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Encyclopedia > Nancy Reagan
Nancy Davis Reagan
Nancy Reagan

In office
January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989
Preceded by Rosalynn Carter
Succeeded by Barbara Bush

Born July 6, 1921 (1921-07-06) (age 86)
Flushing, New York, U.S.
Spouse Ronald Reagan
Relations Kenneth Seymour Robbins and Edith Luckett
Children Patti, Ron
Occupation First Lady of the United States
Religion Presbyterian
Signature Nancy Reagan's signature

Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of the former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. public domain image from http://www. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Eleanor Rosalynn Smith Carter (born August 18, 1927) is the wife of former President Jimmy Carter and was First Lady of the United States from 1977 to 1981. ... For the daughter of President George W. Bush, see Barbara Pierce Bush. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Look up flushing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the state. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Patti Davis (born Patricia Ann Reagan on October 21, 1952 in Los Angeles, California) is the daughter of former President of the United States Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Davis. ... Ron Reagan in 2007 Ronald Prescott Reagan (born May 20, 1958, Los Angeles, California, USA), usually known as Ron Reagan, is the son of the late former President of the United States Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ...


Nancy became an actress in the 1940s, starring in films such as Donovan's Brain, Night into Morning, and Hellcats of the Navy. She married then-president of the Screen Actor's Guild Ronald Reagan in 1952; they have two children. Ronald Reagan was Governor of California from 1967 to 1975, making Nancy the First Lady of California. In January of 1981, Nancy became the First Lady of the United States with Ronald Reagan's 1980 presidential victory. She experienced a great deal of criticism early in her husband's first term, due largely to her decision to replenish the White House china. She took on a championing role in recreational drug prevention causes by founding the "Just Say No" Drug Awareness Campaign, which was considered her major initiative as First Lady. Amidst the Cold War, Nancy aided in softening relations between the Soviet Union and America, by suggesting Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev and her husband form a personal relationship. However, it was leaked in 1988 that she had consulted an astrologer to assist in planning the president's schedule after the 1981 assassination attempt, generating more controversy. Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Donovans Brain is a 1953 film, starring Nancy Reagan, based on the 1942 horror novel Donovans Brain by Curt Siodmak. ... Hellcats of the Navy is a movie starring Ronald Reagan and wife Nancy Davis (her then professional name) — a moral WWII submarine tale — the only film in which they appear together. ... The Screen Actors Guild (SAG) is the labor union representing film actors in the United States. ... Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (left) and Governor Gray Davis (right) with President George W. Bush in 2003 The Governor of California is the highest executive authority in the state government, whose responsibilities include making yearly State of the State addresses to the California State Legislature, submitting the budget, and ensuring that... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The China Room is painted ivory with accenting red and green draperies, carpet, and shelves. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... Mrs. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (Russian: ), surname more accurately romanized as Gorbachyov; (born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ... An astrologer practices one or more forms of astrology. ... The Reagan assassination attempt occurred on March 30, 1981, just 69 days into the presidency of Ronald Reagan. ...


The Reagans retired to their Bel Air, Los Angeles, California home in 1989. Ronald Reagan was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 1994 and Nancy devoted most of her time to caring for him until his death ten years later on June 5. As of 2007, Nancy Reagan has continued to stay active in politics particularly relating to stem-cell research. Bel-Air is a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, California. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Former United States First Lady Nancy Reagan kisses the casket of her husband, Former U.S. President Ronald Reagan during the week long state funeral honoring him in June of 2004. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ...

Contents

Early life

Born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921 in Flushing, New York's Sloan Hospital, she was the only child of car salesman Kenneth Seymour Robbins (1894–1972)[1] and his actress wife, Edith Luckett (1888–1987).[2] While her parents divorced in 1928, they were separated for some time before then. Nancy was raised in Bethesda, Maryland by her Aunt Virginia and Uncle Audley Gailbraith for six years during her childhood, as her mother traveled the country to pursue acting jobs.[3] Nancy describes longing for her mother during those years, saying, "My favorite times were when Mother had a job in New York, and Aunt Virgie would take me by train to stay with her."[4] In 1929, her mother married Dr. Loyal Davis (1896–1982), a prominent politically conservative neurosurgeon who adopted Nancy after moving her and her mother to Chicago.[5] Nancy greatly admired her stepfather, calling him "a man of great integrity who exemplified old-fashioned values."[6] After the adoption, her name was legally changed to Nancy Davis; although her given name was Anne Frances, she had commonly been known as Nancy since her birth.[7] She received her formal education at the Girls' Latin School of Chicago (describing herself as an average student), graduating in 1939, and later at Smith College in Massachusetts, where she majored in English and drama and graduated in 1943.[8][2] is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Flushing is a section of the borough of Queens in New York City, New York. ... This article is about the state. ... Bethesda is an urbanized, but unincorporated, area in southern Montgomery County, Maryland, near Washington, D.C. It takes its name from a church located there, the Bethesda Presbyterian Church, built in 1820 and rebuilt in 1850, which in turn took its name from Jerusalems Pool of Bethesda. ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military,[4] small government and promotion of states rights. ... Neurosurgery is the surgical discipline focused on treating the central and peripheral nervous system. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... The Latin School of Chicago is a private elementary, middle and high school in the Gold Coast neighborhood in Chicago. ... Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ...


