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Encyclopedia > NASCAR
For current sports news on this topic, see
2008 in NASCAR
National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, Inc.
Sport governing body


Image File history File links Soccerball_current_event. ... The 2008 NASCAR Nextel Cup season is scheduled to begin on Saturday, February 9th with the annual Bud Shootout at Daytona International Speedway, followed the following day by pole qualifying for the 2008 Daytona 500, which will celebarte its 50th running on February 18. ... A sport governing body comes in several forms. ... Image File history File links NASCAR.svg‎ Source: http://www. ...

Category Stock cars
Area of jurisdiction United States
Formation date 1948
Headquarters Daytona Beach, Florida
Charlotte, North Carolina
New York City, New York
President Mike Helton
Chairman Brian France
Website www.nascar.com

The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. The three largest racing series sanctioned by NASCAR are the NEXTEL Cup, the Busch Series and the Craftsman Truck Series. It also oversees NASCAR Regional Racing, the Whelen Modified Tour, and the Whelen All-American Series. NASCAR sanctions over 1,500 races at over 100 tracks in 39 states, Canada, and Mexico. From 1996 to 1998, NASCAR held exhibition races in Japan, and an exhibition race in Australia in 1988. This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Daytona Beach in 2005 Daytona Beach is a city in Volusia County, Florida, USA. As of 2004, the population estimates recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 64,422. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... Helton(left) meeting with Adm. ... Brian France (born August 2, 1962) is the CEO and chairman of NASCAR, taking over the position from his father, Bill France, Jr. ... Practicing for the 2004 Daytona 500, public domain image from Air Force Link. ... Practicing for the 2004 Daytona 500, public domain image from Air Force Link. ... Jeffrey Brian Burton (born June 29, 1967 in South Boston, Virginia) also sometimes referred to as JB is a NASCAR Nextel Cup Series driver. ... Elliott Sadler (left) talking with teammate Dale Jarrett. ... Ricky Rudd in 2005, courtesy of the U.S. Air Force Ricky Rudd racing at the Chevy Rock and Roll 400 at Richmond International Raceway. ... Dale Arnold Jarrett (born November 26, 1956 in Newton, North Carolina) is an American race car driver. ... Sterling Marlin (born June 30, 1957 in Columbia, Tennessee) is a NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series driver who drove the #14 Waste Management Chevrolet Monte Carlo for Ginn Racing until being replaced by Regan Smith July 17, 2007. ... For other persons of the same name, see Jimmy Johnson. ... Casey James Mears (born March 12, 1978 in Bakersfield, California) is the driver of the #25 National Guard/GMAC Chevrolet in the NASCAR Nextel Cup Series for Hendrick Motorsports. ... The 2004 NASCAR Nextel Cup season began on Saturday, February 7 and ended on Sunday, November 21. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... The NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCARs top racing series. ... Most recent champion(s) Kevin Harvick The NASCAR Busch Series is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR. It is NASCARs minor league circuit (often compared to Triple-A baseball), and is a proving ground for drivers who wish to step up to the organizations... The NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series is a popular NASCAR racing series that features modified pickup trucks. ... NASCAR Regional Racing is a group of regional stock car racing divisions sanctioned by NASCAR. Divisions NASCAR Grand National Division AutoZone West Series Busch East Series NASCAR Touring Whelen Modified Tour Whelen Southern Modified Tour NASCAR AutoZone Elite Division Midwest Series Northwest Series Southeast Series Southwest Series NASCAR Special Event... (The NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour was previously named NASCAR Winston Modified Tour and NASCAR Featherlite Modified Series) The NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour (WMT) is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR in the Modified division. ... The Whelen All-American Series (formerly the Dodge Weekly Series) is a semi-professional and amateur auto racing series sanctioned by NASCAR. It is commonly seen as the lowest level of competitive racing sanctioned by NASCAR, and is thus the entry point for a number of aspiring drivers. ... The 1996 NASCAR Winston Cup Series started on February 18th 1996 and ended on November 10th 1996 with Terry Labonte winning his 2nd championship. ... The 1998 NASCAR Winston Cup Season began on Sunday February 8 and ended on Sunday November 8. ... The 1988 NASCAR Winston Cup Season began February 7 and ended November 20. ...


With roots as regional entertainment in the Southeastern U.S., NASCAR has grown to become the second-most popular professional sport in terms of television ratings inside the U.S., ranking behind only the National Football League.[1] Internationally, NASCAR races are broadcast in over 150 countries. It holds 17 of the top 20 attended sporting events in the U.S.,1 and has 75 million fans[1] who purchase over $3 billion in annual licensed product sales. These fans are considered the most brand-loyal in all of sports and as a result, Fortune 500 companies sponsor NASCAR more than any other governing body. The US Southeast is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, but the Census Bureau does not provide a standard definition of a Southeast region of the United States, and organizations that need to subdivide the US are free to define a Southeast region to fit their needs. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ...


NASCAR's headquarters are located in Daytona Beach, Florida, although it also maintains offices in four North Carolina cities: Charlotte, Mooresville, Concord, and Conover. Regional offices are also located in New York City, Los Angeles, Arkansas, and international offices in Mexico City and Toronto, Ontario. Daytona Beach in 2005 Daytona Beach is a city in Volusia County, Florida, USA. As of 2004, the population estimates recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 64,422. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Mooresville is a town in Iredell County, North Carolina, U.S.A. The population was 18,823 at the 2000 census. ... Concord is a city located in Cabarrus County, North Carolina, a suburb of Charlotte. ... Conover is a city in Catawba County, North Carolina, United States. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Nickname: Motto: Capital en movimiento Location of Mexico City in south central Mexico Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ...

Contents

History

Early stock car racing

In the first few decades of the 1900s, Daytona Beach became known as the place to set world land speed records. The beach became a mecca for racing enthusiasts and fifteen records were set on this beach between 1905 and 1935. Then, in 1936, the Bonneville Salt Flats became the premier place to host land speed record attempts, so the Daytona beach course began hosting car racing events. Drivers raced a 1.5 to 2 mile stretch of beach as one straightaway and beachfront highway A1A as the other. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ... Daytona Beach in 2005 Daytona Beach is a city in Volusia County, Florida, USA. As of 2004, the population estimates recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 64,422. ... Ralph DePalma in his Packard 905 Special at Daytona Beach in 1919, courtesy Florida Photographic Collection For the album Land Speed Record by the band Hüsker Dü, see Land Speed Record (album). ... Daytona Beach Road Course was a race track that was instrumental in the formation of NASCAR. It originally became famous as the location where fifteen world land speed records were set. ... Bonneville Salt Flats The Bonneville Salt Flats are a 121 km² (47 mi²) salt flat in northwestern Utah. ... State Road A1A is a Florida State Road that runs mostly along the Atlantic Ocean, with sections from Key West at the southern tip of Florida, to Callahan, just south of Georgia. ...


