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Encyclopedia > Names of God

Conceptions of God can vary widely, but the word God in English and its counterparts in cognate languages are normally used for all of them. Other languages have similar generic names, and a common experience is for the word for "God" in one language to be perceived by speakers of other languages as the name of a specific deity worshipped by speakers of that one language. However some names refer almost exclusively to the supreme being of a single religion. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The term “Holy Name” is used across various religions and is often in the names of schools, hospitals, churches, mosques, and other various places associated with religion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see God. ...

A "diagram" of the names of God in Athanasius Kircher's Oedipus Aegyptiacus (1652–54). The style and form are typical of the mystical tradition, as early theologians began to fuse emerging pre-Enlightenment concepts of classification and organization with religion and alchemy, to shape an artful and perhaps more conceptual view of God.
A "diagram" of the names of God in Athanasius Kircher's Oedipus Aegyptiacus (1652–54). The style and form are typical of the mystical tradition, as early theologians began to fuse emerging pre-Enlightenment concepts of classification and organization with religion and alchemy, to shape an artful and perhaps more conceptual view of God.

Contents

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (640x871, 928 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Names of God User:Jason Palpatine ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (640x871, 928 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Names of God User:Jason Palpatine ... Athanasius Kircher ( ) (sometimes erroneously spelled Kirchner) was a 17th century German Jesuit scholar who published around 40 works, most notably in the fields of oriental studies, geology and medicine. ... Oedipus Aegyptiacus is Athanasius Kirchers supreme work of Egyptology. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... The Enlightenment (French: ; German: ; Italian: ; Portuguese: ) was an eighteenth century movement in European and American philosophy — some classifications also include 17th century philosophy (usually called the Age of Reason). ... For Wikipedias categorization projects, see Wikipedia:Categorization. ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ...

Abrahamic religions

Judaism

Further information: Ēl

In the Torah, the name of God represents the Jewish conception of the divine nature. The various Jewish names of God represent God, and His divine attributes. The most important name of God is the tetragrammaton (Hebrew: יהוה, English: YHVH or YHWH – vowels are not written in the Hebrew spelling but are usually taken to be "a" and "e" making the modern pronunciation "Yahveh" or "Yahweh" respectively), and Elohim. At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ... Ä’l is a northwest Semitic word and name translated into English as either god or God or left untranslated as El, depending on the context. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Yahweh be merged into this article or section. ... Hebrew language most commonly refers to Modern Hebrew; in historical contexts, it commonly refers to the Biblical Hebrew language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the Hebrew word. ...


While some from within the scholarly community have made the claim that the pronunciation of YHWH has been lost, other authorities testify that it has not, and that it is pronounced Yahweh. One example of this may be found in the Encyclopaedia Judaica, where we read: For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ... The Encyclopaedia Judaica is a 26-volume English-language encyclopedia of the Jewish people and their faith, Judaism. ...

The true pronunciation of the name YHWH was never lost. Several early Greek writers of the Christian Church testify that the name was pronounced "Yahweh." This is confirmed, at least for the vowel of the first syllable of the name, by the shorter form Yah, which is sometimes used in poetry (e.g., Ex. 15:2) and the -yahu or -yah that serves as the final syllable in very many Hebrew names.[1] For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ...

Other references, such as The New Encyclopædia Britannica, validate the above by offering additional specifics: The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ...

Early Christian writers, such as Clement of Alexandria in the 2nd century, had used a form like Yahweh, and this pronunciation of the tetragrammaton was never really lost. Other Greek transcriptions also indicated that YHWH should be pronounced Yahweh.[2] Clement of Alexandria (Titus Flavius Clemens), was the first member of the Church of Alexandria to be more than a name, and one of its most distinguished teachers. ... For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Yahweh be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ...

Nevertheless, it has been shown that Clement of Alexandria actually transliterated the tetragrammaton as Ιαου. The above claims were founded upon the understanding that Clement of Alexandria had transliterated YHWH as Ιαουε in Greek, which is pronounced "Yahweh" in English. However, the final -e in the latter form has been shown as having been a later addition. For a more in-depth discussion of this, see the article Yahweh. For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ...


Christianity

Yahweh is a common vocalization of God's personal name based on the Hebrew tetragrammaton (above). Because of concerns for avoiding blasphemy, the name is often avoided and replaced with "LORD" (equivalent to the Hebrew Adonai). Furthermore, many scholars avoid the name because its actual pronunciation has been lost in antiquity. The modern rendition, Jehovah is believed by some scholars to be incorrect but many people recognize it to be a different rendition of Yahweh and no more incorrect than using the modern word Jesus. Jehovah's Witnesses use it for English references to the Creator and Almighty God. For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ... The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (1100 BC to 300 CE), Aramaic (10th Century BC to 0) and modern Hebrew scripts. ... This article is about a reading of the name of God in Hebrew scripture. ...


Jesus (Iesus, Yeshua, Joshua, or Yehoshûa) is a Hebraic personal name meaning "Yahweh saves/helps/is salvation", [3]. Christ means "the anointed" in Greek, translating Messiah; while in English the old Anglo-Saxon Messiah-rendering hæland 'healer' was practically annihilated by the Latin Christ, some cognates such as heiland in Dutch survive. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Jesus (8-2 BC/BCE– 29-36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... For the article on the person, teaching, and acts of Jesus Christ, see the Jesus article. ... Joshua, Jehoshuah or Yehoshua. ... Jesus (IPA ) (8–2 BC/BCE to 29–36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... To anoint is to apply perfumed oil. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ...


In Messianic Judaism, generally regarded as a form of Christianity, YHWH (pre-incarnate) and Yeshua (incarnate) are one and the same, the second Person, with the Father and Ruach haQodesh (the Holy Spirit) being the first and third Persons, respectively, of ha'Elohiym (the Godhead). YHWH is expressed as "haShem," which means 'the Name.' The Baruch Hashem Messianic Synagogue in Dallas, Texas Theology and Practice Messiah · Yeshua · Dance · Seal Religious Texts Messianic Bible translations Movement leaders & Orgs. ...


