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Encyclopedia > Nag Hammadi
The town of Nag Hammadi in Egypt
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The town of Nag Hammadi in Egypt

Nag Hammâdi (Arabic نجع حمادي; transliterated: Naj' Hammādi) (26°03′N 32°15′E), is a town in the middle of Egypt, called Chenoboskion in classical antiquity, about 80 kilometres north-west of Luxor with some 30,000 citizens. It is mostly a peasant area where goods such as sugar and aluminium are produced. Image File history File links Eg-NagHamadi-map. ... Image File history File links Eg-NagHamadi-map. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Transliteration in a narrow sense is a mapping from one script into another script. ... It has been suggested that Greco-Roman be merged into this article or section. ... The River Nile at Luxor Street market in Luxor See also the Luxor Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA Luxor (Arabic: الأقصر ) is a city in Upper (southern) Egypt. ... Magnified view of refined sugar crystals. ... General Name, Symbol, Number aluminium, Al, 13 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 13, 3, p Appearance silvery Atomic mass 26. ...


The town of Nag Hammadi was established by Mahmoud Basha Hammadi, who was a member of a large Egyptian family Hammadi in Sohag. He created this town for the indigenous people who were forced to leave their homeland by the British occupation in Sohag. In return those people gave their new town the name of Hammadi. Mahmoud Basha Hammadi was known for his strong positions against the British occupation. He owned most of the agriculture land in Sohag.[citation needed] Sohag is an Egyptian governorate that is located in the Upper_Egypt. ...


The Nag Hammadi Library

Main article: Nag Hammadi library

Nag Hammadi is best known for being the site where, in December 1945 thirteen leather-bound papyrus codices buried in a sealed jar were found by local peasants. The writings in these codices comprised 52 mostly Gnostic tractates (treatises), believed to be a library hidden by monks from the nearby monastery of St Pachomius when the possession of such banned writings, denounced as heresy, was made an offence. The Nag Hammadi library is a collection of early Christian Gnostic texts discovered in the town of Nag Hammadi in 1945. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Papyrus plant Cyperus papyrus at Kew Gardens, London Papyrus is an early form of paper made from the pith of the papyrus plant, Cyperus papyrus, a wetland sedge that grows to 5 meters (15 ft) in height and was once abundant in the Nile Delta of Egypt. ... first page of the Codex Argenteus A codex (Latin for book; plural codices) is a handwritten book from late Antiquity or the Early Middle Ages. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various mystical initiatory religions, sects and knowledge schools, which were most prominent in the first few centuries AD. It is also applied to modern revivals of these groups and, sometimes, by analogy to all religious movements based on secret knowledge gnosis, thus can lead... A treatise is a systematic analysis of a certain subject. ... Pachomius, who died around AD 345 in Tabennisi, Egypt, was one of the founders of Christian monasticism. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the ‘catholic’ or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ...


The contents of the codices were written in Coptic, though the works were probably all translations from Greek. Most famous of these works must be the Gospel of Thomas, of which the Nag Hammadi codices contain the only complete copy. The Coptic language is the last phase of the Egyptian languages, and is the direct descendant of the ancient Egyptian language written in the hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic scripts. ... The Gospel of Thomas, completely preserved in a papyrus Coptic manuscript discovered in 1945 at Nag Hammadi, Egypt, is a list of 114 sayings attributed to Jesus. ...


External links

  • The Nag Hammadi Library

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nag Hammadi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (251 words)
Nag Hammâdi (Arabic نجع حمادي; transliterated: Naj' Hammādi) (26°03′N 32°15′E), is a town in the middle of Egypt, called Chenoboskion in classical antiquity, about 80 kilometres north-west of Luxor with some 30,000 citizens.
The town of Nag Hammadi was established by Mahmoud Basha Hammadi, who was the a member of the big and Egyptian family Hammadi in Sohag.
Nag Hammadi is best known for being the site where in December, 1945 thirteen leather-bound papyrus codices buried in a sealed jar were found by local peasants.
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