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Encyclopedia > Naiads
Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893

In Greek mythology, the Naiads (from the Greek νάειν, "to flow," and νἃμα, "running water") were a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks, as river gods embodied rivers, and some very ancient spirits inhabited the still waters of marshes, ponds and lagoon-lakes, such as pre-Mycenaean Lerna in the Argolid. Naiads were associated with fresh water, as the Oceanids were with saltwater and the Nereids specifically with the Mediterranean; but because the Greeks thought of the world's waters as all one system, which percolated in from the sea in deep cavernous spaces within the bosom of the earth, to rise freshened in seeps and springs, there was some overlap. Arethusa, the nymph of a spring, could make her way through subterranean flows from the Peloponnesus, to surface on the island of Sicily. John William Waterhouse (1849-1917): A Naiad or Hylas with a Nymph. ... John William Waterhouse (1849-1917): A Naiad or Hylas with a Nymph. ... Greek mythology comprises the collected legends of Greek gods and goddesses and ancient heroes and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... For other uses of nymph see Nymph (disambiguation). ... For the municipality, see Myloi (Argolida), Greece, the seat of the municipality of Lerna In classical Greece, Lerna was a region of springs and a former lake near the east coast of the Peloponnesus, south of Argos. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Arethusa means the waterer. In Greek mythology, Arethusa was one of the Hesperides A nymph, daughter of Nereus (making her a Nereid), Arethusa ran from a suitor, Alpheus, the river god, making her way to Sicily. ... Peloponnesos (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, sometime Latinized as Peloponnesus or Anglicized as The Peloponnese) is a large peninsula in Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Isthmus of Corinth. ...


Otherwise, the essence of a naiad was bound to her spring. If a naiad's body of water dried, she died. Though Walter Burkert points out, "When in the Iliad [xx.4 - 9] Zeus calls the gods into assembly on Mount Olympus, it is not only the well-known Olympians who come along, but also all the nymphs and all the rivers; Okeanos alone remains at his station," (Burkert 1985), Greek hearers recognized this impossibility as the poet's hyperbole, which proclaimed the universal power of Zeus over the ancient natural world: "the worship of these deities," Burkert confirms, "is limited only by the fact that they are inseparably identified with a specific locality." The Iliad tells the story of the Trojan War and is, along with the Odyssey, one of the two major Greek epic poems traditionally attributed to Homer, a blind Ionian poet. ... The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... A hyperbole, largely synonymous with exaggeration and overstatement, is a figure of speech in which statements are exaggerated or extravagant. ...


They were often the object of archaic local cults, worshipped as essential to fertility and human life. Boys and girls at coming-of-age dedicated their childish locks to the local naiad of the spring. In places like Lerna their waters' ritual cleansings were credited with magical medical properties. Animals were ritually drowned there. Oracles might be sited by ancient springs.


When a mythic king is credited with marrying a naiad and founding a city, Robert Graves offers a sociopolitical reading: the new arriving Hellenes justify their presence by taking to wife the naiad of the spring, so, in the back-story of the myth of Aristaeus, Hypseus, a king of the Lapiths wed Chlidanope, a naiad, who bore him Cyrene. In parallels among the Immortals, the loves and rapes of Zeus, according to Graves' readings, record the supplanting of ancient local cults by Olympian ones (Graves 1955, passim). Aristaeus had more than ordinary mortal experience with the naiads: when his bees died in Thessaly, he went to consult the naiads. His aunt Arethusa invited him below the water's surface, where he was washed with water from a perpetual spring and given advice. A less well-connected mortal might have drowned, being sent as a messenger in this way to gain the advice and favor of the naiads for his people. Portrait of Robert Graves (circa 1974) by Rab Shiell Robert von Ranke Graves (July 24, 1895–December 7, 1985) was an English scholar, best remembered for his work as a poet and novelist. ... A minor god in Greek mythology, Aristaeus was the son of Apollo and the huntress Cyrene, who despised spinning and other womanly arts but spent her days hunting. ... In Greek mythology, the Lapiths were a semi-legenday, semi-historical race, whose home was in Thessaly in the valley of the Peneus. ... Cyrene can refer to: Cyrene, a figure from Greek mythology Cyrene, a Greek colony in Libya (north Africa) 133 Cyrene, an asteroid See also: Cyrenaica, the region around Cyrene This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Naiads could be dangerous: Hylas of the Argo's crew was lost when he was taken by naiads fascinated by his beauty (illustration, above right). The naiads were also known to exhibit jealous tendencies. Theocritus' story of naiad jealousy was that of a shepherd, Daphnis, who was the lover of Nomia, Daphnis had on several occasions been unfaithful to Nomia and as revenge she permanently blinded him. Two Argonauts before a hunt. ... The Argo was the ship on which Jason and the Argonauts sailed from Iolcus to retrieve the Golden Fleece. ... Theocritus, the creator of bucolic poetry, flourished in the 3rd century BC. Little is known of him beyond what can be inferred from his writings. ... Categories: Mythology stubs ... For a place in Laconia, see Nomia (Laconia), Greece In Greek mythology, Nomia was a naiad. ...


