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Encyclopedia > Nashville, Tennessee
Nashville, Tennessee

Flag
Official seal of Nashville, Tennessee
Seal
Nickname: Music City
Nashville, Tennessee (Tennessee)
Nashville, Tennessee
Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee
Coordinates: 36°10′00″N 86°47′00″W / 36.166667, -86.783333
Country United States
State Tennessee
County Davidson
Founded 1779
Incorporated 1806
Government
 - Mayor Karl Dean (D)
Area
 - City 526.1 sq mi (1,362.5 km²)
 - Land 502.2 sq mi (1,300.8 km²)
 - Water 23.9 sq mi (61.8 km²)
Elevation 597 ft (182 m)
Population (2006)[1][2]
 - City 613,856 (consolidated)
552,120 (balance)
 - Density 1,166.8/sq mi (450.5/km²)
 - Metro 1,486,695
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 37201–37250
Area code(s) 615
Interstates I-40, I-24, I-65, and I-440
Waterways Cumberland River
Airports Nashville International Airport
Public transit Nashville MTA
Regional rail Music City Star
Website: http://www.nashville.gov/

Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee. It is the second most populous city in the state after Memphis, although its Metropolitan Statistical Area population exceeds that of Memphis. It is located on the Cumberland River in Davidson County, in the north-central part of the state. Nashville is a major hub for the health care, music, publishing, banking and transportation industries. Nashville is the name of several cities in the United States of America, most commonly the largest Nashville, in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3000x850, 701 KB) Photo of the Nashville skyline. ... Image File history File links Flag of the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County. ... The official flag of the Nashville Metropolitan government. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1100x1100, 151 KB) The Seal of the Government of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County This logo is an official seal of a government or one of its government agencies, and may be subject to copyright, trademark, and/or other restrictions on... The official flag of the Nashville Metropolitan government. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... Davidson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... Davidson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Karl Foster Dean (born September 20, 1955) is the mayor of Nashville, Tennessee and Davidson County. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area Code 615 is the name of a Nashville folk rock band, taking their name from the telephone area code for Nashville. ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... This page is under construction. ... The Olgiati Bridge on former I-124 (now US 27), spanning the Tennessee River in Chattanooga. ... Interstate 440 in Tennessee is an 8-mile-(13-km)-long loop connecting Interstate 40 and Interstate 24, bypassing downtown Nashville to the south. ... The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... Nashville International Airport (IATA: BNA, ICAO: KBNA) is an airport in southeastern Nashville, Tennessee. ... Music City Star logo Music City Star traincar The Music City Star is a regional rail service running between Nashville and Lebanon, Tennessee. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... Davidson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... “Publisher” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... For the movement of people or objects, see transport. ...


Nashville has a consolidated city-county government which includes seven smaller municipalities in a two-tier system. The population of Nashville-Davidson County stood at 613,856 as of 2006,[1] according to United States Census Bureau estimates. The 2006 population of the entire 13-county Nashville Metropolitan Statistical Area was 1,486,695,[1] making it the largest and fastest-growing metropolitan area in the state. In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ...

Contents

History

Nashville was founded by James Robertson and a party of Wataugans in 1779, and was originally called Fort Nashborough, after the American Revolutionary War hero Francis Nash. Nashville quickly grew because of its prime location, accessibility as a river port, and its later status as a major railroad center. In 1806, Nashville was incorporated as a city and became the county seat of Davidson County, Tennessee. In 1843, the city was named the permanent capital of the state of Tennessee. This article pertains to the history of Nashville, Tennessee, the capital city of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... James Robertson (June 28, 1742–September 1, 1814) was a North Carolina farmer and explorer of the 18th century. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Watauga Petition The Watauga Association (sometimes referred to as the Republic of Watauga or the Watauga Settlement) was an semi-autonomous government from 1772 to 1777 in what is now Northeast Tennessee. ... Fort Nashborough was the original stockade for the settlement that became Nashville, Tennessee. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Francis Nash (1742-1777) was born in Prince Edward County, Virginia. ... For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ...


By 1860, when the first rumblings of secession began to be heard across the South, antebellum Nashville was a very prosperous city. The city's significance as a shipping port made it a desirable prize as a means of controlling important river and railroad transportation routes. In February 1862, Nashville became the first state capital to fall to Union troops. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Historic Southern United States. ... Nashville, Tennessee, was among the leading cities of the Confederate States of America, one that symbolized control of the Upper South. ...


Though the Civil War left Nashville in dire economic straits, the city quickly rebounded.[citation needed] Within a few years, the city had reclaimed its important shipping and trading position and also developed a solid manufacturing base. The post-Civil War years of the late 19th century brought a newfound prosperity to Nashville. These healthy economic times left the city with a legacy of grand classical-style buildings, which can still be seen around the downtown area. Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ...


It was the advent of the Grand Ole Opry in 1925, combined with an already thriving publishing industry, that positioned it to become "Music City USA". In 1963, Nashville consolidated its government with Davidson County and thus became the first major city in the United States to form a metropolitan government. Since the 1970s, the city has experienced tremendous growth, particularly during the economic boom of the 1990s under the leadership of Mayor (now-Tennessee Governor) Phil Bredesen, who made urban renewal a priority, and fostered the construction or renovation of several city landmarks, including the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Nashville Public Library downtown, the Sommet Center, and LP Field. The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... In the United States the term metropolitan government is most frequently used to describe a system of municipal government in which most or all of the functions of a government of a county are combined with those of its principal city. ... In economics, the term boom and bust refers to the movement of an economy through economic cycles due to changes in aggregate demand. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... Philip Norman Phil Bredesen (born November 21, 1943) is the 48th Governor of Tennessee, having served since 2003. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ...

Nashville downtown overlooking the Cumberland River
Nashville downtown overlooking the Cumberland River

The Sommet Center (formerly Nashville Arena and Gaylord Entertainment Center) was built as both a large concert facility and as an enticement to lure either a National Basketball Association or National Hockey League (NHL) sports franchise. This was accomplished in 1997 when Nashville was awarded an NHL expansion team which was subsequently named the Nashville Predators. LP Field (formerly Adelphia Coliseum) was built after the National Football League's (NFL) Houston Oilers agreed to move to the city in 1995. The NFL debuted in Nashville in 1998 at Vanderbilt Stadium, and LP Field opened in the summer of 1999. The Oilers changed their name to the Tennessee Titans and saw a season culminate in the Music City Miracle and a close Super Bowl game. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... Sommet Center (formerly Nashville Arena and Gaylord Entertainment Center and pronounced soh-MAY) is an all-purpose venue in downtown Nashville, Tennessee which was completed in 1996. ... NBA redirects here. ... NHL redirects here. ... The Nashville Predators are a professional ice hockey team based in Nashville, Tennessee. ... LP Field is a football stadium in Nashville, Tennessee, used primarily as the home stadium of the NFLs Tennessee Titans, but also used by Tennessee State University. ... NFL redirects here. ... City New Orleans, Louisiana Team colors Old Gold, Black, and White Head Coach Sean Payton Owner Tom Benson General manager Mickey Loomis Mascot Gumbo League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1967–present) Eastern Conference (1967-1969) Capitol Division (1967; 1969) Century Division (1968) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... City Nashville, Tennessee Team colors Navy, Titan Blue, White, and Red Head Coach Jeff Fisher Owner Bud Adams General manager Mike Reinfeldt Mascot T-Rac League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Eastern Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC Central (1970... The Music City Miracle is a famous play in the NFL Wild Card Playoffs involving the Tennessee Titans and Buffalo Bills that took place on January 8, 2000 (following the 1999 regular season) at Adelphia Coliseum in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Date January 30, 2000 Stadium Georgia Dome City Atlanta, Georgia MVP Kurt Warner, Quarterback Favorite Rams by 7 National anthem Faith Hill Coin toss Super Bowl IV participants: Bud Grant, Lamar Hunt, Bobby Bell, Paul Krause, Willie Lanier, Alan Page, and Jan Stenerud Referee Bob McElwee Halftime show Phil Collins...


Today the city along the Cumberland River is a crossroads of American culture, and easily the fastest-growing part of the Upper South and the territory between Atlanta and Texas. Currently, there are many plans of building multiple residential and business towers in the downtown area, including the Signature Tower. If constructed, this will be the tallest building in both Nashville and Tennessee surpassing the AT&T Building, and will also become the tallest building in the USA outside of New York and Chicago, surpassing the Bank of America Plaza in Atlanta. The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... The Upland South is defined by landform, history, and culture, and does not correspond well to state lines. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Signature Tower is a projected mixed-use skyscraper which has been approved for erection in Nashville, Tennessee, United States. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The AT&T Building (also known as the Batman Building, formerly the South Central Bell Building and BellSouth Building) is a 617 ft (188 m), 31-story skyscraper build in 1994 and located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ...