Acting career

Nancy Davis poses for a publicity photo, 1950
Nancy Davis poses for a publicity photo, 1950
Movie poster for Hellcats of the Navy, 1956

Following her graduation, Davis held jobs in Chicago as a sales clerk in Marshall Field's department store and as a nurse's aide.[2] With the help of her mother's colleagues in the theatre world, she pursued a career as a professional actress in New York. She landed the role of Si-Tchun, a lady-in-waiting,[9] in the 1946 Broadway musical about the Orient, Lute Song, starring Mary Martin and Yul Brynner.[2] She got the role after the show's producer told her, "You look like you could be Chinese."[10] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 484 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 990 pixel, file size: 65 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I got this pic from the Reagan Library online pic catalog. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 484 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 990 pixel, file size: 65 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I got this pic from the Reagan Library online pic catalog. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Hellcats of the Navy is a movie starring Ronald Reagan and wife Nancy Davis (her then professional name) — a moral WWII submarine tale — the only film in which they appear together. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... For other uses, see Clerk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Marshall Fields (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Lady in Waiting is an album by American southern rock band The Outlaws, released in 1976. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Mary Virginia Martin (December 1, 1913 – November 3, 1990) born in Weatherford, Texas, was a Tony Award winning American star of (mainly stage) musicals. ... Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920[1] – October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born Broadway and Academy Award-winning Hollywood actor. ...


She eventually signed a seven-year contract with MGM Studios in 1949,[5] saying "Joining Metro was like walking into a dream world."[11] Davis appeared in 11 feature films, usually typecast as a "loyal housewife,"[12] "responsible young mother", or "the steady woman";[13] she kept her professional name as Nancy Davis even after marrying. Her film career began in 1949's The Doctor and the Girl with Glenn Ford, and followed with East Side, West Side starring Barbara Stanwyck.[14] She played a child psychiatrist in the film noir Shadow on the Wall (1950) with Ann Sothern and Zachary Scott; The New York Times called her "beautiful and convincing" in the role.[15] She co-starred in 1950's The Next Voice You Hear ..., playing a pregnant housewife who hears the voice of God from her radio. Reviewer Bosley Crowther of The New York Times described her as being "delightful," and [a] gentle, plain, and understanding wife".[16] A later critic admired the fact an attempt was made to make Davis actually look pregnant, as many other films from the time neglected to do.[17] In 1951 Davis appeared in Night Into Morning, a study of bereavement starring Ray Milland. The Times' Crowther said Davis "does nicely as the fiancée who is widowed herself and knows the loneliness of grief;"[18] this was Davis's favorite screen role.[19] She soon starred in the 1953 science fiction film Donovan's Brain as well. In her last movie, Hellcats of the Navy (1957), she played nurse Lieutenant Helen Blair, and shared the screen for the only time with her husband, playing what one critic noted as "a housewife who came along for the ride."[20] Another reviewer, however, stated that she does "a good job" of playing her part, and "does well with what she has to work with."[21] Noted author Garry Wills believes that Davis was underrated as an actress overall because Hellcats became her most widely-seen role.[13] For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see typecasting. ... Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Glenn Ford (May 1, 1916 – August 30, 2006) was an acclaimed Canadian-born actor from Hollywoods Golden Era with a career that spanned seven decades. ... Barbara Stanwyck (July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990) was an American actress of film, stage, and screen . ... ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... Ann Sothern Ann Sothern (January 22, 1909 – March 15, 2001) was an American film actress. ... Zachary Scott (Austin, Texas February 24, 1914 – October 3, 1965 also in Austin from a brain tumour) was an American actor, most notable for his roles as villains and mystery men. He was a distant cousin of both George Washington and Bat Masterson. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Bosley Crowther (July 13, 1905 – March 7, 1981) was an American film critic. ... Ray Milland (January 3, 1905 – March 10, 1986) was a successful Welsh actor and director who worked primarily in the United States. ... Donovans Brain is a 1953 film, starring Nancy Reagan, based on the 1942 horror novel Donovans Brain by Curt Siodmak. ... Hellcats of the Navy is a movie starring Ronald Reagan and wife Nancy Davis (her then professional name) — a moral WWII submarine tale — the only film in which they appear together. ... Garry Wills (born May 22, 1934 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an author and historian, and a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. ...


After her final film, she appeared in television dramas such as Wagon Train and The Tall Man until 1962, when she retired as an actress.[14] During her career, she served on the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Board for nearly 10 years.[22] Wagon Train was a television series on NBC from 1957 to 1962 and on ABC from 1962 to 1965. ... Disambiguation: For the Phantasm villain, see Tall Man. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ...


Marriage and family

Newlyweds Ronald and Nancy Reagan, March 4, 1952
Newlyweds Ronald and Nancy Reagan, March 4, 1952

Nancy met Ronald Reagan in 1951 while he was president of the Screen Actor's Guild. Concerned that she would be confused with another actress by the same name who appeared on the Hollywood blacklist, she contacted Ronald Reagan to help maintain her employment as an SAG actress in Hollywood, and for help in removing her name from the list. On March 4, 1952, they were married in a simple ceremony in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles in the Little Brown Church. Ronald Reagan's best man was William Holden.[23] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... blacklisting is gay ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... San Fernando Valley from its southwestern edge. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... William Holden (April 17, 1918 – ca. ...


