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Encyclopedia > Nagasaki, Nagasaki
Nagasaki (長崎市)
Country Japan
Region Kyushu
Prefecture Nagasaki prefecture
Area 338.72km²
Population 447,419
as of 2004
Density 1321
Mayor Itchō Itō
City symbols Tree   Chinese Tallow Tree
Flower   Hydrangea
Nagasaki City Hall
Address 〒850-8685
 Nagasaki-shi, Sakura-machi 2-22
Phone 095-825-5151 
External link Nagasaki City 
Latitude &
Longitude
32°44' N
129°52' E
Image:Nagasaki Nagasaki inPrefecture.png
Notes  
Megane-bashi (Spectacles Bridge)
Megane-bashi (Spectacles Bridge)

Nagasaki Sound  listen? (長崎市; -shi, literally "long peninsula") is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture located at the south-western coast of Kyushu, Japan. Geographical location 32°44′ N 129°52′ E It was a center of European influence in medieval Japan, and the second city on which an atomic bomb was dropped by the US during World War II. Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... Nagasaki Prefecture (長崎県; Nagasaki-ken) is located on Kyushu island, Japan. ... Species See text Hydrangea (scientific name: Hydrangea, pronounced: haidréindÊ’iÉ™) is a genus of about 100 species of flowering plants native to southern and eastern Asia (from Japan to China, the Himalaya and Indonesia) and North and South America. ... Nagasaki City symbol. ... Nagasaki city location in Nagasaki prefecture with Saga Prefecture labelled. ... Megane-bashi, the Eyeglasses bridge (symbol of Nagasaki, Kyushu, Japan) I took this photograph and contribute it to the public domain. ... Megane-bashi, the Eyeglasses bridge (symbol of Nagasaki, Kyushu, Japan) I took this photograph and contribute it to the public domain. ... To play the audio file do not click on the -image. ... Image File history File links Ja-Nagasaki. ... A peninsula is a geographical formation consisting of an extension of land from a larger body, surrounded by water on three sides. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... This article is about the Japanese municipality system. ... Nagasaki Prefecture (長崎県; Nagasaki-ken) is located on Kyushu island, Japan. ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ...


Nagasaki lies at the head of a long bay which forms the best natural harbor on the southern Japanese home island of Kyushu. The main commercial and residential area of the city lies on a small plain near the end of the bay. Two rivers divided by a mountain spur form the two main valleys in which the city lies. The heavily built-up area of the city is confined by the terrain to less than 4 square miles. As of 2004 the population of the city is 447,419 and its size in square kilometres is 338.72 or about 130 sq.mi making it a fairly large city by Japanese standards in relation to its population level.

Contents


History

Medieval era

Founded before 1500, Nagasaki was originally a secluded harbor village. It enjoyed little historical significance until contact with European explorers in 1542, when a Portuguese ship accidentally landed nearby, somewhere in Kagoshima prefecture. The zealous Jesuit missionary Francis Xavier arrived in another part of the territory in 1549, but left for China in 1551 and died soon afterwards. His followers who remained behind converted a number of daimyo (feudal lords). The most notable among them was Omura Sumitada, who derived great profit from his conversion through an accompanying deal to receive a portion of the trade from Portuguese ships at a port they established in Nagasaki in 1571 with his assistance. // Events Europes population was ~60 million. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... Kagoshima Prefecture (鹿児島県 Kagoshima-ken) is located on Kyushu island, Japan. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. ... Saint Francis Xavier (Chinese: 沙勿略) (April 7, 1506 - December 2, 1552) was a pioneering Christian missionary and co-founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuit Order). ... Events July - Ketts Rebellion Francis Xavier arrives in Japan. ... Events Russia, Reforming Synod of the metropolite Macaire, Orthodoxy: introduction of a calendar of the saints and an ecclesiastical law code ( Stoglav ) Major outbreak of the sweating sickness in England. ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ...

