FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Nashville Sound

The Nashville Sound (often known as Countrypolitan) arose during the late 1950s as a sub-genre of American country music, replacing the chart dominance of the Honky Tonk sound which was most popular in the 1940s and 1950s. Key production features where the use of "smooth" strings and background vocals, and a crooning style of lead vocal typified by Jim Reeves and Eddy Arnold. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: , Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Honky tonk was originally the name of a type of bar common throughout the southern United States, also Honkatonk or Honkey-tonk. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eddy Arnold (May 15, 1918) is an American country music singer. ...

Contents

Key personnel

The Nashville Sound was pioneered by staff at RCA Records and Columbia Records in Nashville, Tennessee, including manager Steve Sholes, record producers Chet Atkins, Owen Bradley and Bob Ferguson, and recording engineer Bill Porter. They invented the form by replacing elements of the popular Honky Tonk style (fiddles, steel guitar, nasal lead vocals) with "smooth" elements from 1950s Pop music (string sections, background vocals, crooning lead vocals), and using "slick" production, and pop music structures. RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: , Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... Born: Feb 12, 1911 in Washington, D.C. Died: Apr 22, 1968 in Nashville, Tennessee One of the most influential producers in postwar music. ... In the music industry, record producer designates a person responsible for completing a master recording so that it is fit for release. ... Chet Atkins Chester Burton Chet Atkins (June 20, 1924 – June 30, 2001) was an influential guitarist and record producer. ... The cover of Bradleys biggest single as a performer, Big Guitar. ... Bob Ferguson Robert Bruce Bob Ferguson Sr (December 30, 1927 – July 22, 2001) was an American songwriter, record producer, and historian. ... Bill Porter is a sound engineer who recorded such stars as Elvis Presley and Roy Orbison through the 1960s and 1970s. ... Honky tonk was originally the name of a type of bar common throughout the southern United States, also Honkatonk or Honkey-tonk. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... A Dobro style resonator guitar Steel guitar, strictly speaking, refers to a method of playing using a metal slide (or steel) on a guitar played horizontally, with the strings uppermost. ... For popular forms of music in general, see Popular music. ...


Singers Patsy Cline and Jim Reeves, along with pianist Floyd Cramer, were among the most famous of the artists leading the way to the smooth crooning style of the Nashville Sound's original era. Patsy Cline (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... Floyd Cramer (October 27, 1933 - December 31, 1997) was an American Hall of Fame pianist who was one of the architects of the Nashville Sound. ... A crooner is a singer (usually male) of a certain kind of popular music, often called Standards or American Standards. ...


Countrypolitan

In the early 1960s, the Nashville Sound began to be challenged by the rival Bakersfield sound. Nashville's pop song structure became more pronounced and it morphed into what was named "Countrypolitan". Countrypolitan was aimed straight at mainstream markets and it sold well throughout the later 1960s into the early 1970s. Among the architects of this sound were producers Billy Sherrill, (who was instrumental in shaping Tammy Wynette's early career) and Glenn Sutton. Artists who typified the Countrypolitan sound initially included Wynette, Glen Campbell, Lynn Anderson, Charlie Rich, and Charley Pride. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The Bakersfield sound was a genre of country music developed in the mid- to late 1950s in and around Bakersfield, California, at bars such as The Blackboard. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Billy Sherrill (born Campbell, Alabama, November 5, 1936) was a record producer and arranger who is most famous for his association with a number of country artists, most notably Tammy Wynette. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was an American country singer and songwriter. ... Glenn Sutton (September 28, 1937 - April 17, 2007)[1] was a country music songwriter and producer. ... For the Scottish broadcaster, see Glenn Campbell (broadcaster). ... Lynn Rene Anderson (born September 26, 1947) is a Grammy Award-winning, American country music singer. ... Charlie Rich (December 14, 1932 - July 25, 1995) was an American musician, songwriter, and pianist. ... Charley Frank Pride (born March 18, 1938) is a country music artist. ...


The Bakersfield sound and later, outlaw country, dominated country music among aficionados while Countrypolitan reigned on the pop charts. The Bakersfield sound was a genre of country music developed in the mid- to late 1950s in and around Bakersfield, California, at bars such as The Blackboard. ... Willie Nelson Outlaw country was a significant trend in country music during the late 1960s and the 1970s (and even into the 1980s in some cases), commonly referred to as The Outlaw Movement (both by fans and by people in the music industry) or simply Outlaw music [1]. The focus...


