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Encyclopedia > Nablus
Map of the West Bank, with Nablus in the center north. The West Bank and the Gaza Strip make up the Palestinian territories.
Map of the West Bank, with Nablus in the center north. The West Bank and the Gaza Strip make up the Palestinian territories.

Nablus (sometimes Nābulus; Arabic: نابلس ; IPA: [næːblʊs], Hebrew: שכם  Shechem ; IPA: [ʃxɛm]); 32°13′N 35°16′E) is a major city under Palestinian Authority in the West Bank and, with a population of over 100,000, is one of the largest Palestinian population centers in the Middle East.[1] The city lies 63 km north of Jerusalem, between Mount Ebal and Mount Gerizim. Ancient Shechem is located in the eastern part of the modern city, in a site known as Tal Balatah. An ancient city with a rich history, Nablus is a site of religious significance to the three major Abrahamic faiths, as well as Samaritanism, and is also a scene of political instability related to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Download high resolution version (330x715, 22 KB)Replacement map of the West Bank from CIA Factbook - public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ... Arabic ( or just ), is the largest member of the family of Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew, Amharic, and Aramaic. ... Image File history File links ArNablus. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Image File history File links He-Shchem. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Hebrew יְרוּשָׁלַיִם (Yerushalayim) (Standard) Yerushalayim or Yerushalaim Arabic commonly القـُدْس (Al-Quds); officially in Israel أورشليم القدس (Urshalim-Al-Quds) Name Meaning Hebrew: (see below), Arabic: The Holiness Government City District Jerusalem Population 724,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 123,000 dunams (123 km²) Mayor Uri Lupolianski Web Address www. ... Mount Ebal, a mountain peak 940 meters above sea level just north of the West Bank city of Nablus. ... Mount Gerizim; archaeological research Mount Gerizim (Samaritan Hebrew Ar-garízim, Arabic جبل جرزيم Jabal JarizÄ«m, Tiberian Hebrew הַר גְּרִזִּים Har GÉ™rizzîm, Standard Hebrew הַר גְּרִיזִּים Har GÉ™rizzim) is a mountain in the West Bank near Nablus which is sacred to the Samaritan sect. ... Shechem is a name of geographical places. ... Map showing the prevalence of Abrahamic (purple), Dharmic (dark yellow), and Taoic (light yellow) religions in each country. ... Main article: Samaritan It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Samaritan. ... Israel, with the West Bank and Gaza Strip in diagonal stripes The Israeli-Palestinian conflict which is at the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict, is an ongoing dispute between two peoples, Jewish Israelis and Arab Palestinians, that both claim the right to sovereignty over the land of Israel/Palestine. ...

Contents

Geography

Nablus lies in a strategic position at a junction between two ancient commercial roads; one linking the Israeli coast to the Jordan valley, the other linking Nablus to the Galilee in the north, and the Negev to the south through the mountains. The entire Nablus district is 605 square kilometers, while Nablus city is 28.5 square kilometers. Nablus is surrounded by mountains on all sides. The length of the mountain chain is about 65 km from north to south. Its width is about 55 km from west to east. Ebal, the northern mountain, is the highest peak in this chain at 940 meters, while Gerizim, the southern mountain, is 881 meters high. The city lies along the narrow and fertile valley between the two mountains. Northern part of the Great Rift Valley as seen from space (NASA) The Jordan River The Jordan River (Hebrew: נהר הירדן nehar hayarden, Arabic: نهر الأردن nahr al-urdun) is a river in Southwest Asia flowing through the Great Rift Valley into the Dead Sea. ... Galilee (Arabic al-jaleel الجليل, Hebrew hagalil הגליל), meaning circuit, is a large area overlapping with much of the North District of Israel. ... Ruins in the Negev desert The Negev (Hebrew נֶגֶב;, Tiberian Hebrew Néḡeḇ; Arabic النقب an-Naqab) is the desert region of southern Israel. ... Mount Ebal, a mountain peak 940 meters above sea level just north of the West Bank city of Nablus. ... Mount Gerizim; archaeological research Mount Gerizim (Samaritan Hebrew Ar-garízim, Arabic جبل جرزيم Jabal Jarizīm, Tiberian Hebrew הַר גְּרִזִּים Har Gərizzîm, Standard Hebrew הַר גְּרִיזִּים Har Gərizzim) is a mountain in the West Bank near Nablus which is sacred to the Samaritan sect. ...