Nagasaki at night, 2003
Enlarge
Nagasaki at night, 2003

The little harbor village quickly grew into a diverse port city, and Portuguese products imported through Nagasaki (such as tobacco, bread, tempura, textiles, and a Portuguese sponge-cake called castellas) were assimilated into popular Japanese culture. The Portuguese also brought with them many goods from China. copyright-free Full size version: Image:Nagasaki-night. ... copyright-free Full size version: Image:Nagasaki-night. ... Species N. glauca N. longiflora N. rustica N. sylvestris N. tabacum Ref: ITIS 30562 as of 2002-08-28 Tobacco () is a broad-leafed plant of the nightshade family, indigenous to North and South America, whose dried and cured leaves are often smoked (see tobacco smoking) in the form of... Breads are a group of staple foods prepared by baking, steaming, or frying dough consisting minimally of flour and water. ... Tempura Tempura (Japanese 天麩羅, てんぷら) refers to classic Japanese deep fried batter-dipped seafood and vegetables. ... Vendor sells kasutera at a festival in Hakone Kasutera (カステラ) is a sponge cake made of sugar, flour, eggs, and starch syrup. ...


In 1587, Nagasaki's prosperity was threatened when Toyotomi Hideyoshi came to power. Concerned with the large Christian influence in southern Japan, he ordered the expulsion of all missionaries. Omura had given the Jesuits partial administrative control of Nagasaki, and the city now returned to Imperial control. Japanese and foreign Christians were persecuted, with Hideyoshi crucifying 26 Christians in Nagasaki in 1596 to deter any attempt to usurp his power. Portuguese traders were not ostracized, however, and so the city continued to thrive. Events February 8 - Mary, Queen of Scots is beheaded at Fotheringhay Castle in England after she is implicated in a plot to murder her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I. July 22 - Colony of Roanoke: A group of English settlers arrive on Roanoke Island off of North Carolina to re-establish the... Hideyoshi in old age. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... Events February 5 - 26 catholics crucified in Nagasaki, Japan. ...


When Tokugawa Ieyasu took power almost twenty years later, conditions did not improve much. Christianity was banned outright in 1614 and all missionaries were deported, as well as daimyo who would not renounce the religion. A brutal campaign of persecution followed, with thousands across Kyushu and other parts of Japan killed or tortured. The Christians did put up some initial resistance, with the Nagasaki Shimabara enclave of destitute Christians and local peasants rising in rebellion in 1637. Ultimately numbering 40,000, they captured Shimabara Castle and humiliated the local daimyo. The shogun dispatched 120,000 soldiers to quash the uprising, thus ending Japan's brief 'Christian Century.' Christians still remained, of course, but all went into hiding, still the victims of occasional inquisitions. Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu); 徳川 家康 (January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder of the Tokugawa bakufu of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the restoration of the monarchy in 1868. ... Events April 5 - In Virginia, Native American Pocahontas marries English colonist John Rolfe. ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... Ruins of the Hara fortress The Shimabara Rebellion (ja: 島原の乱, shimabara no ran) was an uprising of Japanese peasants, many of them Christians, during the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1637-1638. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Categories: Stub | Castles in Japan ...


The Dutch had been quietly making inroads into Japan during this time, despite the shogunate's official policy of ending foreign influence within the country. The Dutch demonstrated that they were interested in trading alone, and demonstrated their commitment during the Shimabara Rebellion by firing on those Christians who defied the shogun. In 1641 they were granted Dejima, an artificial island in Nagasaki Bay, as a base of operations. From this date until 1855, Japan's contact with the outside world was limited to Nagasaki. In 1720 the ban on Dutch books was lifted, causing hundreds of scholars to flood into Nagasaki to study European science and art. Ruins of the Hara fortress The Shimabara Rebellion (ja: 島原の乱, shimabara no ran) was an uprising of Japanese peasants, many of them Christians, during the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1637-1638. ... Events The Long Parliament passes a series of legislation designed to contain Charles Is absolutist tendencies. ... View of Dejima in Nagasaki Bay Scale model of Dutch trading post on display in Dejima (2003) Edo-era boundaries of Dejima island (outlined in red) within the modern city of Nagasaki. ... Before Mexico City, Tenochtitlan was an artificial island of 250,000 (Dr Atl) Dejima, not allowed direct contact with nearby Nagasaki An artificial island is an island that has been formed by human, rather than natural means. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ...


