FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "NKVD" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > NKVD
Emblem of the NKVD
Emblem of the NKVD

The NKVD (Russian: НКВД, Народный Комиссариат Внутренних Дел Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del listen ) or People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs was the leading secret police organization of the Soviet Union that was responsible for political repression during the Stalinist era. It conducted mass extrajudicial executions, ran the Gulag system of forced labor, suppressed underground resistance, conducted mass deportations of nationalities and "Kulaks" to unpopulated regions of the country, guarded state borders, conducted espionage and political assassinations abroad, was responsible for subversion of foreign governments, and enforced Stalinist policy within Communist movements in other countries. Image File history File links Ru-NKVD.ogg File links There are no pages that link to this file. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with: :Sovnarkom. ... This article is about secret police as organizations. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For architecture, see Stalinist architecture. ... Extrajudicial execution and extrajudicial punishment are terms to describe death sentences and other types of punishment, respectively, executed without prior proper judicial procedure. ... Nikolai Getman Moving out. ... Unfree labour is a generic or collective term for forms of work, especially in modern or early modern history, in which adults and/or children are employed without wages, or for a minimal wage. ... Not by Their Own Will. ... Kulaks (from the Russian кулак (kulak, fist)) is a pejorative term extensively used in Soviet political language, originally referring to relatively wealthy peasants in the Russian Empire who owned larger farms and used hired labor, as a result of the Stolypin reform introduced since 1906. ... NKVD border guards watching the frontier The border guard in the USSR was known as Border Troops or Border Guard Troops, subordinated to the state security agency, NKVD, later renamed to MVD. Accordingly, they were known as NKVD Border Troops and MVD Border Troops. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... Assassin and Targeted killing redirect here. ... For the version control system, see Subversion (software). ... For architecture, see Stalinist architecture. ...


The NKVD was also known for its Main Directorate for State Security (GUGB), which eventually became the Committee for State Security (KGB). In addition to its state security and police functions, however, some of its departments handled other matters, such as firefighting, border guards (NKVD Border Troops) and archives. The Main Directorate of State Security (Russian: Glavnoe Upravlenie Gosudarstvennoi Bezopasnosti, Главное управление государственной безопасности, ГУГБ, GUGB) was the name of the Soviet secret police from July 1934 to April 1943. ... This article is about the KGB of the Soviet Union. ... Security agency is an organization which conducts intelligence activities for the internal security of a nation, state or organization. ... East German guards wait for the official opening of the Brandenburg Gate George W. Bush in a border patrol dune buggy Border Guard, Border Patrol, Border police, or Frontier police is a state security agency that performs border control, i. ... NKVD border guards watching the frontier The border guard in the USSR was known as Border Troops or Border Guard Troops, subordinated to the state security agency, NKVD, later renamed to MVD. Accordingly, they were known as NKVD Border Troops and MVD Border Troops. ... For alternate uses see: Archive (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History and structure

Picture of Dzerzhinsky during a parade in 1936.
Picture of Dzerzhinsky during a parade in 1936.