Geography

A satellite image of Nashville
A satellite image of Nashville

Nashville lies on the Cumberland River in the northwestern portion of the Nashville Basin. Nashville's topography ranges from 117 meters (385 ft) above sea level at the Cumberland River to 354 meters (1,160 ft) above sea level at its highest point.[3] Image File history File links Landsat 7 image of Nashville, Tennessee. ... Image File history File links Landsat 7 image of Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Nashville Basin is a geographic term used to describe the area surrounding Nashville, Tennessee. ... For discussion of land surfaces themselves, see Terrain. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 526.1 square miles (1,362.6 km²), of which, 502.3 square miles (1,300.8 km²) of it is land and 23.9 square miles (61.8 km²) of it (4.53%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...


Climate

Nashville has a humid subtropical climate with hot and humid summers and chilly winters. Average annual rainfall is 48.1 inches (1222 mm), typically with winter and spring being the wettest and autumn being the driest. Average annual snowfall is about 9 inches (229 mm), falling mostly in January and February.[4] Spring and fall are generally pleasantly warm but prone to severe thunderstorms, which occasionally bring tornadoes—with recent major events on April 16, 1998 and April 7, 2006 and the most recent February 5, 2008 Super Tuesday Tornado Outbreak which affected the Northeast suburbs of Castalian Springs in Sumner and Lafayette in Macon County. Humid subtropical climates are characterized by hot, humid summers and cool to mild winters. ... A severe thunderstorm is a thunderstorm with winds 58 mph or greater, 3/4 inch or larger hail, or tornadoes. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita scale The April 6-8, 2006 Tornado Outbreak was a major tornado outbreak in the Central and parts of the Southern United States that began on April 6, 2006 in the Great Plains and continued until April... Sumner has several possible meanings in the English language. ... Lafayette, LaFayette, or La Fayette may refer to: // Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (Marquis de Lafayette), French general and revolutionary (sometimes referred to as the Marquis de la Fayette) Marie-Madeleine Pioche de la Vergne, comtesse de la Fayette (Madame de Lafayette), French author Elliston-Lafayette, Virginia La... Macon County is the name of several counties in the United States: Macon County, Alabama Two movies also refer to Macon County, Alabama: Macon County Line (1974) Return to Macon County (1975) Macon County, Georgia Macon County, Illinois Macon County, Missouri Macon County, North Carolina Macon County, Tennessee This is...


The coldest temperature ever recorded in Nashville was −17 °F (−27 °C), on January 21, 1985, and the highest was 107 °F (42 °C), on July 28, 1952.[5] The largest one-day snow total was 17 inches (432 mm) on March 17, 1892. The largest and most memorable event in the last few years was the storm on January 16, 2003, on which date Nashville received 7 inches (178 mm).[6] is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Nashville's long springs and autumns combined with a diverse array of trees and grasses can often make it uncomfortable for allergy sufferers.[7] In 2007, Nashville was ranked as the 65th-worst spring allergy city in the U.S. by the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.[8] Allergy is an abnormal reaction to a substance foreign to the body that is acquired, predictable and rapid. ... The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to finding a cure for and controlling asthma, food allergies, nasal allergies and other allergic diseases. ...

Weather averages for Nashville, TN
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 78 (26) 84 (29) 86 (30) 91 (33) 95 (35) 106 (41) 107 (42) 104 (40) 105 (41) 94 (34) 84 (29) 79 (26) 107 (42)
Average high °F (°C) 46 (8) 52 (11) 61 (16) 70 (21) 77 (25) 85 (29) 89 (32) 88 (31) 82 (28) 71 (22) 59 (15) 49 (9) 69 (21)
Average low °F (°C) 28 (-2) 31 (-1) 39 (4) 47 (8) 57 (14) 65 (18) 70 (21) 68 (20) 61 (16) 49 (9) 40 (4) 30 (-1) 48.75 (9)
Record low °F (°C) -17 (-27) -13 (-25) 2 (-17) 23 (-5) 34 (1) 42 (6) 54 (12) 49 (9) 36 (2) 26 (-3) -1 (-18) -10 (-23) -17 (-27)
Precipitation inch (mm) 3.97 (100.8) 3.69 (93.7) 4.87 (123.7) 3.93 (99.8) 5.07 (128.8) 4.08 (103.6) 3.77 (95.8) 3.28 (83.3) 3.59 (91.2) 2.87 (72.9) 4.45 (113) 4.54 (115.3) 48.11 (1,222)
Source: The Weather Channel[9] 2007-09-16

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Metropolitan area

Nashville has the largest metropolitan area in the state of Tennessee, spanning several counties. The Nashville Metropolitan Statistical Area encompasses the Middle Tennessee counties of Cannon, Cheatham, Davidson, Dickson, Hickman, Macon, Maury, Robertson, Rutherford, Smith, Sumner, Trousdale, Williamson, and Wilson.[10] History and Statistics Nashville was settled in 1779 Became state capitol from 1812-1815, then permanently in 1843 Elevation 550 ft. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Middle Tennessee is a distinct portion of the state of Tennessee, delineated according to law as well as custom. ... Cannon County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Cheatham County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Davidson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Dickson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Hickman County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Macon County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Maury County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Robertson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Rutherford County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Smith County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Sumner County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Trousdale County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Williamson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Wilson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ...


Government and politics

See also: List of mayors of Nashville, Tennessee
The State Capitol in Nashville

The City of Nashville and Davidson County merged in 1963 as a way for Nashville to combat the problems of urban sprawl. The combined entity is officially known as "the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County," and is popularly known as "Metro Nashville" or simply "Metro". It offers services such as police, fire, electricity, water, and sewage treatment. When the Metro government was formed in 1963, the government was split into two service districts-- the "urban services district" and the "general services district." The urban services district encompasses the 1963 boundaries of the former City of Nashville, and the general services district includes the remainder of Davidson County. There are five small cities within the county that opted to retain some autonomy: Belle Meade, Berry Hill, Forest Hills, Lakewood, and Oak Hill. Two other cities (Goodlettsville and Ridgetop) cross county lines, and are also not considered part of the consolidated city-county government. The following is a list of the mayors of Nashville, Tennessee since the consolidation of the municipal government with Davidson County, Tennessee, forming the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County: 1. ... Image File history File links Tennessee_state_capitol. ... Image File history File links Tennessee_state_capitol. ... The Tennessee State Capitol, located in Nashville, Tennessee, is the home of the Tennessee legislature, and the location of the governors office. ... Urban sprawl, also known as suburban sprawl, is the spreading out of a city and its suburbs over rural land at the fringe of an urban area. ... The Nashville Fire Department (NFD) provides fire and emergency medical service to Nashville-Davidson County, Tennessee. ... Nashville Electric Service - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Belle Meade is a city located in Davidson County, Tennessee. ... Berry Hill is a city in Davidson County, Tennessee. ... Forest Hills is a city located in Davidson County, Tennessee. ... Lakewood is a city located in Davidson County, Tennessee. ... Oak Hill is a city in Davidson County, Tennessee, United States. ... Goodlettsville is a city located in Tennessee. ... Ridgetop is a city located mostly in Robertson County, Tennessee. ...


Nashville has a strong-mayor form of government. It is governed by a mayor, vice-mayor and 40-member Metropolitan Council. The current mayor of Nashville is Karl Dean. The Metropolitan Council is the legislative body of government for Nashville and Davidson County. There are 5 council members who are elected at large and 35 council members that represent individual districts. The Metro Council has regular meetings that are presided over by the vice-mayor, who is currently Diane Neighbors. The Metro Council meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m., according to the Metropolitan Charter. Karl Foster Dean (born September 20, 1955) is the mayor of Nashville, Tennessee and Davidson County. ... Diane Neighbors is the incumbent vice mayor of of the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County and the President of the Metropolitan Council. ...


Nashville is one of the few major Southern cities that has remained loyal to the Democratic Party. Most local elections are officially nonpartisan. However, Democratic dominance is so absolute that most local races take place between the populist (moderate-to-conservative) and "good government" (liberal) wings of the Democratic Party. [1]; the "good government" faction has held the upper hand for some time; Mayor Dean may be said to represent that perspective. Elected Republicans are few and far between. At the state level, only two Republicans—one in the State House and one in the State Senate—represent significant portions of Nashville. Most area residents who prefer conservative politics generally live in the outlying suburban counties (which themselves were represented by conservative Democrats well into the late 1970s). Much of this, of course, is a reaction in many respects, somewhat akin to urban-suburban polarizations elsewhere in America, to the lifestyle-driven liberal orientation of the city's unusually large (for the South) collegiate and white-collar professional population (with the musician community divided between the cultural traditionalists in country and gospel music and the progressive, even leftist, slant among rock musicians and those in similar genres). The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... The Tennessee Senate is the upper house of the Tennessee General Assembly, the formal name of the Tennessee state legislature. ... Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ...


