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Encyclopedia > Nakota

The Lakota ("friends" or "allies", sometimes also spelled "Lakhota") are a Native American tribe, also known as the Sioux (see Names). The Lakota are part of a band of seven tribes that speak three different dialects, the other two being the Dakota and the Nakota. The Lakota are the western most of the three groups, occupying lands in both North and South Dakota. The Nakota, the smallest division, reside on the Yankton reservation in South Dakota, the Northern portion of Standing Rock Reservation, and Canada (the Stoney and Assiniboine), while the Dakota live mostly in Minnesota and Nebraska. Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ... State nickname: Peace Garden State, Roughrider State, Flickertail State Other U.S. States Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Governor John Hoeven Official languages English Area 183 272 km² (19th)  - Land 178 839 km²  - Water 4 432 km² (2. ... State nickname: The Mount Rushmore State Other U.S. States Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Governor Mike Rounds Official languages English Area 199,905 km² (17th)  - Land 196,735 km²  - Water 3,173 km² (1. ...

Red Bird, a Sioux Indian photographed about 1908.
Contents

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The Lakota

The Lakota [lakxo'ta] came from the western Dakota of Minnesota who, after the adoption of the horse, _sunkawakan_ [s^uN'ka-wakxaN'] ('power/mystery dog'), became part of the Great Plains Culture with their Minnesota Algonkin-speaking allies, the Tsitsistas (Cheyenne), living in the northern Great Plains, which centered on the buffalo hunt with the horse. There were 20,000 Lakota in the mid-18th century. The number has now increased to about 70,000, 20,480 of whom still speak their ancestral language. (See Languages in the United States). Binomial name Equus caballus The Horse (Equus caballus) is a large ungulate mammal, one of the seven modern species of the genus Equus. ... The Algonquian languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... Cheyenne lodges with buffalo meat drying, 1870 The Cheyenne are a Native American nation of the Great Plains, closely allied with the Arapaho and loosely allied with the Lakota (Sioux). ... The Great Plains states. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The United States is (as of 2004) the home of approximately 336 languages (spoken or signed) of which 176 are indigenous to the area. ...


Because the Black Hills are sacred to the Lakota (who refer to them as the Paha Sapa, they objected to mining in the area, which has been attempted since the 19th century. In 1868, the US government signed a treaty with them exempting the Black Hills from all white settlement forever. Four years later, gold was discovered there, and an influx of prospectors descended upon the area, abetted by army commanders like General George Armstrong Custer. The latter tried to administer a lesson of noninterference with white policies. Instead, the Lakota with their allies, the Arapaho and the Cheyenne, defeated the 7th U.S. Cavalry in 1876 at the Battle at the Greasy Grass/Battle of the Little Bighorn, known also as Custer's Last Stand, since he and all 300 of his troopers perished there. But like the Zulu triumph over the British in Africa three years later, it was a pyrrhic victory. The Lakota were defeated slowly by the wholesale slaughter of the buffalo by the U.S. Army and military police actions herding all Indians onto reservations and enforcing government food distribution policies to 'friendlies' only, culminating, fourteen years later, in the killing of Sitting Bull (December 15, 1890) at Standing Rock and the Massacre of Wounded Knee (December 29, 1890) at Pine Ridge. The Black Hills are a small, isolated mountain range rising from the Great Plains of North America in western South Dakota and extending into Wyoming. ... Paha Sapa means “Black Hills”. To the Sioux Indians, it was a sacred place, the center of the world, and the place of the gods. ... The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually (but not always) from an ore body, vein, or (coal) seam. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... ... General Name, Symbol, Number Gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11 (IB), 6, d Density, Hardness 19300 kg/m3, 2. ... George Armstrong Custer George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 - June 25, 1876) was an American cavalry commander in the Civil War and the Indian Wars who is best remembered for his defeat and death at the Battle of the Little Bighorn against a coalition of Native American tribes, led by... Scabby Bull, Arapaho 1806 Arapaho camp, ca. ... Cheyenne lodges with buffalo meat drying, 1870 The Cheyenne are a Native American nation of the Great Plains, closely allied with the Arapaho and loosely allied with the Lakota (Sioux). ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Battle of the Little Bighorn Conflict Black Hills War, Indian Wars Date June 25, 1876 Place Near the Little Bighorn River, Big Horn County, Montana Result Substantial Native American victory The Battle of the Little Bighorn, also called Custers Last Stand, was an engagement between a Lakota-Northern Cheyenne... The Zulu are an African ethnic group of about 11 million people who live mainly in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Wounded Knee Massacre or the Battle of Wounded Knee was the last armed conflict between the Great Sioux Nation and the United States of America. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ...



