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Encyclopedia > Nastika

Nastika is a Sanskrit term meaning: One who denies; unbeliever. It is the antonym of astika, or one who asserts. The meanings can be generalised respectively into unorthodox and orthodox. Sanskrit ( संस्कृतम्) is an Indo-European classical language of India and a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. ... Antonyms, from the Greek anti (against) and onoma (name) are word pairs that are opposite in meaning, such as hot and cold, fat and thin, and up and down. ...


The terms astika and nastika are a traditional classification of Indian schools of thought. Nastika refers to all traditions that reject and deny the scriptural authority of the Vedas. This includes Sikhism, Jainism, Buddhism, the Charvaka materialists and others. Astika refers to those schools that accept the revealed authority of the Vedas as supreme scripture. This includes the four major sects: Saivism, Shaktism, Vaishnavism and Smartism. The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद), collectively refers to a corpus of ancient Indo-Aryan religious literature that are associated with the Vedic civilization and are considered by adherents of Hinduism to be revealed knowledge. ... The Golden Temple is a sacred shrine for Sikhs Sikhism (Punjabi: , ), is a panentheistic religion based on the teachings of ten Gurus who lived in northern India during the 16th and 17th centuries. ... Pre-Kushana Ayagapatta from Mathura Jainism (pronounced in English as //), traditionally known as Jain Dharma (जैन धर्म), is a religion and philosophy originating in the prehistory of South Asia. ... Buddhism (Pāli Buddhadhamma or Sanskrit Buddhadharma) is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, who lived in the 5th century BCE. Buddhism spread throughout the ancient Indian sub-continent in the five centuries following his death, and propagated into Central, Southeast, and... Carvaka, also frequently transliterated as Charvaka, and also known as Lokayata, is a thoroughly materialist and atheist school of thought with ancient roots in India. ... The Vedas (Sanskrit: वेद), collectively refers to a corpus of ancient Indo-Aryan religious literature that are associated with the Vedic civilization and are considered by adherents of Hinduism to be revealed knowledge. ... Shaivism, also Saivism, is a branch of Hinduism that worships Siva as the Supreme God. ... Shaktism is a denomination of Hinduism that worships Shakti, or Devi -- the Hindu name for the Great Mother -- in all of her forms whilst not rejecting the importance of masculine and neuter divinity. ... Vaishnavism is one of the principal divisions of Hinduism. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In Hinduism, the ninth Avatara of Vishnu was Buddha. Hindus believe that Buddha led a race of pious, noble and realized people who were relieved from the clutches of pantheistic cults existing in those times, people who had gone astray from monist view of thoughts. But a large section of Hindus, particulary the priestly class i.e Brahmins continued to practice their rituals. Hinduism (Sanskrit/Hindi —, hindi , and ) is a religion originating in the Indian subcontinent, based on the Vedas, and among the oldest religious traditions still practiced today. ... See Avatar (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... For other uses of the name Vishnu, see Vishnu (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Nastika Information (275 words)
Nastika is a Sanskrit term meaning: One who does not see; unbeliever.
The terms astika and nastika are a traditional classification of Indian schools of thought.
Nastika refers to all traditions that reject and deny the scriptural authority of the Vedas.
Nastika School, Hindu Philosophy, Buddhist, Jaina and Carvaka (1582 words)
This piece deals with the Nastika schools, or those which do not use the Vedas to establish their own authority.
Nastika refers to the schools that do not regard the Vedas as infallible and do not use the Vedas to establish their own authority.
The astika or orthodox schools which believe in the sanctity of the Vedas are six in number; Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, Vaisesika, Vedanta and Mimamsa.
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