The October Revolution of 1917 established a new Bolshevik regime, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic (RSFSR). The Bolsheviks dissolved the old police, then created the NKVD, and Workers' and Peasants' Militsiya under NKVD supervision. However, the NKVD apparatus was overwhelmed by duties inherited directly from the Tsar's Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD), such as the supervision of the local governments and firefighting, and the new proletarian workforce was largely inexperienced. Realizing that it was left with no capable security force, the Council of People's Commissars of the RSFSR created a secret political police, the Cheka, led by Felix Dzerzhinsky. It gained the right to undertake quick non-judicial trials and executions, if that was deemed necessary in order to "protect the revolution". Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2145x1226, 182 KB) Summary Title {{{KGB House Main. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2145x1226, 182 KB) Summary Title {{{KGB House Main. ... The Lubyanka is the popular name for the headquarters of the KGB and affiliated prison on Lubyanka Square in Moscow. ... Stalin ordered all the historic Lubyanka churches to be demolished in order to highlight the dominant position of the NKVD headquarters. ... Aleksey Viktorovich Shchusev (Russian: ) (September 26, 1873, Kishinev - May 24, 1949, Moscow) was an acclaimed Russian architect whose works may be regarded as a bridge connecting Revivalist architecture of Imperial Russia with Stalins Empire Style. ... For the reggaeton aritst, see Cheka (artist). ... The Soviet Union had a succession of secret police agencies over the course of its existence. ... Image File history File links NKVD1936. ... Image File history File links NKVD1936. ... Felix Edmundovich Dzerzhinsky Felix Edmundovich Dzerzhinsky (Polish: Feliks DzierżyÅ„ski, Russian: Феликс Эдмундович Дзержинский, Belarusian: Фелікс Эдмундавіч Дзяржынскі; September 11, 1877 [O.S. August 30] –July 20, 1926) was a Polish Communist revolutionary, famous as the founder of the Bolshevik secret police, the Cheka, later known by many names during the history of the Soviet... For other uses, see October Revolution (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Bolshevik faction in the RSDLP 1903-1912. ... State motto: Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Workers of the world, unite!) Official language None ( Russian in practice) Capital Moscow (last) Chairman of the Supreme Council Boris Yeltsin Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 1st in former Soviet Union 17,075,200 km² 0,5% Population  - Total ( 1989)  - Density Ranked 1st in the... A member of a Russian special purpose police team (OMSN), equipped with a 9A91 submachine gun. ... Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ... Sovnarkom (Russian language СовНарКом, the abbreviation of the phrase Совет Народных Комиссаров, Sovet Narodnykh Komissarov, the Council of Peoples Commissars, sometimes Russian СНК, the SNK), was the name of administrative arm of the Soviet governments until 1946. ... Felix Edmundovich Dzerzhinsky (Феликс Эдмундович Дзержинский; September 11, 1877 - July 20, 1926) was a Polish Communist revolutionary, famous as the founder of the Bolshevik secret police, the Cheka, later known by many names. ...


The Cheka was reorganized in 1922 as the State Political Directorate or GPU of the NKVD of the RSFSR. In 1923, the USSR was formed with the RSFSR as its largest member. The GPU became the OGPU (Joint State Political Directorate), under the Council of People's Commissars of the USSR. The NKVD of the RSFSR retained control of the militsiya, and various other responsibilities. Soviet poster of the 1920s: The GPU strikes on the head the counter-revolutionary saboteur State Political Directorate was the secret police of the RSFSR and USSR until 1934. ... Sovnarkom (Russian language СовНарКом, the abbreviation of the phrase Совет Народных Комиссаров, Sovet Narodnykh Komissarov, the Council of Peoples Commissars, sometimes Russian СНК, the SNK), was the name of administrative arm of the Soviet governments until 1946. ...


In 1934, the OGPU was incorporated into the newly-created NKVD of the USSR, becoming the Main Directorate for State Security; the NKVD of the RSFSR ceased to exist and was not resurrected until 1946 (as the MVD of the RSFSR). As a result, the NKVD also became responsible for all detention facilities (including the forced labor camps, known as the Gulag) as well as for the regular police.[1] The Main Directorate of State Security (Russian: Glavnoe Upravlenie Gosudarstvennoi Bezopasnosti, Главное управление государственной безопасности, ГУГБ, GUGB) was the name of the Soviet secret police from July 1934 to April 1943. ... Nikolai Getman Moving out. ...


Since its creation in 1934, the NKVD of the USSR underwent many organizational changes; between 1938 and 1939 alone, the NKVD's structure changed three times.[2]