Stock car racing had its origins in bootlegging during Prohibition. Bootleggers needed to distribute their illicit products, and they typically used small, fast vehicles to better evade the police. Many of the drivers would modify their cars for speed and handling, as well as increased cargo capacity, and some of them came to love the fast-paced driving down twisty mountain roads. One of the main 'strips' in Knoxville, Tennessee, had its beginning as a mecca for aspiring bootlegging drivers. Rum-running is the business of smuggling or transporting of alcoholic beverages illegally, usually to circumvent taxation or prohibition. ... Prohibition in the United States aimed to achieve alcohol abstinence through legal means. ... Nickname: Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee. ...


The repeal of Prohibition in 1933 dried up some of their business, but by then Southerners had developed a taste for moonshine, and a number of the drivers continued "runnin' shine," this time evading the "revenuers" who were attempting to tax their operations. The cars continued to improve, and by the late 1940's, races featuring these cars were being run for pride and profit. These races were popular entertainment in the rural Southern United States, and they are most closely associated with the Wilkes County region of North Carolina. Most races in those days were of modified cars. Street vehicles were lightened and reinforced. Amendment XXI (the Twenty-first Amendment) to the United States Constitution repealed the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which had mandated nationwide Prohibition. ... Revenue men at the site of moonshine stills, Kentucky, 1911 or earlier For other uses, see Moonshine (disambiguation). ... A stilt-walker entertaining shoppers at a shopping centre in Swindon, England Entertainment is an event, performance, or activity designed to give pleasure or relaxation to an audience (although, for example, in the case of a computer game the audience may be only one person). ... Wilkes County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


Significant people

William France, Sr.

Main article: Bill France, Sr.

Mechanic William France, Sr., moved to Daytona Beach, Florida, from Washington, DC, in 1935 to escape the Great Depression. He was familiar with the history of the area from the land speed record attempts. France entered the 1936 Daytona event, finishing fifth. He took over running the course in 1938. He promoted a few races before World War II. William Bill Henry Getty France, Sr. ... William Bill Henry Getty France, Sr. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


France had the notion that people would enjoy watching "stock cars" race. Drivers were frequently victimized by unscrupulous promoters who would leave events with all the money before drivers were paid. In 1947, he decided this racing would not grow without a formal sanctioning organization, standardized rules, regular schedule, and an organized championship. On December 14, 1947, France began talks with other influential racers and promoters at the Ebony Bar at the Streamline Hotel at Daytona Beach, Florida, that ended with the formation of NASCAR on February 21, 1948. This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Daytona Beach in 2005 Daytona Beach is a city in Volusia County, Florida, USA. As of 2004, the population estimates recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 64,422. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


NASCAR was founded by William France, Sr., on February 21, 1948, with the help of several other drivers of the time. The points system was written on a bar room napkin. The original plans for NASCAR included three distinct divisions: Modified, Roadster, and Strictly Stock.[2] The Modified and Roadster classes were seen as more attractive to fans.[2] It turned out that NASCAR fans wanted nothing to do with the Roadsters, which fans perceived as a Northeast or Midwest series.[2] The Strictly Stock division was put on hold as American automobile manufacturers were unable to produce family sedans quickly enough to keep up with post-World War II demand.[2] The 1948 schedule featured 52 Modified dirt track races. The sanctioning body hosted its first event at Daytona Beach on February 15, 1948. Red Byron beat Marshall Teague in the Modified division race. Byron won the 1948 national championship. Things had changed dramatically by 1949, and the Strictly Stock division was able to debut with a 20 mile exhibition in February near Miami. is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dirt track racing is a type of auto racing performed on oval tracks. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Red Byron (March 12, 1915 - November 11, 1960) was a NASCAR driver who was successful as the series began. ... Marshall Teague (February 17, 1922 - February 11, 1959) was an American race car driver. ...


Erwin "Cannonball" Baker

Main article: Erwin George Baker

The first Commissioner of NASCAR was Erwin "Cannonball" Baker. A former stock car, motorcycle, and open-wheel racer who competed in the Indianapolis 500 and set over one hundred land speed records. Cannonball Baker earned most of his fame for his transcontinental speed runs. Baker would prove a car's worth by driving it from New York to Los Angeles. After his death, the famous transcontinental race the 'Cannonball Run' and the film that was inspired by it were both named in his honor. Baker is enshrined in the Automotive Hall of Fame, The Motorcycle Hall of Fame, The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame, and The NASCAR Hall of Fame. This level of honor and success in each diverse racing association earned Baker the title "King of the Road". Erwin George Cannon Ball Baker (1882-May, 1960) was an automobile racing driver and organizer in the first half of the 20th century. ... Cannonball Run can refer to the following: Cannonball Baker Sea-To-Shining-Sea Memorial Trophy Dash, an outlaw automobile race of the 1970s or its many copycat successors Cannonball Run and Cannonball Run II, movies inspired by the races Cannonball Run 2001, a USA Network reality television show inspired by...


Bob "Barky" Barkhimer

In the early 1950s the United States Navy stationed Bill France, Jr., at the Moffett Federal Airfield in northern California. His father asked him to look up Bob Barkhimer in San Jose, California. Barkhimer was a star of midget car racing from the World War II era, and later ran about 22 different speedways as the head of the California Stock Car Racing Association. Young Bill developed a relationship with Bob Barkhimer and his partner, Margo Burke. He went to events with them, stayed weekends with them and generally became very familiar with racing on the west coast. "Barky," as he was called by his friends, journeyed to Daytona Beach and met with Bill France, Sr. In the spring of 1954, NASCAR became the stock car sanctioning body on the Pacific Coast under Barky. USN redirects here. ... William Bill Clay France, Jr. ... Aerial View of Moffett Field and NASA Ames Research Center. ... For other uses, see San José. Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... Midget cars are very small race cars with a very high power-to-weight ratio. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Strictly Stock to Grand National

The first NASCAR "Strictly Stock" race ever was held at Charlotte Speedway (not the Charlotte Motor Speedway) on June 19, 1949 -- a race won by Jim Roper after Glenn Dunnaway was disqualified after the discovery of his altered rear springs. Initially, the cars were known as the "Strictly Stock Division" and raced with virtually no modifications on the factory models. This division was renamed "Grand National" beginning in the 1950 season. However, over a period of about a dozen years, modifications for both safety and performance were allowed and, by the mid-1960s, the vehicles were purpose-built race cars with a stock-appearing body. for the current NASCAR track, see Lowes Motor Speedway. ... Lowes Motor Speedway (formerly Charlotte Motor Speedway) is a speedway in Concord, North Carolina, north of Charlotte. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Christian D. Jim Roper (August 13, 1916 – June 23, 2000) was a NASCAR driver. ... Henry Glenn Dunnaway (1915 – March 15, 1964) was a NASCAR driver. ...