In the effort to translate the Bible into every language (see SIL), the Christian God has usually been named after a pagan or philosophical concept that was present in the language before Christianity. This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... SIL International is a worldwide non-profit evangelical Christian organization whose main purpose is to study, develop and document lesser-known languages in order to expand linguistic knowledge, promote literacy and aid minority language development. ...


The word God itself is an example of this, the word having earlier referred to Germanic pagan deities. Greek Theos (Θεός) was used for the supreme God even before Christianity, in the Septuagint. St. Jerome translated the Hebrew word Elohim to Latin as Deus. Other names of the Christian God that have a history of pagan meanings include Slavic Bog, Finnish Jumala, Japanese Kami and Sinhala Deviyo. In the Arabic language, Allah is also used for the Christian God. Chinese names for God involve various translations, one of which, Shangdi, derives from a pre-Christianity deity and is used largely by Protestant Chinese-speakers, and the other Tianzhu is used primarily by Catholic Chinese-speakers. Theos may refer to: Theos Is a medical electronics company with revolutionary technology focusing on remote patient monitoring . ... The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ... This article is about the Hebrew word. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... dEUS is an indie rock band based in Antwerp, Belgium, currently consisting of Tom Barman (vocals and guitar), Klaas Janzoons (keyboards and violin), Stéphane Misseghers (drums), Alan Gevaert (bass) and Mauro Pawlowski (guitar and vocals). ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... Jumala, Jumal, Jumali or Ibmel meas god in Finnish, both the Christian God and any other deity of any religion. ... “Megami” redirects here. ... Sinhala language Sinhala alphabet Sinhala people Sinhala place-names Sinhala Place Names, see Sinhala place-names Category: ... Arabic redirects here. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... Chinese terms for God, especially a Supreme God, have produced many variations for the title. ...


Another example comes from the initial stages of the predication of the Catholic missionary Francis Xavier in Japan. He was welcomed by the Shingon monks since he used the Buddhist word Dainichi for the Christian God. As Xavier learnt more about the religious nuances of the word, he changed to Deusu from the Latin and Portuguese Deus. The monks also realized that Xavier was preaching a rival religion. Saint Francis Xavier (Basque: San Frantzisko Xabierkoa; Spanish: San Francisco Javier; Portuguese: São Francisco Xavier; Chinese: 聖方濟各沙勿略) (7 April 1506 - 2 December 1552) was a Spanish pioneering Roman Catholic Christian missionary and co-founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuit Order). ... Shingon (真言宗) is a major school of Japanese Buddhism, and the most important school of Vajrayana Buddhism outside of the Himalayan region. ... Categories: Stub | Buddhist philosophical concepts ...


The less evangelical branch of the Quakers often refers to God as The Light. Another term used is 'King of Kings' or 'Lord of Lords' and Lord of the Hosts. Other names used by Christians include Ancient of Days, Father/Abba, 'Most High' and the Hebrew names Elohim, El-Shaddai, and Adonai. Principle, Mind, Soul, Life, Truth, Love, and Spirit are names for God in Christian Science. These names are considered synonymous and indicative of God's wholeness. The name, "Abba/Father" is the most common term used for the creator within Christianity, because it was the name Jesus Christ (Yeshua Messiah) himself used to refer to God. Quaker redirects here. ... The Light is the 1995 debut release by popular American prog-rock band, Spocks Beard. ... King of Kings is a lofty title that has been used by several monarchies (usually empires in the informal sense of great powers) throughout history, and in many cases the literal title meaning King of Kings, i. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ... Ancient of Days is a name for God in Aramaic (Atik Yomin); in the Greek Septuagint: (Palaios Hemeron); and in the Vulgate: (Antiquus Dierum). ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... Ab means father in most Semitic languages, affectionately extended to Abba or Aba in Northwest Semitic. ... This article describes the Biblical dialects of Hebrew. ... This article is about the Hebrew word. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ... Christian Science is a religious teaching regarding the efficacy of spiritual healing according to the interpretation of the Bible by Mary Baker Eddy, in her book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (first published in 1875). ...


For the Russian Orthodox group Imiaslavie ("Name glorification"), the name of the God is God Himself and can produce miracles. Schema-monk Illarion Imiaslavie (Russian: ) or Imiabozhie (Имябожие), also referred as onomatodoxy, is a dogmatic movement which was condemned by the Russian Orthodox Church, but that is still promoted by some affiliated with Gregory Lourie of the Russian Orthodox Autonomous Church (a splinter group of the Russian Orthodox Church), and by...


See also: Names and titles of Jesus in the New Testament. A large variety of names and titles are used in the New Testament to describe Jesus. ...


Islam

Allah is the most frequently used name of God in Islam when speaking Arabic. It refers to the God without any other beside Him. It originally simply meant "the God" in Arabic, and was used in pre-Islamic times to refer to a divinity worshipped in Mecca. It is properly translated as "God" in English, and seen by Muslims as the same God as of Christianity and Judaism (referred to as "the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob"). The Arabic word Allah is a linguistic cognate of the Hebrew word Eloah and a translation of the English word "god", although there are some Christian sects which claim that there is a distinction between their deity and the deity or deities worshipped in either Judaism or Islam. Nevertheless, Allah is the same word in Arabic used by Arab Jews and Christians when speaking of God. The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 Attributes of God (Arabic: transliteration: ), are the names of God revealed in the Quran and Sunnah;[1] even though the names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran and Sunnah. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... Look up cognate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... This article is about the Hebrew word. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... This article is about religious groups. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Arab Jews (Arabic: يهود العرب, Hebrew: יהודים ערבים) refers to Jews of Arab ancestry or those who speak Arabic. ... Arab Christians are people who are ethnically Arab or culturally and linguistically Arabized and who follow the religion of Christianity. ...


In the Islamic point of view, Allah is the only Omnipotent and has the Most Beautiful Names. So anyone can call Him by the most beautiful names he may call. (e.g. as stated in 18/110, 20/8, 59/24, 7/180 in Quran.). A well established Islamic tradition enumerates 99 Names of God, which are His attributes. // The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 attributes of Allah (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), are the names of God revealed to man in the Quran;[1] even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran. ...