Their first child, Patricia Ann Reagan (better known under her professional name Patti Davis), was born on October 21, 1952. Their son, Ronald Prescott Reagan, was born six years later, on May 20. Nancy Reagan is also stepmother to Michael Reagan and Maureen Reagan, the children of her husband's first marriage to actress Jane Wyman whom he divorced in 1948. Patti Davis (born Patricia Ann Reagan on October 21, 1952 in Los Angeles, California) is the daughter of former President of the United States Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Davis. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ron Reagan in 2007 Ronald Prescott Reagan (born May 20, 1958, Los Angeles, California, USA), usually known as Ron Reagan, is the son of the late former President of the United States Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Edward Reagan (born March 18, 1945 as John L. Flaugher), adopted son of United States President Ronald Reagan and his first wife Jane Wyman, is the host of a conservative talk radio show, the Michael Reagan Show, which is syndicated to radio stations in the United States through Radio... Maureen Elizabeth Reagan Revell (January 4, 1941 – August 8, 2001) was the daughter of former President Ronald Reagan and his first wife, Jane Wyman. ... Jane Wyman (January 5, 1917[1]– September 10, 2007) was an Oscar, Golden Globe-winning and Emmy-nominated American actress. ...

Nancy and Ronald Reagan on a boat in 1964
Nancy and Ronald Reagan on a boat in 1964

Observers described Ronald and Nancy Reagan's relationship as close, real, and intimate.[24] While President and First Lady, the Reagans were reported to display their affection for each other frequently, with one press secretary noting, "They never took each other for granted. They never stopped courting."[25][26] He often called her "Mommy"; she called him "Ronnie".[26] While the President was recuperating in the hospital after the assassination attempt in 1981, Nancy Reagan slept with one of his shirts to be comforted by the scent;[27] in a letter to Nancy, President Reagan wrote, "whatever I treasure and enjoy [...] all would be without meaning if I didn’t have you."[28] In 1994, President Reagan wrote "I have recently been told that I am one of the millions of Americans who will be afflicted with Alzheimer's disease [...] I only wish there was some way I could spare Nancy from this painful experience,"[25] and in 1998, while her husband was severely affected by the disease, Nancy told Vanity Fair, "Our relationship is very special. We were very much in love and still are. When I say my life began with Ronnie, well, it's true. It did. I can't imagine life without him."[25] Nancy Reagan was known for the focused and attentive look she fastened upon her husband during his speeches and appearances, nicknamed "the Gaze."[29] President Reagan's death in June 2004 ended what Charlton Heston called "the greatest love affair in the history of the American Presidency."[25] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 563 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (563 × 450 pixel, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ronald Reagan and Nancy Reagan aboard a boat in California, 1964. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 563 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (563 × 450 pixel, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ronald Reagan and Nancy Reagan aboard a boat in California, 1964. ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...


Nancy's relationship with her children was not always the close and intimate one as with her husband. Patti and Ron, as well as stepchildren Maureen and Michael, quarreled with Nancy frequently. Her relationship with Patti was the most contentious; Patti flouted American conservatism and rebelled against her parents by joining the nuclear freeze movement and authoring many anti-Reagan books.[30] Nancy was thought to be closest to Maureen, her stepdaughter, during the White House years, but each of the Reagan children experienced periods of estrangement with their parents.[25] The nuclear freeze was a proposed agreement between the worlds nuclear powers, primarily the United States and the then-Soviet Union, to freeze all production of new nuclear arms and to leave levels of nuclear armanent where they currently were. ...


First Lady of California, 1967–1975

Reagan was First Lady of California during her husband's two terms as governor. She first attracted controversy early in 1967, when she moved her family out of the California Governor's Mansion in Sacramento and into a wealthy suburb, after fire officials had described the house as being a "firetrap." This move was perceived by many as snobbery, but Nancy defended her actions as being for the good of her family.[31] In 1967 she was appointed by her husband to the California Arts Commission.[32] The Historic Governors Mansion of California is the former official home of the Governor of California and a National Historic Landmark. ... Sacramento redirects here. ... The California Arts Council is a state agency governed by an 11-member council appointed by the Governor and the state Legislature to advance the state through the arts and creativity, with an emphasis on children and under-served communities. ...