One of the tracks used in the inaugural season is still on today's premier circuit: Martinsville Speedway. Another old track which is still in use is Darlington Raceway, which opened in 1950. (The oldest track on today's NEXTEL Cup circuit is the Indianapolis Motor Speedway which dates back to 1909; however, the first Brickyard 400 did not take place until 1994.) Martinsville Speedway is an International Speedway Corporation owned NASCAR stock car racing track located in Martinsville, Virginia. ... Darlington Raceway during the 2006 Dodge Charger 500. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCARs top racing series. ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Allstate 400 at The Brickyard is an annual 400 mile (644 km) NASCAR Nextel Cup points race held each August at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...

Most races were on half-mile to one-mile (800 to 1600 m) oval tracks. However, the first "superspeedway" was built in Darlington, South Carolina, in 1950. This track, at 1.366 miles (2.22 km), was wider, faster and higher-banked than the racers had seen. Darlington was the premiere event of the series until 1959. Daytona International Speedway, a 2.5-mile (4 km) high-banked track, opened in 1959, and became the icon of the sport. The track was built on a swamp, so France took a huge risk in building the track. Image File history File links RichardPettyRoadrunner. ... Image File history File links RichardPettyRoadrunner. ... Richard Lee Petty (born July 2, 1937) is an American former NASCAR Winston Cup Series driver. ... The short-lived Plymouth Road Runner Superbird, a sister design to the Dodge Charger Daytona, was designed to beat the Ford Torino Talladega at NASCAR stock car racing and to lure Richard Petty back to Plymouth. ... Darlington Raceway during the 2006 Dodge Charger 500. ... In North American motorsports, a superspeedway is a race track over one mile (1. ... Darlington is a city in Darlington County, in northeastern South Carolina. ... Daytona International Speedway is a superspeedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ...


The first NASCAR competition held outside of the U.S. was in Canada, where on July 1, 1952, Buddy Shuman won a 200-lap race on a half-mile (800 m) dirt track in Stamford Park, Ontario, near Niagara Falls. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buddy Shuman Buddy Shuman (September 8, 1915 - November 13, 1955) was a stock car driver for NASCAR when it was known as the Grand National Series. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ...


Beginning of the modern era

NASCAR made major changes in its structure in the early 1970s. The top series found sponsorship from R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company (RJR). Tobacco companies, which had been banned from television advertising, found a popular and demographically suitable consumer base in NASCAR fans and engaged NASCAR as a promotional outlet. As a result of that sponsorship, the top competitive series became known as The "Winston Cup" starting in 1971, with a new points system and some significant cash benefits to compete for championship points. Also in 1971, the NASCAR season was shortened from 48 races to 31. For these reasons, 1971 is often acknowledged as the beginning of NASCAR's "modern era". Reynolds American Inc. ... Tobacco advertising is the promotion of tobacco use (typically cigarette smoking) by the tobacco industry through a variety of media. ...


The next competitive level, called Late Model Sportsman, gained the "Grand National" title passed down from the top division and soon found a sponsor in Busch Beer. In the mid-1970s, some races began to get partial television coverage, frequently on the ABC sports variety show "Wide World of Sports." This article is about the American broadcast network. ... ABCs Wide World of Sports is a long-running sports anthology show on American television. ...


Finally, in 1979, the Daytona 500 became the first stock car race that was nationally televised from flag to flag on CBS. The leaders going into the last lap, Cale Yarborough and Donnie Allison, wrecked on the backstretch while dicing for the lead, allowing Richard Petty to pass them both and win the race. Immediately, Yarborough, Allison, and Allison's brother Bobby were engaged in a fistfight on national television. This underlined the drama and emotion of the sport and increased its broadcast marketability. Luckily for NASCAR, the race coincided with a major snowstorm along the United States' eastern seaboard, successfully introducing much of the captive audience to the sport. The Daytona 500 is a 200-lap, 500 mile (805 km) NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series race held annually at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... William Caleb Cale Yarborough (born March 27, 1939 in Timmonsville, South Carolina, near the Famous Darlington Raceway), is a former NASCAR Winston Cup Series driver and was one of the series engaging personalities. ... Donnie Allison is a former driver on the NASCAR Winston Cup circuit, who won ten times during his racing career, which spanned the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s. ... Richard Lee Petty (born July 2, 1937) is an American former NASCAR Winston Cup Series driver. ... Bobby Allison (born December 3, 1937) was one of the first NASCAR drivers and was named one of NASCARs 50 greatest drivers. ...


The beginning of the modern era also brought a change in the competitive structure. The purse awarded for championship points accumulated over the course of the season began to be significant. Previously, drivers were mostly concerned about winning individual races. Now, their standing in championship points became an important factor.


NASCAR-sanctioned series

Nextel Cup

The 2006 NASCAR NEXTEL cup
The 2006 NASCAR NEXTEL cup
Main article: Nextel Cup

The "NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series" is the sport's highest level of professional competition. It is consequently the most popular and most profitable NASCAR series. The 2006 NEXTEL Cup season consisted of 36 races over 10 months, with over $4 million in total prize money at stake at each race. Writers and fans often use "Cup" to refer to the NEXTEL Cup series and the ambiguous use of "NASCAR" as a synonym for the NEXTEL Cup series is common. As of 2007, the defending champion is Jimmie Johnson. Image File history File links EdwardsSadlerLabonte. ... Image File history File links EdwardsSadlerLabonte. ... The NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCARs top racing series. ... For other persons of the same name, see Jimmy Johnson. ...

In 2004, NEXTEL took over sponsorship of the premier series from R. J. Reynolds, formally renaming it from the Winston Cup to the NEXTEL Cup Series. A new championship points system, "The Chase for the NEXTEL Cup" was also developed, which reset the point standings with ten races to go, making only drivers in the top ten or within 400 points of the leader eligible to win the championship. In 2007, NASCAR announced it was expanding "The Chase" from ten to twelve drivers, eliminating the 400-point cutoff, and giving a ten-point bonus to the top twelve drivers for each of the races they have won out of the first 26. Wins throughout the season will also be worth five more points than in previous seasons. In 2008, the premier series title name will become the Sprint Cup Series, as part of the merger between NEXTEL and Sprint. Image File history File links NASCAR_Nextel_Cup_Series_Logo. ... Sprint Nextel Corporation (NYSE: S), headquartered in Reston, Virginia, is one of the largest telecommunications companies in the United States. ... Richard Joshua R.J. Reynolds (1850-1918) was an American businessman and founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. ... The NASCAR Championship is the championship held in NASCARs top stock car racing series. ... The NEXTEL Cup trophy presented to the champion after the Ford 400. ...


Busch Series

The Busch Series field following the pace car at Texas in April 2007
The Busch Series field following the pace car at Texas in April 2007
Main article: Busch Series

The "NASCAR Busch Series" is the second-highest level of professional competition in NASCAR. The cars look very similar to Nextel Cup cars with only a few differences, such as the weight and length of the car, the size of the rear spoiler, and the power output of the engine. For 2007, the champion is "Buschwacker" Carl Edwards, who won the series with two races left on the schedule. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 458 pixels Full resolution (2844 × 1628 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 458 pixels Full resolution (2844 × 1628 pixel, file size: 2. ... Most recent champion(s) Kevin Harvick The NASCAR Busch Series is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR. It is NASCARs minor league circuit (often compared to Triple-A baseball), and is a proving ground for drivers who wish to step up to the organizations...