During the Edo period, the Tokugawa shogunate governed the city, appointing a hatamoto, the Nagasaki bugyō, as its chief administrator. History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Edo period (江戸時代) is a division of Japanese... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... A hatamoto (旗本) is an official guard of a daimyo or shogun in feudal Japan. ...

Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 60,000 feet into the air on the morning of August 9th, 1945
Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 60,000 feet into the air on the morning of August 9th, 1945

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x1094, 131 KB)Picture taken of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x1094, 131 KB)Picture taken of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. ...

Modern era

US Commodore Matthew Perry landed in 1853. The Shogunate crumbled shortly afterward, and Japan opened its doors once again to foreign trade and diplomatic relations. Nagasaki became a free port in 1859 and modernization began in earnest in 1868. With the Meiji Restoration, Nagasaki quickly began to assume some economic dominance. Its main industry was ship-building. This very industry would eventually make it a target in World War II, since many warships used by the Japanese Navy during the war were built in its factories and docks. Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Photograph of Perry Matthew Calbraith Perry (April 10, 1794 – March 4, 1858) was the Commodore of the U.S. Navy who forced the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854, under the threat of military force. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... A free port (porto franco) or free zone (US: Foreign-Trade Zone) is a port or area with relaxed jurisdiction with respect to the country of location. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Meiji Restoration (明治維新; Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to a change in Japans political and social structure. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb. ...


On 9 August 1945, the primary target for the second atomic bomb attack was the nearby city of Kokura, but the bomber pilot found it to be covered in cloud. The industrial areas outside Nagasaki were the secondary target and so, despite a far more powerful bomb, the devastation visited upon Nagasaki was less severe than that experienced by Hiroshima. The bomb exploded directly above the suburb of Urakami, the site of Urakami Cathedral, then the largest cathedral in East Asia. August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Citizens of Hiroshima walk by the A-Bomb Dome, the closest building to have survived the citys atomic bombing. ... Kokura (小倉) was an ancient castle town guarding, via its suburb Moji, the Straits of Shimonoseki between Honshu and Kyushu in Japan. ... Main keep of Hiroshima Castle The city of Hiroshima (広島市; -shi) is the capital of Hiroshima Prefecture, and the largest city in the Chugoku region of western Honshu, the largest of Japans islands. ... Urakami, Nagasaki, Nagasaki Prefecture, is a suburb in Nagasaki, the exact ground zero where the atomic bomb exploded on August 9, 1945. ...

Catholic Church in Nagasaki
Catholic Church in Nagasaki

The city was rebuilt after the war, albeit dramatically changed. New temples were built, and new churches as well, since the Christian presence never died out and even increased dramatically after the war. Some of the rubble was left as a memorial, such as a one-legged torii gate and a stone arch near ground zero. New structures were also raised as memorials, such as the Atomic Bomb Museum. Nagasaki remains first and foremost a port city, supporting a rich shipping industry and setting a strong example of perseverance and peace. Image File history File links Catholic church in Nagasaki, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. ... Image File history File links Catholic church in Nagasaki, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. ... A famous floating torii at Itsukushima Shrine Gateway to Shinto shrine with torii A torii (Japanese: 鳥居) is a traditional Japanese gate commonly found at the entry to a Shinto shrine. ...