As California's First Lady, Reagan visited veterans, the elderly, and the handicapped, and worked in conjunction with a number of charitable groups.[33] She began her involvement with the Foster Grandparent Program, which she would continue and expand after arriving in Washington.[34] The Reagans also held dinners for former POWs and Vietnam War veterans while Governor and First Lady. Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


On the campaign trail

Governor Reagan's term ended in 1975, and he did not run for a third. Instead, he met with advisors to discuss a possible bid for the presidency in 1976, something they approved of. Reagan had to convince a reluctant Nancy before doing anything, however.[35] She eventually approved and did her part in the campaign: oversaw personnel, monitored her husband's schedule, and gave occasional press conferences. He lost the 1976 Republican nomination to the incumbent President Gerald Ford, but ran again for the presidency in 1980 and succeeded in winning the nomination. During this campaign, her managing of staff became more apparent.[36] She arranged a meeting between feuding campaign staffers John Sears and Michael Deaver with her husband, which resulted in Deaver's leaving the campaign and placing Sears in charge. After the Reagan camp lost the Iowa caucus and fell behind in New Hampshire polls, Nancy organized a second meeting and decided it was time to fire Sears and his associates; she gave him a copy of the press release announcing his letting-go.[36] As well as being influential, Nancy continued to answer questions from the press and give speeches when needed. She played a large part in her husband's successful 1980 presidential bid. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... A joint press conference by U.S. President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair at the White House. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Patrick Sears is a Republican political strategist, best known for three things: Being Richard Nixons campaign manager in 1972, Managing Ronald Reagans presidential bid, prior to being fired by Reagan and replaced by William Casey on the day he won the New Hampshire primary in 1980. ... The Troika (from left to right) Chief of Staff James Baker III, Counselor to the President Ed Meese, Deputy Chief of Staff Michael Deaver at the White House. ... Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ...


First Lady of the United States, 1981–1989

First Lady Nancy Reagan and President Reagan during the inaugural parade, 1981
First Lady Nancy Reagan and President Reagan during the inaugural parade, 1981

When Ronald Reagan was inaugurated as president of the United States in 1981, Nancy Reagan became the First Lady. Though a controversial First Lady, more then half of Americans had a favorable opinion of her when her husband left office in 1989.[37] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 759 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2953 × 2334 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 759 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2953 × 2334 pixel, file size: 2. ...


White House China

Early during her tenure as First Lady, Nancy Reagan stated that it was one of her objectives to create a home in the White House. Rather than use government funds to redecorate as well as renovate the floors, she sought private funds to complete the work.[2] Nancy drew controversy early on by announcing the purchase of 4,370 pieces of new scarlet, cream and gold State China Service for the White House costing $210,399.[38] Although the china was paid for by private donations, as well as the private Knapp Foundation, it was ordered at a time when the nation was undergoing an economic recession.[39] The new china, a White House renovation, her attending the royal wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, her elegant fashions much emulated by many women of the time, and her acceptance of new, free clothing from luxury designers gave her a feeling of being "out of touch" with the American people, and the derogatory nickname "Queen Nancy" was created.[2] Reagan attempted to deflect this criticism in 1982 at the Gridiron Dinner when she self-deprecatingly donned a baglady costume and sang "Second-Hand Clothes," a mimicking version of "Second-Hand Rose."[40] For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The China Room is painted ivory with accenting red and green draperies, carpet, and shelves. ... The recession of the early 1980s was caused by the combination of 1) tight monetary policy, 2) the Reagan tax cut, 3) increased government spending [citation needed]. The causing aggregate demand to increase, while at the same time constraining the money supply resulted in very high interest rates, which caused... Prince Charles may refer to: Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, current heir-apparent to the British throne Any of the previous British royals named Charles, Prince of Wales The former Belgian regent, Prince Charles of Belgium This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor, née Spencer) (1 July 1961–31 August 1997), commonly, but incorrectly, known as Princess Diana, was for fifteen years the wife of HRH The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. ... The Gridiron Club, founded in 1885, is the oldest and most prestigious journalistic organization in Washington, D.C. Its 65 active members represent major newspapers, news services, news magazines and broadcast networks. ... A homeless person in Paris. ...


President Reagan's assassination attempt

Nancy Reagan hosts the First Ladies Conference on Drug Abuse at the White House in 1985

On March 30, 1981, President Reagan and three others were struck by gunfire when leaving the Washington Hilton Hotel. Nancy was alerted of a shooting and arrived at George Washington University Hospital not long after the event took place. She recalls having seen "emergency rooms before, but I had never seen one like this—with my husband in it."[41] She was escorted into a waiting room, and when granted access to see the president he said to her, "Honey, I forgot to duck" (borrowing defeated boxer Jack Dempsey's line to his wife).[42] While President Reagan was in the hospital recuperating, Nancy slept with one of his shirts to be comforted by the scent.[43] Upon his release from the hospital on April 12, she personally escorted President Reagan back to the White House. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Reagan assassination attempt occurred on March 30, 1981, just 69 days into the presidency of Ronald Reagan. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... The George Washington University (GWU) is a private university in Washington, D.C., founded in 1821 as The Columbian College. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


"Just Say No"

Further information: Just Say No
Nancy Reagan gives a speech at a "Just Say No" rally in Los Angeles, California, 1987
Nancy Reagan gives a speech at a "Just Say No" rally in Los Angeles, California, 1987

Nancy Reagan launched the "Just Say No" Drug Awareness Campaign in 1982, it being considered her primary project and major initiative as First Lady.[2] While visiting a school in Oakland, California, she was asked by a schoolgirl what to do if she was offered drugs; Nancy responded by saying, "Just say no."[44] The phrase soon proliferated through the popular culture of the 1980s and was eventually adopted as the name of club organizations, as well as in schools, where young people pledged not to experiment with drugs.[2] Reagan traveled over 250,000 miles throughout the United States and several nations, visiting drug prevention programs and rehabilitation centers. She also appeared on television talk shows, taped public service announcements, and wrote guest articles.[2] Mrs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 399 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (495 × 744 pixel, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nancy Reagan Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 399 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (495 × 744 pixel, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nancy Reagan Metadata This file contains... Mrs. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Mrs. ... “Oakland” redirects here. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events...