Demographics

The Nablus district has over 320,000 inhabitants, including refugee camps and surrounding villages. The estimated population of the city is 135,000, with a majority of Muslim and a minority of Christian Palestinian Arabs, as well as a small Samaritan community. The population of Nablus city comprises 40% of the district. The entire district contains 14 Israeli settlements, with a total population of 10,000 and two of the largest Palestinian refugee camps in the West Bank, Askar and Balata, which compromise about 8% of the total district population. A refugee camp is a camp built up by governments or NGOs (such as the ICRC) to receive refugees. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Israeli settlement. ...


History

Shechem

Main article: Shechem

The ancient city of Shechem dates back an estimated four thousand years. Shechem is a name of geographical places. ...


At Shechem, Abram "built an altar to the Lord who had appeared to him . . . and had given that land to his descendants" (Gen 12:6-7). This Biblical account, considered by some to be the first place Abram stopped when Abraham, Sarah, Lot, and their party entered Canaan. The Bible states that on this occasion, God confirmed the covenant He had first made with Abraham in Harran, regarding the possession of the land of Canaan. Joshua assembled the Israelites in Shechem and encouraged them to reaffirm their adherence to the Torah. During the Judges period, Abimelech was crowned king in Shechem. It has been suggested that Abraham (Hebrew Bible) be merged into this article or section. ... Sarah(Hebrew: שָׂרָה, Standard Tiberian  ; Arabic: سارة, Saara ; a woman of high rank) is the wife of Abraham as described in the Quran and the Hebrew Bible. ... Lot is: Place Specific - A French département, see Lot (département) A French river, a tributary of the Garonne, see Lot River A Belgian town, see Lot, Belgium A Polish Airline, see LOT Polish Airlines Character Specific - A Biblical figure, the nephew of Abraham, see Lot (Biblical) Lot, a... Canaan (Canaanite: כנען, Hebrew: , Greek: Χαναάν whence Latin: Canaan; and from Hebrew, Aramaic: whence Arabic: ‎). Canaan is an ancient term for a region approximating present-day Israel(94%.) and West Bank and Gaza plus adjoining coastal lands and parts of Lebanon and Syria. ... Covenant, in its most general sense, is a solemn and bilateral promise to do or not do something specified. ... Harran, also known as Carrhae, is a district of Åžanlıurfa Province in the southeast of Turkey, near the border with Syria, 24 miles (44 kilometres) southeast of the city of Åžanlıurfa, at the end of a long straight road across the roasting hot plain of Harran. ... Canaan (Canaanite: כנען, Hebrew: , Greek: Χαναάν whence Latin: Canaan; and from Hebrew, Aramaic: whence Arabic: ‎). Canaan is an ancient term for a region approximating present-day Israel(94%.) and West Bank and Gaza plus adjoining coastal lands and parts of Lebanon and Syria. ... Tora redirects here. ... Judges may refer to the Book of Judges in the Bible more than one judge. ... pages edit history. ...


Shechem was a commercial center due to its position in the middle of vital trade routes through the region. It traded in local grapes, olives, wheat, livestock, and pottery between the middle Bronze Age and the late Hellenic Period (1900-100 BCE). Archeological evidence indicates that the city was razed and reconstructed up to 22 times before its final demise in 200 CE. Within the remains of the city can still be found a number of walls and gates built for defense, a government house, a residential quarter and the ruins of a temple raised to Zeus by the Roman Emperor Hadrian, the latter dating to 200 CE. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around one thousand years. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Díos), is... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 – July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was Roman emperor from 117 – 138, and a member of the gens Aelia. ...


Shechem was the first capital of the Israelites. The archaeological site of Shechem was discovered in 1903 by a German party of archaeologists led by Dr. Hermann Thiersch at a site known as Tell Balatah, beside the traditional site associated with the tomb of Joseph. Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ...