Democrats are no less dominant at the federal level. Since the end of Reconstruction, the Democratic presidential candidate has carried Nashville and Davidson County in every election with the exception of two. In the 1968 U.S. presidential election, George Wallace of the American Independent Party (and governor of nearby Alabama) carried the city by a large margin, although he did not win the state (Richard Nixon did). In the 1972 presidential election, Nixon became the only Republican to carry Nashville since Reconstruction, gaining support from the then-dominant conservative Democrats in the area. However, since then, Democrats have usually won Nashville by some of the largest, if not the largest, margins in Tennessee, even when the rest of the state strongly favors the Republican. In the 2000 presidential election, Al Gore carried Nashville with over 59% of the vote even as he narrowly lost his home state. In the 2004 election, John Kerry carried Nashville with 55% of the vote even as George W. Bush won the state by 14 points. The only part of Tennessee more heavily Democratic than Nashville is the major portion of the city of Memphis, which has a far larger population of African-Americans (some 60 percent as compared to Nashville's 25 or so), making Nashville's continued loyalty to the Democratic Party all the more remarkable--and increasingly unique--for a city so far south in the U.S. For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Corley Wallace, Jr. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential election results map. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


Despite its size, all of Nashville has been in one congressional district for most of the time since Reconstruction. For most of the time, it has been numbered as the 5th District, currently represented by Democrat Jim Cooper. A Republican has not represented a significant portion of Nashville since 1875. While Republicans made a few spirited challenges in the mid-1960s and early 1970s, they have not made a serious bid for the district since 1972, when the Republican candidate gained only 38% of the vote even as Nixon carried the district by a large margin. The district's best-known congressman was probably Jo Byrns, who represented the district from 1909 to 1936 and was Speaker of the House for much of Franklin Roosevelt's first term. Another nationally prominent congressman from Nashville was Percy Priest, who represented the district from 1941 to 1956 and was House Majority Whip from 1949 to 1953. Former mayors Richard Fulton and Bill Boner also sat in the U.S. House before assuming the Metro mayoral office. A congressional district is an electoral constituency that elects a single member of a congress. ... The current boundaries of Tennessee District 5 The 5th Congressional District of Tennessee is a congressional district in central Tennessee. ... James Hayes Shofner Jim Cooper (born July 19, 1954) is a politician from the U.S. state of Tennessee, currently a member of the U.S. House of Representatives representing the states fifth congressional district, based in Nashville. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Joseph Wellington Jo Byrns, Sr. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), often referred to as FDR, was the 32nd (1933–1945) President of the United States. ... Jospeh Percy Priest (April 1, 1900–October 12, 1956) was a U.S. political figure. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Majority Whip is an elected member of the U.S. House of Representatives who assists the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader to coordinate ideas on and garner support for proposed legislation. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... Richard Harmon Dick Fulton (born January 27, 1927) is a Tennessee political figure. ... William J. Bill Boner (born February 14, 1945) is a Tennessee educator and former Democratic politician. ...


A tiny portion of southern Davidson County (between Hillsboro and Nolensville Roads, split by Interstate 65) was drawn into the heavily Republican 7th District after the 2000 Census. That district is currently represented by Marsha Blackburn of neighboring Williamson County. Despite this, many living Nashvillians have never been represented by a Republican on the state or federal levels. Marsha Blackburn (born June 6, 1952 in Laurel, Mississippi) is a Tennessee politician. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1830 5,566
1840 6,929 24.5%
1850 10,165 46.7%
1860 16,988 67.1%
1870 25,865 52.3%
1880 43,350 67.6%
1890 76,168 75.7%
1900 80,865 6.2%
1910 110,364 36.5%
1920 118,342 7.2%
1930 153,866 30.0%
1940 167,402 8.8%
1950 174,307 4.1%
1960 170,874 -2.0%
1970 448,003 162.2%
1980 455,651 1.7%
1990 488,374 7.2%
2000 569,891 16.7%
Source: U.S. Census[11]

The data below is for all of Metropolitan Nashville-Davidson County, including other incorporated cities within the consolidated city-county (such as Belle Meade and Berry Hill). See Nashville-Davidson (balance) for demographic data on Nashville-Davidson County excluding separately incorporated cities. The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... Belle Meade is a city located in Davidson County, Tennessee. ... Berry Hill is a city in Davidson County, Tennessee. ... Nashville-Davidson (balance) is the name used by the U.S. Census Bureau to designate the portion of Davidson County, Tennessee that is not a part of any seperately incorporated cities in the county. ...

Population density map per 2000 census
Population density map per 2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 569,891 people, 237,405 households, and 138,169 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,134.6 people per square mile (438.1/km²). There were 252,977 housing units at an average density of 503.7/sq mi (194.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 66.99% White, 25.92% African American, 0.29% Native American, 2.33% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 2.42% from other races and 1.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.58% of the population. Nashville's estimated population for 2006 is 613,856 people.[1] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1064x890, 111 KB) From the United States Census Bureaus Fact Finder website: Source. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1064x890, 111 KB) From the United States Census Bureaus Fact Finder website: Source. ... The United States Census of year 2000, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 237,405 households out of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.9% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% were non-families. 33.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.96. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 11.6% from 18 to 24, 34.0% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 93.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.8 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $39,797, and the median income for a family was $49,317. Males had a median income of $33,844 versus $27,770 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,069. About 10.0% of families and 13.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.1% of those under age 18 and 10.5% of those age 65 or over. 4.6% of the civilian labor force is unemployed. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Because of its relatively low cost of living and large job market, Nashville has become a popular city for immigrants.[12] Nashville’s foreign-born population more than tripled in size between 1990 and 2000, increasing from 12,662 to 39,596. Large groups of Mexicans, Kurds, Vietnamese, Laotians, Arabs, and Somalis call Nashville home, among other groups.[13] Nashville has the largest Kurdish community in the United States, numbering approximately 11,000.[14] During the Iraqi election of 2005, Nashville was one of the few international locations where Iraqi expatriates could vote.[15] The American Jewish community in Nashville dates back over 150 years ago, and numbers about 6,500 (2001). 2000 Census Population Ancestry Map Immigration to the United States of America is the movement of non-residents to the United States. ... Kurdish Americans are Americans of Kurdish descent, the majority of Kurdish Americans are recent migrants. ... A Laotian American is a resident of the United States who was originally from Laos or whose parents were originally from Laos. ... Arab Americans constitute an ethnicity made up of several waves of immigrants from 22 Morocco in the west to Oman in the east. ... Look up Kurdish in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Iraqi police officers hold up their index fingers marked with purple indelible ink, a security measure to prevent double voting. ... History See main article: History of the Jews in the United States Though Jews arrived in the United States are early as the 17th century, Jewish immigration grew in the 19th century. ...


Economy

As the "home of country music", Nashville has become a major music recording and production center. All of the Big Four record labels, as well as numerous independent labels, have offices in Nashville, mostly in the Music Row area.[16] Since the 1960s, Nashville has been the second biggest music production center (after New York) in the U.S.[17] As of 2006, Nashville's music industry is estimated to have a total economic impact of $6.4 billion per year and to contribute 19,000 jobs to the Nashville area.[18] The world music market, or global music market consists of record companies, labels and publishers that distribute recorded music products internationally and that often control the rights to those products. ... Music Row is an area just to the southwest of Downtown Nashville, Tennessee that is home to hundreds of businesses related to the country music, gospel music, and Christian music industries. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


In 2009, the Signature Tower will begin construction in Downtown Nashville. Standing at more than 1,000 feet above the ground, it will be the largest skyscraper outside of either Chicago or New York City and will be the seventh tallest building in the United States. Signature Tower is a projected mixed-use skyscraper which has been approved for erection in Nashville, Tennessee, United States. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This list of tallest buildings in the United States ranks skyscrapers in the United States based on official height. ...


Although Nashville is renowned as a music recording center and tourist destination, its largest industry is actually health care. Nashville is home to more than 250 health care companies, including Hospital Corporation of America, the largest private operator of hospitals in the world. As of 2006, it is estimated that the health care industry contributes $18.3 billion per year and 94,000 jobs to the Nashville-area economy.[19] The automotive industry is also becoming increasingly important for the entire Middle Tennessee region. Nissan North America moved its corporate headquarters in 2006 from Gardena, California (Los Angeles County) to Nashville, with corporate headquarters temporarily located in the AT&T Building until 2008, when the Japanese auto maker will establish permanent headquarters in Franklin, Tennessee. Nissan also has its largest North American manufacturing plant in Smyrna, Tennessee (a Nashville suburb). The Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) NYSE: HCA is the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world. ... Nissan redirects here. ... Seal of Gardena Gardena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Map of California showing Los Angeles County. ... The AT&T Building (also known as the Batman Building, formerly the South Central Bell Building and BellSouth Building) is a 617 ft (188 m), 31-story skyscraper build in 1994 and located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Franklin is the county seat of Williamson County, Tennessee, USA. The population was 41,842 at the 2000 census. ... Smyrna is a town in Rutherford County, Tennessee, United States. ...