On February 3, 1941, the Special Sections of the NKVD responsible for military counterintelligence (CI) became part of the Army and Navy (RKKA and RKKF, respectively). The GUGB was separated from the NKVD and renamed the "People's Commissariat for State Security" (NKGB). After the German invasion, the NKVD and NKGB were reunited on 20 July 1941. The CI sections were returned to the NKVD in January 1942. In April 1943, the CI sections were again transferred to the People's Commissariats (Narkomat) of Defense and the Navy, becoming SMERSH (from Smert' Shpionam or "Death to Spies"); at the same time, the NKVD was again separated from the NKGB. is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Military counterintelligence of the Red Army and later of the Soviet Army, throughout all its history was controlled by the Soviet secret police (Cheka, GPU, NKVD, ...) departments (names vary over the time). ... The Peoples Commissariat for State Security (Народный комиссариат государственной безопасности) was the name of the Soviet secret police force existed during February 3, 1941 — July 20, 1941, from 1943 to 1946, and then renamed into the Ministry for State Security. ... Combatants Germany Romania Finland Italy Hungary Slovakia  Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb Fedor von Bock Gerd von Rundstedt Heinz Guderian Günther von Kluge Franz Halder Ion Antonescu C.G.E. Mannerheim Giovanni Messe, CSIR Italo Garibaldi, ARMIR Iosef Stalin Kliment Voroshilov Semyon Timoshenko Fyodor Kuznetsov... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... From 1919 to 1946, functions of ministers in the government of Russia and, later, the Soviet Union were performed by Peoples Commissars (Russian title: Narodny Komissar, or Narkom). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In 1946, the NKVD of the USSR was renamed as the Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD), while the NKGB was renamed as the Ministry of State Security (MGB). According to a 1996 radio documentary by the Russian Service of Radio Liberty, the MGB was reduced from being a ministry to a committee because Soviet leaders feared what the MGB might do if the purges were to resume.[citation needed] In 1953, after the arrest of Lavrenty Beria, the MGB was merged back into the MVD. The police and security services were finally split in 1954 to become: Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) is a radio and communications organization which is funded by the United States Congress. ... Lavrenty Beria Lavrentiy Pavlovich Beria (Georgian: ლავრენტი ბერია; Russian: Лаврентий Павлович Берия; (29 March 1899 – 23 December 1953), was a Soviet politician and chief of the Soviet security and police apparatus. ...

  • The USSR Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD), responsible for the criminal police and correctional facilities.
  • The USSR Committee for State Security (KGB), responsible for the political police, CI, intelligence, personal protection (of the leadership), and confidential communications.

This article is about the institution. ... A secret police (sometimes political police) force is a police organization that operates in secret to enforce state security. ...

NKVD activities

The main function of the NKVD was to protect the state security of the Soviet Union. This function was successfully accomplished through massive political repression. Security agency is an organization which conducts intelligence activities for the internal security of a nation, state or organization. ... Political repression is the oppression or persecution of an individual or group for political reasons, particularly for the purpose of restricting or preventing their ability to take part in the political life of society. ...


Repressions and executions

See Category:Political repression in the Soviet Union for detailed articles on the issue.

Nikolai Getman "Moving Out". The Gulag Collection.[3]

In implementing Soviet internal policy with respect to perceived enemies of the state ("enemies of the people"), to GULAG camps and hundreds of thousands were executed by the NKVD. Formally, most of these people were convicted by NKVD troikas ("triplets") — special courts martial. Evidential standards were very low; a tip off by an anonymous informer was considered sufficient grounds for arrest. Usage of "physical means of persuasion" (torture) was sanctioned by a special decree of the state, which opened the door to numerous abuses, documented in recollections of victims and members of the NKVD itself. Hundreds of mass graves resulting from such operations were later discovered throughout the country. Documented evidence exists that the NKVD committed mass extrajudicial executions, guided by secret "plans". Those plans established the number and proportion of victims (officially "public enemies") in a given region (e.g. the quotas for clergy, former nobles etc, regardless of identity). The families of the repressed, including children, were also automatically repressed according to NKVD Order no. 00486. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Getmans painting of Nagaevo, Magadans port Nikolai Getman (Russian: , Ukrainian: ), an artist, was born in 1917 in Kharkiv, Ukraine, and died in Orel, Russia, in 2004. ... Nikolai Getman Moving out. ... For the play by Henrik Ibsen, see An Enemy of the People. ... What does it mean? The Russian word troika (threesome, triumvirate) denoted commissions of three persons as an additional instrument of extrajudicial punishment (внесудебная расправа, внесудебное преследование) introduced to supplement the legal system with a means for quick punishment of anti-Soviet elements. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... The NKVD Order no. ...


The purges were organized in a number of waves according to the decisions of the Politburo of the Communist Party (e.g. the campaigns among engineers ("Shakhty Case"), party and military elite ("fascist plots"), and medical staff ("Doctors Plot"). Distinctive and permanent purging campaigns were conducted against non-Russian nationalities (including Ukrainians, Poles, Tatars, Germans and many others, who were accused of "bourgeois nationalism", "fascism", etc.) and religious activists. Politburo is short for Political Bureau. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Doctors plot (Russian language: дело врачей (doctors affair), врачи-вредители (doctors-saboteurs) or врачи-убийцы (doctors-killers)) was an alleged conspiracy to eliminate the leadership of the Soviet Union. ... Historically, the term Tatar (or Tartar) has been ambiguously used by Europeans to refer to many different peoples of Inner Asia and Northern Asia. ...