The Busch Series is currently the only series of the top three to race outside the United States and the only series to have ever held points-paying international events. The season is a few races shorter and the prize money is significantly lower. Over the last several years, a number of NEXTEL Cup drivers have tried to run races in both series, using the Busch race as a warm-up to the Cup event at the same facility. Detractors of this practice have labeled such drivers as "Buschwhackers." The Busch sponsorship is set to expire at the end of 2007, and the series will now be sponsored by Nationwide Insurance. Nationwide will also become NASCAR's official insurance agency replacing Allstate. NASCAR Busch Series logo. ... The NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCARs top racing series. ... For other uses, see Bushwhackers (disambiguation). ... Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company & Affiliated Companies are a group of large US insurance and financial services companies. ... The Allstate Corporation NYSE: ALL is the largest publicly held personal lines insurer in the United States. ...


Craftsman Truck Series

Mike Skinner racing Todd Bodine in the Texas Craftsman Truck Series race.
Mike Skinner racing Todd Bodine in the Texas Craftsman Truck Series race.

The '"NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series" features modified pickup trucks. It is one of the three national divisions of NASCAR, together with the Busch Series and the Nextel Cup. As of 2007, the defending champion is Todd Bodine. Ron Hornaday is the 2007 champion by a 54 point margin over Mike Skinner. Hornaday has now earned two Craftsman Truck championships, a distinction he shares with Jack Sprague, the only other driver to win two Truck cups. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 619 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,412 × 2,336 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 619 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,412 × 2,336 pixels, file size: 2. ... Mike Skinner can refer to: The NASCAR driver, Mike Skinner. ... Todd Bodine (born February 27, 1964) is a stock car racer. ... The NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series is a popular NASCAR racing series that features modified pickup trucks. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Pickup truck with extended cabin and homebuilt lumber rack. ... Most recent champion(s) Kevin Harvick The NASCAR Busch Series is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR. It is NASCARs minor league circuit (often compared to Triple-A baseball), and is a proving ground for drivers who wish to step up to the organizations... The NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCARs top racing series. ... Todd Bodine (born February 27, 1964) is a stock car racer. ...


In 1994, NASCAR announced the formation of the NASCAR SuperTruck Series presented by Craftsman. The first series race followed in 1995. In 1996, the series was renamed the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series to emphasize Craftsman's involvement. The series was first considered something of an oddity or a "senior tour" for NASCAR drivers, but eventually grew in popularity and has produced Nextel Cup series drivers who had never raced in the Busch Series. Most recent champion(s) Kevin Harvick The NASCAR Busch Series is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR. It is NASCARs minor league circuit (often compared to Triple-A baseball), and is a proving ground for drivers who wish to step up to the organizations...


NASCAR Canadian Tire Series

NASCAR Canadian Tire Series Logo

NASCAR announced the purchase of Canadian racing series CASCAR in September of 2006. The CASCAR Western Series will become NASCAR's fourth-tier series starting in the Fall of 2007. Image File history File links NASCAR-CanadianTireLogo. ... The NASCAR Canadian Tire Series is a NASCAR series in Canada. ... The Canadian Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (CASCAR), established in 1981 by President Anthony Novotny (who still serves in this capacity), is the governing body for amateur and professional stock car racing in Canada. ...


NASCAR Corona Series

Main article: NASCAR Corona Series

In December of 2006, NASCAR also announced the creation of a new series in Mexico, the NASCAR Corona Series, replacing the existing Desafio Corona Series, to begin in 2007.[3] Image File history File links NASCAR-CoronaLogo. ... The NASCAR Corona Series (formerly NASCAR Mexico Corona Series) is a NASCAR series in Mexico. ... The NASCAR Corona Series (formerly NASCAR Mexico Corona Series) is a NASCAR series in Mexico. ... The Desafio Corona is a NASCAR series in Mexico. ...


Regional racing series

In addition to the five main series, NASCAR operates several other racing circuits.


Many local race tracks across the United States and Canada run under the Whelen All-American Series banner, where local drivers are compared against each other in a formula where the best local track champion of the nation wins the Whelen All-American Weekly Series National Championship. The Whelen All-American series is split into four divisions. Each division champion receives a point-fund money payout and even more goes to the National champion (driver with most points out of the four division winners). The Whelen All-American Series is the base for stock car racing, developing NASCAR names such as Clint Bowyer, Jimmy Spencer, Tony Stewart, the Bodine brothers and many others along the way. The Whelen All-American Series (formerly the Dodge Weekly Series) is a semi-professional and amateur auto racing series sanctioned by NASCAR. It is commonly seen as the lowest level of competitive racing sanctioned by NASCAR, and is thus the entry point for a number of aspiring drivers. ... Clint Bowyer (born May 30, 1979, in Emporia, Kansas) is a NASCAR driver. ... Jimmy Spencer Jimmy Spencer (born February 15, 1957 in Berwick, Pennsylvania) is an American NASCAR driver and commentator. ... For other persons named Tony Stewart, see Tony Stewart (disambiguation). ...


NASCAR also sanctions three regional racing divisions: The Whelen Modified Tour, which races open-wheel "modified" cars in Northern and Southern divisions; the Grand National Division, which races in the Busch East Series (formerly Busch North); and the NASCAR West Series. Grand National cars are similar to Busch Series cars, although they are less powerful. The AutoZone Elite Division, which races late-model cars which are lighter and less powerful than NEXTEL Cup cars, was originally split into four divisions: Northwest, Southwest, Southeast, and Midwest. At the end of 2005, NASCAR announced that the AutoZone Elite Division would be discontinued after the 2006 season due to having trouble securing NASCAR-sanctioned tracks to successfully host AutoZone Elite Division events, plus escalating costs of competing and downsizing of the Division in recent years. (The NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour was previously named NASCAR Winston Modified Tour and NASCAR Featherlite Modified Series) The NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour (WMT) is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR in the Modified division. ... The NASCAR Whelen Southern Modified Tour (WSMT) is a stock car racing series owned by NASCAR and operated in the Southeastern United States as part of its Modified Division. ... The NASCAR Grand National Division, Busch East Series is a regional stock car racing division sanctioned by NASCAR. Formed in 1987, The series races primarily in the Northeastern United States, including Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Delaware, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. ... The NASCAR Grand National Division, West Series (formerly the NASCAR Winston West Series and the NASCAR Grand National Division, Autozone West Series) is a regional stock car racing division of NASCAR. The West Series was first formed in 1954 as a proving ground for drivers from the West who could...


In 2003, NASCAR standardized rules for its AutoZone Elite and Grand National divisions regional touring series as to permit cars in one series to race against cars in another series in the same division. The top 15 (Grand National) or 10 (AutoZone Elite) in each series will race in a one-race playoff, called the NASCAR Toyota All-Star Showdown, to determine the annual AutoZone Elite and Grand National champions. This event has been hosted at Irwindale Speedway in California since its inception. Irwindale Speedway is located in Irwindale, California. ...


