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Encyclopedia > Nap Lajoie
Napoléon "Nap" Lajoie
Second Base
Born: September 5, 1874(1874-09-05)
Woonsocket, Rhode Island
Died: February 7, 1959 (aged 84)
Daytona Beach, Florida
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 12, 1896
for the Philadelphia Phillies
Final game
August 26, 1916
for the Philadelphia Athletics
Career statistics
Batting average     .338
Hits     3242
Runs scored     1504
Teams

As Player
Image File history File links Lajoie_Nap_3. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Woonsocket is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Daytona redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... There have been three professional baseball teams based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania known as the Philadelphia Athletics: 1. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances safely around all three bases and returns safely to home plate. ...

As Manager
Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... The following are the baseball events of the year 1896 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1900 throughout the world. ... There have been three professional baseball teams based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania known as the Philadelphia Athletics: 1. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1901 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1902 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1915 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1916 throughout the world. ... For other uses, see Cleveland Indians (disambiguation). ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1902 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1914 throughout the world. ...

Career highlights and awards
1901 American League Triple Crown
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1937
Vote     83.58% (second ballot)

Napoléon "Nap" Lajoie [la-ZHWAH, or often la-ZHWAY, per the Canadian French pronunciation; or, as he himself usually pronounced it, LAJ-a-way[1]] (September 5, 1874February 7, 1959), also known as Larry Lajoie, was an American professional athlete of French Canadian descent from Woonsocket, Rhode Island. In his career as a second baseman in Major League Baseball, he was considered one of the greatest players of the fledgling American League in the early 20th century and the most serious of Ty Cobb's challengers. For other uses, see Cleveland Indians (disambiguation). ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1905 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1909 throughout the world. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1937 throughout the world. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Woonsocket is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The position of the second baseman Second base redirects here. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ...

Contents

Playing career

Lajoie started his career in the National League with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1896. In 1901, he jumped to the crosstown Philadelphia Athletics, owned by Connie Mack. Lajoie's batting average that year was .426, still a league record. The same year Lajoie became the second Major Leaguer to be intentionally walked with the bases loaded after Abner Dalrymple in 1881. Only three other players who did it afterwards were Del Bissonette in 1928, Bill Nicholson (1944), and Barry Bonds in 1998. National league can refer to: National Basketball League, in the United States and Canada, which merged with the rival Basketball Association of America to form the National Basketball Association National Football League, the major American football league in the United States National Hockey League, the major ice hockey league in... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... The following are the baseball events of the year 1896 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1901 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Connie Mack baseball card, 1910 Cornelius Alexander Mack (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), born Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy, was an American professional baseball player, manager, and team owner. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, an intentional base on balls (denoted by IBB), often called an intentional walk, is used in baseball to count the number of times a walk was issued with no intent of ever allowing a hit. ... Abner Dalrymple was a baseball player who hit 43 home runs (including 22 in 1884) and batted . ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1881 throughout the world. ... Adelphia Louis Bissonette (September 6. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1928 throughout the world. ... William Beck Nicholson, nickamed Swish, was a 16-year veteran of Major League Baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1944 throughout the world. ... Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is currently a left fielder for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball. ... This year in baseball 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 5 - Don Sutton, a 324-game winner is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on his fifth try. ...


The next year the Phillies obtained an injunction, effective only in Pennsylvania, barring Lajoie from playing baseball for any team other than the Phillies. The American League responded by transferring Lajoie's contract to the Cleveland Indians, then known as the Broncos and subsequently renamed the "Naps" in Lajoie's honor for several seasons before adopting their current name in 1915 when Lajoie left the team. For the remainder of 1902 and most of 1903, Lajoie and teammate Elmer Flick traveled separately from the rest of the team, never setting foot in Pennsylvania so as to avoid a subpoena. The issue was finally resolved when the leagues made peace through the National Agreement in September 1903. Look up Injunction in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Cleveland Indians (disambiguation). ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1915 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1902 throughout the world. ... Births June 19 - Lou Gehrig - Hall of Fame First baseman ... Elmer Flick baseball card, 1909 Elmer Harrison Flick (January 11, 1876 - January 9, 1971) was an American player in Major League Baseball from 1898 until 1910. ...


Lajoie won three batting titles and might have won a fourth if he had not contracted blood poisoning from an untreated spike injury in 1905. With Cobb's arrival in the Majors in 1905, however, Lajoie faced real competition. Blood poisoning, also known as septicaemia, is a bacterial infection that occurs when bacteria get into the bloodstream and multiply rapidly. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1905 throughout the world. ...