In 1985, Nancy expanded the campaign to an international level by inviting the First Ladies of different nations to the White House for a conference on drug abuse. On October 27, 1986, President Reagan signed a drug enforcement bill into law, which granted $1.7 billion dollars to fight the crisis, and ensured a mandatory minimum penalty for drug offenses.[45] Although the bill was criticized by some, Nancy Reagan said that she considered it a personal victory.[2] In 1988, she became the first First Lady invited to address the United Nations General Assembly, speaking on international drug interdiction and trafficking laws.[2] This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The United Nations General Assembly (GA) is one of the five principal organs of the United Nations. ...


Critics of "Just Say No" and the American war on drugs argued that the program was too expensive to be taught as a school course or club. Its purpose was questioned as well. Author Jeff Elliot states that the Reagan administration's usage of the words " drug use" and "drug abuse" were synonymous, commenting on Dr. Michael Newcomb claiming that there is "no evidence that most people who experiment with drugs get hooked."[46]

Mrs. Reagan sits on Mr. T's lap in the White House Cross Hall during a 1983 Christmas party for underprivileged children of the District

Nonetheless, there are a number of "Just Say No" clubs and organizations still in operation around the country, aimed at educating children and teens about the effects of drugs.[47] In 1983, Reagan appeared as herself in an episode of the soap opera Dynasty to underscore support for the anti-drug campaign. In addition, she appeared in an episode of a popular 1980s sitcom Diff'rent Strokes,[48] as well as in a rock music video Stop the Madness in 1985, also to promote "Just Say No." Image File history File links WH120383flotusNDR.png‎ U.S. government agency produced image of First Lady of the United States Nancy Davis Reagan with the television and movie personality Mr. ... Image File history File links WH120383flotusNDR.png‎ U.S. government agency produced image of First Lady of the United States Nancy Davis Reagan with the television and movie personality Mr. ... This article is about the actor. ... The Cross Hall, looking east. ... Dynasty was an American primetime television soap opera that aired on ABC from January 12, 1981 to May 10, 1989. ... Diffrent Strokes is an American sitcom that aired on the NBC television network from 1978 to 1985, and on ABC from 1985 to 1986. ... Stop the Madness was an anti-drug music video sponsored by the Reagan administration in 1985, starring New Edition, LaToya Jackson (aka Michael), Whitney Houston, Nancy Reagan, David Hasselhoff, Tootie Ramsey (Kim Fields) from the The Facts of Life, Herb Alpert, Casey Kasem and Boogaloo Shrimp from the Breakin franchise...


Her husband's protector

Reagan took on a role as being her husband's unofficial "protector" after the attempted assassination in 1981; when Senator Strom Thurmond entered the hospital room claiming he was the President's "close friend," Nancy had him thrown out.[49] She stated in her memoirs, "I felt panicky every time he left the White House,"[50] and made it her concern to know her husband's schedule: what events he would be attending, when, where, and with whom.[2] Eventually, this "protection" led to the consultation of an astrologer, Joan Quigley, who gave insight on which days were "good," "neutral," or "days that should be avoided," which influenced the White House time schedule of her husband. Days were color-coded according to the astrologer's advice to discern precisely what days and at what times would be optimal for safety and success.[2] The White House Chief of Staff, Donald Regan, grew frustrated with this regimen, which created friction between him and the First Lady. While the two were talking on the telephone in 1987, Regan became so angry that he hung up on the First Lady. According to former ABC News correspondent Sam Donaldson, when the President heard of this treatment, he demanded—and eventually received—Regan's 1987 resignation.[51] In his 1988 memoirs, Regan released the fact that Reagan consulted an astrologer, resulting in embarrassment for Nancy. James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... A memoir, as a literary genre, forms a sub-class of autobiography. ... Joan Quigley, of San Francisco, is a famous astrologer best known for her top secret devotion to the Reagan White House in the 1980s. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... Donald Thomas Regan (December 21, 1918 – June 10, 2003) was the 66th United States Secretary of the Treasury, from 1981 to 1985, and Chief of Staff from 1985 to 1987 in the Reagan administration, where he advocated supply-side economics and tax cuts to create jobs and stimulate production. ... ABC News Special Report ident, circa 2006 ABC News is a division of American television and radio network ABC, owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... Samuel Andrew Donaldson (born March 11, 1934 in El Paso, Texas) was a news anchor for ABC News, known for his persistence in questioning senior government officials up to and including the President of the United States. ...