Besides those names of Qur'anic origin, Muslims of non-Arabic peoples may also sometimes use some other names in their own language which refers to God, e.g. the Ottoman anachronism Tanrı (originally the pagan Turks' celestial chief god, corresponding to the Ancient Turkish Tengri), or Khoda in Persian language which has the same indo-European root as god. The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Tengri is the god of the old Turkic and Altaic religion named Tengriism. ... Tengri is the god of the old Turkic, Mongolian and Altaic religion named Tengriism. ... Khoda is a Farsi word for God. ... Farsi redirects here. ...


Rastafari

  • Haile Selassie, whose titles include King of Kings (nəgusä nägäst), Lord of Lords, and Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah, is the name of God incarnate in the Rastafari movement. God is called Jah and Haile Selassie is called Jah Rastafari, from his precoronation name Ras Tafari Makonnen.

Haile Selassie Emperor Haile Selassie I (Power of Trinity) (born Lij Tafari Makonnen, July 23, 1892 – August 27, 1975), styled His Imperial Majesty (or HIM), was the Emperor (1930–1936; 1941–1974) of Ethiopia, and is the religious symbol for God incarnate among the Rastafari movement. ... Haile Selassie I The Rastafari movement, or Rasta, is a cultural value system that accepts Haile Selassie I, the former Emperor of Ethiopia, as God incarnate, whom they call Jah. ... Jah (IPA: ) is a name for God, most commonly used in the Rastafari movement. ...

Bahá'í Faith

Bahá'ís refer to God using the local word for God in whatever language is being spoken, so God is used in English, Allah in Arabic, Gud in the Scandinavian languages, and so forth. This is because Bahá'ís believe that, although people have different concepts of God and His nature, and may call Him by different names and use different languages, everyone is referring to one unique Deity. This article is about the generally-recognized global religious community. ...


Bahá'ís believe that the essence of God is beyond the knowledge and understanding of human beings, and that he therefore must be known through his names, or attributes. God's names are seen as his attributes, and God is often, in prayers, referred to by these titles and attributes, such as the Mighty, the All-Powerful, the Merciful, the Ever-Forgiving, the Most Generous, the All-Wise, the Incomparable, the Gracious, the Helper, the All-Glorious, the Omniscient.


Translations of scripture typically use the local language unless a whole phrase is being transliterated for a specific purpose. However, since the languages in which the Bahá'í Faith was first authored were Arabic and Persian, the term Allah and other "names" are used in some specific contexts, even by non-Arabic speakers. The above-mentioned attributes are sometimes referred to in their Arabic form - for instance Bahá'ís refer to "Bahá" (meaning Glory or Splendour) or any derivation thereof (ex. Al-Abhá, or The Most Glorious) as The Greatest Name of God. This also forms the root of the word "Bahá'i." The Bahá'í greeting Alláh-u-Abhá is a formulation of this word and is usually translated "God is most Glorious". The official symbol of the Baháí Faith is the five-pointed star, as mentioned by Shoghi Effendi: Strictly speaking the 5-pointed star is the symbol of our Faith, as used by the Báb and explained by Him. ...


Chinese religions

Main article: Chinese terms for God
  • Shangdi 上帝 (Hanyu Pinyin: shàng dì) (literally King Above) was a supreme God worshipped in ancient China. It is also used to refer to the Christian God in the Standard Mandarin Union Version of the Bible. Likewise, Korean Christians and Vietnamese Christians also use cognates of this name, to refer to the Biblical god.
  • Shen 神 (lit. God, spirit, or deity) is commonly used to refer to various spirits, including gods, and was adopted by Protestant missionaries in China to refer to the Christian God. In this context it is usually rendered with a space, " 神", to demonstrate reverence.
  • Zhu, Tian Zhu 主,天主 (lit. Lord or Lord in Heaven) is translated from the English word, "Lord", which is a formal title of the Christian God in Mainland China's Christian churches.
  • Tian 天 (lit. sky or heaven) is used to refer to the sky as well as a personification of the sky. Whether it possesses sentience in the embodiment of an omnipotent, omniscient being is a difficult question for linguists and philosophers.

Chinese terms for God, especially a Supreme God, have produced many variations for the title. ... Shangdi or Shang Ti (Wade-Giles) (上帝, pinyin Shàngdì), literally translated, Lord Above or Sovreign Above, in Chinese culture, is the name used both in traditional Chinese religion as well as Christianity for a supreme deity. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Shen can refer to the supreme kai in the Japanese anime series Dragon Ball Z. an abbrievation for Shanghai, Peoples Republic of China. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Chopsticks is also the name of a simple piece of music for piano. ... Tian (天 Pinyin Tiān) is the Chinese character for heaven or sky. ...

Religions of India

Hinduism

Main article: Sahasranama
Radha and Krishna - Venerated within many traditions of Hinduism as the Supreme God, or as manifestations therof
  • Bhagavan - "The Opulent One", Brahman -"The Great", Paramatma - "The Supersoul" and Ishvara- "The Controller", are the terms used for God in the scriptures of Hinduism. A number of Hindu traditions worship a personal form of God or Ishvara, such as Vishnu or Shiva, whereas others worship the non-personal Supreme cosmic cpirit, known as Brahman. The Vaishnava schools consider Vishnu as the Supreme Personality of Godhead and within this tradition is the Vishnu sahasranama, which is a hymn describing the one thousand names of God (Vishnu). Shaivites consider Shiva as the Supreme God in similar way to the followers of Vaishnavism. The Supreme Ishvara of Hinduism must not be confused with the numerous deities or demigods who are collectively known as devas.
  • Krishna - "The All Attractive" is the name for God used in Srimad Bhagavatam, which says that "All of the above-mentioned incarnations are either plenary portions or portions of the plenary portions of the Lord, but Lord Sri Krishna is the original Personality of Godhead".[4]In Bhagavad Gita Krishna explains that "He who knows Me as the unborn, as the beginningless, as the Supreme Lord of all the worlds — he only, undeluded among men, is freed from all sins."; "I am the source of all spiritual and material worlds."; "I am the Supersoul, O Arjuna, seated in the hearts of all living entities. I am the beginning, the middle and the end of all beings." and that "But what need is there, Arjuna, for all this detailed knowledge? With a single fragment of Myself I pervade and support this entire universe."[5]
  • Brahman in Sanskrit is both the knowable and unknowable Supreme. Aum, has been seen as the first manifestation of the unmanifest Brahman (the single Divine Ground of Hinduism) that resulted in the phenomenal universe.
  • Trimurti is the Hindu "Trinity", although this differs largely to the Christian concept. See Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva.
  • In Vaishnavism, the Vishnu sahasranama enumerates names of God. The names of Vishnu's Dasavatara in particular are considered divine names. In Gaudiya Vaishnavism, Krishna in particular is held as the personal aspect of God, the Hare Krishnas being a modern example of a movement following this philosophy.
  • In Shaivism, the Shiva sahasranama enumerates names of God.
  • Anami Purush (nameless power) and Radha Soami (lord of the soul) are two names used for God in Surat Shabda Yoga.
  • There are many thousands of devas within Hinduism who are regarded as different facets of God within some philosophical schools and referred to by a large number of names and titles. Ganesha is one such example.