In Nebraska on September 3, 1855, 700 soldiers under American General William S. Harney avenged the Grattan Massacre by attacking a Sioux village killing 100 men, women, and children. Seven years later on November 5, 1862 also in Minnesota, 303 Santee Sioux were found guilty of rape and murder of white settlers and were sentenced to hang. Of those 38 were hanged, the rest where pardoned by President Lincoln. State nickname: Cornhusker State Other U.S. States Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Governor Dave Heineman Official languages English Area 200,520 km² (16th)  - Land 199,099 km²  - Water 1,247 km² (0. ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... William Selby Harney (22 August 1800 - 9 May 1889) was a cavalry officer in the U.S. Army during the Mexican-American War and the Indian Wars. ... The Grattan Massacre occurred in what is today Nebraska, USA on August 17, 1854 near Fort Laramie, in which a number of US soldiers were killed by Brule Sioux. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1862 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ...


The Dakota

The original Dakota people migrated north and westward from the south and east into Ohio then to Minnesota. The Dakota were a woodland people who thrived on hunting, fishing and subsistence farming. Migrations of Anishinaabe/Chippewa people from the east in the 17th and 18th centuries, with rifles supplied by the French and English, pushed the Dakota further into Minnesota and west and southward, giving the name "Dakota Territory" to the northern expanse west of the Mississippi and up to its headwaters. The western Dakota obtained horses, probably in the 17th century, and moved onto the plains, becoming the Lakota, subsisting on the buffalo herds and corn-trade with their linguistic cousins, the Mandan and Hidatsa along the Missouri. In the 19th century, as the railroads hired hunters to exterminate the buffalo herds, the Indians' primary food supply, in order to force all tribes into sedentary habitations, the Dakota and Lakota were forced to accept white-defined reservations in exchange for the rest of their lands, and domestic cattle and corn in exchange for buffalo, becoming dependent upon annual federal payments guaranteed by treaty. State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... Anishinaabe is a self-description often used by people belonging to the indigenous Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples of North America, who share closely related Algonkian languages. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Bison bison Linnaeus, 1758 The American Bison (Bison bison), also called Buffalo, is a bovine mammal that is the largest terrestrial mammal in North America. ... Crows Heart, a Mandan male, circa 1908. ... Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation, also known as the Three Affiliated Tribes, are a Native American group comprised of a union of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara peoples, whose native lands ranged across the Missouri River basin in the Dakotas. ... The Missouri River and its tributaries N.P. Dodge Park, Omaha, Nebraska High silt content makes the Missouri (left) noticably lighter than the Mississipi here at their confluence above St. ...


In 1862, after a failed crop the year before and a winter starvation, the federal payment was late to arrive. The local traders would not issue any more credit to the Dakota and the local federal agent told the Dakota that they were free to eat grass. As a result on August 17, 1862, the Sioux Uprising began when a few Dakota men attacked a white farmer, igniting further attacks on white settlements along the Minnesota River. The US Army put the revolt down, then later tried and condemned 303 Dakota for war crimes. President Abraham Lincoln remanded the death sentence of 285 of the warriors, signing off on the execution of 38 Dakota men by hanging on December 29, 1862 in Mankato, Minnesota, the largest mass execution in US history. August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1862 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Chief Taoyateduta, known as Little Crow The Sioux Uprising, also known as the Dakota Conflict or the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, was an armed conflict between the United States and several eastern bands of the Dakota people (often referred to as the Santee Sioux) that began on August... The Minnesota River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 332 miles (534 km) long, in the state of Minnesota in the United States. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ...


Names

The name Sioux was created by the French Canadians, who abbreviated the Algonquin compound Nadouéssioux (from nadowe ("Iroquois") plus siu ("snake"/the massasauga rattler), by which a neighboring Ojibwa tribe, or the Ottawa, referred to the Dakota to the west and south. This term is popularly interpreted as an insult but it could refer to a time when the Dakota people, like other southeastern tribes, were known to revere serpents (see Serpent Mounds in Ohio, feathered serpent, water serpents - unktehi/uktena, etc.) Today many of the tribes continue to officially call themselves 'Sioux' which the Federal Government of the United States applied to all Dakota/Lakota/Nakoda people in the 19th and 20th centuries. French Canadian is a term that has several different connotations. ... For the larger language family of which Algonquin is but one member, see Algonquian. ... One Called From A Distance (Midwewinind) of the White Earth Band, 1894 The Ojibwa or Chippewa (also Ojibwe, Ojibway, Chippeway) are the third-largest group of Native Americans in the United States, surpassed only by Cherokee and Navajo. ... The Creeks are a Native American people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ... Quetzalcoatl (feathered snake) is the Aztec name for the Feathered-Serpent deity of ancient Mesoamerica, one of the main gods of many Mexican and northern Central American civilizations. ...