Flavia Neapolis

Flavia Neapolis ("new city of the emperor Flavius") was founded in the year 72 by the emperor Vespasian 2 km west of the site of the Biblical city of Shechem. In the 5th and 6th centuries, the emperor Zeno built a church on the summit of Mount Gerizim in response to a revolt, but the church (called Maria Theotokos) was destroyed after the Arab conquest of the city in 636. The city became Nablus, the Arabic pronunciation of Neapolis. The name Neapolis, Greek for "new city", suggests that the original founders were Greek Hellenes, who preceded the Romans in the area. The city was occupied by Crusaders in 1099 under the command of Tancred who called it Naples. The Crusaders built a number of churches, and with its fortified citadel, the city was a major center of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem, but their reign came to an end in 1187 when they were expelled by Saladin. During Ottoman rule, Nablus was the first capital of one of four districts in the Syria-Palestine province. Flavius was the name of a gens in ancient Rome, meaning blonde. The feminine form was Flavia. ... For other uses, see number 72. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (November 17, 9–June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... Shechem is a name of geographical places. ... The Siege of Antioch, from a medieval miniature painting, during the First Crusade. ... Tancred (1072 - 1112) was a leader of the First Crusade, and later became regent of the Principality of Antioch and Prince of Galilee. ... This article is about a type of fortification. ... Official language Latin, French, Italian, and other western languages; Greek and Arabic also widely spoken Capital Jerusalem, later Acre Constitution Various laws, so-called Assizes of Jerusalem The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 by the First Crusade. ... Saladin depicted on a Dirham-coin (~1190) Saladin or Salah al-Din, or Salahuddin Al-Ayyubi (Arabic: صلاح الدين الأيوبي, Kurdish: صلاح الدین ایوبی) (solaah-hud-deen al-ayoobi) (c. ... Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI...


After World War I, Palestine became a British Mandate, and Nablus became a point of resistance against the British. Also, an earthquake in 1927 damaged many of the city's buildings, which were subsequently rebuilt but lost their previous picturesque character. The city came under Jordanian occupation following the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, and was later captured by Israel in 1967 during the Six-Day War. Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz... An earthquake is a phenomenon that results from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... Combatants Egypt Syria Transjordan  Lebanon Saudi Arabia Iraq Holy War Army Arab Liberation Army  Israel Jewish militias: (Haganah, Irgun, Lehi) Druze militias Commanders Glubb Pasha Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni† Hasan Salama† Fawzi al-Qawuqji Yaakov Dori Yigael Yadin Strength Egypt: 10,000 initially rising to 20,000 Iraq: 5... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ...


Religious roots

The city has a long biblical history, and has major significance in Judaism, and is important to Christianity and Islam. Besides Abraham's ties to the area, the city contains religious sites such as Joseph's Tomb, Jacob's Well, the site of Dinah's rape, location of the Middle Bronze Gate, where the Israelites rejected Rehoboam and also the location of the destroyed Samaritan temple. Near a Greek Orthodox monastery there is a well associated with that of the Biblical figure Jacob. Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dinah (Hebrew: דִּינָה, Standard Tiberian  ; Judged; vindicated), mentioned in the Book of Genesis as the daughter of Jacob and Leah. ... Rehoboam was king of Judah, succeeding his father Solomon. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus and the Twelve Apostles, preserving the traditions of the early church unchanged, accepting the canonicity of the first seven ecumenical councils held between the 4th and the... Monastery of St. ... Jacob Wrestling with the Angel – Gustave Doré, 1855 Jacob or Yaakov, (Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב, Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: يعقوب, ; holds the heel), also known as Israel (Hebrew: יִשְׂרָאֵל, Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: اسرائيل, ; Struggled with God), is the third Biblical patriarch. ...


In the New Testament, this is the well at which Jesus spoke to the Samaritan woman. An ancient mosque nearby is considered by Jews to be the Joseph's Tomb. The site has seen much friction between Israelis and Palestinians. During the Oslo period, from 1980 to 2000 the Israeli army maintained an armed guard at the Tomb of Joseph compound to protect worshipers. John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... It has been suggested that Sebastia, Middle East be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In a move that embittered Jews and embarrassed the Palestinians, at the beginning of the second Intifada, Joseph's Tomb was damaged by Palestinian rioters, and one Israeli soldier, a Druze, was killed. The Palestinian leadership rebuilt the site a few months later. Mount Gerizim in Nablus is holy to the Samaritan community, who remember it as the site of their ancient temple. The site remains in Palestinian hands. The al-Aqsa Intifada is the wave of violence and political conflict that began in September 2000 between Palestinian Arabs and Israelis; it is also called the Second Intifada (see also First Intifada). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Features