The word Sahasra-nāma in Sanskrit means 1000 names. Sahasra-nāma-stotra stands for a poem or a succession of verses (shlokas,) which contain thousand names of God. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 438 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (507 × 693 pixel, file size: 349 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Motive-description: Bookpainting of Krishna and Radha, two indian deities Scan/photo by: User:Henryart (who is owner of the original painting/object/photo) Date: December... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 438 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (507 × 693 pixel, file size: 349 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Motive-description: Bookpainting of Krishna and Radha, two indian deities Scan/photo by: User:Henryart (who is owner of the original painting/object/photo) Date: December... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... Bhagavan, also written Bhagwan or Bhagawan, from the Sanskrit nt-stem (nominative/vocative ) (hindi sandhi vichchhed:भ्+अ+ग्+अ+व्+आ+न्+अ)literally means: भ bh=bhoo soil अ a=agni fire ग g=gagan sky वा va=vaayu air न n=neer water BHAGAVAN is said to be composed up of all five matters other meanings possessing fortune, blessed, prosperous... This page deals with the Hindu concept of The Supreme Reality. ... In Hindu theology, Paramatman is Absolute Atman or Supreme Soul. ... Ishvara (Sanskrit lord, master, from an adjective capable) is a philosophical concept in Hinduism, similar to the Abrahamic concept of God. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages)[1] is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... This page deals with the Hindu concept of The Supreme Reality. ... Vaishnavism is one of the principal traditions of Hinduism, and is distinguished from other schools by its primary worship of Vishnu (and his associated avatars) as the Supreme God. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... The Vishnu sahasranāma (literally: the thousand names of Vishnu) is a list of 1,000 names for Vishnu, one of the main forms of God in Hinduism and the Supreme Person for Vaishnavas (followers of Vishnu). ... Saivite: of Saivism; belonging to Saivism, the Hindu denomination that worships God Siva as the Supreme God. ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... The Bhagavata Purana (sometimes rendered as Bhagavatha Purana), also known as the Srimad Bhagavatam, written c. ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ... This page deals with the Hindu concept of The Supreme Reality. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... “Om” redirects here. ... This article is about the Hindu gods. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages)[1] is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... Vaishnavism is one of the principal traditions of Hinduism, and is distinguished from other schools by its primary worship of Vishnu (and his associated avatars) as the Supreme God. ... The Vishnu sahasranāma (literally: the thousand names of Vishnu) is a list of 1,000 names for Vishnu, one of the main forms of God in Hinduism and the Supreme Person for Vaishnavas (followers of Vishnu). ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... In Hinduism, an avatar is the incarnation (bodily manifestation) of an Immortal Being, or of the Ultimate Supreme Being. ... Gaudiya Vaishnavism, (Bengal) Vaishnavism, is a sect of Hinduism founded by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... The International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) is a new religious movement based on Bengali, or more specifically Gaudiya, Vaishnavism founded by A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, referred to by followers as His Divine Grace, in New York in 1966. ... This article is about the religion Shaivism. ... The Shiva sahasranama is the Shaiva sahasranama (list of thousand names of God), contained in the Linga Purana. ... Surat Shabd Yoga or Surat Shabda Yoga is a form of spiritual practice that is followed in the Sant Mat and many other related spiritual traditions. ... For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ganesha (disambiguation). ...

Sikhism

Main article: God in Sikhism

The fundamental belief of Sikhism is that God exists, not merely as an idea or concept, but as a Real Entity, indescribable yet knowable and perceivable to anyone who is prepare to dedicate the time and energy to become perceptive to His persona. ...

Background

In Sikhism God is One Universal Entity, the creator, self-illuminated, perpetual and gender-less. He is referred to in the Sikh Scriptures by many hundreds of names. The holy scripture of the Sikhs called the Sri Guru Granth Sahib (SGGS) begins with the following passage called the Mool Mantar or the "Main Mantra": Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Guru Granth Sahib. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... Guru Granth Sahib (Granth is Punjabi for book, Sahib is Hindi meaning master, from Arabic, meaning companion, friend, owner, or master) or Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji or SGGS for short, is more than a holy book of the Sikhs. ... Illuminated Adi Granth folio with nisan (Mool Mantar) of Guru Gobind Singh. ... In Tibet, many Buddhists carve mantras into rocks as a form of devotion. ...

Original text -Punjabi: ੴ ਸਤਿ ਨਾਮੁ ਕਰਤਾ ਪੁਰਖੁ ਨਿਰਭਉ ਨਿਰਵੈਰੁ ਅਕਾਲ ਮੂਰਤਿ ਅਜੂਨੀ ਸੈਭੰ ਗੁਰ ਪ੍ਰਸਾਦਿ ॥
ISO 15919 transliteration: Ika ōaṅkāra sati nāmu karatā purakhu nirabha'u niravairu akāla mūrati ajūnī saibhaṃ gura prasādi
Simplified transliteration: Ik ōaṅkār sat nām kartā purkh nirbha'u nirvair akāl mūrat ajūnī saibhaṃ gur prasād ||
English: One Universal Creator God.The Name Is Truth.Creative Being Personified. No Fear. No Hatred. Image Of The Timeless One, Beyond Birth, Self-Existent. By Guru's Grace ~

The English translation uses 'His' or 'He' when referring to God. Sikhism does not recognise God as being of either sex and the original Punjabi version reflects this by being gender neutral. Punjabi redirects here. ... A romanization or latinization is a system for representing a word or language with the Roman (Latin) alphabet, where the original word or language used a different writing system. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Punjabi (also Panjabi; in Gurmukhī, Panjābī in Shāhmukhī) is the language of the Punjab regions of India and Pakistan. ... Gender-neutral language (gender-generic, gender-inclusive, non-sexist, or sex-neutral language) is language that attempts to refer neither to males nor females when discussing an abstract or hypothetical person whose sex cannot otherwise be determined. ...