Rivalry with Ty Cobb

Main article: 1910 Chalmers Award

Their rivalry reached a peak in 1910, when the Chalmers Auto Company promised a car to the batting leader (and MVP) that year. Cobb took the final two games of the 1910 season off, confident that his average was high enough to win the AL title—unless Lajoie had a near-perfect final day. Cobb and Napoleon Nap Lajoie Before the start of the 1910 baseball season, Hugh Chalmers of the Chalmers Automobile Company announced a promotion in which a Chalmers Model 30 automobile would be given to the batting champion for Major League baseballs American League and National League. ...


Lajoie, a far more popular player than Cobb, was allowed by the opponent St. Louis Browns to go 8-for-8 in a season-ending doubleheader. After a ‘sun-hindered’ fly went for a triple and another batted ball landed for a cleanly hit single, Lajoie had six subsequent 'hits'—bunt singles dropped in front of the (manager-ordered) deep-fielding third baseman. Lajoie also laid down a seventh bunt that was credited as a sacrifice hit.


The subsequent chicanery involved the Browns’ manager and a coach offering a new suit to the official scorer if he changed the sacrifice hit to another base hit. Considering the uproar that followed, the Browns fired their manager and coach.

As it turns out, Lajoie's average is not the only one tainted by controversy - Cobb's average might have been inflated by counting a single game twice in his statistics, as researchers discovered 70 years later. In the end, the Chalmers Auto Company avoided taking sides in the dispute by awarding cars to both Cobb and Lajoie. Download high resolution version (456x640, 53 KB)Nap Lajoie 1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... Download high resolution version (456x640, 53 KB)Nap Lajoie 1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1911 throughout the world. ... The American Tobacco Company was founded in 1890 by J. B. Duke as a merger between a number of tobacco manufacturers including Allen and Ginter. ... A baseball card is one type of trading card, relating to baseball, usually printed on some type of paper stock or card stock. ...


Legacy

Lajoie ended his career in 1915 and 1916 with a return to the Athletics, finishing with a lifetime .339 average. His career total of 3242 hits was the second best in Major League history at the time, behind only Honus Wagner's total. Lajoie's 2521 hits in the AL was the league record until Cobb surpassed it in 1918. Among second basemen, Lajoie posted staggering career offensive numbers; in the history of baseball, only Rogers Hornsby and Joe Morgan can compare. The following are the baseball events of the year 1915 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1916 throughout the world. ... Johannes Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed The Flying Dutchman due to his superb speed and German heritage, was an American Major League Baseball shortstop who played in the NL from 1897 to 1917. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1918 throughout the world. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... This article is about the former Major League Baseball player. ...


Lajoie was among the second group of players elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1937, being inducted when the Hall opened in 1939. He died in Daytona Beach, Florida in 1959 at the age of 84. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... See previous election: 1936 and next election: 1938 The 1937 process of selecting inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame was markedly different from the initial elections the previous year. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... Daytona redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ...


In 1999, he ranked number 29 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was a nominee for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... In 1998, The Sporting News compiled a list of Baseballs Greatest Players. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ...


Lajoie is mentioned in the poem "Lineup for Yesterday" by Ogden Nash: Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse. ...

Lineup for Yesterday
L is for Lajoie
Whom Clevelanders love,
Napolean himself,
With glue in his glove.
Ogden Nash, Sport magazine (January 1949)[2]

Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse. ... The inaugural issue of SPORT magazine, September, 1946, depicting New York Yankees centrefielder Joe DiMaggio together with his son Joe Jr. ...

See also

Below is the list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone. ... Players denoted in boldface are are still actively contributing to the record noted. ... // † - While only technically a rookie, Ichiro Suzuki is credited with the rookie record for hits in a single season. ... Players denoted in boldface are still actively contributing to the record noted. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in doubles. ... Below is the list of 158 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 100 triple milestone. ... Below is the list of 295 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 Runs milestone. ... Below is the list of 252 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 RBI milestone. ... In Major League Baseball, the 3,000 Hit Club is an informal term applied to the group of players who have made 3,000 or more career base hits. ... Eric Davis hit for the cycle in 1989 In baseball, a player hits for the cycle when he hits a single, a double, a triple and a home run in the same game, though not necessarily in that order. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes home run champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs scored champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes doubles champions in the American League and National League each season. ... At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. ...

