullahoma, Tennessee, was one of the Armys largest training bases during World War II. It was an active Army post between 1941 and 1946. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Tullahoma is a city in Coffee County and Franklin County, Tennessee, in the south-central part of the state. ... Arnold Engineering Development Center Arnold Engineering Development Center is the most advanced and largest complex of flight simulation test facilities in the world. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... The Presidents of the United States of America has two meanings. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ...


Standing next to an earlier monument to Confederate soldiers buried there, a monument to Forrest in the Old Live Oak Cemetery in Selma, Alabama reads "Defender of Selma, Wizard of the Saddle, Untutored Genius, The first with the most. This monument stands as testament of our perpetual devotion and respect for Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest. CSA 1821-1877, one of the south's finest heroes. In honor of Gen. Forrest's unwavering defense of Selma, the great state of Alabama, and the Confederacy, this memorial is dedicated. DEO VINDICE." Selma was the armory for the Confederacy, providing most of the South's ammunition. Selma is the name of a number of places: in the United States of America: Selma, Alabama Selma, Arkansas Selma, California Selma, Colorado Selma, Indiana Selma, Iowa Selma, Kansas Selma, Louisiana Selma, Michigan Selma, Mississippi Selma, Missouri Selma, North Carolina Selma, Ohio Selma, Oregon Selma, South Carolina Selma, Texas Selma... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Selma is the name of a number of places: in the United States of America: Selma, Alabama Selma, Arkansas Selma, California Selma, Colorado Selma, Indiana Selma, Iowa Selma, Kansas Selma, Louisiana Selma, Michigan Selma, Mississippi Selma, Missouri Selma, North Carolina Selma, Ohio Selma, Oregon Selma, South Carolina Selma, Texas Selma...


There are also high schools named for Forrest in Chapel Hill, Tennessee, and Jacksonville, Florida. However, in the latter case, the Duval County School Board is controversially looking at renaming Forrest High School in Jacksonville for any of a number of people, including Eartha White. Nathan Bedford Forrest High School is the name of two high schools in the United States. ... The Jacksonville skyline and the Acosta Bridge. ... Duval County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... Eartha White in 1950; UNF Special Collections Eartha Mary Magdalene White (November 8, 1876 - January 18, 1974) was an American humanitarian, philanthropist, and businesswoman. ...


The Duval County School Board is hardly alone: recent years have seen attempts by black leaders in some localities to remove or eliminate Forrest monuments, usually without success. In 2005, Shelby County Commissioner Walter Bailey started an effort to move the statue over Forrest's grave and rename Forrest Park. Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton, who is black, blocked the move. Others have tried to get a bust of Forrest in the Tennessee House of Representatives chamber removed.[9] Shelby County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ...


At Middle Tennessee State University, the ROTC building is named after Forrest. The building's name has thus been the source of controversy. Middle Tennessee State University (founded September 11, 1911, and commonly abbreviated as MTSU) is an American university located in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. ... The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program of the United States armed forces present on college campuses to recruit and educate commissioned officers. ...


Forrest's great-grandson, Nathan Bedford Forrest III, also pursued a military career, eventually attaining the rank of brigadier general in the United States Army Air Forces during World War II. In 1943, N. B. Forrest III was killed in action while participating in a bombing raid over Germany. Nathan Bedford Forrest III (April 7, 1905 - June 13, 1943) was a Brigadier General of the United States Army Air Force, and a great-grandson of Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was the aviation component of the United States Army primarily during World War II. The title of Army Air Forces succeeded the prior name of Army Air Corps in June 1941 during preparation for expected combat in what came to be known as...


In popular culture

In the 1994 motion picture Forrest Gump, the eponymous Tom Hanks character states that he was named after his ancestor General Nathan Bedford Forrest, and there is an edited sequence from the 1915 pro-Klan film, Birth of a Nation, showing Hanks as the General in Klan robes. For the main character of the same name, see Forrest Gump (character) Forrest Gump is a 1994 drama film based on a 1986 novel by Winston Groom and the name of the title character of both. ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist and movie producer. ... The Birth of a Nation is a controversial silent film directed by D.W. Griffith, based on the play The Clansmen and the book The Leopards Spots, both by Thomas Dixon. ...