The Guru Granth Sahib says the following about God: "You have so many Names, Lord, I do not know their limit. There is no other equal to You." (Guru Granth Sahib page 877). The Shri Guru Granth Sahib (Punjabi: , ) is the 11th Guru of Sikhism, the holy book of Sikhism, which is revered as a living Guru by the Sikhs. ...


A testament to the above, is the 10th Guru, Guru Gobind Singh Ji's hymn, the Jaap Sahib, which is a list of many names of God, comprised 199 verses. Jaap Sahib is the morning prayer of the Sikhs. ...


Waheguru is the main and true name used for God in Sikhism Waheguru (Punjabi: , or , ) means The Wonderful Lord in the Punjabi language. ...


The Sikhs believe that Allah - The name of God used by Muslim is a valid name to use. Similarly, the name Raam, Paarbrahm, Krishan which are names of God used by Hindus are frequently mentioned in the Sikh holy scriptures. The same God of the Christians, Muslims, Hindus, etc is the Akal Purakh, the primal being of the Sikhs. Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... RAAM may mean: United Arab List, Hebrew. ... This page deals with the Hindu concept of The Supreme Reality. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... Akal Purakh: is a Sikh name used for God. ...

You fashioned all these men and women, Lord. All these are Your Forms. Kabeer is the child of God, Allah, Raam. All the Gurus and prophets are mine. (5) Says Kabeer, listen, O men and women: seek the Sanctuary of the One. Chant the Naam, the Name of the Lord, O mortals, and you shall surely be carried across. ((6)(2)) Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... RAAM may mean: United Arab List, Hebrew. ... The term Nām refers to the act of worship of God by Hindus and is also adopted by Sikhs. ...

Sri Guru Granth Sahib page 1349 Guru Granth Sahib (Granth is Punjabi for book, Sahib is Hindi meaning master, from Arabic, meaning companion, friend, owner, or master) or Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji or SGGS for short, is more than a holy book of the Sikhs. ...

Sikh names for God

However, some of the popular names for God are:

  • Akal Purakh meaning Timeless Primal Being. "Akal" stands for 'Primal, timeless' and "Purakh" stands for 'Being'
  • Ek Onkar meaning One Creator. "Ek" means "One"; "Onkar" means "Creator".
  • Satnam meaning True Name, some are of the opinion that this is a name for God in itself, others believe that this is an adjective used to describe the 'Gurmantar', Waheguru (See below)
  • Waheguru, meaning Wonderful Teacher, this name is considered the greatest among Sikhs, and it is known as 'Gurmantar', the Guru's Word.
  • Bhao Khandan meaning Destroyer of Fear
  • Dukh Bhanjno meaning Dispeller of Pain
  • Bhagat Vachhal meaning Lover of His Saints
  • Hari meaning Glowing, Shining, Vitalising - Absolute Name of God
  • Govinda meaning Preserver of the World
  • Bhagavan meaning Lord or Supreme being
  • Rabh
  • Uppar Valah
  • Malik

God according to Guru Nanak is beyond full comprehension by humans; has endless number of virtues; takes on innumerable forms; and can be called by an infinite number of names thus "Your Names are so many, and Your Forms are endless. No one can tell how many Glorious Virtues You have." (Guru Granth Sahib page 358) Akal Purakh: is a Sikh name used for God. ... Stylised Ek Onkar Simple Ek Onkar Ek Onkar (also , , Ä’k ÅŒaá¹…kār, Ek Omkar, Ik Onkar and other variants) means one God and is a central tenet of Sikh religious philosophy. ... Satnaam | ਸਤਿਨਾਮੁ This word is the second word that appears in the Sikhs sacred Scripture called the Sri Guru Granth Sahib. ... Waheguru (Punjabi: , or , ) means The Wonderful Lord in the Punjabi language. ... Bhagat refers to a Holy Person who leads humanity towards God. ... Hari (Sanskrit: हरि) is another name of Vishnu or God in Vaishnavism, Smarta or Advaitan Hinduism, and appears as the 650th name in the Vishnu sahasranama. ... Krsnas name is Govinda. ... Bhagavan, also written Bhagwan or Bhagawan, from the Sanskrit nt-stem (nominative/vocative ) (hindi sandhi vichchhed:भ्+अ+ग्+अ+व्+आ+न्+अ)literally means: भ bh=bhoo soil अ a=agni fire ग g=gagan sky वा va=vaayu air न n=neer water BHAGAVAN is said to be composed up of all five matters other meanings possessing fortune, blessed, prosperous... Guru Nanak (Gurmukhi: ਗੁਰੂ ਨਾਨਕ, Devanagari: गुरु नानक) (20 October 1469 - 7 May 1539), the founder of Sikhism and the first of the ten Gurus of the Sikhs, was born in the village of Talwandi, now called Nankana...


Jainism

There are no direct names of God in Jainism. However, Mahavir and other 'prophets' or 'perfected beings' are known as Tirthankar (literally 'Fordmaker') or Jina. Jain and Jaina redirect here. ... This article or section should be merged with Mahavir Swami Mahavir or Mahavira (the Great Hero -- Also, Vardhamana (increasing) or Niggantha Nathaputta -- 599 BC - 527 BC) was the 24th, and last, Jainist Tirthankara. ... The 24 Jinas carved on a rock in Ginjee, Tamilnadu In Jainism, a Tirthankar (Fordmaker) (also Tirthankara or Jina) is a human who by adopting asceticism achieves enlightenment (perfect knowledge), thus becoming a Jina (one who has conquered his inner enemies - anger, pride, deceit, desire etc. ...