Nablus is the site of An-Najah National University, the largest Palestinian university with over 13,000 students in 2000. It is also the location of the Palestine Stock Exchange and leading information and communication technology organizations such as Palestine Telecommunication Company and AMRA Information Technology. Nablus is an agricultural and commercial trade center dealing in traditional industries such as production of soap, olive oil, and handicrafts. Other industries include furniture production, tile production, stone quarrying, textile manufacturing and leather tanning. The city is also a regional trading center for live produce. There are three refugee camps just outside the city, which were built for the Palestinian refugees of 1948. These camps are Ein Beit el Ma, Balata and Askar al Qadim and Askar al Jadid. Together they have more than 34,000 inhabitants. The An-Najah National University An-Najah National University is located in the mountainous region of northern Palestine in and around the city of Nablus. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... A Palestinian refugee In the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, a Palestinian refugee is a refugee from Palestine created by the Palestinian Exodus, which Palestinians call the Nakba (Arabic: ‎, meaning disaster or catastrophe). The United Nations definition of a Palestinian refugee is a person whose normal place of residence was Palestine between... Balata is the name of a Palestinian refugee camp established on the West Bank in 1950 adjacent to the city of Nablus. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Nablus is famous for the architecture of its market, the casbah in the old city, and also for the Palestinian culinary specialty of knafeh, a pastry dessert drenched in syrup and served in square-cut slices fresh from the oven. Knafeh made in Nablus is known throughout the world as "Knafeh Nabulsia". The Casbah (French) or more correctly Qasbah (from Arabic qasbah, قصبة, citadel) is specifically the citadel of Algiers and the traditional quarter clustered round it. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to the Wikibooks Cookbook. ...

Panorama of Nablus
Panorama of Nablus

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3570x834, 499 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3570x834, 499 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Nablus and the Palestinian-Israeli conflict

On July 2 1980 Bassam Shaka, then mayor of Nablus, became the victim of a bomb placed in his car by militants affiliated with the Israeli Gush Emunim movement; he survived although both his legs were amputated. [2] Bassam Shakaa (1930- ) (Arabic: ‎) was elected mayor of Nablus in 1976. ... Gush Emunim Underground, sometimes called the Jewish Terror Organization, was a militant organization formed by prominent members of the Israeli political movement Gush Emunim, that existed from 1979-1984. ... Gush Emunim גוש אמונים (Hebrew: Block [of the] faithful) was an Israeli political movement. ...


The city's unemployment rates have increased dramatically in recent years, rising from 14.2% in 1997 to an estimate of 60% in 2004. It is estimated that the unemployment in the old city and in the refugee camps is as high as 80%. Due to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the city was closed off by the IDF. The city's encirclement with checkpoints is cited by the United Nations as a reason for high unemployment and a "devastated" economy[3]; other sources cite mismanagement by the Palestinian Authority as a contribution to the poor state of the economy.[4] Israeli checkpoints around Nablus restrict traveling of residents to and from the city (and there is a ban on vehicles, only pedestrians can cross checkpoints). Around 400 Palestinians (including armed fighters as well as unarmed civilians and children) from Nāblus have been killed by Israeli military operations against militants during the the Intifada for Al-Aqsa . Israeli soldiers along with Jewish settlers have also been killed by members of militant groups that originate from there.[5][6][7][8]. In March 2002, Israeli Forces launched a military operation focused on the casbah in the city center and on the nearby Balata refugee camp, in a repeat of a similar operation in 2001. The Israeli Forces took control of the city and imposed a month-long curfew, arresting at least ten Palestinians suspected of involvement in militant activities. In April, Israel launched Operation Defensive Shield, in which Nablus was one of the cities targeted in a massive military operation. Dozens of Palestinians, both militants and civilians, were killed in the Nāblus area during that month.[9] Isreal used tanks and heavy bulldozers to attack the Old City, destroying hundreds of buildings, many of which are of unmatched historical value. Israeli Forces' withdrawal from Nāblus is still pending negotiations with the Palestinian Authority. Israel, with the West Bank and Gaza Strip in diagonal stripes The Israeli-Palestinian conflict which is at the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict, is an ongoing dispute between two peoples, Jewish Israelis and Arab Palestinians, that both claim the right to sovereignty over the land of Israel/Palestine. ... An Israel Defense Forces checkpoint, usually called an Israeli checkpoint (Hebrew: מחסום, machsom), is a barrier put forth by the Israel Defense Forces to enhance the security of Israel and prevent those who wish to harm it from entering the country. ... The Casbah (French) or more correctly Qasbah (from Arabic qasbah, قصبة, citadel) is specifically the citadel of Algiers and the traditional quarter clustered round it. ... Operation Defensive Shield (In Hebrew, מבצע חומת מגן) was a large-scale military operation conducted by the Israeli Defence Forces in April 2002. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ...