Other major industries in Nashville include insurance, finance, and publishing (especially religious publishing). The city hosts headquarters operations for several Protestant denominations, including the United Methodist Church, Southern Baptist Convention, and National Baptist Convention, USA., and the National Association of Free Will Baptists. Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... “Publisher” redirects here. ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination that consists of numerous agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual meetings... The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc. ...


Nashville has a small but growing film industry. Several major motion pictures have been filmed in Nashville, including The Green Mile, The Last Castle, Gummo, The Thing Called Love, Coal Miner's Daughter, and Robert Altman's Nashville. This article is about the 1999 film adaptation. ... The Last Castle is a 2001 movie starring Robert Redford and James Gandolfini. ... Gummo is a 1997 cult film written and directed by Harmony Korine, better known for his writing contributions to Larry Clarks controversial 1995 film, Kids. ... The Thing Called Love is a Peter Bogdanovich movie released in 1993. ... DVD cover Loretta Lynn published her autobiography, Coal Miners Daughter, in the mid-70s. ... For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... Nashville is a 1975 film which mixes themes of U.S. presidential politics with those of the country music and gospel music businesses in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


Fortune 500 companies within Nashville include HCA Inc. (formerly Hospital Corporation of America) and Dollar General Corporation (in Goodlettsville). The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... The Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) (NYSE: HCA) is the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world. ... Dollar General is a chain of limited-selection consumable retail stores operating in 30 U.S. states. ... Goodlettsville is a city located in Tennessee. ...

See also: List of companies based in Nashville
See also: List of tallest buildings in Nashville

Nashville skyline This is a list of the tallest skyscrapers and buildings in the city of Nashville, Tennessee, United States. ...

Education

Nashville is often labeled the "Athens of the South" due to the many colleges and universities in the city and metropolitan area. These colleges and universities in Nashville include American Baptist College, Aquinas College, The Art Institute of Tennessee- Nashville, Belmont University, Draughons Junior College, Fisk University, Free Will Baptist Bible College, Gupton College, Lipscomb University, Meharry Medical College, Nashville School of Law, Nashville Auto Diesel College, Nashville State Community College, Strayer University, Tennessee State University, Trevecca Nazarene University, University of Phoenix, Vanderbilt University, and Watkins College of Art and Design. American Baptist College (also known as American Baptist Theological Seminary or ABTS) is a small, predominantly African American liberal arts college located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This institution is unrelated, other than by name and a shared Catholic affiliation, to other institutions of the same or similar names. ... The Art Institute of Tennessee- Nashville – one of 32 Art Institutes nationwide, accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, is an applied arts college, providing bachelor’s degrees, associate’s degrees and diplomas in the creative fields. ... Belmont University is a private, coeducational, liberal arts university located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Draughons Junior College is a career college founded in 1879, by John F. Draughon, of Adams Tennessee. ... {{THESE FOOLS GOT OWNED Hermosa, Herman and Jefferson Sts. ... Free Will Baptist Bible College is a private four-year college in Nashville, Tennessee. ... John A. Gupton College, founded in 1946, is a professional school of mortuary science located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Lipscomb University is a Church of Christ-affiliated liberal arts university in Nashville, Tennessee, United States. ... Meharry Medical College was founded in 1876 in Nashville, Tennessee to provide health sciences education. ... The Nashville School of Law is an independent, night law school specializing in legal education for non-traditional and part-time students. ... Nashville State Community College is a junior college in Nashville, Tennessee operated by the Tennessee Board of Regents. ... Strayer University, formerly Strayer College of Washington, D. C., is a private, for-profit educational institution. ... Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912. ... Trevecca Nazarene University is a liberal arts university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... University of Phoenix (UOP) is a for-profit educational institution specializing in adult education, with campuses located throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Watkins College of Art and Design is a four year art and design college located in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


Within 30 miles (50 km) of Nashville in Murfreesboro is Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), a full-sized public university with Tennessee's largest undergraduate population. Enrollment in post-secondary education in the city is around 43,000. Within the Nashville Metropolitan Statistical Area which includes MTSU, Cumberland University (Lebanon), Volunteer State Community College (Gallatin), and O'More College of Design (Franklin) total enrollment exceeds 74,000. Within a 40 mile (65 km) radius are Austin Peay State University (Clarksville) and Columbia State Community College (Columbia), enrolling an additional 13,600. Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ... Middle Tennessee State University (founded September 11, 1911, and commonly abbreviated as MTSU) is an American university located in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. ... This institution is unrelated, other than by similarity of name, to the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Kentucky. ... Gallatin is a city in Sumner County, Tennessee, United States. ... O’More College of Design, founded as OMore School of Interior Architecture and Design in 1970, is located in Franklin, Tennessee. ... This article is about the public university in Clarksville, Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Clarksville (disambiguation). ...


The city is served by the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools and numerous private schools. Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, or MNPS, is a school district that serves the city of Nashville, Tennessee. ...


Culture

Ryman Auditorium, the "Mother Church of Country Music"
Ryman Auditorium, the "Mother Church of Country Music"

Much of the city's cultural life has revolved around its large university community. Particularly significant in this respect were two groups of critics and writers who were associated with Vanderbilt University in the early twentieth century, the Fugitives and the Agrarians. Download high resolution version (1200x1426, 337 KB)The Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Download high resolution version (1200x1426, 337 KB)The Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Ryman Auditorium The Ryman Auditorium is a 2,362-seat live performance venue located at 116 Fifth Avenue North in Nashville, Tennessee, and is best-known as the one-time home of the Grand Ole Opry. ... The Fugitives were a group of poets and literary scholars who came together at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennesee around 1920. ... The Southern Agrarians or Vanderbilt Agrarians were a group of 12 American Traditionalist writers and poets from the Southern United States who joined together to publish the Agrarian manifesto, a collection of essays entitled Ill Take My Stand in 1930. ...


Popular destinations include Fort Nashborough, a reconstruction of the original settlement; the Tennessee State Museum; and The Parthenon, a full-scale replica of the original Parthenon in Athens, Greece. The State Capitol is one of the oldest working state capitol buildings in the nation, while The Hermitage is one of the older presidential homes open to the public. The Nashville Zoo is one of the city's newer attractions. The image of Andrew Jackson exhibited at Nashville museum in 1823 Tennessee State Museum is a large museum in Nashville depicting the history of Tennessee. ... The Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee is a full-scale replica of the original Parthenon in Athens. ... For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... The Nashville Zoo at Grassmere is a zoo located six miles (10 km) southeast of downtown Nashville, Tennessee. ...


Country music

Many popular tourist sites involve country music, including the Country Music Hall of Fame, Ryman Auditorium, which was for many years the site of the Grand Ole Opry, and Belcourt Theater. Each year, the CMA Music Festival (formerly known as Fan Fair) brings thousands of country fans to the city. This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... The Ryman Auditorium The Ryman Auditorium is a 2,362-seat live performance venue located at 116 Fifth Avenue North in Nashville, Tennessee, and is best-known as the one-time home of the Grand Ole Opry. ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... The CMA Music Festival is steeped in more than three decades of tradition. ...


Nashville was once home to the Opryland USA theme park, which operated from 1972 to 1997 before being closed by its owners Gaylord Entertainment, and soon after demolished to make room for the Opry Mills mega-shopping mall. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Gaylord Entertainment Company (NYSE: GET) operates a number of hotel, resort, and media companies. ... One of the entrances to Opry Mills Opry Mills is a shopping mall owned by the Mills Corporation. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see pedestrian street or promenade. ...


Lower Broadway is home to many honky tonk bars and clubs. Honky tonk was originally the name of a type of bar common throughout the southern United States, also Honkatonk or Honkey-tonk. ...


Christian pop music

The Christian pop and rock music industry is based just south of Nashville in Franklin and Brentwood area in Williamson County. The Christian record companies include EMI (formally Sparrow Records), Rocketown Records, Beach Street and Reunion Records with many of the genre's most popular acts such as Rebecca St. James, tobyMac, Michael W. Smith, Amy Grant, Steven Curtis Chapman, Avalon and Newsboys based there. Contemporary Christian Music (or CCM; also by its religious neutral term inspirational music) is a genre of popular music which is lyrically focused on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... Sparrow Records is a popular Christian Music record label; a Division of EMI Music. ... Rocketown Records is an independent record label which was started in 1996 by Michael W. Smith. ... Reunion Records is a Brentwood, Tennessee based independent record label started in 1982 by Dan Harrell and Mike Blanton. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kevin (Toby) Michael McKeehan, professionally known as tobyMac, is known for his role as a member of the Christian music group dc Talk. ... // Michael Whitaker Smith (born October 7, 1957, to Paul and Barbara Smith in Kenova, West Virginia), often nicknamed Smitty, is a Christian singer, songwriter, guitarist, and keyboardist. ... Amy Lee Grant (born November 25, 1960 in Augusta, Georgia) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for her Contemporary Christian Music and pop music, as well as a New York Times Bestselling author, TV personality, and occasional actress. ... Steven Curtis Chapman (born November 21, 1962 in Paducah, Kentucky, U.S.) is a contemporary Christian musician who has won five Grammy awards and more Gospel Music Association awards than any other artist in history. ... For other uses, see Avalon (disambiguation). ... Newsboys is a Christian pop band. ...