The Dakota, Lakota and Nakoda have names for their own subdivisions. The "Santee" received this name from camping for long periods in a place where they collected stone for making knives. The "Yankton" received this name which meant people from the villages of far away. The "Tetonwan" were known as people who moved west with the coming of the horse to live and hunt buffalo on the prairie. From these three principal groups, came seven sub-tribes.


Divisions

The Sioux Nation consists of divisions, each of which may have distinct bands, the larger of which are divided into sub-bands.

  • Eastern division (the Dakota or Santee)
    • Mdewakantonwan
    • Sisitonwan
    • Wahpekute
    • Wahpetonwan
  • Middle division (the Nakota)(Nakoda)
    • Ihanktonwan (Yankton)
    • Ihanktonwana (Yanktonai or Little Yankton)
    • Stoney (Canada)
    • Assiniboine (Canada)
  • Western division (the Lakota)
    • Titonwan (Teton)
      • Hunkpapa
        notable persons: Tatanka Iyotake
      • Oglala
        notable persons: Tasunka witko, Makhpyia-luta, and Billy Mills (Olympics sportsman)
        • Payabya
        • Tapisleca
        • Kiyaksa
        • Wajaje
        • Itesica
        • Oyuhpe
        • Wagluhe
      • Sihasapa (Blackfoot Sioux)
      • Sichangu (French: Brulé) ("burnt thighs")
        • Upper Sichangu
        • Lower Sichangu
      • Miniconjou
      • Itazipacola (French: Sans Arcs "No Bows")
      • Oohenonpa (Two-Kettle or Two Boilings)

Also: Jef Baetens is an American (haska) Related Siouan peoples: Sitting Bull Sitting Bull (Sioux: Tatanka Iyotake or Tatanka Iyotanka orTa-Tanka I-Yotank, born Hunkesni, Slow), (c. ... Crazy Horse (Sioux: Tasunka witko, pronounced tashúnka uitko), (December 4, 1849 - September 5, 1877) was a respected member of the Oglala Sioux Native American tribe and is noted for his courage in battle. ... Red Cloud Red Cloud (Sioux: Makhpyia-luta), (1822 – December 10, 1909) was a chief of the Oglala Sioux. ... William Billy Mills (born June 30, 1938) is the only American ever to win a Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 m run which he did at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. ...

  • Chiwere
    • Iowa
    • Oto
    • Missouri
  • Mandan
    • Mandan
  • Hidatsa
    • Hidatsa
  • Crow
  • Eastern
    • Catawba
    • Woccon
    • Monacan
  • Southern/Ohio Valley
    • Tutelo
    • Biloxi
    • Oto

The Osage Nation is an Native American tribe in the United States, which is mainly based in Osage County, Oklahoma, but can still be found throughout America. ... The Crow, also called the Absaroka or Absáalooke, are a tribe of Native Americans who historically lived in the Yellowstone river valley and now live on a reservation south of Billings, Montana, and the current chairman of the tribal council is Carl Venne. ...

Reservations

Today, one half of all Enrolled Sioux live off the Reservation. BIA map of Indian reservations in the continental United States. ...


Sioux Reservations recognized by the US government include:

Oglala can refer to the following: Oglala is a town located in Shannon County, South Dakota. ... Pine Ridge is a census-designated place located in Shannon County, South Dakota. ... Brule may refer to: Brule (people), a branch of the Sioux Naive American tribe. ... Rosebud can refer to: Rosebud, Victoria city in Australia Rose the buds of the flower Rosebud (movie) a 1975 movie A plot device in the movie Citizen Kane An episode of the TV comedy The Simpsons This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... The Cheyenne River The Cheyenne River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 295 mi (475 km) long, in the U.S. states of Wyoming and South Dakota. ... The Cheyenne River The Cheyenne River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 295 mi (475 km) long, in the U.S. states of Wyoming and South Dakota. ... The Cheyenne River The Cheyenne River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 295 mi (475 km) long, in the U.S. states of Wyoming and South Dakota. ... Santee can refer to: Several towns in the United States Santee, California Santee, Nebraska Santee, South Carolina Two different ships The USS Santee (1855) The USS Santee (CVE-29) The Santee River This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Yankton is the name of: A county in South Dakota, or The county seat of Yankton County. ... Flandreau is a city located in Moody County, South Dakota. ... The Lower Sioux Indian Reservation is located along the southern bank of the Minnesota River in Redwood County, Minnesota. ... The Upper Sioux Indian Reservation is located along the Minnesota River in Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota five miles south of Granite Falls. ... Prairie Island has multiple meanings: Prairie Island Indian Reservation in Minnesota Prairie Island Nuclear Power Plant located nearby This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Derived placenames