Buddhism

Main article: God in Buddhism

Buddhism is generally viewed as a religion or philosophy without a supreme being in the sense of a universal creator or a creator of the human race. The historical Buddha, also known as Siddhartha Gautama or Gautama Buddha is sometimes viewed as an example of a human who has achieved the primal, eternal, sustaining essence within all beings and phenomena. While in the Theravada tradition the Buddha is not thought of as divine, in many Mahayana schools the Buddha is conceived as the eternal, imperishable essence of all phenomena. Buddhism is usually regarded as a religion without an absolute God who created the universe ex nihilo (from nothing) and to whom devotion and worship are due (although veneration and worship of the Buddhas do play a major role in both Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism). ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Media:Example. ... Standing Buddha, ancient region of Gandhara, northern Pakistan, 1st century CE. Gautama Buddha was a South Asian spiritual leader who lived between approximately 563 BCE and 483 BCE. Born Siddhartha Gautama in Sanskrit, a name meaning descendant of Gotama whose aims are achieved/who is efficacious in achieving aims, he... Siddhartha and Gautama redirect here. ... Theravada (Pāli: theravāda; Sanskrit: स्थविरवाद sthaviravāda; literally, the Way of the Elders) is the oldest surviving Buddhist school, and for many centuries has been the predominant religion of Sri Lanka (about 70% of the population[1]) and most of continental Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand). ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Kuan Yin from Mt. ...


The Pure Land schools of Buddhism in China and Japan revere the Nembutsu, the formulaic name of Amida Buddha (Namu Amida Butsu), as the sole method in this latter age of "degenerate Dharma" (mappo) for birth in the Pure Land after earthly death. Shinran, the founder of the Japanese Pure Land sect of Jodo Shinshu, went so far as to declare the Name as the same as Amida and his characteristics (Infinite Light and Infinite Life). The Buddha Amitabha, 13th century, Kamakura, Japan. ... Nianfo (念佛. Chinese pinyin nian fo; Japanese: nembutsu; Korean: yeombul), literally mindfulness of the Buddha. ... The Big Buddha in Kamakura, an image of Amitabha Amitābha (阿彌陀佛 Ch. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... Mappo, 末法 Jp. ... Shinran Shonin (親鸞聖人) (1173-1263) was a pupil of Honen and the founder of the Jodo Shinshu (or True Pure Land) sect in Japan. ... Jōdo ShinshÅ« ), also known as Shin Buddhism, was founded by the former Tendai Japanese monk Shinran Shonin. ...


Religions in classical antiquity

Pharaonic Egypt

  • Aten is the earliest name of a supreme being associated with monotheistic thought, being the solar divinity which Akhenaten had declared the only god of the state cult, as part of his wholesale absolutist reforms, thereby threatening the position on the various temple priesthoods, which had the old polytheism restored immediately after his death. See also the Great Hymn to the Aten .

[1] Aten (or Aton) was the disk of the sun in ancient Egyptian mythology, and originally an aspect of Ra. ... For other uses, see Akhenaten (disambiguation). ... The Great Hymn to the Aten was found in the tomb of Ay, in the rock tombs at Akhetaten. ...

Roman religion

While some of the older deities have names long pre-dating the Latin people the Romans belong to, and even more were adopted with their autochthonous names (or Latinized in a recognizable way), many minor divinities were named simply as personifications of various minor aspects of daily life. Latin also prominently used an abstract word for god, deus (hence deity and, from its adjective divinus, divinity), from Proto-Indo-European root deiwos, also the root of words for "sky" and "day" – the god-sense is originally "shining," but "whether as originally sun-god or as lightener" is not now clear; the epithet Deus Optimus Maximus, DOM "Best and Greatest God", coined for Jupiter, the pater familias of the Roman pantheon, was later adopted in Christianity, as well as Deus. The Latins were an ancient Italic people who migrated to central Italy, (Latium Vetus - Old Latium), in the 2nd millennium B.C., maybe from the Adriatic East Coast and Balkanic Area, perhaps from pressures by Illyrian peoples. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Indigenous peoples are: Peoples living in an area prior to colonization by a state Peoples living in an area within a nation-state, prior to the formation of a nation-state, but who do not identify with the dominant nation. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, spoken by the Proto-Indo-Europeans. ... Look up epithet in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A pantheon (from Greek Πάνθειον, temple of all gods, from πᾶν, all + θεός, god) is a set of all the gods of a particular religion or mythology, such as the gods of Hinduism, Norse, Egyptian, Shintoism, Greek, vodun, Yoruba Mythology and Roman mythology. ...


Mithras

The name of this Persian god of light, one of the earliest Indic words we possess, being found in clay tablets from Anatolia dating to about 1500 B.C, reported in English only since 1551, is from Latin, derived from the Greek Mithras. This was in turn derived from Avestan Mithra-, possibly from an Indo-Iranian root mitram "contract," whence mitras "contractual partner, friend," conceptualized as a god, or, according to Kent, first the epithet of a divinity and eventually his name; from proto-Indo-Germanic root base mei- "to bind"; related to Sanskrit Mitra, a Vedic deity associated with Varuna. For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... This article or section contains too much jargon and may need simplification or further explanation. ... Yasna 28. ... The Indo-Iranian language group constitutes the easternmost extant branch of the Indo-European family of languages. ... Look up epithet in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Vedic deity Mitra. ... In Vedic religion, Varuna (Devanagari:वरुण, IAST:) is a god of the sky, of rain and of the celestial ocean, as well as a god of law and of the underworld. ...