Cold War

It was Nancy Reagan who suggested the notion that Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev and her husband, Ronald Reagan, form a personal relationship with each other before discussing nuclear affairs during the Cold War.[2] In 1985, 1987, and 1988, while discussions between the Soviet Leader and the President took place, Nancy met with Gorbachev's wife, Raisa. The two women usually had tea, and discussed differences between the USSR and the United States. Their relationship was anything but the friendly, diplomatic one between their husbands, however; Nancy found Raisa too hard to converse with and somewhat shrewd.[2] Visiting the United States for the first time in 1987, Raisa irked Reagan with lectures on subjects ranging from architecture to socialism, reportedly prompting the American President's wife to quip, "Who does that dame think she is?"[52] Joseph Stalin, first General Secretary The General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (First Secretary in 1953-1966) was the title synonymous with leader of the Soviet Union after Vladimir Lenins death in 1924. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (Russian: ), surname more accurately romanized as Gorbachyov; (born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Raisa Maximovna Gorbacheva (Russian: Раи́са Макси́мовна Горбачёва), maiden name Raisa Maximovna Titarenko (Раи́са Макси́мо&#1074...


Later life

Upon leaving the White House on January 20, 1989, the Reagans returned to California, where they purchased a second home in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles, dividing their time between that home and the Reagan Ranch in Santa Barbara, California.[53] After leaving Washington Nancy Reagan made numerous public appearances, many on behalf of her husband. January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Bel-Air is a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, California. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Rancho del Cielo, or Ranch of the Sky, is a 688 acre (2. ... Nickname: Location in Santa Barbara County and the state of California Coordinates: , County Government  - Mayor Marty Blum Area  - City 111. ...

Nancy Reagan's official White House portrait which hangs in the Vermeil Room

In late 1989, she established the Nancy Reagan Foundation, which aimed to continue to educate people about the serious dangers of substance abuse.[54] The Foundation teamed with the BEST Foundation For A Drug-Free Tomorrow in 1994, and developed the Nancy Reagan Afterschool Program. Subsequently she continued to travel around the nation, speaking out against the abuse of drugs and alcohol. After President Reagan revealed that he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 1994, she made herself his primary care-person and became actively involved with the National Alzheimer’s Association and its affiliate, the Ronald & Nancy Reagan Research Institute in Chicago, Illinois.[53] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... White House ground floor. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...

Former First Lady Nancy Reagan kisses her husband's casket on June 7, 2004, during the week-long state funeral for President Ronald Reagan

Reagan published her memoirs in late 1989. Titled My Turn: The Memoirs of Nancy Reagan, she gives an account of her life in the White House, speaking openly about the influence she had within the Reagan administration and about the myths and controversies that surrounded her and her husband.[55] In 1991, controversial author Kitty Kelley wrote an unauthorized, and largely uncited, biography about Nancy Reagan, repeating rumors of supposed sexual relations with singer Frank Sinatra, and a poor relationship with her children. National Review observes that Kelley's unsupported claims are most likely untrue.[56][57] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Former United States First Lady Nancy Reagan kisses the casket of her husband, Former U.S. President Ronald Reagan during the week long state funeral honoring him in June of 2004. ... Kitty Kelley (born April 4, 1942) is an American investigative journalist and author of several best-selling biographies of celebrities and politicians, most of them unauthorized. ... “Sinatra” redirects here. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ...


She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, by President George W. Bush on July 9, 2002.[58] President Reagan received his own Presidential Medal of Freedom in January 1993. Earlier in 2002, Nancy and her husband were jointly awarded the Congressional Gold Medal on May 16 at the Capitol Building, being only the third President and First Lady to receive it; she was on hand to receive the medal on behalf of herself and her husband.[59] The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Nancy has continued to stay active in politics, particularly relating to stem cell research. In 2004, she favored the Democrat's position, crossing party lines to urge President George W. Bush to support embryonic stem cell research in the hopes that such research would lead to a cure for Alzheimer's disease.[60] She was not notably successful in changing the President's opinion, and did support his campaign for a second term.[61] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ...

Nancy Reagan (left) accepts Poland's highest award, the Order of the White Eagle, on behalf of Ronald Reagan from Polish President Lech Kaczyński (to her right), July 17, 2007 at the Reagan Library

Nancy Reagan resides in her Bel Air home, where she lived with her husband until his death on June 5, 2004.[62] During the six-day state funeral, Nancy, escorted by her military escort, traveled from her home to the Reagan Library, and to Washington, D.C., before returning to the library in California for the interment. At that ceremony, she broke down and cried for the first time in public during the week, and mouthed "I love you" to the casket before leaving.[63] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Order of the White Eagle (badge) The Order of the White Eagle (Polish Order OrÅ‚a BiaÅ‚ego) is Polands highest decoration awarded to both civilians and the military for their merits. ...  , IPA: [] (born June 18, 1949) is the President of the Republic of Poland and a politician of the conservative party Prawo i Sprawiedliwość (Law and Justice, PiS.) KaczyÅ„ski served as President of Warsaw from 2002 until December 22, 2005, the day before his presidential inauguration. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Former United States First Lady Nancy Reagan kisses the casket of her husband, Former U.S. President Ronald Reagan during the week long state funeral honoring him in June of 2004. ... The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library is the presidential library of Ronald Wilson Reagan, the 40th President of the United States. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