The U.S. states of North Dakota and South Dakota are named after the Dakota. Two other U.S. states have names of Siouan origin: Minnesota is named from mni ("water") plus sota ("hazy/smoky, not clear"), while Nebraska is named from a language close to Dakota, in which mni plus blaska ("flat") refers to the Platte (French for "flat") River. Also, the states Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri are named for cousin Siouan tribes, the Kansa, Iowa, and Missouri, respectively, as are the cities Omaha, Nebraska and Ponca City, Oklahoma. The names vividly demonstrate the wide dispersion of the Siouan peoples across the Midwest U.S. State nickname: Peace Garden State, Roughrider State, Flickertail State Other U.S. States Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Governor John Hoeven Official languages English Area 183 272 km² (19th)  - Land 178 839 km²  - Water 4 432 km² (2. ... State nickname: The Mount Rushmore State Other U.S. States Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Governor Mike Rounds Official languages English Area 199,905 km² (17th)  - Land 196,735 km²  - Water 3,173 km² (1. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... State nickname: Cornhusker State Other U.S. States Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Governor Dave Heineman Official languages English Area 200,520 km² (16th)  - Land 199,099 km²  - Water 1,247 km² (0. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... State nickname: The Hawkeye State Other U.S. States Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Governor Thomas Vilsack Official languages English Area 145,743 km² (26th)  - Land 144,701 km²  - Water 1,042 km² (0. ... Missouri, named after the Missouri Siouan Indian tribe meaning canoe, is a Midwestern state of the United States with Jefferson City as its capital. ... Omaha Skyline For other uses, see Omaha (disambiguation). ... Ponca City is a city located in Oklahoma. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


More directly, several Midwestern municipalities utilize Sioux in their names, including Sioux City (IA), Sioux Center (IA) and Sioux Falls (SD). Midwestern rivers include the Big Sioux River in Iowa and Little Sioux River along the Iowa/South Dakota border. Sioux City is a city located in Western Iowa. ... Photo of the waterfall in Sioux Falls Sioux Falls is the largest city located in South Dakota. ... The Big Sioux River is a tributary of the Missouri River in the upper Midwest of the United States. ... The Little Sioux is a river in the United States. ...


Media

Sioux ghost dance, 1894 ( info)
Video clip of a dance performed by a Sioux tribe from Buffalo Bill's Wild West show. This is part of a group of films constituting the first appearance of Native Americans in motion pictures. (3.97 MB, ogg/Theora format).
Sioux buffalo dance, 1894 ( info)
Video clip of a dance performed by a Sioux tribe from Buffalo Bill's Wild West show. This is part of a group of films constituting the first appearance of Native Americans in motion pictures. (3.23 MB, ogg/Theora format).
Problems seeing the videos? Media help.


Download high resolution version (1024x1024, 83 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Sioux ghost dance, 1894. ... This article is about a unit of data measurement. ... If you are visiting this page because your computer cant play a sound file, see How to play Ogg files OGG is also the abbreviated title of the British mockumentary Operation Good Guys Ogg is a patent-free, fully open multimedia bitstream format designed for efficient streaming and storage. ... Theora is a video codec being developed by the Xiph. ... Sioux buffalo dance, 1894. ... This article is about a unit of data measurement. ... If you are visiting this page because your computer cant play a sound file, see How to play Ogg files OGG is also the abbreviated title of the British mockumentary Operation Good Guys Ogg is a patent-free, fully open multimedia bitstream format designed for efficient streaming and storage. ... Theora is a video codec being developed by the Xiph. ...


See also

Lakota is a language spoken by the Native American Lakota people. ...

External links

  • Lakota Language Consortium (http://www.lakhota.org)
  • Explore the history and culture of the Lakota Sioux (http://www.historytelevision.ca/chiefs/htmlen/sioux/lc_tribe.asp)
  • Winter Counts (http://www.wintercounts.si.edu) a Smithsonian exhibit of the annual icon chosen to represent the major event of the past year

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nakota (703 words)
The Nakota are one division of the Dakota Nation.
The Nakota grew plentiful gardens of corn and other vegetables which were either eaten raw, boiled,or roasted, dried, and stored for later use.
The Nakota lived in Tipis in small family arrangements when on-the-go, and also in rounded lodges.
U of R General Calendar 2002-2003 (127 words)
Introduction to the Nakota language, with emphasis on oral expression, basic grammar, and writing in Roman orthography.
Conversational Nakota II A continuation of NAK 100.
Nakota Grammar and Orthography II A continuation of NAK 104.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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