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Encyclopedia > Nashville Banner
The front page from a 1974 issue of The Nashville Banner
The front page from a 1974 issue of The Nashville Banner

The Nashville Banner was a daily newspaper of Nashville, Tennessee which ceased publication in 1998. It was long a voice of conservative and many would say even reactionary views at times, in contrast to its "progressive" morning counterpart, The Tennessean, although these views were greatly moderated in the paper's twilight years. Image File history File links Nashville_banner. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Nickname: Music City Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area    - City 526. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Reactionary (or reactionist) is a political epithet, generally used as a pejorative, originally applied in the context of the French Revolution to counter-revolutionaries who wished to restore the real or imagined conditions of the monarchical Ancien Régime. ... Progressivism is a term that refers to a broad school of contemporary international social and political philosophies. ... The Tennessean is a dominant daily newspaper in Nashville, Tennessee. ... In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who holds an intermediate position between two extreme or radical viewpoints. ...


The first edition of the Nashville Banner was published on April 10, 1876. It was begun as a voice for the railroads and other interests in comparison with other area papers of the time which tended to take the viewpoint of workers and unions. It was long controlled by Nashville's influential Stahlman family. This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers...


The Banner was an evening paper, which at one time published as many as five editions (first, second, market final, sports final, and sunset final), although these were later consolidated into three editions, and eventually, two. For many years it was in a superior financial condition to its competitors, and in fact, when the rival Tennessean went bankrupt and almost had to cease publication, the Banner assisted in its purchase by the Evans family, who saved it. The Tennesseean and the Banner entered into what was the first joint operating agreement in the U.S. in 1937. Under this agreement, which became a common model for many other cities over the next half-century, the papers maintained editorial independence and remained separate as news-gathering organizations. However, they were printed on the same presses, distributed by a common agent, and had a consolidated classified advertising department. They were fierce competitors in the realm of news and ideas, but no longer business competitors in the truest sense. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A joint operating agreement (JOA) in the sense of this article is an arrangement whereby two daily newspapers published in the same city or geographic area find it convenient to operate certain business aspects together. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ...


This arrangement stood both papers in good stead for many years. However, the Banner began to suffer in the post-World War II era from the slow loss of readership that became common to most U.S. evening papers, which was largely attributed to the rise of television. In the early 1970s the Stahlmans sold the Banner to the Gannett Co. Gannett published it for several years, but in 1979 announced that it was selling the Banner back to local owners and assuming publication of the Tennessean. Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... Gannett Company, Inc. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ...


Although it took almost twenty years, this was the death knell for the Banner. It was now clearly inferior in resources to its morning counterpart, and its circulation continued to shrink. In the 1980s Gannett insisted on renegotiation of the joint operating agreement to its benefit, and the Banner had little choice but to comply. Another reason for the weakness of the Banner was its lack of a Sunday edition comparable to the Tennessean's, which it had given up in the formation of the joint operating agreement. It had since always published on a six-day schedule, and as weekday papers, especially evening weekday papers, continued to decline, it did not have this profit center to draw upon. The Banner switched its Saturday edition for a while to a single, morning edition in direct competition with the Tennesseean, then announced that it was terminating its Saturday edition entirely. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


During this time, the Banner began to take far more moderate positions on issues on its editorial pages, although it generally remained more conservative than the Tennessean in most areas. It was in the contradictory situation of probably becoming more-respected by people, especially those in the journalism community, at the same time that it was becoming less-read. The end occurred when the Gannett Co. made the publishers of the Banner a large offer to terminate the joint operating agreement. The offer was more than any profit that could have probably been made by the continued publication of the Banner, so it ceased to exist, with a small portion of its staff and a few of its most popular features being absorbed by the Tennessean. Interestingly, this was not considered by the Justice Department to be an antitrust violation, but when Gannett attempted to do the same thing with its Honolulu Advertiser and the evening paper in that joint operating agreement, the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, only a few months later, it was prosecuted as such, the merger was forestalled, and both papers still operate. Journalism is a discipline of collecting, analyzing, verifying, and presenting news regarding current events, trends, issues and people. ... DOJ headquarters in Washington, D.C. Justice Department redirects here. ... Antitrust is also the name of a movie, see Antitrust (film) Antitrust or competition laws are laws whose stated purpose is the promotion of economic and business competition by prohibiting anti-competitive behavior and unfair business practices. ... The Honolulu Advertiser is the largest newspaper in the U.S. state of Hawai‘i and has a morning circulation of 143,983 and a Sunday edition of 165,481 copies. ... The Honolulu Star-Bulletin, based in Honolulu, Hawaii, is one of two major daily newspapers in the state of Hawaii (the other being the Honolulu Advertiser. ...


Among the Banner's last big stories was the closing of Opryland USA in late 1997. The Banner's final edition was published on Friday, February 20, 1998. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


The archives of the Nashville Banner were donated to the Nashville Public Library. The collection features the entire archive, a vending machine with the final edition still displayed in the window, the many awards the paper won over the years, various trinkets from the paper's offices, and a bronze statue of a paperboy selling the Banner which was originally placed on the plaza in front of the Tennessean/Banner offices. The archive is located at the downtown Nashville Public Library on Church Street and is open to the public.


Notable contributors

 Buster Olney (ESPN Senior writer) 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nashville Banner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (732 words)
The Nashville Banner was a daily newspaper of Nashville, Tennessee which ceased publication in 1998.
However, the Banner began to suffer in the post-World War II era from the slow loss of readership that became common to most U.S. evening papers, which was largely attributed to the rise of television.
In the early 1970s the Stahlmans sold the Banner to the Gannett Co. Gannett published it for several years, but in 1979 announced that it was selling the Banner back to local owners and assuming publication of the Tennessean.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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