Other traditions

Religions Yazdânism (Yazidism) Scriptures Kitêba Cilwe (Book of Illumination) Languages Kurmanji, Arabic The Yazidi (also Yezidi, Kurdish: Êzidîtî or Êzidî, Arabic: يزيدي or ايزيدي) are adherents of the smallest of the three branches of Yazdânism, a Middle Eastern religion with ancient Indo-European roots. ... The Kurdish language (Kurdish: Kurdî or کوردی) is the language spoken by Kurds. ... Engraving from an Abraxas stone. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Within certain variations of Gnosticism, especially those inspired by Monoimus, the Monad was the highest God which created lesser gods, or elements (similar to aeons). ... Cao Dais Holy See, called the Tay Ninh Holy See, is located in Tay Ninh, Viet Nam Caodaism (Vietnamese:  ) is a relatively new, syncretist, monotheistic religion, officially established in Tây Ninh, southern Vietnam, in 1926. ... Cao Dais Holy See, called the Tay Ninh Holy See, is located in Tay Ninh, Viet Nam Caodaism (Vietnamese:  ) is a relatively new, syncretist, monotheistic religion, officially established in Tây Ninh, southern Vietnam, in 1926. ...

Zoroastrianism

  • Ahura Mazda "Lord of Light" or "Lord Wisdom" (wisdom and light being synonymous in either case) is the name of the supreme benevolent god in Zoroastrianism. Zoroastrians today may refer to Ahura-Mazda as 'Ormazd,' simply being a contraction of the original term.

Ahura Mazda () is the Avestan language name for a divinity exalted by Zoroaster as the one uncreated Creator, hence God. ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ...

Deism and Pantheism

In Deism and Pantheism, and in variations of these like Pandeism and Panentheism, God is sometimes referred to as Deus (pronounced Day-us), the Latin word for god, which gave rise to the word Deism. Believers in Pantheistic or Pandeistic systems equate God with the Universe, and may refer to God by that term (sometimes using the definite article and referring to God as "the Deus"). For other uses, see Ceremonial Deism. ... Pantheism (Greek: πάν ( pan ) = all and θεός ( theos ) = God) literally means God is All and All is God. It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent abstract God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. ... Pandeism (Greek πάν, pan = all and Latin deus = God, in the sense of deism), is a term used at various times to describe religious beliefs. ... Panentheism (from Greek (pân) all; (en) in; and (Theós) god; all-in-God) is the theological position that God is immanent within the Universe, but also transcends it. ... dEUS is an indie rock band based in Antwerp, Belgium, currently consisting of Tom Barman (vocals and guitar), Klaas Janzoons (keyboards and violin), Stéphane Misseghers (drums), Alan Gevaert (bass) and Mauro Pawlowski (guitar and vocals). ...


Taboos

Several religions advance taboos related to names of their gods. In some cases, the name may never be spoken, or only spoken by inner-circle initiates, or only spoken at prescribed moments during certain rituals. In other cases, the name may be freely spoken, but when written, taboos apply. It is common to regard the written name of one's god as deserving of respect; it ought not, for instance, be stepped upon or dirtied. It may be permissible to burn the written name when there is no longer a use for it. This article is about cultural prohibitions in general, for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ... Coming from the Latin, initiation implies a beginning. ... A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of a community. ... This article is about the emotion. ...


Judaism

Because of the influence of Ugaritic Pagan tradition, most observant Jews forbid any method of discarding the written name of God. Once written, the name must be preserved indefinitely. This leads to several noteworthy practices:

  • Commonplace materials, such as calendars which include quotations from the Torah, are written with an intentionally abbreviated form of the name. For instance, quotations written in English may substitute "G-d" for the name of God. Thus, a calendar or children's Hebrew school workbook may be discarded along with ordinary trash.
  • Copies of the Torah are, like most scriptures, heavily used during worship services, and will eventually become worn out. Since they may not be disposed of in any way, including by burning, they are removed, traditionally to the synagogue attic. See genizah. There they remain until they are buried.
  • All religious texts that include the name of God are buried.

For other uses, see Calendar (disambiguation) A page from the Hindu calendar 1871–1872. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... Taken during a Hindu prayer ceremony on the eve of Diwali. ... A synagogue (from , transliterated synagogē, assembly; beit knesset, house of assembly; or beit tefila, house of prayer, shul; , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ... This article is about the area generally found above a house. ... A genizah or geniza (Hebrew: storage; plural: genizot) is the store-room or depository in a synagogue, usually specifically for worn-out Hebrew-language books and papers on religious topics that were stored there before they could receive a proper cemetery burial, it being forbidden to throw away writings containing...

Islam

  • In Islam, the name (or any names) of God should be treated with the utmost respect. It is referred to in many verses of the Qur'an that the real believers respect the name of God very deeply. (e.g. stated in 33/35, 57/16, 59/21, 7/180, 17/107, 17/109, 2/45, 21/90, 23/2 ) On the other hand the condition is openly stressed by prohibiting people from unnecessary swearing using the name of Allah. (e.g. stated in 24/53, 68/10-11-12-13-14, 63/2, 58/14, 58/16, 2/224) Thus the mention of the name of God is expected to be done so reverently.

Christianity

  • In Christianity, God's name may not "be used in vain" (see the Ten Commandments), which is commonly interpreted to mean that it is wrong to curse while making reference to God. A more natural interpretation of this passage[citation needed] is in relation to oath taking, where the command is to hold true to those commands made 'in God's name'. (Jesus also makes it clear that a Christian should hold true to all their words - cf Matthew 5:37)
  • Some Christians capitalize all references to God in writing, including pronouns. (ex. "The Lord, He is God, Holy is His Name.")
  • God's name being used in vain can also be interpreted as trying to invoke the power of God, as a means to impress, intimidate, punish, condemn, and/or control others. Since "God is a loving God" (according to the New Testament), any efforts to use God's name in vain will forever be fruitless. Love is not compelled into action by fear. Saying that God's name should not be used in vain is just a helpful reminder that doing so, is just a waste of time and energy.
  • Different Christian cultures have different views on the appropriateness of naming people after God. English speakers would not name a son "Jesus", but "Jesús" is a common Spanish first name. This taboo does not apply to more indirect names and titles like Emmanuel or Salvador. Nor does it apply to "Joshua," which is the English translation of "Jesus."