She was briefly hospitalized in 2005 upon falling during a trip to the United Kingdom,[64] and attended the National funeral service for Gerald Ford two years later in the Washington National Cathedral. She also continues to present the Ronald Reagan Freedom Award to one notable person who "embodied President Reagan's lifelong belief that one man or woman truly can make a difference." On February 6, 2007, she presented it to former President George H.W. Bush; other notable recipients include Mikhail Gorbachev, Margaret Thatcher, and Rudy Giuliani.[65] On May 3 of the same year, Nancy Reagan hosted and attended the first 2008 Republican Presidential Candidates Debate at the Reagan Presidential Library. While she did not participate in any of the discussions, she sat in the front row and listened as the men vying to become the nation's 44th president claimed to be the rightful successor to her husband, the 40th. Betty Ford kneels in prayer at the casket of her late husband, Gerald Ford, as he lies in state. ... Washington National Cathedral has been the site of three presidential state funerals: for Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ronald W. Reagan, Gerald R. Ford and a presidential burial for Woodrow Wilson and a memorial service for Harry Truman. ... Nancy Reagan presents the 2007 Ronald Reagan Freedom Award to former United States President George Bush. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (Russian: ), surname more accurately romanized as Gorbachyov; (born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and to date only woman to hold either post. ... Rudolph William Louis Giuliani III, (born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, prosecutor, businessman, and Republican politician from the state of New York. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Reagan attended the funeral of Lady Bird Johnson in Austin, Texas on July 14, 2007,[66] and three days later accepted the highest Polish distinction, the Order of the White Eagle, on behalf of Ronald Reagan at the Reagan Library. She mourned the death of friends Merv Griffin and Michael Deaver in August of that year.[67][68] Claudia Alta Lady Bird Taylor Johnson (December 22, 1912 – July 11, 2007)[1] was a First Lady of the United States, having been the wife of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas, the seat of Travis County. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Order of the White Eagle (badge) The Order of the White Eagle (Polish Order Orła Białego) is Polands highest decoration awarded to both civilians and the military for their merits. ... Mervyn Edward Merv Griffin, Jr. ... The Troika (from left to right) Chief of Staff James Baker III, Counselor to the President Ed Meese, Deputy Chief of Staff Michael Deaver at the White House. ...


Filmography

  • The Doctor and the Girl (1949)
  • East Side, West Side (1949)
  • Shadow on the Wall (1950)
  • The Next Voice You Hear ... (1950)
  • Night Into Morning (1951)
  • It's a Big Country (1951)
  • Talk About a Stranger (1952)
  • Shadow in the Sky (1952)
  • Donovan's Brain (1953)
  • Rescue at Sea (also known as Crash Landing—1955)
  • Hellcats of the Navy (1957)[14]