Nāblus lost much of its traditional political and economic importance due to continued Isreali siege, but also due to a centralization process practiced by Palestinian Authorities. With the arrival of Palestinian Authority in mid 1990s, banks and other economic firms were ordered to transfer their West Bank headquarters to Ramallah, the undeclared capital of the Palestinian Authority.


Israeli allegations regarding Nāblus

The Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center, an Israeli NGO, alleged in 2002 that Nablus was "the infrastructure center of Palestinian terrorists". The organization stated that "Nablus constitutes the main infrastructure of Palestinian terrorism and the location of the main headquarters of the terrorist organizations leaderships in the West Bank." The report continues that "hundreds of gunmen in the city" belong to militant organizations such as "Hamas, PFLP, DFLP, PDA, the PFLPGC/ Jibril Front and the "People's HQ" (former Communists)." The list of charges by this NGO against Nablus included: NGO is an abbreviation or code for: Non-governmental organization Nagoya Airport (IATA code) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Hamas (Arabic: ‎; acronym: Arabic: ‎, or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement; the Arabic acronym means zeal) is a Palestinian Sunni Islamist organization that currently (since January 2006) forms the majority party of the Palestinian National Authority. ... The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) (Arabic Al-Jabhah al-Shabiyyah Li-Tahrir Filastin الجبهة الشعبية لتحرير فلسطين) is a secular, Marxist-Leninist, nationalist Palestinian... The Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine (Al-Jabhah al-Dimuqratiyah Li-Tahrir Filastin) is a Marxist-Leninist organization, which was founded in 1969 when it split from the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP). ... PDA may stand for: Personal digital assistant, a digital device which can include the functionality of a computer, a cellphone, a music player and a camera Pitch detection algorithm, a mathematical method of finding the pitch of a signal Public display of affection, an area of study within social psychology... NGO is an abbreviation or code for: Non-governmental organization Nagoya Airport (IATA code) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

  • Most of the explosive charges and explosive belts used for the Hamas suicide bombings in Israel, including the attack in Haifa (December 2001, 15 Israelis killed) and the Passover massacre in Netanya (27 March 2002, 30 Israelis killed, 140 injured) were produced in Nablus.
  • The Hamas activists in Nablus who constitute in practice the organization's leadership in the West Bank, masterminded and directed from the city areas which served as its main headquarters, most of the attacks which the movement carried out in Israel and in the West Bank since the outbreak of the current confrontation with the Palestinians, e.g. Emmanuel (December 2001, 11 Israelis killed, and 27 wounded), Hamra in the Jordan Valley (February 2002, 3 Israelis killed), Elon Moreh (28 March, 2002, 4 Israelis killed).
  • Nablus constituted the center of knowhow for the production and operation of the rockets in the West Bank.

[10] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Netanya suicide attack (also known as the Netanya bombing and the Passover massacre) was a Palestinian suicide bombing in Park Hotel at Netanya on March 27, 2002. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


Palestinians reject "dehumanization through political language" such as claiming all acts of "resistance" as "terror", and claim that Israel blames the victim [11][12]. As Palestinians regard themselves as under Israeli military occupation, they often cite the United Nations charter that recognizes the right of all peoples to self-determination and what Palestinians see as a right to resist foreign occupation. [13][14][15]. Palestinian and foreign NGOs often counter Israeli accusations with statements that it is Israel that is involved in aggression and is in violation of UN resolutions and international law. Representatives of some of these organization have reported directly from Nablus.[16][17] The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ...