Nagasaki in Western music and song

Nagasaki is the title and subject of a 1928 song with music by Harry Warren and lyrics by Mort Dixon. A popular success in its day, the music remains a popular base for jazz improvisations. The lyrics today are enjoyed for their ludicrous incongruity and their lack of political correctness. The song asserts: "Hot ginger and dynamite/There's nothing but that at night/Back in Nagasaki/Where the fellers chew tobaccy/And the women wicky wacky woo." 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Harry Warren (December 24, 1893 - September 22, 1981) was a music composer of many different styles. ...


Nagasaki is also the setting for Puccini's opera Madama Butterfly. Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two acts) by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on the book by John Luther Long and the drama by David Belasco. ...


Sights

  • Oura Cathedral (大浦天主堂)
  • Urakami Cathedral (浦上天主堂)
  • Glover Garden (グラバー園) - Thomas Blake Glover
  • Nagasaki Shinchi Chinatown in Japanese

Thomas Blake Glover (June 6, 1838 - December 13, 1911), known as the Scottish Samurai, was a trader from the North East of Scotland, instrumental in the founding of what was later to become the Mitsubishi Corporation of Japan. ...

Foods

Champon (ちゃんぽん) is a type of noodle dish originating from Nagasaki. ... Vendor sells kasutera at a festival in Hakone Kasutera (カステラ) is a sponge cake made of sugar, flour, eggs, and starch syrup. ... Karasumi (カラスミ) is a specialty of Nagasaki and along with salt-pickled sea urchin roe and Konowata one of the so-called three chinmi of Japan . ...

Universities in Nagasaki city

  • Nagasaki University (national)
  • Nagasaki Institute of applied science
  • Nagasaki University of Foreign Studies
  • Kwassui Women's College
  • Nagasaki Junshin University

Sister Cities

'Nagasaki's Sister Cities

State capitol building in Saint Paul Saint Paul is the capital and second-largest city of the state of Minnesota in the United States. ... for the Australian oil company, see Santos Limited; for the football team, see Santos Futebol Clube. ... District Porto Mayor   - Party Rui Rio PSD Area 41. ... This is about the city in the Netherlands. ... Fuzhou (Chinese: 福州; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Fu-chou; SLC: Hùk-cieu; also seen as Foochow or Fuchow) is a city on the coast of China, the largest city in and capital of Fujian province. ... Vaux-sur-Aure is a commune and a canton of the Calvados département, in the Basse-Normandie région, in France. ...

See also

Gunkanjima Island is one among 505 uninhabited islands in the Nagasaki Prefecture about 15 kilometers from Nagasaki itself. ... The foreign cemeteries (gaijin bochi) in Japan are chiefly located in Tokyo and at the former treaty ports of Nagasaki, Kobe, Yokohama, and Hakodate. ... Citizens of Hiroshima walk by the A-Bomb Dome, the closest building to have survived the citys atomic bombing. ...

External links

  Nagasaki Prefecture Symbol of Nagasaki Prefecture
Cities
Fukue | Goto | Hirado | Iki | Isahaya | Matsuura | Nagasaki (capital) | Omura | Sasebo | Shimabara | Tsushima
Districts
Higashisonogi | Kitamatsura | Kitatakaki | Minamimatsura | Minamitakaki | Nishisonogi
Subprefecture
Tsushima
  See also: Towns and villages by district edit

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nagasaki - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1102 words)
Nagasaki listen [▶] (長崎市; -shi, literally "long peninsula") is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture located on the south-western coast of Kyushu, the southernmost of the four mainland islands of Japan.
Nagasaki became a free port in 1859 and modernization began in earnest in 1868.
Nagasaki is the title and subject of a 1928 song with music by Harry Warren and lyrics by Mort Dixon.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Nagasaki (1653 words)
Nagasaki, capital of the prefecture (ken) of the same name, is situated on a small peninsula on the south-eastern coast of the Island of Kiushiu, Japan.
Prior to the arrival of the Christian missionaries, however, Nagasaki was an insignificant village.
In the territory of the present Diocese of Nagasaki 137 churches of the Jesuits were demolished, as well as their college in Amakusa and their seminary in Arima.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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