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Encyclopedia > Númenor

Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkien's universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. From the Quenya Númenórë: "West-land", which Tolkien translated as Westernesse (it was Anadûnê in the Númenórean language). The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916, wearing his British Army uniform in a photograph from the middle years of WW1. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... An artistic rendition of an imaginary Atlantis Atlantis was a legendary ancient island, whose existence and location have never been confirmed. ... Text in Quenya, written in the Tengwar and Latin alphabets Quenya is one of the languages spoken by the Elves in J. R. R. Tolkiens work. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Adûnaic (language of the west) was the language of the men of Númenor during the Second Age. ...

Contents

Geography

Enlarge
A map of Númenor (called Andor by the Elves), courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda (http://www.glyphweb.com/arda/default.htm).

Númenor was a rather large island in the middle of the Western Sea. The island itself was in the shape of a 5-point star, each point having its own unique geological and physical features. Each point, therefore, was considered a separate region of Númenor and had separate names: A map of Númenor (called Andor by the Elves), courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... A map of Númenor (called Andor by the Elves), courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ...

  • Forostar (Northlands)
  • Andustar (Westlands)
  • Hyarnustar (Southwestlands)
  • Hyarrostar (Southeastlands)
  • Orrostar ("Eastlands")
  • Mittalmar (Inlands)

The island had a mountain in the center known as Meneltarma; it is suggested that the island itself is of volcanic origin. Meneltarma is the highest location on the entire island and was considered sacred by the Númenoreans as a shrine of the god Eru Ilúvatar. Only the Kings of Númenor were allowed to ascend to the top. It was said that on a clear day, Tol Eressëa, the outer shores of Valinor, could be seen. Andustar is a location in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth and the western promontory of Númenor, separated from the Hyarnustar to the south by the wide Bay of Eldanna. ... Hyarnustar in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth is a promontory and the southwestern of the five regions of Númenor, noted for its vineyards and fertile farmlands, although it became more mountainous in the far southwest. ... In Tolkiens Middle-earth, Meneltarma, meaning Pillar of the Heavens, was a sacred mountain in the centre of Númenor. ... Eru (the One), also called Ilúvatar (the Father of All), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God. ... The following is a list of the twenty-five Rulers of Númenor, a fictional realm in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe: After Ar-Pharazôn, who perished in the Downfall of Númenor, the direct line of Kings was broken. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Tol Eressëa is a large island, where the mallorn trees come from. ... A map of Aman and Valinor A fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is the realm of the Valar in Aman, the place to which they moved after being driven from Almaren by Melkor. ...


Meneltarma itself was a tall mountain in centre of the island (in the region of Mittalmar) that, when translated, means Pillar of the Heavens. The lower slopes of the mountain were gentle grass-covered, however, near the summit the slopes became more vertical and could not be ascended easily. The kings later built a spiraling road to the peak, beginning at the southern tip of the mountain and winding up to the lip of the summit in the north. The summit, however, was unique in that it was flattened and somewhat depressed, and was said to be able to "contain a great multitude". It was considered the most sacred spot of Númenor; no one ever set foot there and nothing was ever built throughout the entire history of the island. In Tolkiens Middle-earth, Meneltarma, meaning Pillar of the Heavens, was a sacred mountain in the centre of Númenor. ... A summit is: A point higher than all the ground immediately surrounding it; see topographical summit. ...


The island itself was tilted southward and a little westward; the southern coasts were all steep sea cliffs. geography, a cliff is a significant vertical, or near vertical, rock exposure. ...


Culture

The population of Númenor chiefly consisted of Men (the Edain); although before the Shadow fell on the island the westernmost cities such as Andunie contained a small population of Elves because of the frequent visits from Tol-Eressea. They were known as the Númenoreans, or rather, Kings among Men. In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Edain were those Men (humans) who made their way into Beleriand in the First Age, and were friendly to the Elves. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, And was an important city and port in the realm of N menor, located on the Bay of And the Andustar region, And nie was initially the chief city of N menor, as it was the haven where the Eldar of Tol...


The Númenoreans were extremely skilled in arts and craft, with the forging of weapons and armour; but the Númenoreans were not warmongers, hence the chief art on the island became that of ship-building and sea-craft. The Númenoreans became great mariners, exploring the world in all directions save for the westward, where the Ban of the Valar was in force. The oft travelled to the shores of Middle-Earth, teaching the men there the art and craft, and introduced farming as to improve their everyday lives.