Many drivers move up through the series before reaching the NEXTEL Cup series. In 2002, over 9,000 drivers had licenses from NASCAR to race at all levels.


The winners of the Dodge Weekly Series National Championship, the four AutoZone Elite Divisions, the two Whelen Modified and Grand National Divisions, and the three national series are invited to New York City in December to participate in Champions Week ceremonies which conclude with the annual awards banquet at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. The hotels name with a single hyphen is engraved and gilded over the entrance. ...


North Carolina race shops

Most NASCAR teams are based in North Carolina, especially near Charlotte. Cities in North Carolina that are home to NASCAR teams include: Charlotte, Mooresville, Concord, Statesville, Huntersville, Cornelius, Welcome, Wilkesboro, Kernersville, Randleman, Greensboro, High Point, Harrisburg, and Kannapolis.[citation needed] Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Charlotte (also known as candle stick) is a figure skating grace move - one of the spirals, where the skater is bended and glides on its one leg with the other one lifted to the air. ... Mooresville is a town in Iredell County, North Carolina, U.S.A. The population was 18,823 at the 2000 census. ... Concord is a city located in Cabarrus County, North Carolina, a suburb of Charlotte. ... Statesville is a city in Iredell County, North Carolina, United States. ... Huntersville is a town in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, United States. ... Cornelius is a town in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, United States. ... Welcome is a census-designated place (CDP) in Davidson County, North Carolina, United States. ... Wilkesboro is a town in Wilkes County, North Carolina, United States. ... Kernersville is a town located in Forsyth County, North Carolina. ... Randleman is a city located in Randolph County, North Carolina. ... Greensboro redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Guilford County and the state of North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Guilford, Davidson, Randolph, Forsyth Government  - Mayor Rebecca Smothers Area  - Total 95. ... Harrisburg, a northeastern suburb of Charlotte, is a town located in Cabarrus County, North Carolina. ... The Kannapolis logo contains a Colonial Williamsburg architectural style cupola. ...


NASCAR compared to other forms of motorsport

The oval track of California Speedway.

NASCAR races take place predominantly on oval tracks of 3 or 4 turns, with all turns to the left. Oval tracks are classified as short track (less than 1 mile), intermediate or speedway (1 to 2 miles) or superspeedway (2.5 mile tri-oval). Road courses are any tracks having both left and right turns. As of 2007, the NEXTEL Cup series includes 36 points races, comprised of 34 oval-track races and 2 road course races. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 527 pixelsFull resolution‎ (992 × 653 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 527 pixelsFull resolution‎ (992 × 653 pixels, file size: 1. ... The California Speedway is a two-mile, low-banked, D-shaped oval superspeedway in Fontana, California, similar to that of sister track Michigan International Speedway. ... Oval racing is a type of motorsport, primarily American, that involves running multiple cars wheel-to-wheel in a race around a track roughly oval in shape. ... In North American auto racing, particularly with regard to NASCAR, a short track is a racetrack of less than one mile (1. ... Road racing can be a term involving road running, road bicycle races, or automobile races. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


NASCAR races are different compared to the rough terrain and sharp turns of Rally, as well as the complicated twists and turns seen in the Formula One course that put up to 5 or 6 g's of stress on the driver's body. NASCAR is not the only racing league to run a large number of races on oval tracks; the Indy Racing League IndyCar Series also runs many oval track races, although IndyCars usually average over 30-40 miles an hour faster than NEXTEL Cup cars due to lighter cars, high downforce designs, and wider tires. Petter Solberg driving on gravel at the 2006 Cyprus Rally, a World Rally Championship event. ... F1 redirects here. ... The term g force or gee force refers to the symbol g, the force of acceleration due to gravity at the earths surface. ... The Indy Racing League, better known as IRL, is the sanctioning body of a predominantly American based open-wheel racing series. ... The IndyCar Series is the premier series of the Indy Racing League. ... Three different styles of front wings from three different Formula 1 eras, all designed to produce downforce on the front wheels. ...


NEXTEL Cup races have 43 cars in competition at the start of each race (with more being forced to go home after qualifying), compared to 22 for Formula One and 18-20 for the IndyCar Series and Champ Car World Series. NASCAR teams must endure a 36-race schedule over 41 weeks. Teams usually only have about five days to prepare before arriving at any given track. F1 redirects here. ... Nigel Mansell racing in a Champcar in 1993 Terminology Champcar, a shortened form of Championship Car, has been the name for a class of cars used in American Championship Car Racing for many decades. ...


While many fans of other racing series are often critical of NASCAR, fans of the sport can point to the success (or lack thereof) of drivers who move to NASCAR from other series. Juan Pablo Montoya won his sole IndyCar race, the 2000 Indianapolis 500; 25% of his CART races; and 7.3% of his Formula 1 races; yet he has won just 3.2% of his NASCAR Nextel Cup starts. Two-time Australian V8 Supercar Champion Marcos Ambrose has failed to win a race in 22 Truck and 30 Busch Series starts while generating a total of just 8 top 10 finishes. A.J. Allmendinger, who won 5 of the 14 Champ Car races in 2006, has qualified for just 13 of the 30 NASCAR Nextel Cup races in 2007 with no top ten finishes. Champion road racers Ron Fellows and Boris Said have failed to win in 17 and 30 NASCAR Nextel Cup Starts respectively. Sprint Car great Steve Kinser's NASCAR career lasted just 5 races before he was replaced after recording a best finish of just 27th. 3 Time IndyCar Series champion and Indy 500 champion Sam Hornish Jr. successfully qualified for his first Nextel Cup race (starting 26th) at Phoenix International Speedway, where he finished in 30th position, but has not had a top 10 finish in any of his 8 career Busch Series starts. Juan Pablo Montoya Roldán (born September 20, 1975 in Bogotá, Colombia) is a race car driver in NASCAR for Chip Ganassi Racing and a former Formula One driver. ... “Indy 500” redirects here. ... V8 Supercars is a touring car racing category. ... Marcos Ambrose (born September 1, 1976 in Launceston, Tasmania) is an Australian racing driver. ... A.J. Allmendinger (born December 16, 1981 in Los Gatos, California) is an American racecar driver. ... Ron Fellows (born September 28, 1959) from Windsor, Ontario, Canada is an accomplished Sports Car driver, and a NASCAR Road Course Ringer. ... Boris Said (born September 18, 1962) is an American race car driver from Carlsbad, California. ... Sprint cars are small, high-powered race cars designed primarily for the purpose of running in short races (generally, five to fifty miles) on short tracks, which are often not paved (dirt tracks). The high power-to-weight ratio makes sprint car racing exciting; it often also makes it very... Kinsers 2007 World of Outlaws sprint car at the Kings Royal race Kinser in a 2006 IROC race at Texas Steve Kinser (born June 2, 1954, Bloomington, Indiana), is a professional sprint car racer. ... Sam Hornish, Jr. ...