A number of mass operations of the NKVD were related to the prosecution of whole ethnic categories. Whole populations of certain ethnicities were forcibly resettled. Despite this, ethnic Russians still formed the majority of NKVD victims. Mass operations of the NKVD were carried out during the Great Purge and targeted specific categories of people. ... Not by Their Own Will. ...


NKVD agents became not only executioners, but also one of the largest groups of victims. Most 1930s agency staff (hundreds of thousands), including all commanders, were executed.


During the Spanish Civil War, NKVD agents, acting in conjunction with the Communist Party of Spain, exercised substantial control over the Republican government, using Soviet military aid to help further Soviet influence. The NKVD established numerous secret prisons around Madrid, which were used to detain, torture, and kill hundreds of the NKVD's enemies. In June, 1937 Andres Nin, the secretary of the anti-Stalinist POUM, was tortured and killed in an NKVD prison. Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... PCE symbol The Communist Party of Spain (Partido Comunista de España or PCE) is the third largest political party of Spain. ... Anthem El Himno de Riego Capital Madrid Language(s) Spanish Government Republic President  - 1931–1936 Niceto Alcalá-Zamora  - 1936–1939 Manuel Azaña Legislature Congress of Deputies Historical era Interwar period  - Monarchy abolished April 14, 1931  - Spanish Civil War 1936–1939  - Republic in exile dissolved July 15, 1977 Currency Spanish... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Andreu Nin, (Spanish: Andrés Nin) (February 4, 1892 - June 20, 1937) was a Catalan Spanish revolutionary. ... For architecture, see Stalinist architecture. ... A POUM poster urges Workers: to victory! A POUM poster appeals to peasants: Peasants: the land is yours The Workers Party of Marxist Unification (POUM, Spanish: Partido Obrero de Unificación Marxista; Catalan: Partit Obrer dUnificació Marxista) was a Spanish communist political party formed during the Second Republic, and...


Cooperation between the NKVD and the Gestapo: In March, 1940 representatives of the NKVD and the Gestapo met for one week in Zakopane, to coordinate the pacification of Poland; see Gestapo–NKVD Conferences. The Soviet Union delivered hundreds of German and Austrian Communists to the Gestapo, as unwanted foreigners, together with their documents. The   (contraction of Geheime Staatspolizei: “secret state police”) was the official secret police of Nazi Germany. ... Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat Tatra County Gmina Zakopane Estabilished 17th century City Rights 1933 Government  - Mayor Janusz Majcher Area  - Town 84 km²  (32. ... Zakopane The Gestapo-NKVD conferences were a series of meetings organized in late 1939 and early 1940, whose purpose was the mutual cooperation between Nazi Germany and Soviet Union. ...


During World War II, NKVD units were used for rear area security, including stopping desertion. In liberated territory the NKVD and (later) NKGB carried out mass arrests, deportations, and executions. The targets included both collaborators with Germany and non-Communist resistance movements such as the Polish Armia Krajowa. The NKVD also executed thousands of Polish political prisoners in 1939-1941. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses of Desertion, see Abandonment. ... Look up resistance in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Armia Krajowa (the Home Army), abbreviated AK, was the dominant Polish resistance movement in World War II German-occupied Poland. ... Massacre of prisoners was a series of massacres committed by Soviet NKVD on prisoners in cities in the annexed territory of Poland close to the border with the part of Poland occupied by Germany and from which the Red Army was withdrawing after the German invasion in 1941. ...


The NKVD's intelligence and special operations (Inostrannyi Otdel) unit organized overseas assassinations of ex-Soviet citizens and foreigners who were regarded as enemies of the USSR by Josef Stalin. Among the officially confirmed victims of such plots were: Intelligence (abbreviated or ) is the process and the result of gathering information and analyzing it to answer questions or obtain advance warnings needed to plan for the future. ... Special forces or special operations forces is a term used to describe relatively small military units raised and trained for reconnaissance, unconventional warfare and special operations. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from...