The Númenoreans, too, became skilled in the art of husbandry, breeding great horses that roamed across the open plains in Mittalmar. Although the Númenoreans were a peaceful people, their weapons, armour, and horse-riding skills could not be contested anywhere else in Arda, save for the Valar. In general stewardship is responsibility for taking good care of resources entrusted to one. ... horse, see Horse (disambiguation). ... A map of Arda before the end of the First Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the world in which all of the events occur, including the continents of Middle-earth and Aman. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, the Valar are the Powers of Arda who live on the Western continent of Aman. ...


Plant life

Númenor contained many species of plants that could be found nowhere else in Middle-earth, for many of them were given to the Númenoreans from the Valar in Aman. Most important of these was the White Tree that dwelt in the King's Palace at Armenelos; it was the symbol of Men thereafter, in both Númenor, Arnor, and Gondor. A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, the Valar are the Powers of Arda who live on the Western continent of Aman. ... AMAN (A.M.A.N.) is a television comedy series aired by ANT1 in Greece. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth, the White Tree of Gondor stood as a symbol of Gondor in the Court of the Fountain in Minas Tirith. ... In Tolkiens Middle-earth, Armenelos the Golden, translated as The City of the King, was the capital and (in later years) the largest city of Númenor. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... Gondor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


The other parts of Númenor contained many types of plants, many unique to each of the promontories of the island. Andustar contained great forests of beech and birch at the higher ground, and oak and elm forests are lower altitudes. The term promontory has several similar meanings in English, including geographical names: A promontory is a prominent mass of land which overlooks lower lying land or a body of water (e. ... Andustar is a location in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth and the western promontory of Númenor, separated from the Hyarnustar to the south by the wide Bay of Eldanna. ... Species Fagus crenata - Japanese Beech Fagus engleriana - Chinese Beech Fagus grandifolia - American Beech Fagus hayatae - Taiwan Beech Fagus japonica - Japanese Blue Beech Fagus longipetiolata - South Chinese Beech Fagus lucida - Shining Beech Fagus mexicana - Mexican Beech or Haya Fagus orientalis - Oriental Beech Fagus sylvatica - European Beech Beech (Fagus) is a genus... Species many species see text and classification Birch is the name of any tree of the genus Betula, in the family Betulaceae, closely related to the beech/oak family, Fagaceae. ... Oakland International Airport is located in Oakland, California and serves the San Francisco Bay Area metro region. ... Species See text Elms are deciduous trees of the genus Ulmus, family Ulmaceae. ...


The greatest delight of the Númenoreans, however, were the flowers given to them by the Eldar. They grew mostly in the Western portion (Andustar). They are oft remembered in song and lore, and few have flowered east of Númenor. Eldar is the name J. R. R. Tolkien in his fictional universe of Middle-earth gave to those of the Elves that accepted the summons of Oromë. ... Andustar is a location in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth and the western promontory of Númenor, separated from the Hyarnustar to the south by the wide Bay of Eldanna. ...

  • Ololairë
  • Lairelossë
  • Nessamelda
  • Vardarianna
  • Taniquelassë
  • Yavannamíre

Because of the diversity of wildlife in Andustar, it was soon called Nisimaldar, or the Fragrant Trees. Also only in Andustar could the Golden Tree be found, Malinornë. Andustar is a location in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth and the western promontory of Númenor, separated from the Hyarnustar to the south by the wide Bay of Eldanna. ... Andustar is a location in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth and the western promontory of Númenor, separated from the Hyarnustar to the south by the wide Bay of Eldanna. ...


In Hyarrostar grew the tree Laurinquë, which the Númenorans loved because of their flowers. They believed that it came from the Great Tree of Valinor, Laurelin. The Two Trees of Valinor in the fictional universe of J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth are Telperion and Laurelin, the Silver Tree and the Gold that brought light to the Land of the Valar in ancient times. ...