Jazz

Kirk Whalum visiting the audience at a riverfront concert in 2007
Kirk Whalum visiting the audience at a riverfront concert in 2007

Although Nashville was never known as a jazz town, it did have many great jazz bands including The Nashville Jazz Machine led by Dave Converse and its current version, the Nashville Jazz Orchestra led by Jim Williamson as well as The Establishment led by Billy Adair. The Francis Craig Orchestra entertained Nashvillians from 1929 to 1945 from the Oak Bar and Grille Room in the Hermitage Hotel. Craig's orchestra was also the first to broadcast over local radio station WSM and enjoyed phenomenal success with a 12-year show that was aired over the entire NBC network. In the late 1930s, he introduced a newcomer, Dinah Shore, a former cheerleader and local graduate of Hume Fogg High School and Vanderbilt University. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (2800 × 1876 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (2800 × 1876 pixel, file size: 1. ... Dinah Shore (born Frances Rose Shore February 29, 1916 - February 24, 1994) was an American singer and actress. ...


Radio station WMOT in nearby Murfreesboro has aided significantly in the recent revival of the city's jazz scene, as has the non-profit Nashville Jazz Workshop, which holds concerts in a renovated building in the north Nashville neighborhood of Germantown. WMOT is a radio station featuring jazz music programming serving the metropolitan Nashville market. ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ...


Civil War

Civil War history is important to the city's tourism industry. Sites pertaining to the Battle of Nashville and the nearby Battle of Franklin and Battle of Stones River can be seen, along with several well-preserved antebellum plantation houses such as Belle Meade Plantation and Belmont Mansion. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George H. Thomas John Bell Hood Strength IV Corps, XXIII Corps, detachment of Army of the Tennessee, provisional detachment, and Cavalry Corps Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,900 approximately 13,000 The Battle of Nashville was a two-day battle... Battle of Franklin II Conflict American Civil War Date November 30, 1864 Place Williamson County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Franklin was a major engagement of the American Civil War fought at Franklin, Tennessee on November 30, 1864. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William S. Rosecrans Braxton Bragg Strength 43,400 37,712 Casualties 13,249 (1,730 killed, 7,802 wounded, 3,717 captured/missing) 10,266 (1,294 killed, 7,945 wounded, 1,027 captured/missing) The Battle of Stones River...


Performing arts

The Parthenon in Nashville's Centennial Park is a full-scale reconstruction of the original Greek Parthenon.
The Parthenon in Nashville's Centennial Park is a full-scale reconstruction of the original Greek Parthenon.

The Tennessee Performing Arts Center is the major performing arts center of the city. It is the home of the Tennessee Repertory Theatre, Nashville Children's Theatre, the Nashville Opera, and Nashville Ballet. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1064x720, 193 KB) Photograph of the Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee, replica. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1064x720, 193 KB) Photograph of the Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee, replica. ... Centennial Park (Nashville) is a large urban park located approximately two miles (three km) west of downtown Nashville, Tennessee, across West End Avenue (U.S. Highway 70S) from the campus of Vanderbilt University and adjacent to the headquarters campus of the Hospital Corporation of America. ... For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... The revamped façade of the Tennessee Performing Arts Center in Nashville opened in 2003. ... Nashville Childrens Theatre (NCT) is the oldest professional childrens theatre company in America. ...


In September 2006, the Schermerhorn Symphony Center opened as the home of the Nashville Symphony Orchestra. The Schermerhorn Symphony Center is a symphony center in downtown Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Nashville Symphony Orchestra is one of the up and coming symphony orchestras in the United States. ...


Art museums

Nashville has several arts centers and museums, including the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, located in the former post office building; Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art; the Tennessee State Museum; Fisk University's Van Vechten and Aaron Douglas Galleries; Vanderbilt University's Fine Art Gallery and Sarratt Gallery; and the Parthenon. The Frist Center for the Visual Arts is an art museum in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... Nashvilles Cheekwood. ... The image of Andrew Jackson exhibited at Nashville museum in 1823 Tennessee State Museum is a large museum in Nashville depicting the history of Tennessee. ...


Major annual events

Nashville at dusk
Nashville at dusk
  • The GMA Music Awards Christian and Gospel music awards is held each April at various locations including the Grand Ole Opry or the Ryman Auditorium. Leading up to the awards is GMA week where radio stations interview and fans get autographs.
  • The CMA Music Festival is a four day event in June featuring performances by country music stars, autograph signings, artist/fan interaction, and other activities for country music fans.
  • In September, Nashville hosts the Tennessee State Fair at the State Fairgrounds. The State Fair lasts nine days and includes rides, exhibits, rodeos, tractor pulls, and numerous other shows and attractions.
  • The Nashville Film Festival takes place each year for a week in April. It features hundreds of independent films and is one of the biggest film festivals in the Southern United States.
  • In September, the African Street Festival takes place on the campus of Tennessee State University.
  • Other big events in Nashville include the Fourth of July celebration which takes place each year at Riverfront Park, the Country Music Marathon and Half Marathon which normally includes over 25,000 runners from around the world, the Tomato Art Festival which takes place in East Nashville every August, and the Australian Festival which celebrates the cultural and business links between the U.S. and Australia.

Download high resolution version (1200x540, 100 KB)The skyline of Nashville, Tennessee at dusk. ... Download high resolution version (1200x540, 100 KB)The skyline of Nashville, Tennessee at dusk. ... The GMA Music Awards, formerly the Dove Awards, were created in 1969 by the Gospel Music Association to honor the outstanding achievements in contemporary Christian and gospel music. ... The CMA Music Festival is steeped in more than three decades of tradition. ... For other uses, see Rodeo (disambiguation). ... Race-tractor with 4 V8-engines Allis Chalmers Diesel Pulling Tractor Sled Tractor pulling, also known as power pulling, is a competition using tractors to pull a heavy sled along a track and is very popular in rural areas. ... These fireworks over the Washington Monument are typical of Fourth of July celebrations In the United States, Independence Day, also called the Fourth of July, is a federal holiday celebrating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. ... The Country Music Marathon is located in Nashville, TN. The route begins in Centennial Park and continues along many of Nashvilles sights including music row, Belmont University, the State Capitol Building, the Cumberland River, Shelby Park, Shelby Bottoms Greenway, and ends outside LP Field, home of the Tennessee Titans. ...

Media

See also: List of Nashville media

The primary daily newspaper in Nashville is The Tennessean, which, until 1998, competed fiercely with another daily, the Nashville Banner (although the two were housed in the same building under a joint-operating agreement). Although The Tennessean now enjoys a relative monopoly on the local newspaper market, a smaller free daily called The City Paper has cut into The Tennessean's market share somewhat. Online news service NashvillePost.com competes with the printed dailies to break news of business and local/state politics. Several weekly papers are also published in Nashville, including the Nashville Scene, Nashville Business Journal, and The Tennessee Tribune. Historically, The Tennessean was associated with a broadly liberal editorial policy, while The Banner carried staunchly conservative views in its editorial pages; The Banner's heritage is carried on these days by The City Paper. The Scene is the area's alternative weekly broadsheet, while The Tribune serves Nashville's African-American population. This is a list of print, television, and radio media in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Tennessean is a dominant daily newspaper in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The front page from a 1974 issue of The Nashville Banner The Nashville Banner was a daily newspaper of Nashville, Tennessee which ceased publication in 1998. ... The City Paper is a free daily newspaper serving Nashville, Tennessee. ... NashvillePost. ... Nashville Scene is an alternative newsweekly in Nashville, Tenn. ... Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ...


Nashville is home to nearly a dozen broadcast television stations, although most households are served by direct cable network connections. Comcast Cable has a monopoly on terrestrial cable service in Davidson County (but not throughout the entire DMA). Nashville is ranked as the 30th largest television market in the United States. Cable TV redirects here. ... Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ: CMCSA) is the largest[1] cable television (CATV) company and the second largest Internet service provider in the United States. ... A media market, broadcast market, media region, designated market area, DMA or simply market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet content. ...