There are exceptions to this, however, such as Mario Andretti who is the only driver ever to win the Indianapolis 500 (1969), NASCAR's Daytona 500 (1967), and the Formula One World Championship. Mario Gabriele Andretti (born February 28, 1940 in Montona dIstria, Italy, now Motovun, Croatia) is an Italian American racing driver, and one of the most successful Americans in the history of auto racing. ... The Daytona 500 is a 200-lap, 500 mile (805 km) NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series race held annually at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ...


Criticism

Technology far from "stock" or production

Mark McFarland (88) spins at Bristol Motor Speedway, while Kenny Wallace (22) and Ashton Lewis Jr. (25) pass to the inside
Mark McFarland (88) spins at Bristol Motor Speedway, while Kenny Wallace (22) and Ashton Lewis Jr. (25) pass to the inside

The 1960s-era technologies used in the "stock cars" bear little resemblance to modern-day street vehicles. Modern NASCAR vehicles share very few attributes of the commercial models with which they are associated; for example, the production Chevrolet Monte Carlo weighs nearly the same as the NASCAR Chevy Monte Carlo, but the NASCAR vehicle has a cast-iron eight-cylinder engine driving the rear wheels, whereas the production car has an aluminum alloy front-wheel-drive V6. Also, NASCAR vehicles continue to use carburetors instead of the now-common fuel injection, and they also use a 2-valve per cylinder configuration operated by a single cam-in-block using push rods, instead of the double overhead cams operating 4-valves per cylinder that are common on production cars. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 578 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1517 pixel, file size: 774 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Kenny Wallace in the foreground (#22). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 578 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1517 pixel, file size: 774 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Kenny Wallace in the foreground (#22). ... This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... The Chevrolet Monte Carlo was an American mid-size car. ... The Ford Essex V6 engine V6 and V-6 redirect here. ... Bendix-Technico (Stromberg) 1-barrel downdraft carburetor model BXUV-3, with nomenclature A carburetor (North American spelling) / carburettor (international spelling), colloquially called a carb (in North America and the United Kingdom) or carby (chiefly in Australia), is a device that blends air and fuel for an internal combustion engine. ... // Fuel injection is a means of metering fuel into an internal combustion engine. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with pushrod engine. ... A cylinder head sliced in half shows two overhead camshafts—one above each of the two valves. ...


Supporters note that this is a modern condition: when NASCAR first started 59 years ago, the race cars were production vehicles, but the safety and performance needs of modern racing have required custom-built race cars. Supporters also note that the strict equipment rules place less emphasis on getting a technological advantage, and thus more emphasis on individual driver skill. All of NASCAR's series also run on spec tires made by certain tire manufacturers such as Goodyear and American Racer. Some suggest that this discourages tire competition and development, which they further assert has led to the absence of rain/wet condition tires, and to races (such as the 2005 UAW-GM Quality 500) where tires seem to self-destruct.[4] NASCAR makes and enforces numerous rules and regulations that transcend all racing series. ... Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company was founded in 1898 by Frank Seiberling. ... The UAW-GM Quality 500 is a NASCAR race that is hosted annually at Lowes Motor Speedway in the United States. ...


Business structure and decision-making policies

NASCAR's business structure has also been criticized. Since its founding in 1947 by William France Sr., the overall NASCAR organization has been majority owned by the France family, ensuring that the family controls a majority of the overwhelming revenue that the sport generates (compared to other sports where the owners and players split revenue almost evenly). NASCAR is also criticized for its reluctance to promote some aspects of safety that it would have to pay for (e.g., traveling safety crew),[5][6] and other allegedly monopolistic aspects such as merchandising and race-track ownership. In addition, due to its overwhelming influence and lack of drivers' say, NASCAR has even been compared to a dictatorship by some motorsports, political, and economic analysts.[7][8] Examples of such influence include the cancellation of the SPEED Channel television show Pit Bull (which frequently criticized many of NASCAR's decisions and policies and enjoyed modest ratings), frequent use of the vague "detrimental to NASCAR" rule, and the creation of rules on whim, especially during a race. NASCAR has taken to penalizing drivers in recent years, with fines, point penalties, and lap penalties in races for drivers or mechanics who use obscene language in interviews to the media.[9] William Bill Henry Getty France, Sr. ... SPEED Channel, based in Charlotte, NC, was launched on New Years Day 1996, by Roger Werner, as SpeedVision. ... Pit Bull was a debate show that aired live every Saturday on SPEED Channel during the 2004 NASCAR season. ...


Driver competition in multiple series

Milwaukee Mile race track
Milwaukee Mile race track

NASCAR has long allowed drivers to compete in as many series and events as they like, with few restrictions. However, in recent years, top NEXTEL Cup drivers have competed in and dominated the lower tier Busch races on a regular basis, earning NEXTEL drivers the nickname "Buschwhackers". The situation is compounded by the close timing of the races in the two series: a typical NASCAR weekend has a Busch race on Saturday followed by a NEXTEL race on Sunday at the same track. Some have wondered why "major league" NEXTEL drivers are allowed to compete in the "minor league" Busch races with such frequency, and whether Busch is an adequate developmental series. Sportswriter Bob Margolis noted that much of this is due to the similarities between the cars used in the two series (they are mostly alike except for the engines and the wheelbase), and the desire for NEXTEL drivers to get as much practice time as possible to learn about the track and car setup before the main race. [10] The extra skill and money brought in by teams and drivers from the NEXTEL Cup Series has led to a wide gap above the Busch Series only teams, which was most evident in 2006 when NEXTEL Cup driver Kevin Harvick clinched the Busch Series title with four races to go. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A Buschwhacker is a term commonly used in NASCAR. It refers to any regular Nextel Cup driver that participates in a NASCAR Busch Series event. ... The Busch Series is celebrating its 25th season with this special logo. ...


Environmental impact

Fuel consumption

According to NASCAR, about 6,000 U.S. gallons of fuel are consumed during a typical NEXTEL Cup weekend.[11] For the 2006 season, which includes 36 points races, the total for the season would be 216,000 U.S. gallons. One environmental critic recently estimated NASCAR's total fuel consumption across all series at two million U.S. gallons (7.57 million liters) of gas for one season;[12] however, the methodology used has been a point of dispute.


At race speeds, NEXTEL Cup cars get two to five miles per gallon.[12][13][11] Consumption under caution can be estimated at 14-18 mpg, based on comparable engines generally available to the public. Interestingly, the rate of fuel consumption tends to be the same regardless of the actual speeds of the cars, as teams change gear ratios for each race to ensure that the engine always operates in its optimum power band; however, the fuel mileage will vary for each race, depending on the maximum speeds attained.


Emissions and pollution

The consumption figures above provide no insight on environmental impact in terms of emissions. NASCAR vehicles are generally unregulated by the EPA, and in particular, they have no mufflers, catalytic converters or other emissions control devices. However, some local short tracks which run under NASCAR sanction require certain emissions control devices. Many short tracks run mufflers in compliance with noise ordinances at some tracks; in the early years of the Craftsman Truck Series, some races were held at venues which required mufflers, a requirement still used in some Busch East, AutoZone West, and Whelen Modified races. EPA redirects here. ... The NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series is a popular NASCAR racing series that features modified pickup trucks. ...