History

Númenor was the kingdom of the Dúnedain, located on an island in the Great Sea, between Middle-earth and Aman. The land was brought up from the sea as a gift to Men. It was also called Elenna ("Starwards") because the Dúnedain were led to it by the star of Eärendil, and because the island was in the shape of a five-pointed star. At the center of the island was a mountain named Meneltarma, which the Dúnedain used as a temple to Ilúvatar. The largest city and capital of Númenor was Armenelos. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Dúnedain (singular: Dúnadan) were the Men who descended from the Númenóreans who survived the fall of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth led by Elendil and his sons. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Belegaer, the Great Sea or the Sundering Seas, is the sea of Arda that is west of Middle-earth. ... AMAN (A.M.A.N.) is a television comedy series aired by ANT1 in Greece. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... This article deals with the Half-elven Eärendil. ... In Tolkiens Middle-earth, Meneltarma, meaning Pillar of the Heavens, was a sacred mountain in the centre of Númenor. ... Eru (the One), also called Ilúvatar (the Father of All), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God, the creator of the angels ( Ainur) and the universe ( Eä). ... In Tolkiens Middle-earth, Armenelos the Golden, translated as The City of the King, was the capital and (in later years) the largest city of Númenor. ...


Númenor had only two rivers: Siril which began at Meneltarma and ended in a small delta near the city of Nindamos, and the Nunduinë, which reached the sea in the Bay of Eldanna near the haven Eldalondë. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe, the river Siril was a river of Númenor. ... In Tolkiens Middle-earth, Meneltarma, meaning Pillar of the Heavens, was a sacred mountain in the centre of Númenor. ... Nunduinë is a location in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe. ... Bay of Eldanna is a fictional location in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle_earth universe. ... Eldalondë is a fictional location in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth universe. ...


Elros son of Eärendil was the first King of Númenor, taking the name of Tar-Minyatur ("First King"). Under his rule (year 32 to 442 of the Second Age), and those of his descendants, Men rose to become a powerful race. The first ships sailed from Númenor to Middle-earth in the year 600 of the Second Age. Elros Tar-Minyatur (F.A. 525 - S.A. 442, ruled 32 - 442 S.A.) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Elros Tar-Minyatur (F.A. 525 - S.A. 442, r 32 - 442) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...


The Númenóreans were forbidden by the Valar from sailing so far westward that Númenor was no longer visible, for fear that they would come upon the Undying Lands, to which Men could not come. Over time the Númenóreans came to resent the Ban of the Valar and to rebel against their authority, seeking the everlasting life that they believed was begrudged them. They tried to compensate this by going eastward and colonizing large parts of Middle-earth, first in a friendly way, but later as tyrants. Few (the "Faithful") remained loyal to the Valar and friendly to the Elves. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, the Valar are the Powers of Arda who live on the Western continent of Aman. ... In the fictional writings of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Undying Lands are a realm inhabited by immortal beings. ... The Elves (always pluralized as such, never Elfs) are one of the races that appear in the work of J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


In the year 3255 of the Second Age, the 25th king, Ar-Pharazôn, sailed to Middle-earth. Seeing the might of Númenor, Sauron agreed to be the king's captive, and he was brought back to Númenor. Sauron soon became an advisor to the King and promised the Númenóreans eternal life if they worshipped Melkor. With Sauron as his advisor, Ar-Pharazôn had a 500 foot tall temple to Melkor erected, in which he offered human sacrifices to Melkor. In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Ar-Pharazôn the Golden (3118 - 3319 S.A., r. ... The main part of this article relates to the last versions of Middle-earths history, and as such may controvert parts of The Silmarillion. ... Morgoth Bauglir (Morgoth means The Dark Enemy, Bauglir is The Constrainer), originally named Melkor (He Who Arises in Might), is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


During this time, the white tree Nimloth the Fair, whose fate was said to be tied to the line of kings, was chopped down and burned as a sacrifice to Melkor. Isildur rescued a fruit of the tree which became the White Tree of Gondor, preserving the ancient line of trees. This entry concerns J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle Earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth, the White Tree of Gondor stood as a symbol of Gondor in the Court of the Fountain in Minas Tirith. ... Gondor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


Prompted by Sauron and fearing death and old age, Ar-Pharazôn built a great armada and set sail into the west to make war upon the Valar and seize the Undying Lands. Sauron remained behind. In the year 3319 of the Second Age, Ar-Pharazôn landed on Aman and marched to the city of Valimar. Manwë, chief of the angelic Valar, called upon Ilúvatar, who broke and changed the world, taking Aman and Tol Eressëa from the world forever, changing the world's shape from flat to round, sinking Númenor and killing its inhabitants, including the body of Sauron who was thereby robbed of his ability to assume fair and charming forms. Valmar, otherwise known as the City of Bells and as Valimar, was the residence of the Valar and the Vanyar in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, in the realm of Valinor. ... A fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth, Manwë Súlimo (from the Valarin Mânawenûz) is the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, brother of the Dark Lord Melkor (Morgoth), and King of Arda. ... Eru (the One), also called Ilúvatar (the Father of All), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God, the creator of the angels ( Ainur) and the universe ( Eä). ...