References

  1. ^ Lee Allen in The American League Story
  2. ^ Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Preceded by
George Davis
National League RBI Champion
1898
Succeeded by
Ed Delahanty
Preceded by
First Triple Crown Winner
American League Triple Crown
1901
Succeeded by
Ty Cobb
Preceded by
First Champion
American League Home Run Champion
1901
Succeeded by
Socks Seybold
Preceded by
First Champion
Buck Freeman
American League RBI Champion
1901
1904
Succeeded by
Buck Freeman
Harry Davis
Preceded by
First Champion
Ed Delahanty
Ty Cobb
American League Batting Champion
1901
1903-1904
1910
Succeeded by
Ed Delahanty
Elmer Flick
Ty Cobb
Preceded by
Bill Armour
Cleveland Naps Manager
19051909
Succeeded by
Deacon McGuire
In Major League Baseball, the 3,000 Hit Club is an informal term applied to the group of players who have made 3,000 or more career base hits. ... Charlie Hustle redirects here. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Henry Louis Hank Aaron (born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Hammer, Hammerin Hank”, or Bad Henry”, is a retired American baseball player whose Major League Baseball (MLB) career spanned the 1950s through the 1970s. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Tristram E. Speaker (April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, Texas - December 8, 1958 in Lake Whitney, Texas), nicknamed “Spoke” (a play on his last name) and “Grey Eagle” (for his prematurely graying hair), was an American baseball player known as one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in history. ... Carl Yastrzemskis number 8 was retired by the Boston Red Sox in 1989 Carl Michael Yaz Yastrzemski (pronounced ), i. ... Adrian Constantine Anson (April 17, 1852 – April 14, 1922), known by the nicknames Cap (for Captain) and Pop, was a professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball. ... Johannes Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed The Flying Dutchman due to his superb speed and German heritage, was an American Major League Baseball shortstop who played in the NL from 1897 to 1917. ... Reverse side of a Paul Molitor baseball card Paul Leo Molitor (born August 22, 1956 in St. ... Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... Eddie Clarence Murray (born February 24, 1956 in Los Angeles, California) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman who was known as one of the most reliable and productive hitters of his era, earning the nickname Steady Eddie. Murray is regarded as one of the best switch hitters ever... Cal Ripken redirects here. ... For the US Army Air Forces general during World War II, see George Brett (military). ... Paul Glee Waner (April 16, 1903 - August 29, 1965) was an American player in Major League Baseball who, along with his brother Lloyd, starred in the Pittsburgh Pirates outfield in the 1920s and 1930s. ... Robin Rachel Yount (born September 16, 1955 in Danville, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball player who spent his entire career with the Milwaukee Brewers (1974-1994). ... Anthony Keith Gwynn (born May 9, 1960 in Los Angeles, California) is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball, statistically one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. ... David Mark Winfield (born October 3, 1951, in St. ... Rickey Henley Henderson (born December 25, 1958 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who is baseballs all-time leader in stolen bases[1] and runs scored. ... Rodney Cline Rod Carew (born October 1, 1945), is a former Major League Baseball player for the Minnesota Twins and California Angels from 1967 to 1985. ... Craig Alan Biggio (born December 14, 1965 in Smithtown, New York) is a former seven-time All-Star Major League baseball player who played his entire 20-year career with the Houston Astros. ... Louis Clark Lou Brock (born June 18, 1939, El Dorado, Arkansas) is an American former player in Major League Baseball. ... Rafael Palmeiro Corrales (born September 24, 1964 in Havana, Cuba) is a Major League Baseball player with a career spanning 20 years, 1986 to 2005. ... Wade Anthony Boggs (born June 15, 1958 in Omaha, Nebraska) is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball, primarily with the Boston Red Sox. ... Albert William Kaline (born December 19, 1934 in Baltimore, Maryland) is a former Major League Baseball player. ... Roberto Clemente Walker (August 18, 1934 – December 31, 1972) was a professional baseball player and a former Major League Baseball right fielder. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... Tristram E. Speaker (April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, Texas - December 8, 1958 in Lake Whitney, Texas), nicknamed “Spoke” (a play on his last name) and “Grey Eagle” (for his prematurely graying hair), was an American baseball player known as one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in history. ... For the Major League Baseball award, see Cy Young Award. ... The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ... Morgan Bulkeley. ... Byron Bancroft Johnson (January 5, 1864 - March 28, 1931) was an American executive in Major League Baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League. ... Connie Mack baseball card, 1910 Cornelius Alexander Mack (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), born Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy, was an American professional baseball player, manager, and team owner. ... John Joseph McGraw (April 7, 1873–February 25, 1934), nicknamed Little Napoleon and Muggsy, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Napoleon Lajoie - MSN Encarta (195 words)
Napoléon "Nap" Lajoie [la-ZHWAH, or often la-ZHWAY, per the Canadian French pronunciation; or, as he himself usually pronounced it, LAJ-a-way ] (September 5, 1874 – February 7...
Napoleon Lajoie (1875-1959), American professional baseball player, one of the best second basemen in the sport, celebrated for his sure and graceful fielding and his heavy hitting.
Lajoie played 2475 games in the major leagues and had a lifetime batting average of.339.
Nap Lajoie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (616 words)
Lajoie won three batting crowns and might have won a fourth if he had not contracted blood poisoning from an untreated spike injury in 1905.
Lajoie ended his career in 1915 and 1916 with a return to the Athletics, finishing with a lifetime.339 average.
Lajoie was among the second group of players elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1937, being inducted when the Hall opened in 1939.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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