Nashville is also home to cable networks Country Music Television (CMT), Great American Country (GAC), and Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN, actually located in nearby Hendersonville), among others. CMT's Master Control facilities are located in New York City with the other Viacom properties. The Top 20 Countdown and CMT Insider are taped in their Nashville studios. Nashville is also the home and namesake of the USA Network country music singing competition Nashville Star, which broadcasts from the Opryland complex. Country Music Television, or CMT as it usually called, is an American country music oriented cable television channel. ... Great American Country (or GAC), is a Nashville, Tennessee-based country music cable television network. ... The Trinity Broadcasting Network, or TBN, is the largest Christian religious television network in the world and is headquartered near Los Angeles in Costa Mesa, California with studios near Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex in Irving, Texas and near Nashville in Hendersonville, Tennessee. ... Hendersonville is a large town in Sumner County, Tennessee, USA, on Old Hickory Lake. ... Control room for The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, taken November 7, 2005 during an interview with Gen. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Viacom (NYSE: VIA) (NYSE: VIAb) is an American media conglomerate with various worldwide interests in cable and satellite television networks (MTV Networks and BET), and movie production and distribution (the Paramount Pictures and DreamWorks movie studios). ... USA Network is a popular American cable television network with about 89 million household subscribers as of 2005. ... Nashville Star is a television program broadcast on the USA Network in the United States and CMT in Canada. ... Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center, formerly known as Opryland Hotel, is a large hotel and convention center located in Nashville, Tennessee and owned by Gaylord Hotels, a division of Gaylord Entertainment Company. ...


Several dozen FM and AM radio stations broadcast in the Nashville area, including five college stations and one LPFM community station. Nashville is ranked as the 44th largest radio market in the United States. Nashville is home to WSM which originally stood for "We Shield Millions". WSM-FM is owned by Cumulus Media and is 95.5 FM the Wolf. WSM-AM, owned by Gaylord Entertainment Company, can be heard nationally on 650 AM or online at WSM Online from its studios located inside the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center. WLAC is a Clear Channel-owned talk station which was originally sponsored by the Life and Casualty Insurance Company of Tennessee, and its competitor WWTN is owned by Cumulus. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) conveys information over a carrier wave by varying its frequency. ... Amplitude modulation (AM) is a technique used in electronic communication, most commonly for transmitting information via a radio carrier wave. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... Low-power broadcasting is the concept of broadcasting at very low power and low cost, to a small community area. ... Community radio is a type of radio service that caters to the interests of a certain area, broadcasting material that is popular to a local audience but is overlooked by more powerful broadcast groups. ... WSM may refer to one of the following: AM radio station WSM in Nashville, Tennessee, USA FM radio station WSM-FM, also in Nashville Web-based System Manager, an IBM management software for administering AIX 5L host on RS/6000 systems. ... Current logo for WSM-FM Nashville, Tennessee WSM-FM is a Nashville, Tennessee FM radio station. ... WSM is the call letters of a 50,000 watt AM radio station (and its associated FM station) located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center, formerly known as Opryland Hotel, is a large hotel and convention center located in Nashville, Tennessee and owned by Gaylord Hotels, a division of Gaylord Entertainment Company. ... WLAC is a clear channel radio station based in Nashville, Tennessee, operating at 1510 kHz on the AM dial. ... Not to be confused with clear channel radio stations, which are AM radio stations with certain technical parameters. ... The Life and Casualty Insurance Company of Tennessee was a life insurance company based in Nashville, Tennessee, founded in 1903 by A. M. Burton, great-grandfather of singer Amy Grant. ... WWTN is a 100 kW FM radio station serving the Nashville, Tennessee media market. ... Cumulus Media, Inc. ...


Sports

Nashville has several professional sports teams, most notably the Nashville Predators of the National Hockey League and the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League. Several other pro sports teams also call Nashville home, as does the NCAA college football Music City Bowl. The Vanderbilt Commodores are members of the Southeastern Conference. The football team of Tennessee State University plays its home games at LP Field. A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ... NCAA redirects here. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... The Music City Bowl is a post-season American college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played in Nashville, Tennessee, since 1998. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912. ...

Club Sport League Venue
Tennessee Titans Football National Football League LP Field
Nashville Predators Hockey National Hockey League Sommet Center
Nashville Sounds Baseball Minor League Baseball: Pacific Coast League Herschel Greer Stadium
Nashville Metros Soccer Premier Development League Ezell Park
Nashville Storm Football North American Football League TBA
Nashville Dream Women's football National Women's Football Association Glencliff Comprehensive High School

Sports venues in Nashville are: City Nashville, Tennessee Team colors Navy, Titan Blue, White, and Red Head Coach Jeff Fisher Owner Bud Adams General manager Mike Reinfeldt Mascot T-Rac League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Eastern Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC Central (1970... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... NFL redirects here. ... LP Field is a football stadium in Nashville, Tennessee, used primarily as the home stadium of the NFLs Tennessee Titans, but also used by Tennessee State University. ... The Nashville Predators are a professional ice hockey team based in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... NHL redirects here. ... Sommet Center (formerly Nashville Arena and Gaylord Entertainment Center and pronounced soh-MAY) is an all-purpose venue in downtown Nashville, Tennessee which was completed in 1996. ... Class-Level Triple-A (1985-present) Double-A (1978-1984) Minor League affiliations Pacific Coast League (1998-present) American Conference - North Division American Association (1985-1997) Southern League (1978-1984) Major League affiliations Milwaukee Brewers (2005-present) Pittsburgh Pirates (1998-2004) Chicago White Sox (1993-1997) Cincinnati Reds (1987-1992... This article is about the sport. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a minor league baseball league operating in the West and Midwest of the United States. ... Greer Stadium as viewed down the first base line. ... Nashville Metros are an American soccer team, founded in 1989. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The USL Premier Development League (PDL) is the amateur league of the United Soccer Leagues in the United States and Canada, forming part of the American Soccer Pyramid. ... Ezell Park is a soccer specific-stadium based in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Nashville Storm are an amateur outdoor football team in Nashville, Tennessee, which plays in the North American Football League. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The North American Football League (NAFL) is a wholly owned subsidiary of 360 Sports Management. ... The Nashville Dream are a womens professional American football team based in Nashville, Tennessee. ... A new variation of American football is Womens American football. ... The National Womens Football Association (NWFA) is a full-contact American football league for women. ...

LP Field is a football stadium in Nashville, Tennessee, used primarily as the home stadium of the NFLs Tennessee Titans, but also used by Tennessee State University. ... Sommet Center (formerly Nashville Arena and Gaylord Entertainment Center and pronounced soh-MAY) is an all-purpose venue in downtown Nashville, Tennessee which was completed in 1996. ... The Nashville Municipal Auditorium was the primary indoor sports venue in Nashville, Tennessee from the time of its completion in 1962 until the completion of what is now the Gaylord Entertainment Center in 1996. ... Greer Stadium as viewed down the first base line. ... Ezell Park is a soccer specific-stadium based in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Vanderbilt Stadium at Dudley Field is a football stadium located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Memorial Gymnasium is a multi-purpose facility located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Curb Event Center is a multipurpose arena on the campus of Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Gentry Complex is a 10,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This facility is not to be confused with the Allen Fieldhouse at the University of Kansas. ... Music City Motorplex is a NASCAR Dodge Weekly Series racetrack located at the Tennessee State Fairgrounds near downtown Nashville, Tennessee. ...

Parks

Metro Board of Parks and Recreation owns and manages 10,200 acres (4,120 ha) of land and 99 parks and greenways (comprising more than 3% of the total area of the county). 2,684 acres (1,086 ha) of land is home to Warner Parks, which houses a 5,000 square-foot (460 m²) learning center, 20 miles (30 km) of scenic roads, 12 miles (19 km) of hiking trails, and 10 miles (16 km) of horse trails. In late 2005, Centennial Park began offering free wireless broadband internet service. Centennial Park (Nashville) is a large urban park located approximately two miles (three km) west of downtown Nashville, Tennessee, across West End Avenue (U.S. Highway 70S) from the campus of Vanderbilt University and adjacent to the headquarters campus of the Hospital Corporation of America. ...


Warner Parks, the largest municipal parks in the state, are home to the annual Iroquois Steeplechase. Edwin Warner Park and Percy Warner Park, collectively known as Warner Parks, are two major public parks in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers maintains parks on Old Hickory Lake and Percy Priest Lake. These parks are used for multiple activities including fishing, water-skiing, sailing and boating. Percy Priest Lake is also home to the Vanderbilt Sailing Club. United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ... The Old Hickory Lock and Dam forms Old Hickory Lake. ... J. Percy Priest Dam forms Percy Priest Lake on the Stones River. ... Fishermen in the harbor of Kochi, India. ... // Water skiing began in 1922 when Ralph Samuelson strapped two boards to his feet and rigged a clothesline up to his boat on Lake Pepin in Lake City, Minnesota. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... // Boating, the leisurely activity of traveling by boat typically refers to the recreational use of boats whether power boats, sail boats, or yachts (large vessels), focused on the travel itself, as well as sports activities, such as fishing or waterskiing. ... Vanderbilt Sailing Club Homecoming Regatta in 2004. ...