Use of lead additives in gasoline

NASCAR continued to use lead additives in its race gasoline until the 2007 Auto Club 500 at California Speedway on February 25,[14] which led to concerns about the health of those exposed to the fumes of the cars (fans and residents living near the race tracks). Lead is a well-known environmental risk, but the performance needs of race engines (in particular, the high compression ratios and lubricating properties of lead) once made it difficult to switch to unleaded fuel. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (2464 × 1632 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (2464 × 1632 pixel, file size: 2. ... Gasoline, as it is known in North America, or petrol, in many Commonwealth countries (sometimes also called motor spirit) is a petroleum-derived liquid mixture consisting primarily of hydrocarbons, used as fuel in internal combustion engines. ... The 2007 Auto Club 500 is the second race in the 2007 NASCAR Nextel Cup season. ... The California Speedway is a two-mile, low-banked, D-shaped oval superspeedway in Fontana, California, similar to that of sister track Michigan International Speedway. ... Bold text The compression ratio is a single number that can be used to predict the performance of any engine (such as an internal-combustion engine or a Stirling Engine). ...


In the US, the commercial use of leaded fuel has been phased out since the early 1970's, when catalytic converters were required to be installed on new cars, making unleaded fuel a requirement (leaded fuel will destroy a catalytic converter). The sale of leaded fuel has been mostly banned in the US since 1996, but exemptions exist for auto racing, as well as aircraft, farm and marine equipment. Catalytic converter on a Dodge Ram Van. ...


NASCAR eventually took steps to eliminate the need for leaded fuels. In 1998, NASCAR and then-fuel supplier Tosco (Now ConocoPhillips, the company that produces the 76 brand of Fuel) conducted an unsuccessful test of unleaded fuel in selected Busch Series races. In July 2006, in the first in a four-week test run of unleaded fuel, the first race since 1998 to run unleaded gasoline, known as Sunoco 260 GT Plus, the same fuel used in road races, was held during a Busch race at the Gateway International Raceway in Madison, Illinois. The testing in July 2006 was successful with no suspected engine failures or malfunctions from the new fuel. In October 2006, NASCAR stated its intention to transition to unleaded fuel in all three top series (Craftsman, Busch and Nextel Cup) in 2007, with the exception of the Daytona 500. Tosco (The Oil Shale COrporation) was an independent U.S. based petroleum refining and marketing corporation. ... ConocoPhillips (NYSE: COP) is an international energy company with its headquarters located in Houston, Texas. ... This article is about the American oil company. ... Gateway International Raceway is a race track in Madison, Illinois, USA. It hosts a NASCAR Busch Series event and a NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series race on a 1. ... Madison is a city located in Madison County, Illinois. ...


During the first race in which unleaded fuel was used, there were a number of engine failures during the race, leading many to believe that the unleaded fuel is to be blamed. The drivers who encountered failures include Dale Earnhardt, Jr. and Martin Truex Jr. of Dale Earnhardt, Inc. and Kasey Kahne of Evernham Motorsports. The engine failures of both Earnhardt and Truex were attributed in part to the lack of a lead additive, but also to centrifugal force causing improper distribution of oil between the left and right sides of the engine. Evernham Motorsports has not disclosed the reason behind Kahne's engine failure. Ralph Dale Earnhardt, Jr. ... Martin Lee Truex, Jr. ... Dale Earnhardt, Inc. ... Kasey Kenneth Kahne (born April 10, 1980 in Enumclaw, Washington) is a driver in NASCARs NEXTEL Cup series. ... Evernham Motorsports is a racing team in NASCAR. For the 2005 NEXTEL Cup Season, the team won two races, which were also the first two for the new Dodge Charger, along with nine top-5 finishes and seventeen top-10 finishes. ...


Participation of non-U.S. manufacturers

NASCAR's early history included several foreign manufacturers, such as Aston Martin, Austin-Healey, Citroën, Jaguar, MG, Morgan, Porsche, Renault, and Volkswagen.[15] At a 1954 road race in Linden, New Jersey, Jaguar cars finished first, fourth, fifth and sixth.[16] Aston Martin Lagonda Limited is a British manufacturer of luxury performance cars, whose headquarters are at Gaydon, Warwickshire, England. ... -1... Citroën is a French automobile manufacturer, founded in 1919 by André Citroën. ... For the author, see Mary Renault. ... Linden is a city in southeastern Union County, New Jersey, United States. ...


As a matter of policy, NASCAR restricted entry to American car makers from the 1960s until 2004, when Toyota was allowed to enter the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series with the Toyota Tundra. The restriction was relaxed in recognition of the fact that the Tundra, while Japanese in origin, is built in the United States. Commentators have also noted that the "American" cars are often built or assembled in Canada and Mexico. This article is about the automaker. ... The NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series is a popular NASCAR racing series that features modified pickup trucks. ... The Toyota Tundra is a full-size pickup truck sold by Toyota, replacing the Toyota T100. ...

Las Vegas Motor Speedway
Las Vegas Motor Speedway

Some fans have complained about the entry of a foreign manufacturer into what is perceived as an American sport, while drivers and owners have expressed concern that Toyota's deep pockets, and stated willingness to spend, may increase costs for other teams as well.[17] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 242 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 242 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


NASCAR announced in 2006 the addition of Toyota to both the Busch Series and NEXTEL Cup Series for the 2007 season. Toyota is supporting three Cup teams in a total of seven cars in 2007. Notable drivers that switched to the Toyota Camry include Dave Blaney, Michael Waltrip, and Dale Jarrett. Most recent champion(s) Kevin Harvick The NASCAR Busch Series is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR. It is NASCARs minor league circuit (often compared to Triple-A baseball), and is a proving ground for drivers who wish to step up to the organizations... The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... The 2007 NASCAR NEXTEL Cup season began on February 10, 2007 at Daytona International Speedway with the Budweiser Shootout and will end with the Ford 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 18 of that same year. ... The Toyota Camry is a mid-size sedan assembled by Toyota in Georgetown, Kentucky; Altona, Victoria, Guangzhou, China and the original factory in Toyota City, Japan. ... Dave Blaney (born October 24, 1962) in Hartford, Ohio, United States is a NASCAR Nextel Cup Series driver. ... Michael Curtis Waltrip (born April 30, 1963 in Owensboro, Kentucky) is a professional race car driver and owner of Michael Waltrip Racing. ... Dale Arnold Jarrett (born November 26, 1956 in Newton, North Carolina) is an American race car driver. ...