After the death of Stalin in 1953, the new Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev halted the NKVD purges. From the 1950s to the 1980s, thousands of victims were legally "rehabilitated" (i.e. acquitted and had their rights restored). Many of the victims and their relatives refused to apply for rehabilitation out of fear or lack of documents. The rehabilitation was not complete: in most cases the formulation was "due to lack of evidence of the case of crime", a Soviet legal jargon that effectively said "there was a crime, but unfortunately we cannot prove it". Only a limited number of persons were rehabilitated with the formulation "cleared of all charges". Leon Trotsky (Russian:  , Lev Davidovich Trotsky, also transliterated Leo, Lyev, Trotskii, Trotski, Trotskij, Trockij and Trotzky) (November 7 [O.S. October 26] 1879 – August 21, 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronstein (), was a Ukrainian-born Bolshevik revolutionary and Marxist theorist. ... Boris Viktorovich Savinkov (Russian:Борис Викторович Савинков) (1879-1925) was a Russian writer and terrorist. ... Trust or Trest Operation (операция Трест) was an operation presented as a spectacular counterintelligence success of OGPU in 1921-1926. ... Soviet poster of the 1920s: The GPU strikes on the head the counter-revolutionary saboteur State Political Directorate was the secret police of the RSFSR and USSR until 1934. ... Yevhen Konovalets (b. ... Khrushchev redirects here. ...


Very few NKVD agents were ever officially convicted of the particular violation of anyone's rights. Legally, those agents executed in the 1930s were also "purged" without legitimate criminal investigations and court decisions. In the 1990s and 2000s a small number of ex-NKVD agents living in the Baltic states were convicted of crimes against the local population. The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. ...


At present, living former agents retain generous pensions and privileges established by the USSR and later confirmed by all of the member countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States. They have not been persecuted in any way, although some have been identified by their victims.  Member state  Associate member Headquarters Minsk, Belarus Working language Russian Type Commonwealth Membership 11 member states 1 associate member Leaders  -  Executive Secretary Sergei Lebedev Establishment December 21, 1991 Website http://cis. ...


Intelligence activities

These included:

  • Establishment of a widespread spy network through the Comintern.
  • Operations of Richard Sorge, the "Red Orchestra", and other agents who provided valuable intelligence during World War II.
  • Recruitment of important [United States|U.K.] officials as agents in the 1940s.
  • Penetration of British intelligence (MI6) and counter-intelligence (MI5) services.
  • Collection of detailed nuclear weapons design information from the U.S. and Britain.
  • Disruption of several confirmed plots to assassinate Stalin.

The Comintern (Russian: Коммунистический Интернационал, Kommunisticheskiy Internatsional – Communist International, also known as the Third International) was an international Communist organization founded in March 1919, in the midst of the war communism period (1918-1921), by Vladimir Lenin and the Russian Communist Party (Bolshevik), which intended to fight by all available means, including... Dr Sorge aka Ramsay Richard Sorge (Russian: Рихард Зорге) (October 4, 1895 - November 7, 1944) is considered to have been one of the best Soviet spies in Japan before and during World War II, which has gained him fame among spies, and espionage enthusiasts. ... Die Rote Kapelle (the Red Orchestra) was the name given by the Gestapo to two Communist resistance rings in Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II. The Gestapo used the name Red Orchestra to refer to the Schulze-Boysen / Harnack group, an anti-Hitler resistance movement in Germany with international... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), more commonly known as MI6 (originally Military Intelligence Section 6), or the Secret Service, is the United Kingdom external security agency. ... MI-5 redirects here. ...

The NKVD and the Soviet economy

The extensive system of labor exploitation in the GULAG made a notable contribution to the Soviet economy and the development of remote areas. Colonization of Siberia, the North and Far East was among the explicitly stated goals in the very first laws concerning Soviet labor camps. Mining, construction works (roads, railways, canals, dams, and factories), logging, and other functions of the labor camps were part of the Soviet planned economy, and the NKVD had its own production plans.[citation needed] A labor camp is a simplified detention facility where inmates are engaged in penal labor. ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... For other uses, see Construction (disambiguation). ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ... This article is about structures for water impoundment. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Logging is the process in which trees are cut down usually as part of a timber harvest which is good for the environment. ... This article refers to an economy controlled by the state. ...