Transportation

A Music City Star commuter train beneath the Shelby Street Bridge
A Music City Star commuter train beneath the Shelby Street Bridge

Nashville is centrally located at the crossroads of three Interstate Highways: I-40, I-24, and I-65. Interstate 440 is a bypass route connecting I-40, I-65, and I-24 south of downtown Nashville. The Metropolitan Transit Authority [2] provides bus transit within the city. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 851 pixel, file size: 306 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nashville, Tennessee ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 851 pixel, file size: 306 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nashville, Tennessee ... Music City Star logo Music City Star traincar The Music City Star is a regional rail service running between Nashville and Lebanon, Tennessee. ... The Shelby Street Bridge (sometimes called the Shelby Avenue Bridge) spans the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 40 Interstate 40 (abbreviated I-40) is a major west-east interstate highway in the United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 24 Interstate 24 (abbreviated I-24) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Interstate 440 in Tennessee is an 8-mile-(13-km)-long loop connecting Interstate 40 and Interstate 24, bypassing downtown Nashville to the south. ... The Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) is a Public transit bus system that serves Nashville-Davidson County, Tennessee. ...


The city is served by Nashville International Airport, which was a hub for American Airlines between 1986 and 1995 and is now a mini-hub for Southwest Airlines. Nashville International Airport (IATA: BNA, ICAO: KBNA) is an airport in southeastern Nashville, Tennessee. ... American Airlines, Inc. ... This article is about the American airline. ...


Although it is a major rail hub, with a large CSX Transportation freight rail yard, Nashville is one of the largest cities in the U.S. not served by Amtrak. CSX redirects here. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ...


Nashville launched a passenger rail system called the Music City Star on September 18, 2006. The first and only currently operational leg of the system connects the city of Lebanon to downtown Nashville at Nashville Riverfront. Legs to Murfreesboro and Gallatin are currently in the feasibility study stage. The system plan includes seven legs connecting Nashville to surrounding suburbs. Music City Star logo Music City Star traincar The Music City Star is a regional rail service running between Nashville and Lebanon, Tennessee. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Platforms 1 Tracks 1 Other information Opened 18 September 2006 Accessible Nashville Riverfront is a station on Nashvilles regional rail line, the Music City Star. ...


Notable bridges in the city are:

Official Name Other Names Length Date Opened
Korean War Veterans Memorial Bridge Gateway Bridge 506 m (1,660 ft) May 19, 2004
Kelly Miller Smith Bridge Jefferson Street Bridge March 2, 1994
Old Hickory Bridge 1929
Martin Luther King Jr. Bridge Bordeaux Bridge September 18, 1980
Shelby Street Bridge Shelby Avenue Bridge 960 m (3,150 ft) July 5, 1909
Silliman Evans Bridge 720 m (2,362 ft) 1963
Victory Memorial Bridge July 2, 1956
William Goodwin Bridge Hobson Pike Bridge 675 m (2,215 ft)
Woodland Street Bridge 195 m (639 ft)

is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The Shelby Street Bridge (sometimes called the Shelby Avenue Bridge) spans the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Notable residents

See also: List of notable Nashvillians

Some of the most notable people born in Nashville include novelist Madison Smartt Bell, civil rights activist Julian Bond, rapper Young Buck (David Darnell Brown), singer Rita Coolidge, former U.S. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, artist Red Grooms, pin-up model Bettie Page, actress Annie Potts, actor James Denton, and soldier of fortune William Walker. The following is a list of some of the more notable people who have lived in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Madison Smartt Bell (born August 1, 1957) is a U.S. novelist. ... Julian Bond (2004) Horace Julian Bond (born January 14, 1940) is an American leader of the American Civil Rights Movement. ... David Darnell Brown (born March 15, 1981), better known as Young Buck, is an American rapper who is a member of the popular rap group G-Unit. ... Rita Coolidge (born May 1, 1945, in Lafayette, Tennessee) is a Grammy Award winning American Singer. ... The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by the party conference which holds the majority in the Senate to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the... William Harrison Bill Frist, Sr. ... Red Grooms (born Charles Rogers Grooms on June 7, 1937) is an American multimedia artist best known for his colorful pop-art constructions depicting frenetic scenes of modern urban life. ... Pin-up photo of Ingrid Bergman for the March 16, 1945 issue of the U.S. Army magazine, Yank. ... Bettie Mae Page (though listed Betty on her birth certificate) born April 22, 1923 in Nashville, Tennessee, is a former American model who became famous in the 1950s for her fetish modeling and pin-up photos. ... Annie Potts (born October 28, 1952) is an American television and film actress. ... James Denton (born January 20, 1963) is an American film and television actor. ... For other uses, see Mercenary (disambiguation). ... William Walker William Walker (May 8, 1824 – September 12, 1860) was a U.S. physician, lawyer, journalist, adventurer, and soldier of fortune who attempted to conquer several Latin American countries in the mid-19th century. ...


Many notable musicians have lived in Nashville including Rascal Flatts, Chet Atkins, Johnny Cash, Sheryl Crow, Amy Grant, Vince Gill, Jimi Hendrix, Trey Hill, Faith Hill, Alan Jackson, Willie Nelson, Aaron Neville, Roy Orbison, Dolly Parton, Ernest Tubb, Shania Twain, Hank Williams, Loretta Lynn, Tammy Wynette, Jimmy Buffett, Michael McDonald, Peter Frampton, Jack White, Kings of Leon, Billy Ray Cyrus, Ben Folds, and Carrie Underwood. “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... Rascal Flatts is an American Country Pop band formed in Nashville, Tennessee in 2000. ... Chet Atkins Chester Burton Chet Atkins (June 20, 1924 – June 30, 2001) was an influential guitarist and record producer. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American blues rock singer, guitarist, bassist, and songwriter. ... Amy Lee Grant (born November 25, 1960 in Augusta, Georgia) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for her Contemporary Christian Music and pop music, as well as a New York Times Bestselling author, TV personality, and occasional actress. ... Vince Gill (born Vincent Grant Gill[1], April 12, 1957) is an American neotraditional country musician, songwriter, and singer. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Justin Trey Hill (Songwriter, Guitarist, Vocalist) Born September 5, 1984 in Shelby, North Carolina to parents, Gary and Tammy. ... Audrey Faith Perry McGraw, known professionally as Faith Hill (born September 21, 1967), is an American country singer, known for her commercial success as well as her marriage to fellow country singer Tim McGraw. ... Alan Eugene Jackson (born 17 October 1958 in Newnan, Georgia) is an American country singer-songwriter who has sold over 40 million records. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 29, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... Aaron Neville (born January 24, 1941 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American soul and R&B singer. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is an American, Grammy Award-winning country music singer/songwriter, composer, author, actress, and philanthropist. ... Ernest Dale Tubb (February 9, 1914 – September 6, 1984), nicknamed the Texas Troubadour, was an American singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of country music. ... Shania Twain, IPA: OC (born Eilleen Regina Edwards, August 28, 1965, Windsor, Ontario) is a Canadian singer and songwriter in the country and pop music genres. ... For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... Loretta Lynn (born Loretta Webb April 14, 1934) is an American country singer-songwriter and was one of the leading country female vocalists during the 1960s and 1970s and overall is revered as a country icon. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was an American country singer and songwriter. ... Jimmy Buffett tours Pearl Harbor with United States Navy Admiral Jonathan Greenert, June 12, 2003 James William Jimmy Buffett (born December 25, 1946) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... Michael McDonald (born February 12, 1952, in St. ... Peter Kenneth Frampton (born April 22, 1950 in Beckenham, Kent) is an English musician, best known today for his solo work in the mid-1970s and as one of the original members of the band Humble Pie. ... For other persons named Jack White, see Jack White (disambiguation). ... Kings of Leon are a rock band made up of three brothers and one cousin, based in Mt. ... Billy Ray Cyrus (born August 25, 1961) is an American country singer-songwriter and actor, best known for his hit single Achy Breaky Heart. A multi-platinum selling recording artist, he has one number one country single and seven top-ten singles. ... Benjamin Scott Folds (born September 12, 1966, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina[1]) is an American singer-songwriter and the former frontman of the musical group Ben Folds Five. ... Carrie Marie Underwood (born March 10, 1983) is an American pop country music singer who won the fourth season of American Idol. ...