Elendil, son of the leader of the Faithful during the reign of Ar-Pharazôn, his sons and his followers had foreseen the disaster that was to befall Númenor, and they had set sail in nine ships before the island fell. They landed in Middle-earth, and founded the kingdoms of Arnor and Gondor. In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Elendil was a heroic figure. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... Gondor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


After its fall Númenor was called Atalantë, meaning "the Downfallen", in the Quenya language. (The similarity with Atlantis is obvious, although Tolkien described his invention of the name as a happy accident when he realised that the Quenya root meaning "fallen" could be incorporated into a name referring to Númenor.) Other names after the Downfall include Mar-nu-Falmar ("Land under the Waves") and Akallabêth ("the Downfallen" in Adûnaic). Text in Quenya, written in the Tengwar and Latin alphabets Quenya is one of the languages spoken by the Elves in J. R. R. Tolkiens work. ... An artistic rendition of an imaginary Atlantis Atlantis was a legendary ancient island, whose existence and location have never been confirmed. ...


The story of the rise and downfall of Númenor is told in the Akallabêth. Akallabêth is the fourth part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


Notes:

  • The cartoon series Ulysses 31 includes a character called Numinor, whose name may be derivative of Númenor.

See also: List of rulers of Númenor Ulysses 31 is a Japanese-French anime series (1981) which updates the Greek and Roman mythology of Ulysses (or Odysseus) to the thirty-first century. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898–November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... That Hideous Strength is a novel by C. S. Lewis first published in 1945. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916, wearing his British Army uniform in a photograph from the middle years of WW1. ... The Inklings was a literary discussion group associated with the University of Oxford. ... The University of Oxford, situated in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The following is a list of the twenty-five Rulers of Númenor, a fictional realm in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe: After Ar-Pharazôn, who perished in the Downfall of Númenor, the direct line of Kings was broken. ...


External links

  • A History and Complete Chronology of Númenor (http://members.ozemail.com.au/~sdgeard/hccnum.html) - A detailed chronology of Númenor, its successor states and their rulers.


J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916, wearing his British Army uniform in a photograph from the middle years of WW1. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ...


Works published during his lifetime
The Hobbit | The Lord of the Rings | The Adventures of Tom Bombadil | The Road Goes Ever On The Hobbit is a fantasy novel written by J.R.R. Tolkien originally as a childrens story in the tradition of the fairy tale. ... Wikicities has a wiki about The Lord of the Rings: The Lord of the Rings Wiki The Encyclopedia of Arda - Mark Fishers tribute site to the works of Tolkien Tolkien Gateway Tolkien Collectors Gateway The Tolkien Wiki Community TheOneRing. ... The Adventures of Tom Bombadil is a collection of poetry by J. R. R. Tolkien, published in 1962. ... The Road Goes Ever On is a walking song by J. R. R. Tolkien, fictionally written by Bilbo Baggins; verses of it are sung at various places in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ...


Posthumous publications
The Silmarillion | Unfinished Tales | The History of Middle-earth (12 volumes) | Bilbo's Last Song The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher, with the assistance of fantasy fiction writer Guy Gavriel Kay. ... Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. ... The History of Middle-earth is a 12-volume series of books that collect and analyse material relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... Bilbos Last Song is a poem by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


Lists of Wikipedia articles about Middle-earth
by category | by name | writings | characters | peoples | rivers | realms | ages This is a list of articles related to J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... This article aims to list all articles on Wikipedia that are related to J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... This article is a list of all books by J. R. R. Tolkien and writings contained in these books (stories, essays, poems, etc. ... This is a list of rivers which appear in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth and Númenor. ... This is a list of the known realms of Arda, J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world. ... This article includes several timelines relating to J. R. R. Tolkiens fiction. ...


 
 

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