The most unusual part of the NKVD's achievements was its role in Soviet science and arms development. Many scientists and engineers arrested for political crimes were placed in special prisons, much more comfortable than the GULAG), colloquially known as sharashkas. These prisoners continued their work in these prisons. When later released, some of them became world leaders in science and technology. Among such sharashka members were Sergey Korolev, the head designer of the Soviet rocket program and first human space flight mission in 1961, and Andrei Tupolev, the famous airplane designer. Sharashka (sometimes Sharaga or Sharazhka, Russian: ) was an informal name for secret research and development laboratories in the Soviet Gulag labor camp system. ... Korolev was key in the design and launch of Sputnik 1, the first ever artificial satellite Sergei Pavlovich Korolev (Серге́й Па́влович Королёв) (January 12, 1907 - January 14, 1966) was the head Soviet rocket engineer and designer during the space race, known only as the chief designer during his lifetime. ... Andrei Nikolayevich Tupolev Andrei Nikolayevich Tupolev (Russian: ; November 10, 1888 – December 23, 1972) was a pioneering Russian aircraft designer. ...


After World War II, the NKVD coordinated work on Soviet nuclear weaponry, under the direction of General Pavel Sudoplatov. The scientists were not prisoners, but the project was supervised by the NKVD because of its great importance and the corresponding requirement for absolute security and secrecy. Also, the project used information obtained by the NKVD from the U.S> Pavel Sudoplatov 1907 - 1996 Pavel Sudoplatov (1907 - September, 1996) was a member of the intelligence services of the Soviet Union who rose to the rank of major general. ...


See also

Katyn massacre 1943 exhumation. Photo made by Polish Red Cross delegation.
Katyn massacre 1943 exhumation. Photo made by Polish Red Cross delegation.

Katyn and KatyÅ„ redirect here. ... The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is the worlds largest group of humanitarian non-governmental organizations, often known simply as the Red Cross, after its original symbol. ... Bykivnia (Russian: Bykovnia) is a small village on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine. ... Zakopane The Gestapo-NKVD conferences were a series of meetings organized in late 1939 and early 1940, whose purpose was the mutual cooperation between Nazi Germany and Soviet Union. ... The Great Purge (Russian: , transliterated Bolshaya chistka) refers collectively to several related campaigns of political repression and persecution in the Soviet Union orchestrated by Joseph Stalin during the 1930s, which removed all of his remaining opposition from power. ... Child victim of the Holodomor Map of Ukrainian SRR in 1932-1933 (7 Oblast`s (Regions) + Moldavian ASSR) administrative borders given in light grey The Ukrainian famine (1932-1933), or Holodomor (Ukrainian: Голодомор), was one of the largest national catastrophes of the Ukrainian nation in modern history with direct loss of... Katyn and KatyÅ„ redirect here. ... Kurapaty (Belarusian: Курапаты) is a wooded area on the outskirts of Minsk, Belarus, where in 1941 a vast number of people were executed. ... Mass operations of the NKVD were carried out during the Great Purge and targeted specific categories of people. ... NKVD buildings in former Soviet Union - during the first years of the Soviet Union the NKVD took over a number of existing buildings, many building were also constructed for offices and investigation/torture chambers and internal prisons. ... The massacre of prisoners refers to a series of mass executions committed by Soviet NKVD against prisoners in Poland and parts of the Soviet Union from which the Red Army was withdrawing after the German invasion in 1941 (see Operation Barbarossa). ... Not by Their Own Will. ... Special Council of the USSR NKVD (Особое Совещание при НКВД СССР, ОСО) was created by the same decree of Sovnarkom of July 10, 1934 that introduced the NKVD itself. ... NKVD border guards watching the frontier Soviet Border Troops, (Russian: Пограничные войска СССР, Pogranichnyie Voiska SSSR) were the militarized border guard of the Soviet Union, subordinated to its subsequently reorganized state security agency: first to Cheka, than to NKVD and, finally, to to KGB. Accordingly, they were known as NKVD Border Troops and... Modern memorial for the victims of the Soviet terror of 1937–1938 close to Gorky park, Vinnytsia. ...