Other notable people who have resided in Nashville include former U.S. Vice President Al Gore and his wife, former Second Lady of the United States Tipper Gore, former U.S. President Andrew Jackson, civil rights leader James Lawson, former Tennessee Governor and U.S. President James K. Polk, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and poet Robert Penn Warren, Academy Awarding-winning actresses Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman, talk show host and entrepreneur Oprah Winfrey, and financial talk show host, Dave Ramsey. The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Lynne Cheney, the current Second Lady of the United States The Second Lady of the United States is an unofficial title for the wife of the Vice President of the United States styled relatively to the formal title of the First Lady who is wife to the President and principal... Mary Elizabeth Aitcheson Gore (born August 19, 1948), known as Tipper Gore, is the wife of former Vice President Al Gore and was the Second Lady of the United States from 1993 until 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... For details on the English football (soccer) player, see James Lawson (footballer) James Lawson speaking at a community meeting in Nashville, Tennessee in 2005 James M. Lawson (born September 22, 1928 in Uniontown, Pennsylvania) was a leading theoretician and tactician of nonviolence within the American Civil Rights Movement He continues... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic, and was one of the founders of The New Criticism. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon[1] (born March 22, 1976) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Nicole Mary Kidman (born June 20, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning Australian [1] actress. ... A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by the Irish economist Richard Cantillon) is a person who operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ... Dave Ramsey (b. ...


Nicknames

Nashville is a colorful, well-known city in several different arenas. As such, it has earned various sobriquets, including:

WSM is the call letters of a 50,000 watt AM radio station (and its associated FM station) located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... The Fisk Jubilee Singers were a group of African American singers in the 1870s. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Academy (disambiguation). ... The Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee is a full-scale replica of the original Parthenon in Athens. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red The Bible Belt is an informal term for an area of the United States of America in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a dominant part of the culture. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination that consists of numerous agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual meetings... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... National Association of Free Will Baptists - a national body of predominantly white Free Will Baptist churches in the United States and Canada, organized on November 5, 1935 in Nashville, Tennessee. ... A copy of a Bible distributed by Gideons International. ... The Gospel Music Association (GMA) was founded in 1964 for the purpose of supporting and promoting the development of all forms of Gospel music. ... Thomas Nelson Early American Pioneer Thomas Nelson Jr US Statesman Thomas Nelson (Publishing House) Categories: Disambiguation ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... David Darnell Brown (born March 15, 1981), better known as Young Buck, is an American rapper who is a member of the popular rap group G-Unit. ... G-Unit is a rap group which consists of 50 Cent, Lloyd Banks, Tony Yayo, Young Buck, (The) Game, R & B singer Olivia and, most recently, Spider Loc. ... Straight Outta Ca$hville is Young Bucks debut solo album an allusion to the famous N.W.A. album Straight Outta Compton. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... For other uses, see Americana (disambiguation). ... Languages Kurdish Religions Predominantly Sunni Muslim also some Shia, Yazidism, Yarsan, Judaism, Christianity Related ethnic groups other Iranian peoples (Talysh Baluch Gilak Bakhtiari Persians) The Kurds are an ethnic group who consider themselves to be indigenous to a region often referred to as Kurdistan, an area which includes adjacent parts...

Sister cities

Nashville is an active participant in the Sister Cities program and has relationships with the following towns:[27] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm Town twinning or sister cities is a concept whereby towns or cities from geographically and politically distinct areas are paired, with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

The city is also exploring forming a sister city relationship with: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Edmonton is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta, situated in the north central region of the province, an area with some of the most fertile farm land on the prairies. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... , Caen (pronounced ) is a commune of northwestern France. ... Capital Caen Land area¹ 17,589 km² Regional President Philippe Duron (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... Overview of the city Pernik (Bulgarian: ) is a city in western Bulgaria with a population of 91,883 as of 2006. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... This article is about the German city. ... With an area of 20,447 km² and a population of 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Location within China Taiyuan (Chinese: ; pinyin: Tàiyuán; Wade-Giles: Tai-yüan) is a prefecture-level city in China, capital of the Shanxi province. ... Shanxi (Chinese: 山西; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shansi) is a province in the northern part of the Peoples Republic of China. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Arezzo (Latin Arretium) is an old city in central Italy, capital of the province of the same name, located in Tuscany. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Veneto or Venetia, is one of the 20 regions of Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Diyarbakır (Ottoman Turkish: دیاربکر land of the Bekr as derived from Persian; Kurdish Amed; Syriac ; Greek Amida; Armenian Ամիդ Amid) is a major city in the Southeastern Anatolia region of Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... This article is about the Spanish city. ... This article is about the Spanish Autonomous Community. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Monument dedicated to the Army of the Andes, on the summit of the Cerro de la Gloria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Seogwipo is a city in Jeju Province, South Korea. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of South Korea highlighting Jeju-do. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d U.S. Census Population Estimates for 2007 - Counties
  2. ^ Consolidated refers to the population of Davidson County, Balance refers to the population of Nashville excluding other incorporated cities within the Nashville-Davidson boundary
  3. ^ Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (2001). Retrieved on November 7, 2006.
  4. ^ National Weather Service data for Nashville
  5. ^ Calendar of Significant Weather Events in Middle Tennessee provided by the National Weather Service. Retrieved August 8, 2006.
  6. ^ Daily Records for Nashville (1871-Present)
  7. ^ Buchanan, Joy. "Nashville's an allergy leader, but it's not alone", The Tennessean, March 21, 2007. 
  8. ^ Spring Allergy Capitals 2007. Accessed April 6, 2007.
  9. ^ Monthly Averages for Nashville, TN. Weather.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-16.
  10. ^ U.S. Census Bureau: Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Components, November 2004
  11. ^ U.S. Census Bureau: Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places In The U.S.: 1790 to 1990
  12. ^ Swarns, Rachel. "U.S. a Place of Miracles for Somali Refugees", The New York Times, July 20, 2003. 
  13. ^ Cornfield, Daniel B. Final Report of the Immigrant Community Assessment. August 15, 2003.
  14. ^ a b Copeland, Larry. "Who's the biggest fish in the South?", USA Today, June 15, 2006. 
  15. ^ a b Alligood, Leon. "Local Iraqis ready to vote but worried about process", The Tennessean, January 11, 2005. 
  16. ^ List of Nashville-based labels at clubnashville.com. Retrieved March 10, 2006.
  17. ^ "Hoedown on a Harpsichord", TIME Magazine, November 14, 1960. 
  18. ^ "Nashville's Music Industry Worth $6.38 Billion", MusicDish, January 11, 2006. 
  19. ^ Pack, Todd. "Health care worth $18B here", The Tennessean, February 15, 2006. 
  20. ^ Music City, U.S.A.. BMI.com. Archived from the original on 2001-07-07. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  21. ^ (March 2007) "Fisk Jubilee Singers Celebrate 135 Year Tradition with "Walk of Fame" Honors". Fisk 2 (1): p. 14. Retrieved on 2007-08-07. 
  22. ^ Vanderbilt University Press - home
  23. ^ "Tennessee Repertory to Present God's Man in Texas", Christian Activities, November 14, 2003. 
  24. ^ Nashville, Music City USA, Tennessee Vacations, Tennessee Tours, Tennessee Travel Reviews, Tennessee Attractions, Tennessee Tourism, Tennessee Travel - ROAD & TRAVEL Magazine
  25. ^ Nashville Scene - Love-Hate Mail
  26. ^ Viva Nashvegas
  27. ^ Nashville's Sister Cities. SCNashville.org. Retrieved on 2008-03-20.
  28. ^ Kimler, Scott (2004-07-08). Edmonton - Eskimos, Ermine & Energy. Randsco.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-20.

Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Carey, Bill (2000). Fortunes, Fiddles, & Fried Chicken: A Nashville Business History. Franklin, Tenn.: Hillsboro Press. ISBN 1-57736-178-4. 
  • Egerton, John (1979). Nashville: The Faces of Two Centuries, 1780-1980. Nashville: PlusMedia. LCCN 79089173. 
  • Egerton, John and E. Thomas Wood (eds.) (2001). Nashville: An American Self-Portrait. Nashville: Beaten Biscuit Press. ISBN 0-9706702-1-4. 
  • Lovett, Bobby L. (1999). African-American History of Nashville, Tennessee, 1780-1930: Elites and Dilemmas. University of Arkansas Press. ISBN 1-55728-555-1. 
  • Wooldridge, John (ed.) (1890). History of Nashville, Tennessee. Nashville: Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. LCCN 76027605. 

External links

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  • Sister Cities of Nashville
  • Nashville, Tennessee is at coordinates 36°09′54″N 86°47′02″W / 36.165, -86.784 (Nashville, Tennessee)Coordinates: 36°09′54″N 86°47′02″W / 36.165, -86.784 (Nashville, Tennessee)

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In 1806 Nashville was incorporated as a city and became the county seat of Davidson County, Tennessee.
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Nashville has several arts centers and museums, including the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, located in what was formerly the main post office; Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art; the Tennessee State Museum; Fisk University's Van Vechten and Aaron Douglas Galleries; Vanderbilt University's Fine Art Gallery and Sarratt Gallery; and The Parthenon.
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