In the alternative history/science fiction novel The Guns of the South by Harry Turtledove, Forrest runs for president of the Confederacy in its 1867 election. The Guns of the South (1992, ISBN 0-345-37675-7) is a novel by writer Harry Turtledove. ... Harry Norman Turtledove (born June 14, 1949) is an American historian and prolific novelist who has written historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction works. ...


See also

U.S. Army Cavalry Sergeant, 1866 Cavalry was a branch of army service in a process of transition during the American Civil War. ... Forrest City is a city located in St. ... Forrest County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... Monument to Emma Sansom Emma Sansom (June 2, 1847 – August 9, 1900) was an Alabama farmgirl noted for her bravery during the American Civil War. ...

References

Notes

  1. ^ Confederate silver dollar site.
  2. ^ Domestic slave trade site.
  3. ^ Tennesseans in the Civil War
  4. ^ Blueshoe Nashville Travel Guide.
  5. ^ Bill Slater website
  6. ^ Catton, p. 160
  7. ^ Catton, pp. 160 - 161
  8. ^ Tennessee Code Annotated 15-2-101
  9. ^ Scott Barker, "Nathan Forrest: Still confounding, controversial," Knoxville News Sentinel, February 19, 2006.

[[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Lytle, Andrew Nelson,"Bedford Forrest and His Critter Company" 1931. Republished in 1984 by J.S. Sanders & Co.
  • Wyeth, John Allen, "That Devil Forrest", 1899 (original) republished in 1989 by Louisiana State University Press
  • Carney, Court, "The Contested Image of Nathan Bedford Forrest", Journal of Southern History. Volume: 67. Issue: 3., 2001, pp 601+.
  • Bearss, Edwin C Forrest at Brice's Cross Roads and in north Mississippi in 1864Dayton OH, Press of Morningside Bookshop, 1979
  • Bearss, Ed, Unpublished remarks to Gettysburg College Civil War Institute, July 1, 2005.
  • Harcourt, Edward John, "Who Were the Pale Faces? New Perspectives on the Tennessee Ku Klux", Civil War History. Volume: 51. Issue: 1, 2005, pp: 23+.
  • Henry, Robert Selph, First with the Most, 1944.
  • Hurst, Jack, Nathan Bedford Forrest: A Biography, 1993.
  • Williams, Edward F. "Fustest with the mostest; the military career of Tennessee's greatest Confederate, Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest Memphis", Distributed by Southern Books 1969
  • Tap, Bruce, "'These Devils are Not Fit to Live on God's Earth': War Crimes and the Committee on the Conduct of the War, 1864-1865," Civil War History, XLII (June 1996), 116-32. on Ft Pillow.
  • Wills, Brian Steel, A Battle from the Start: The Life of Nathan Bedford Forrest, 1992.
  • Catton, Bruce (1971). The Civil War. American Heritage Press, New York. Library of Congress Number: 77-119671. 

Ed Bearss leading a tour in 2005 Edwin Cole Bearss (born June 26, 1923), U.S. Marine Corps veteran of World War II, is a military historian and author notable for his work on the American Civil War and World War II eras and is a popular tour guide of... Gettysburg College is a private national four-year liberal arts college founded in 1832, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, adjacent to the famous battlefield. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Nathan Bedford Forrest: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (3722 words)
Nathan Bedford Forrest was born to a poor Scottish-Irish family in the Marshall County town of Chapel Hill, Tennessee.
Forrest never stayed in one place long enough to be located, raided as far north as the banks of the Ohio River in southwest Kentucky, and came back to his base in Mississippi with more men than he had started with, and all of them fully armed with captured Union weapons.
Forrest died in October 1877, reportedly from complications of diabetes, in Memphis and was buried at Elmwood Cemetery.
Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) (2218 words)
Forrest was born to a poor middle Tennessee family in the Bedford County town of Chapel Hill.
Forrest was one of the first men to grasp the doctrines of "mobile warfare" that became prevalent in the 20th century.
Forrest lost almost all his fortune during the war, since much of it was invested in slaves, and of what was left, he gave much to the men who had served under him, but who had come home to find they had nothing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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