Notes

  1. ^ At various times, the NKVD had the following Chief Directorates, abbreviated as "ГУ" — главное управление, glavnoye upravleniye.
    ГУГБ — государственная безопасность, of State Security (GUGB, gosudarstvennaya bezopasnost’)
    ГУРКМ — рабоче-крестьянская милиция, of workers and peasants militsiya (radoče-krest'yanskaya militsiya)
    ГУПВО — пограничная и внутренняя охрана, of border and internal guards (pograničnaya i vnytrennyaya okhrana)
    ГУПО — пожарная охрана, of fire guards (požarnaya okhrana)
    ГУШосдор — шоссейные дороги, of highways (šosseyniye dorogi)
    ГУЖД — железные дороги, of railways (železniye dorogi)
    ГУЛАГ — GULAG (Главное Управление Исправительно—Трудовых Лагерей и колоний, Glavnoye Upravleniye Ispravitelno-trudovykh Lagerey i kolonii)
    ГЭУ — экономика, of economics (ekonomika)
    ГТУ — транспорт, of transport (transport)
    ГУВПИ — военнопленных и интернированных, of POWs and interned persons (voyennoplennikh i internirovannikh)
  2. ^ NKVD Organization in 1939
    NKVD management
    Deputies
    • for NKVD troops — Ivan Maslenikov
    • for Militsiya — Vasyli Chernyshov
    • for Staff — Sergei Kruglov
    Secretariats
    • NKVD Secretariat — Stepan Mamulov
    • Secretariat of Special Council of the NKVD — Vladimir Ivanov
    • Special Technical Bureau — Valentin Kravchenko
    • Special Bureau — Pyotr Scharia
    • NKVD Inspection Group — Nikolai Pavlov
    • Special Plenipotentiary — Aleksei Stefanov
    • Secretariat of the First Deputy for GUGB Task — Vsevolod Merkulov
    • Inspection Group — Vsevolod Merkulov
    • Special Secretariat — Vasyli Chernyshov
    • Section for Organization of Labor Force — Vsevolod Merkulov
    • Permanent Technical Committee — ?
    • Section for Repair Work — Pyotr Vainschtein
    • Supply Section — M. Mituschyn
    • Department of Railroad Transportation and Water — ?
    Directorates and departments
    • Main Directorate of State Security (GUGB) — Vsevolod Merkulov
    • 1st Special Department — Leonid Baschtakov
    • 2nd Special Department — Evgeny Lapishin
    • 3rd Special Department — Dmitry Shadrin
    • 4th Special Department — Mikhail Filimonov
    • 5th Special Department — Vladimir Vladimirov
    • Department of Mobilization — Ivan Scherediega
    • Department of Staff — Sergei Kruglov
    • The Chief Directorate of Economics (GEU) — Bogdan Kobulov
    • The Chief Directorate of Transportation (GTU) — Solomon Milshtein
    • The Chief Directorate of Prison (GTU) — Aleksandr Galkin
    • The Chief Directorate of Administration (AČU) — J.Schumbatov
    • The Chief Directorate of Archive (GAU) — Yosif Nikitynsky
    • The Chief Directorate of fire guards (GUPO) — Nikolay Istomin
    • The Chief Directorate of Militsiya (GURKM) — Pavel Zujev
    • The Chief Directorate [or Administration] of Corrective Labour Camps and Colonies (GULAG) — Vasyli Chernyshov
    • The Chief Directorate of Highways (GUŠOSDOR) — Vsevolod Fedotov
    • Directorate of Kremlin Commander — Nikolai Spyrydonov
    • The Chief Directorate of Border Troops (GUPW) — Grigori Sokolov
    • The Chief Directorate of NKVD Troops for Railroad Protection — Aleksandr Guliev
    • The Chief Directorate of NKVD Troops for Escort — Vladimir Sharapov
    • The Chief Directorate of NKVD Troops for Protection of Industrial Enterprise — I. Kozik
    • The Chief Directorate of NKVD Operative Troops — P. Ariemyev
    • The Chief Directorate of Military Provision — Aleksandr Wurgaft
    • The Chief Directorate of Military Construction — Ivan Luby
    • Directorate for Prisoners of War — Pyotr Soprunienko
    • Directorate for Construction in the Far East — Ivan Nikishev
    • Main Fanacial Department — Lazar Bierienzon
    • Main Department for Civil Status — Fyedor Sokolov
  3. ^ The Gulag Collection: Paintings of Nikolai Getman.