This article is about the list of religious and moral imperatives. ... Look up Profanity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... In Spanish-speaking countries (exception made of Argentina), people normally have at least two surnames. ... Immanuel or Emmanuel or Imanuel (עִמָּנוּאֵל God with us, Standard Hebrew ʿImmanuʾel, Tiberian Hebrew ʿImmānûʾēl) is a title used in the Book of Isaiah in the Hebrew Bible. ... Salvador (meaning saviour in Spanish and Portuguese) is normally an indirect way of naming Jesus. ... According to the New Testament, Mary (Judeo-Aramaic מרים Maryām Bitter; Arabic مريم (Maryam); Septuagint Greek Μαριαμ, Mariam, Μαρια, Maria; Geez: ማሪያም, Māryām; Syriac: Mart, Maryam, Madonna), was the mother of Jesus of Nazareth, who at the time of his conception was the betrothed wife of Saint Joseph (cf. ... Look up Profanity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Humorous cartoon from the French newspaper Le Canard Enchaîné, featuring Jacques Chirac and his wife discussing Quebec French profanity. ... For the black metal band, see Blasphemy (band). ... A minced oath, also known as a pseudo-profanity, is an expression based on a profanity which has been altered to reduce or remove the disagreeable or objectionable characteristics of the original expression; for example, gosh used instead of God, darn instead of damn,heck instead of hell and freaking...

Phrases and alternatives

Tabuism or glorification are usually reasons not to refer to a deity directly by name. Tapu (or tabu) is a concept existing in many Polynesian societies, including traditional Hawaiian, Tongan, and Maori cultures. ...


In addition to capitalized pronouns (e.g. He, Him, She, Her, One), this can be split into two types: Phrases (such as King of Kings) and Alternatives (such as G*d or HaShem). Generally, phrases are used to extol, and alternatives are more direct replacements for words. In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun is a word that usually takes the place of a noun or noun phrase that was previously mentioned (such as she, it) or that refers to something or someone (I, me, you). Pronouns are often one of the basic parts of speech of the... King of Kings is a lofty title that has been used by several monarchies (usually empires in the informal sense of great powers) throughout history, and in many cases the literal title meaning King of Kings, i. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Hashem/השם, literally: The Name is a term used by Orthodox Jews to casually refer to God, Whose Name is only used in blessings and prayer. ...


Literature and fiction

In Old English poetry, many descriptive epithets for God were used to satisfy alliterative requirements. ... Hildegards 23 litterae ignotae Lingua Ignota (unknown language) is a language described by the German abbess, visionary, artist, composer, physician, and mystic St Hildegard of Bingen in the 12th century, apparently for mystical purposes. ... Illumination from the Liber Scivias showing Hildegard receiving a vision and dictating to her scribe and secretary Hildegard of Bingen (German: Hildegard von Bingen; Latin: Hildegardis Bingensis; 1098 – 17 September 1179), also known as Blessed Hildegard and Saint Hildegard, was a German magistra who later founded convents (Rupertsberg in 1150... Eru (the One), also called Ilúvatar (the Father of All), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God, the creator of the angels (Ainur) and the universe (Eä). He is the single omnipotent creator, but has delegated most direct action within E... Quenya is one of the fictional languages spoken by the Elves (the Quendi) the ones who speak. The first-found children of Ilúvatar, in the fantasy works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... The Nine Billion Names of God is the name of a famous short story by Arthur C. Clarke, and of a collection of his short stories in which it was published in New York by Harcourt, Brace & World in 1967. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Arthur C. Clarke Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE (born 16 December 1917) is a British science-fiction author and inventor, most famous for his novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for collaborating with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Space Trilogy, Cosmic Trilogy or Ransom Trilogy is a trilogy of three science fiction novels by C. S. Lewis. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... Ï€ (also known as Pi or Pi - Faith in Chaos) is a 1998 American psychological thriller directed by Darren Aronofsky. ... 72 names of God Note: This article contains special characters. ... Warlock was a 1989 horror film from New World Pictures. ... -1... Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is a 1989 adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Harrison Ford, Sean Connery, Denholm Elliott, Julian Glover, Alison Doody, River Phoenix, and John Rhys-Davies. ... This article is about a reading of the name of God in Hebrew scripture. ...

See also

This sign shows religous agreement
This sign shows religous agreement

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (787 × 1184 pixels, file size: 356 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (787 × 1184 pixels, file size: 356 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... This list of deities aims to give information about deities in the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ... . ... The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 Attributes of God (Arabic: transliteration: ), are the names of God revealed in the Quran and Sunnah;[1] even though the names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran and Sunnah. ... The word Sahasra-nāma in Sanskrit means 1000 names. Sahasra-nāma-stotra stands for a poem or a succession of verses (shlokas,) which contain thousand names of God. ... 72 names of God Note: This article contains special characters. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Encyclopædia Judaica, Vol. 7, Copyright 1971 by Keter Publishing House, Ltd., Jerusalem, Israel, Encyclopædia Judaica Jerusalem, The Macmillan Company, article "God, Names Of," p. 680.
  2. ^ The New Encyclopædia Britannica, Vol. 12, 1998, Chicago, IL, article "Yahweh," p. 804.
  3. ^ Bible Dictionary by William Smith LLD 1948 p.307; An Expository Dictionary of NT Words by W.E. Vine 1965 edition p.275, Websters English Dictionary; etc.
  4. ^ Krishna explained in Srimad Bhagavatham
  5. ^ Krishna on Himself in Bhagavad Geeta

References

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
JewishEncyclopedia.com - NAMES OF GOD. (3948 words)
Thus the Twelve-Lettered Name was substituted, which, a baraita says, was at first taught to every priest; but with the increase of the number of licentious priests the Name was revealed only to the pious ones, who "swallowed" its pronunciation while the other priests were chanting.
The sacredness of the divine names must be recognized by the professional scribe who writes the Scriptures, or the chapters for the phylacteries and the mezuzah.
Divine names that occur in the handwriting of minim should be excised and buried in the genizah (Shab.
Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Names God in Judaism (1325 words)
Names for God In the Old Testament various names for God are used.
Its name, taken from its first verse, means 'beginning.' Genesis provides the creation story for Judaism and Christianity and begins the history of the Israelite people.
In the Old Testament, the name Zion frequently refers to Jerusalem as a whole; it is overwhelmingly a poetic and prophetic designation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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