Four Camrys qualified for and ran in the 2007 Daytona 500, becoming the first foreign make to compete in a NEXTEL Cup race since the British-made MG in 1962. However, Toyota's debut was marred by a cheating scandal involving owner/driver Michael Waltrip.[18] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Driver safety

Although NASCAR frequently publicizes the safety measures it mandates for drivers, these features are often only adopted long after they were initially developed. The impact-absorbing "SAFER Barrier" that is now in use had been proposed by legendary mechanic Smokey Yunick during the 1970's, but his idea had been dismissed as too expensive and unnecessary. Only after the deaths of Kenny Irwin, Tony Roper, and Dale Earnhardt in 2000 and 2001 did NASCAR revisit the idea of decreasing the G-forces a driver sustained during a crash. Other examples of slow reactions include the mandating of a throttle "kill switch" (mandated after the death of Adam Petty) and requiring anti-spill bladders in fuel cells and improved fire-retardant driver suits following the death of Glen Fireball Roberts. Dale Earnhardt was killed after he received massive head and neck trauma from a hard crash in the 2001 Daytona 500. Earnhardt's death prompted NASCAR to require all drivers to use the "HANS Device" (Head And Neck Restraint System), a device that keeps the driver's neck from going forward in a wreck.Also with the introduction of the COT(Car of Tomorrow), safety features of the car itself has been greatly improved. Foam is inserted between the sheetmetal and the drivers cage to help absorb some of the shock during a collision. The drivers seat has also been moved closer to the center of the car to help minimize injuries resulting from side collisions. NASCAR makes and enforces numerous rules and regulations that transcend all racing series. ... The Steel and Foam Energy Reduction (SAFER) barrier, sometimes called a soft wall, is a new technology found primarily on oval automobile race tracks and intended to make racing accidents safer. ... Henry Smokey Yunick (born May 25, 1923, somewhere around Maryville, Tennessee, died May 9, 2001 of leukemia) was a mechanic and car designer associated with motorsports in the United States. ... Kenny Dale Irwin, Jr. ... Tony Roper(December 13, 1964 - October 13, 2000) is a former NASCAR driver. ... This article is about the elder Dale Earnhardt. ... The acceleration due to gravity denoted g (also gee, g-force or g-load) is a non-SI unit of acceleration defined as exactly 9. ... Adam Kyler Petty (July 10, 1980 – May 12, 2000) was an auto racing car driver. ... Edward Glenn Fireball Roberts, Jr. ... 2005 and 2006 WTCC Champion Andy Priaulx with a HANS device NASCAR driver Ken Schraders HANS device The HANS device (Head And Neck Support device) is a safety item compulsory in many car racing sports. ...


Changes in traditional tracks

Over the past number of seasons, a number of new tracks have been built and used in places such as Homestead, Florida; Chicago; the Dallas area, and the Los Angeles area. This is part of the trend in making NASCAR a more national sport rather than a regional sport. One result of new tracks requesting dates is that some of the more traditional tracks in the Southeast lose races. In past years, Darlington Raceway has lost a race, North Wilkesboro Speedway is no longer used, and other tracks only have one date a season. Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Miami-Dade Established 1913 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Roscoe Warren Area  - City  14. ...


Education

NASCAR Technical Institute located in Mooresville, North Carolina, is the country's first technical training school to combine a complete automotive technology program and a NASCAR-specific motor sports program, and is the exclusive educational partner of NASCAR. Universal Technical Institute, Inc. ... Mooresville is a town in Iredell County, North Carolina, U.S.A. The population was 18,823 at the 2000 census. ...


See also

NASCAR makes and enforces numerous rules and regulations that transcend all racing series. ... The 2007 NASCAR NEXTEL Cup season began on February 10, 2007 at Daytona International Speedway with the Budweiser Shootout and will end with the Ford 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 18 of that same year. ... The 2007 Chase for the NEXTEL Cup is a ten-race series that will commence with the Sylvania 300 on September 18, 2007 at New Hampshire International Speedway and will conclude with the Ford 400 on November 18, 2007 at Homestead-Miami Speedway. ... Busch cars at Texas in April 2007 The 26th season of the NASCAR Busch Series opened February 17, 2007, with the Orbitz 300 at Daytona International Speedway and concludes November 17, 2007, with the Ford 300 at Homestead-Miami Speedway. ... The 12th season of the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series season set off on February 16, 2007 at Daytona International Speedway with the Chevy Silverado HD 250, and ends on November 16, 2007 with the Ford 200 at Homestead-Miami Speedway. ... This article is about the NASCAR car style. ... This is a list of National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) champions; that is, a list of all the champions in NASCARs three major series (NEXTEL Cup, Busch Series, and Craftsman Truck Series). ... // All statistics used in these tables are as of the end of the 2007 USG Sheetrock 400 race. ... 12. ... The following is a list of current (as of 2007) NASCAR races from the Nextel Cup, Busch Series, and Craftsman Truck Series, along with their venues. ... This is a list of NASCAR teams, a list of all teams that race in one of NASCARs top three divisions (NEXTEL Cup, Busch Series and Craftsman Truck Series). ... Former NASCAR driver Richard Petty with U.S. President George W. Bush at the Victory Junction Gang Camp. ... NASCAR has committed itself to building a Hall of Fame at some location in the southern or midwestern United States. ... The NASCAR Rookie of the Year Award is presented to the first-year driver that has the best season in a NASCAR season. ... NASCAR, the most popular motorsport in the United States, has worked with video game developers to design several video games. ...

Notes

Note 1: The largest NASCAR tracks can accommodate upwards of 170,000 people in the stands and infield, far larger than any non-motorsport venue in North America.


References

  1. ^ a b http://www.nascar.com/guides/about/nascar/
  2. ^ a b c d Fleischman, Bill; Al Pearce (1999). The Unauthorized NASCAR Fan Guide (1998-99). Visible Ink Press, 6. 
  3. ^ http://www.nascar.com/2006/news/headlines/official/12/08/nascar.mexico.series/index.html
  4. ^ About.comReport on tires at 2005 UAW-GM Quality 500
  5. ^ CBS Sportsline.com
  6. ^ KansasCity.com
  7. ^ CNN Money Magazine (online)
  8. ^ USA Today, June 20, 2005
  9. ^ SpeedWayMedia.com
  10. ^ Sports.Yahoo.com
  11. ^ a b Finney, Mike (January 2, 2006). AZCentral.com Like the cars, fuel goes fast in NASCAR. The (Wilmington, Del.) News Journal. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  12. ^ a b Gerard, Jean. Motor Madness: Gas Guzzling is Business as Usual at NASCAR. E/The Environmental Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-11-18.
  13. ^ Servino, Natale. NASCAR goes green? New tracks touted as good for the planet. Earth Island Journal. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  14. ^ Bob Passrock (October 21, 2006). Nextel Cup going to unleaded fuel in 2007. scenedaily.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-17.
  15. ^ http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do/Columns/articleId=119633
  16. ^ http://sports.yahoo.com/nascar/news?slug=db-statswatkinsglen081006&prov=yhoo&type=lgns
  17. ^ http://sports.yahoo.com/nascar/news?slug=ap-nascar-toyota&prov=ap&type=lgns
  18. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17136318/

is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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