Donovans Brain is a 1953 film, starring Nancy Reagan, based on the 1942 horror novel Donovans Brain by Curt Siodmak. ... Hellcats of the Navy is a movie starring Ronald Reagan and wife Nancy Davis (her then professional name) — a moral WWII submarine tale — the only film in which they appear together. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 66
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o First Lady Biography: Nancy Reagan. National First Ladies Library. Retrieved on 2007-06-02.
  3. ^ The 'just say no' first lady. MSNBC (February 18, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-10-16.
  4. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 71
  5. ^ a b Nancy Reagan: Her Life & Times. Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  6. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 74
  7. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 67
  8. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 82
  9. ^ Lute Song. Internet Broadway Database. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  10. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 85
  11. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 88
  12. ^ Biography for Nancy Davis. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc (2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  13. ^ a b Cannon, Lou (2003). Governor Reagan: His Rise to Power. Public Affairs. ISBN 1586480308.  pp. 75–76.
  14. ^ a b c Nancy Reagan > Her Films. Ronald Reagan Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  15. ^ "Another View of Psychiatrist's Task", The New York Times, 1950-05-19. Retrieved on 2007-10-18. 
  16. ^ Bosley Crowther. "'The Next Voice You Hear ...', Dore Schary Production, Opens at Music Hall", The New York Times, 1950-06-30. Retrieved on 2007-10-18. 
  17. ^ Sindelar, Dave. The Next Voice You Hear... (1950). SciFilm. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  18. ^ Bosley Crowther. "'Night Into Morning,' Starring Ray Milland as a Bereaved Professor, at Loew's State", The New York Times, 1951-06-11. Retrieved on 2007-10-18. 
  19. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 91
  20. ^ Erickson, Glenn (2003). Hellcats of the Navy, review one. Kleinman.com Inc. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  21. ^ Harper, Erick (2003). Hellcats Of The Navy, review two. DVDVerdict. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  22. ^ Screen Actors Guild Presidents. Screen Actors Guild. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  23. ^ First Ladies: Nancy Reagan. The White House. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  24. ^ Beschloss, Michael (2007), p. 296
  25. ^ a b c d e End of a Love Story. BBC News (June 5, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  26. ^ a b Berry, Deborah Barfield (June 6, 2004). By Reagan's Side, but her own person. Newsday. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  27. ^ Beschloss, Michael (2007), p. 284
  28. ^ Reagan Love Story. NBC News (June 9, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  29. ^ "Up Next for Nancy Reagan: tending her Ronnie's flame", St. Petersburg Times, June 13, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-03-08. 
  30. ^ Wolf, Julie (2000). The Reagan Children. PBS. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  31. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), pp. 135–137
  32. ^ Robert_Windeler. "Reagan Panel Fills Arts Chief's Post After It Ousted Aide", The New York Times, 1967-11-17. Retrieved on 2007-10-18. 
  33. ^ Medal of Freedom Recipients: Nancy Reagan. medaloffreedom.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  34. ^ Foster Grandparent's Program. Scholastic. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  35. ^ Benze, James G. (2005), p. 32
  36. ^ a b Benze, James G., Jr. (2005), p. 33
  37. ^ A Look Back At The Polls. CBS Interactive Inc (June 7, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-09-23.
  38. ^ "Lenox: White House". Lenox, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-06-02.
  39. ^ Klapthor, Margaret Brown (1999), p. 184
  40. ^ Page, Susan (2004-06-13). Husband's Past will shape Nancy Reagan. USA Today. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  41. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 5
  42. ^ Noonan, Peggy. Character Above All: Ronald Reagan essay. PBS. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  43. ^ Beschloss, Michael (2007), p. 284
  44. ^ Remarks at the Nancy Reagan Drug Abuse Center Benefit Dinner in Los Angeles, California. Ronald Reagan Foundation (1989-01-04). Retrieved on 2007-10-03. “...in Oakland where a schoolchild in an audience Nancy was addressing stood up and asked what she and her friends should say when someone offered them drugs. And Nancy said, "Just say no." And within a few months thousands of Just Say No clubs had sprung up in schools around the country.”
  45. ^ Thirty Years of America's Drug War. pbs.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  46. ^ Just say nonsense - Nancy Reagan's drug education programs 3. FindArticles (May 1993). Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  47. ^ "Mrs. Reagan's Crusade". Ronald Reagan Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  48. ^ 'Diff'rent Strokes': The Reporter (1983). The Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  49. ^ Beschloss, Michael (2007), p. 284
  50. ^ Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 21
  51. ^ Thomas, Rhys (Writer/Producer); Donaldson, Sam (interviewee). (2005). The Presidents [Documentary]. A&E Television.
  52. ^ Chua-Eoan, Howard G.. ""My Wife Is a Very Independent Lady"", Time Magazine, June 6, 1988. Retrieved on 2007-10-05. 
  53. ^ a b Reagan, Nancy. Classbrain.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-12.
  54. ^ Nancy Reagan: Her Life and Times. Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-05-12.
  55. ^ "My Turn Review". A-1 Women's Discount Bookstore. Retrieved on 2007-03-28.
  56. ^ "Judging the Reagans", The New York Times, May 26, 1991. Retrieved on 2007-03-28. 
  57. ^ Here Kitty, Kitty - public reaction to Kitty Kelley's book 'Nancy Reagan: The Unauthorized Biography'. National Review (May 13, 1991). Retrieved on 2007-04-24.
  58. ^ The White House (July 9, 2002). President Bush Honors Recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom Award. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  59. ^ "Congressional Gold Medal History". United States House of Representatives. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  60. ^ Erika Check (2004). "Bush pressured as Nancy Reagan pleads for stem-cell research". Nature 429: 116. DOI:10.1038/429116a. 
  61. ^ Former first lady Nancy Reagan supports Bush's re-election. USA Today (August 4, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  62. ^ "Ronald Reagan dies at 93", CNN, 2004-06-05. Retrieved on 2007-02-07. 
  63. ^ "Reagan Laid to Rest". Fox News (June 12, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-03-24.
  64. ^ "Nancy Reagan to rest after fall in London", Associated Press, 2005-06-16. Retrieved on 2007-02-07. 
  65. ^ Ronald Reagan Freedom Award. Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  66. ^ Alex Johnson (May 4, 2007). Republicans walk tightrope over war in Iraq. MSNBC. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.
  67. ^ Friends Mourn TV Legend Merv Griffin. People Magazine (August 13, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  68. ^ Obituary: Michael Deaver. Legacy.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Internet Broadway Database The Internet Broadway Database (IBDb) is an online database of Broadway theatre productions and their personnel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lou Cannon is an American non-fiction author and biographer. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bosley Crowther (July 13, 1905 – March 7, 1981) was an American film critic. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bosley Crowther (July 13, 1905 – March 7, 1981) was an American film critic. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the St. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Benze, James G., Jr. (2005). Nancy Reagan: On the White House Stage. United States of America: University Press of Kansas. ISBN 070061401X. 
  • Beschloss, Michael (2007). Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders and How They Changed America. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0684857057. 
  • Klapthor, Margaret Brown (1999). Official White House China: 1789 to the Present. Harry N. Abrams. ISBN 0810939932. 
  • Reagan, Nancy (2002). I Love You, Ronnie: The Letters of Ronald Reagan to Nancy Reagan. United States: Random House. ISBN 0375760512. 
  • Reagan, Nancy; William Novak (1989). My Turn: The Memoirs of Nancy Reagan. New York: Random House. ISBN 0394563689. 

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Nancy Reagan
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Nancy Reagan
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Death and state funeral of Ronald Reagan
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Rosalynn Carter
First Lady of the United States
1981-1989
Succeeded by
Barbara Bush
Order of precedence in the United States of America
Preceded by
Betty Ford
United States order of precedence
as of 2007
Succeeded by
Variable (ministers of foreign powers); next fixed is John Paul Stevens

 
 

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