Upon being asked what the Nashville Sound was, Chet Atkins would reach his hand into his pocket, shake the loose change around and say "That's what it is. It's the sound of money." Chet Atkins Chester Burton Chet Atkins (June 20, 1924 – June 30, 2001) was an influential guitarist and record producer. ...


Examples of the Nashville Sound

Classic examples of Nashville Sound recordings:

The Three Bells is a song made popular by The Browns in 1959. ... The Browns were an American family singing group from Pine Bluff, Arkansas made up of Jim Ed Brown and his sisters, Maxine Brown and Bonnie Brown. ... Four Walls is a 1928 film starring John Gilbert, Joan Crawford, and Carmel Myers. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hell Have to go was 1960 Country Music Billboard (magazine) hit for Jim Reeves and you can find it on the CD called Billboard Country Hits:1960 along with Hell Have To Stay by Jeanne Black which was written to answer Jim Reeves. ... Floyd Cramer (October 27, 1933 - December 31, 1997) was an American Hall of Fame pianist who was one of the architects of the Nashville Sound. ... I Fall to Pieces is a famous Country/Pop ballad written by Hank Cochran and Harlan Howard and was first recorded and released as a single by Patsy Cline in 1961. ... Patsy Cline (b. ... Note: This article is linked to the discography in the Burl Ives article. ... Note: This article is linked to the discography in the Burl Ives article. ... Note: This article is linked to the discography in the Burl Ives article. ... Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives (14 June 1909 – 14 April 1995), an Academy Award winner, was an acclaimed American folk music singer, author, and actor. ... The End of the World is a pop music hit by Skeeter Davis that enjoyed international success in the 1960s. ... Skeeter Davis (born Mary Frances Penick December 30, 1931 – September 19, 2004) was an American Country Music Singer, who was best known for crossover Pop music songs of the early 1960s. ... Here Comes My Baby is a pop song recorded in 1967 by Cat Stevens. ... Dottie West (born Dorothy Marie Marsh October 11, 1932 – September 4, 1991) was an American Country music singer. ... Make the World Go Away is a famous Country/Pop song that was written by Hank Cochran and was recorded and became a hit for Eddy Arnold in 1965. ... Eddy Arnold (May 15, 1918) is an American country music singer. ... Album cover for Ella Fitzgeralds Misty Blue. ... Wilma Burgess (born June 11, 1939; died August 26, 2003) is a country vocalist best known for her rendition of Bobby Montgomerys Misty Blue, which became a significant hit at country radio upon its 1966 release. ...

Examples of Countrypolitan

Country music | Country genres
Bakersfield sound | Bluegrass | Close harmony | Country blues | Honky tonk | Lubbock sound | Nashville sound | New Traditionalists | Outlaw country | Australian country music
Alternative country | Country pop | Country rock | Psychobilly | Rockabilly | Country-rap

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rare Vinyl Records at Craig Moerer ~ Records By Mail | Used, Collectible, Vintage and Rare Vinyl Records, LPs and 45s (915 words)
In the late 1950s, Bradley's home base of Nashville was poising itself to be a vibrant, affluent, urban city with a burgeoning music recording industry, and not just the traditional home of the Grand Ole Opry.
Nashville's revered "A-Team." The success of Bradley's Quanset Hut studio spurred RCA to built its famous Studio B. A handful of other labels soon followed setting up shop on what would eventually become known as Music Row.
As one of the architects of the Nashville sound, Owen Bradley was one of the most influential country music producers in history.
24-Track Narrative?  Robert Altman's Nashville (7270 words)
The highest rank among diegetic sounds is accorded to sounds that contribute to the elaboration of narrative (primarily narrative-oriented sound effects and the principal characters' dialogue), while attention to characterization and style is evaluated somewhat less highly.
Sounds that serve primarily to enhance realism (incomprehensible dialogue, atmospheric sound effects) are considered to have the least importance of all diegetic sounds.
As sound technique is codified during the thirties, the potential of sound cinema is slowly reduced to the point where nearly all non-narrative uses of the medium are stripped from standard usage.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m