The Naiads were either daughters of Zeus or various Oceanids, but a genealogy for such ancient, ageless creatures is easily overstated. The water nymph associated with particular springs was known all through Europe in places with no direct connection with Greece, surviving in the Celtic wells of northwest Europe that have been rededicated to Saints, and in the medieval Melusine. Statue of Zeus The Greek sculptor Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall Statue of Zeus in about 435 bc. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of Oceanus and Tethys. ... Melusines secret discovered, from One of sixteen paintings by Guillebert de Mets circa 1410. ...

Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Titans and Olympians
Chthonic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Aquatic deities
Nymphs

Greek mythology comprises the collected legends of Greek gods and goddesses and ancient heroes and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek Τιτάν, plural Τιτᾶνες) are among a series of gods who oppose Zeus and the Olympian gods in their ascent to power. ... The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... In mythology chthonic (from Greek χθονιος-pertaining to the earth; earthy) designates, or pertains to, gods or spirits of the underworld, especially in Greek mythology. ... For other uses see Muse (disambiguation). ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... The ancient Greeks had a large number of sea gods. ... Andrea Doria as Neptune by Agnolo Bronzino: a potent allegory of Genoas hegemony in the Tyrrhenian Sea In Greek Mythology, Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea, known to the Romans as Neptune, and to the Etruscans as Nethuns. ... Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Ceto, or Keto (sea monster) was a hideous aquatic monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. ... Nereus: in Greek Mythology, eldest son of Pontus and Gaia, the Sea and the Earth. ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny or bright or bluish-green) referred to several different people. ... This article is about the Greek nymph. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Neptune and Amphitrite Amphitrite, in ancient Greek mythology, was a sea-goddess, and wife of Poseidon, identified with the Salacia the wife of Neptune in Roman mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... In Greek mythology, Triton is the son of Poseidon and Amphitrite, the personification of the roaring waters, represented as having the upper body of a human and the tail of a fish. ... This article is about Proteus from the Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was a primevil sea god, son of Pontus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Pontus (or Pontos, sea) was an ancient, pre-Olympian sea-god, son of Gaia and Aether, the Earth and Sky. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... For other uses of nymph see Nymph (disambiguation). ... Dryad - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... In Greek mythology, the Meliae were nymphs of the manna-ash tree. ... In Greek mythology, Oreads (ὄρος, mountain) were a type of nymph that lived in mountains. ... In Greek mythology, the Napaeae (νάπη, a wooded dell) were a type of shy but mirthful nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... Categories: Mythology stubs | Nymphs ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, the Limnades were a type of nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Crinaeae were a type of nymph associated with fountains. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... In Greek mythology, the Pegaeae were a type of nymph that lived in springs. ...

Types of Naiads

  1. Crinaeae (fountains)
  2. Limnades or Limnatides (lakes)
  3. Pegaeae (springs)
  4. Potameides (rivers)
  5. Eleionomae (marshes)

In Greek mythology, the Crinaeae were a type of nymph associated with fountains. ... In Greek mythology, the Limnades were a type of nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Limnades were a type of nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Pegaeae were a type of nymph that lived in springs. ... Potameides were graceful nymphs of rivers and streams. ...

Individual Naiads

  1. Aegle
  2. Arethusa
  3. Castalia
  4. Creusa
  5. Lilaea
  6. Melite
  7. Nomia
  8. Periboea
  9. Lara
  10. Salmacis

In Greek mythology, there were three different people named Aegle. ... Arethusa means the waterer. In Greek mythology, Arethusa was one of the Hesperides A nymph, daughter of Nereus (making her a Nereid), Arethusa ran from a suitor, Alpheus, the river god, making her way to Sicily. ... Castalia, in Greek and Roman mythology was a nymph whom Apollo transformed into a fountain at Delphi, at the base of Mt. ... In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... In Greek mythology, Lilaea was a Naiad who lived in the Cephissus River. ... In Greek mythology, Melite was a Naiad who lived in the Aegaeus River in Corcyra. ... For a place in Laconia, see Nomia (Laconia), Greece In Greek mythology, Nomia was a naiad. ... In Greek mythology, five people shared the name Periboea. ... Alternative use: Lara State, a Venezuelan state. ... In Greek mythology, Salmacis was a Phrygian nymph (a Limnades) who loved Hermaphroditus. ...

References

Apollodorus. Library 2.95, 2.11, 2.21, 2.23, 1.61, 1.81, 1.7.6; Homer. Odyssey 13.355, 17.240, Iliad 14.440, 20.380; Ovid. Metamorphoses; Hesiod. Theogony Apollodorus was a popular name in the ancient world. ... Modern-style library In its traditional sense, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ... Bust of Homer in the British Museum For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... The Odyssey (ΟΔΥΣΣΕΙΑ) is the second of the two great Greek epic poems ascribed to Homer, the first of which is the Iliad. ... The Iliad tells the story of the Trojan War and is, along with the Odyssey, one of the two major Greek epic poems traditionally attributed to Homer, a blind Ionian poet. ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso, (March 20, 43 BC – AD 17) Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women, and mythological transformations. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the poem Metamorphoses written by the poet Ovid. ... Hesiod (Hesiodos) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, believed to have lived around the year 700 BC. From the 5th century BC literary historians have debated the priority of Hesiod or of Homer. ... Theogony is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins of the gods of Greek mythology. ...


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