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Encyclopedia > Mythical place

A mythical place is a place that does not really exist but is accepted folklore or speculation that it might exist or might have existed in earlier times but its actual location is now lost. Unlike fictional places, which are only used in fictional writings, mythical places are often considered un(re)discovered places in the real world. While they may appear in fictional stories, there is often some scientific, historical or archeological evidence, as well as myths and legends that indicate such places may have existed or are awaiting discovery, rediscovery or at least explanation about their location. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mythology. ... Folklore is the body of narratives, including tales, legends, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs current among a particular population, comprising the oral tradition of that culture, subculture, or group. ... This list is of fictional cities: villages, towns, and cities that do not exist in the world we know. ... The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. ...


"Mythical" can also refer to a state of religious influence.


Some examples of mythical places are:

Athanasius Kirchers map of a possible Atlantis location. ... Avalon is a legendary island somewhere in the British Isles, famous for its beautiful apples. ... This Ayotha Amirtha Gangai is a mythical river found in Akilattirattu Ammanai the source of Ayyavazhi mythology. ... Biarmland (or Bjarmaland) was a territory in Northern Europe, Northern Russia, mentioned by Norse sagas, where Finnic Biarmians lived or rather ruled. ... The Norse sagas or Viking sagas (Icelandic: sögur), are stories about ancient Scandinavian and Germanic history, about early Viking voyages, about migration to Iceland, and of feuds between Icelandic families. ... Camelot is the name of the stronghold of the legendary King Arthur, from which he fought many of the battles that made up his life. ... For the genealogist George Edward Cokayne, see Cokaynes Complete Peerage Pieter Bruegel the Elders The Land of Cockaigne, painted in 1567. ... El Dorado (Spanish for the gilded one), a legend that began with the story of a South American tribal chief who covered himself with gold dust. ... Hawaiki is the mythical island that the Polynesians trace their origins to. ... Polynesia is generally defined as the islands within the triangle Polynesia (from Greek, poly = many and nesos = island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... Te Puni, Māori Chief Māori is the name of the indigenous people of New Zealand, and their language. ... Lemuria is the name of a hypothetical Lost Land variously located in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. ... Lyonesse, Lyoness, or Lyonnesse is the sunken land (or, Lost Land) believed in legend to lie off the Isles of Scilly, to the south-west of Cornwall. ... In Irish mythology, Mag Mell (plain of joy), also called Tír na nÓg (land of the young), Land of the Living, the Many-colored Land and the Promised Land, was a mythical realm achievable through death and/or glory. ... Mu is the name of a Lost Land, or hypothetical vanished continent, located in the Pacific Ocean but now, like Atlantis and Lemuria, believed to have sunk beneath the waters. ... // The origin of the legend Quivira and Cíbola are two of the fantastic Seven Cities of Gold existing only in a myth that originated around the year 1150 when the Moors conquered Mérida, Spain. ... The name Kingdom of Saguenay (French: Royaume du Saguenay) has its origin in an Algonquin legend learned by the French during French colonisation in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. ... Shangri-La is a fictional place described in the novel, Lost Horizon, written by British writer James Hilton in 1933. ... Terra Australis is the large continent on the bottom of the map Terra Australis (more completely Terra Australis Incognita, (the) unknown southern land) was an imaginary continent, appearing on European maps from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. ... James Cook, portrait by Nathaniel Dance, c. ... Thule as Tile on the Carta Marina by Olaus Magnus. ... Thuvaraiyam Pathi is described in Ayyavazhi mythology. ... Flight of King Gradlon, by E. V. Luminais, 1884 (Musée des Beaux-Arts, Quimper) Ys (also spelled Is in Breton) is a mythical city built in the Douarnenez bay in Brittany by Gradlon, King of Cornouaille for his daughter, Dahut. ... Traditional coat of arms This article is about the historical duchy and French province, as well as the cultural area of Brittany. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mythical place - definition of Mythical place in Encyclopedia (213 words)
A mythical place is a place that does not really exist but is accepted folk lore or speculation that it might exist or might have existed in earlier times but its actual location is now lost.
Unlike fictional places, which are only used in fictional writings, mythical places are often considered un(re)discovered places in the real world.
Atlantis - The mythical lost continent; some believe it might only be a small Greek island that was the subject of a volcanic eruption.
Encyclopedia: Mythical place (1132 words)
A mythical place is a place that does not really exist but is accepted folklore or speculation that it might exist or might have existed in earlier times but its actual location is now lost.
Shangri-La is a fictional place described in the novel, Lost Horizon, written by British writer James Hilton in 1933.
Flight of King Gradlon, by E. Luminais, 1884 (Musée des Beaux-Arts, Quimper) Ys (also spelled Is in Breton) is a mythical city built in the Douarnenez bay in Brittany by Gradlon, King of Cornouaille for his daughter, Dahut.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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