The Main Directorate of State Security (Russian: Glavnoe Upravlenie Gosudarstvennoi Bezopasnosti) was the name of the Soviet secret police from July 1934 to April 1943. ... A member of a Russian special purpose police team (OMSN), equipped with a 9A91 submachine gun. ... Nikolai Getman Moving out. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Lavrenty Beria Lavrentiy Pavlovich Beria (Georgian: ლავრენტი ბერია; Russian: Лаврентий Павлович Берия; (29 March 1899 – 23 December 1953), was a Soviet politician and chief of the Soviet security and police apparatus. ... Vsevolod Nikolayevich Merkulov (Всеволод Николаевич Меркулов in Russian) (10. ... Sergei Nikiforovich Kruglov (Russian: Сергей Никифорович Круглов) (1907 - 1977) was the minister of the interior of the USSR from March of 1953 until March of 1954. ... Vladimir Ivanov (born February 6, 1973) is a Bulgarian football player who, as of 2004 was playing for Lokomotiv Plovdiv. ... Vsevolod Nikolayevich Merkulov (Всеволод Николаевич Меркулов in Russian) (10. ... Vsevolod Nikolayevich Merkulov (Всеволод Николаевич Меркулов in Russian) (10. ... Vsevolod Nikolayevich Merkulov (Всеволод Николаевич Меркулов in Russian) (10. ... Vsevolod Nikolayevich Merkulov (Всеволод Николаевич Меркулов in Russian) (10. ... Sergei Nikiforovich Kruglov (Russian: Сергей Никифорович Круглов) (1907 - 1977) was the minister of the interior of the USSR from March of 1953 until March of 1954. ...

External links

  • NKVD.org: information site about the NKVD
  • (Russian) MVD: 200-year history of the Ministry
  • (Russian) MEMORIAL: history of the OGPU/NKVD/MGB/KGB
For the reggaeton aritst, see Cheka (artist). ... Soviet poster of the 1920s: The GPU strikes on the head the counter-revolutionary saboteur State Political Directorate was the secret police of the RSFSR and USSR until 1934. ... The Main Directorate of State Security (Russian: Glavnoe Upravlenie Gosudarstvennoi Bezopasnosti) was the name of the Soviet secret police from July 1934 to April 1943. ... The Peoples Commissariat for State Security (Народный комиссариат государственной безопасности) or NKGB - was the name of the Soviet secret police, intelligence and counter-intelligence force that existed from February 3, 1941 to July 20 1941, and again from 1943 to 1946, and then renamed into the Ministry for State Security, or MGB. // On... The Ministry of State Security (MGB) ( Russian: Министерство государственной безопасности (Ministerstvo Gosudarstvennoi Bezopasnosti)) was the name of the Soviet secret police agency from 1946 to 1953. ... This article is about the KGB of the Soviet Union. ... The Directorate of State Security, or Sigurimi (Full name:Drejtorija e Sigurimit të Shtetit) was Albanias secret police agency during the communist regime. ... This article is about the state which existed from 1949 to 1990. ... Logo of East Germanys Ministerium für Staatssicherheit (MfS or Stasi) / Ministry for State Security This article is about Stasi, the secret police of East Germany. ... The State Protection Authority (Hungarian: or ÁVH) was the secret police force of Hungary from some time in 1944 or 1945 until 1956. ... Ministry of Public Security of Poland (Polish: ) was the organ established and controlled by Soviet Union officers to provide collaborationist government in Poland with secret police, intelligence and counter-espionage services from 1945 to 1954. ... SÅ‚użba BezpieczeÅ„stwa (or SB) Ministerstwa Spraw WewnÄ™trznych, of the Ministry of Internal Affairs - was the name of communist internal intelligence agency and secret police, established in the Peoples Republic of Poland in 1956, SB was the main organ in Poland responsible for political repression, until its... The Securitate (Romanian for Security; official full name Departamentul Securităţii Statului, State Security Department), was the secret police force of Communist Romania. ... Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... UDBA or Uprava državne bezbednosti/sigurnosti/varnosti (Serbian Cyrillic: УДБА or Управа државне безбедности) (State Security Administration, literally state security directorate) was the secret police organization of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
NKVD top (462 words)
NKVD was started almost by accident with the goal of putting out music by great bands that I felt weren't being noticed.
NKVD’s goal isn’t to make a bunch of money, although I do want to break even.
Since selling 1,000 copies of a given CD one at a time is virtually impossible, I’ve taken up trading NKVD releases for good music on other labels with a similar philosophy to produce a much broader catalog of bands to represent.
NKVD troika - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (532 words)
NKVD troika or Troika, in Soviet Union history, were commissions of three people employed as an additional instrument of extrajudicial punishment (внесудебная расправа, внесудебное преследование) introduced to supplement the legal system with a means for quick punishment of anti-Soviet elements.
It began as an institution of the Cheka, then later became prominent again in the NKVD, when it was used during the Great Purge period in the Soviet Union.
The chairman of a troika was the chief of the corresponding territorial subdivision of NKVD (People's Commissar of a republican NKVD, etc.).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m