Politics

Municipal elections in Nablus and elsewhere occurred in May 2005 and again in December 2005. Hamas won the December 15, 2005 Nablus Municipal Elections . The Reform and Change list representing the Hamas faction won 73,4% of total voters to gain 13 seats of total 15 seats in the city council. The final vote count showed a total vote of 33,761 people, which is 69.3% of eligible voters. The Reform and Change list (Hamas) gained 24,787 votes (73.4%) thirteen seats, Palestine Tomorrow (Fateh) gained 4290 votes (12.7%) two seats, Pledge to Nablus (Independents & Fateh) 2166 votes, The Future (PPP, DFLP, Fida, independents) 1140 votes, Nablus: Faithfulness and Development (independents) 1386 votes. None of later three lists were not able to gain a seat in the municipal council. Nablus was one of several Palestinian cities where Hamas showed a dramatic growth in electoral support. [18]


The Mayor of Nablus is Adly Yaish and the Governor of the Nablus Governorate is Kamal Alsheikh. Adly Yaish (Arabic: ‎) is the Mayor of the Nablus Municipality (Dec. ... The Nablus Governorate is one of a number of Governorates of the West Bank and Gaza Strip within the Palestinian Territories, located in the Central Highlands of the West Bank, 63 km north of Jerusalem. ...


Twinning

Nablus has several sister cities. They are:

Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Bay of Naples Naples (Italian: , Neapolitan: Nàpule, from Greek Νεάπολη < Νέα Πόλις Néa Pólis New City) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of the Campania region and the Province of Naples. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland_corrected_(bordered). ... PoznaÅ„ ( ; full official name: The Capital City of PoznaÅ„, Latin: , German: , Yiddish: פּױזן Poyzn) is a city in west-central Poland with over 578,900 inhabitants (2002). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... County Rogaland District Jæren Municipality NO-1103 Administrative centre Stavanger Mayor (1995-) Leif Johan Sevland (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 406 71 km² 68 km² 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... For other uses, see Lille (disambiguation). ...

See also

The Nablus Governorate is one of a number of Governorates of the West Bank and Gaza Strip within the Palestinian Territories, located in the Central Highlands of the West Bank, 63 km north of Jerusalem. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Faqqu´a,( also Faqqua, Faqqu´ah) is a village on the West Bank, known for it’s delicious cactus fruits, but also for the so-called separation barrier surrounding it. ... Jenin (Arabic:  , Hebrew: גנין), a city on the West Bank, is a major Palestinian agricultural center. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ...

People from Nablus

Dr. Hatem Bazian has emerged as one of the leading public intellecutals in America in recent years. ... Fadwa Toukan (Arabic: ‎, also known as Fadwa Tuqan, Spanish: , French: ; b. ... This is the list of Mayors of Nablus in chronological order. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Nablus
  • Official Nablus website
  • "Jewish Virtual Library" entry
  • Christianity in Nablus
  • Palestine Securities Exchange
  • AMRA Information Technology
  • A site explaining the reasons for the devastated Palestinian economy
  • Nablus the Culture, reviveing cultural life in Nablus
  • Nablus after Five Years of Conflict December 2005 report by OCHA (PDF).

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Nablus, Holy Land (661 words)
Nablus or "The Uncrowned Queen of Palestine" as historians call it, is located 63 km north of Jerusalem between Mt. Gerzim and Mt. Ebal.
Nablus enjoys a strategic position being at the junction between two ancient commercial roads: one linking the coast to the Jordan valley, the other linking the north to the south of Palestine through the mountains.
Today Nablus is one of the largest cities in the West Bank aside from Jerusalem, with a population of 120,000 and a principal industrial and commercial center.
Nablus, Israel (402 words)
Nablus (Shekhem to the Israelis) lies 42km/26mi northeast of Tel Aviv and 60km/37mi north of Jerusalem in the uplands of Samaria.
In the 16th century Nablus was the center of one of the four Ottoman administrative divisions of Palestine (the other centers being Gaza, Jerusalem and Safed).
In 1980 the mayor of Nablus, Bassam Sheker, one of the most influential Palestinian politicians in the Israeli-occupied territories, lost both legs in a bomb attack, and in 1986 his successor Zafer el-Musri was murdered.
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