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Encyclopedia > Myrtle Beach Pavilion
Myrtle Beach Pavilion

Pavilion from the main entrance.
Location Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
Website Myrtle Beach Pavilion

Pavilion Nostalgia Park Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 566 pixel Image in higher resolution (1164 × 824 pixel, file size: 834 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A view of the Pavilion from the entrance. ... Myrtle Beach is a city located in Horry County, South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35...

Owner Burroughs & Chapin
Opened 1948
Closed September 24, 2006
Operating season mid March-late September
Area 11 acres
Rides 36 total
  • 3 roller coasters
  • 2 water rides
Slogan One More Ride, One More Thrill, One More Memory, One Last Time (Farewell Season)

The Myrtle Beach Pavilion was an amusement park in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. It was on the corner of 9th Avenue and Ocean Boulevard, more or less the "heart" of Myrtle Beach, one block away from the beach itself, and surrounded by similar attractions, in a highly pedestrian-dominated area. It was once a major attraction in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, even being voted #1 Family Attraction in Myrtle Beach by the Travel Channel. It was a pay-per-ride park. Germany Pavilion, part of the Epcot Center theme park in Orlando, Florida Amusement park (also called theme park) is the generic term for a collection of rides and other entertainment attractions assembled for the purpose of entertaining a fairly large group of people. ... Myrtle Beach is a city in Horry County, South Carolina, United States. ...

Contents

History

Located Ocean Boulevard in the heart of Myrtle Beach, S.C., The Myrtle Beach Pavilion Amusement Park entertained generations of families for more than 50 years. An 11-acre amusement park by the Atlantic Ocean, The Pavilion featured more than 40 rides ranging from a large variety of kiddie rides to the Hurricane Category 5, the largest wooden roller coaster in South Carolina. The Pavilion’s main building, which houses The Attic, was located on the east side of Ocean Boulevard and the amusement park was located on the west side of Ocean Boulevard.


The first Pavilion building was a one-story wooden structure attached to Myrtle Beach’s first hotel, the Seaside Inn (long since demolished and also a Burroughs & Chapin property). This first Pavilion building was used as an annex and gathering place for Inn guests. It burned to the ground in 1920 and was replaced by a two story wooden Pavilion in 1925. It is in this Pavilion building that “shagging” became the hot new dance at the beach. In 1944 this second Pavilion building burned to the ground and in 1948 the company built a new Pavilion building with walls of reinforced concrete, the first of its kind along the Grand Strand. It weathered Hurricane Hazel, which in 1954 destroyed much of Myrtle Beach’s oceanfront. It was this building that remained in use until it was demolished in late 2006.


The gradual development of the Pavilion Amusement Park on the west side of Ocean Boulevard across from the main Pavilion building began in 1948 when a traveling carnival playing the annual Tobacco Festival in nearby Conway, S.C. caught the interest of Burroughs & Chapin representatives. An agreement was signed, and the carnival stopped traveling, making its home directly in front of and west of the Pavilion. Ice skaters, bear acts, dance troupes and talent shows were also brought in. In 1950 Burroughs & Chapin bought out Central Amusement Company and added that company’s 14 rides to the amusement park. It took 38 trucks to haul in the new rides. Concession stands were also added. After that, the pace of the amusement park’s evolution quickened as company representatives traveled far and wide in the United States and abroad, searching for new rides for Myrtle Beach’s residents and vacationers to enjoy. When it came to family entertainment, for decades the Myrtle Beach Pavilion Amusement Park was without peer or competition.

The sign at the main entrance
The sign at the main entrance

Two of the amusement park’s offerings have been recognized for their historic significance: The Herschell-Spillman Carousel dates back to 1912. Most carousels feature an assortment of horses, while the Pavilion’s carousel features a menagerie of animals including frogs, lions, ostriches, zebras, giraffes, roosters and even dragons. The “lead horse”, which is in fact a horse, is bejeweled and decorated in the finest detail and, as tradition demands, is found on the outside row of the carousel. Of approximately 15 working Herschell-Spillman carousels in the country, it is one of the most elaborate and well-kept machines, protected at night from the wear and tear of the ocean by lowered metal doors. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...


The Baden Band Organ was built at Waldkirch Baden, Germany by A. Ruth & Sohn, who hand-carved its ornate figurines and decorations from wood. The organ was first exhibited at the World Exposition in Paris in 1900. After the exposition, it was moved from town to town in Europe on a wagon pulled by a team of six horses. The organ in 20-feet long, 11-feet high, seven feet deep and weighs approximately two tons. It has 400 different pipes, 98 keys and still operates with old-style cardboard music, most of which was composed more than 50 years ago. The organ remains in excellent condition, complete with twirling ladies and cherubs that play cymbals, bells and drums. It was destroy in 2005.


Rides

The Pavilion complex, including the 1940's building and the modern amusement park
The Pavilion complex, including the 1940's building and the modern amusement park

Over the next decades the park added numerous rides including the $2,000,000 Arrow Dynamics roller coaster, Mad Mouse (addded in 1998), the Log Flume, Hydro: SURGE, and the major expansion of 2000: Hurricane: Category 5 roller coaster. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 551 pixel Image in higher resolution (1121 × 772 pixel, file size: 826 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Myrtle Beach Pavilion complex including the original 1940s Pavilion building as well as the famous amusement park. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 551 pixel Image in higher resolution (1121 × 772 pixel, file size: 826 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Myrtle Beach Pavilion complex including the original 1940s Pavilion building as well as the famous amusement park. ... Arrow Dynamics was a roller coaster design company based in Clearfield, Utah. ... Mad Mouse was a very compact roller coaster located at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion. ... Hurricane: Category 5 was a wooden roller coaster located at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion. ...


The Myrtle Beach Pavilion featured many rides commonly found at traveling carnivals, as well as a few rides created for the park. A variety of kiddie rides, thrill rides, two major roller coasters as well as water rides. In the US, traveling carnivals are made up of amusement rides, food, games, and other things that comes to town. ...


Major Rides

Hurricane: Category 5 was a wooden roller coaster located at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion. ... Mad Mouse was a very compact roller coaster located at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion. ... A log flume ride A log flume is a horizontal structure that has a cavity for flowing water to carry lumber and logs and generally spans a long distance. ...

Closure

The owners of the Pavilion, Burroughs and Chapin, announced shortly before its opening that 2006 would be its final season. The 2006 season concluded to the public on September 24, 2006, although, a select number of people were able to participate in a "Last Ride" event on Sept. 30, 2006. The Pavilion will be dismantled and built into a shopping area. The farewell season proved extremely popular bringing in the Pavilion's largest growth in attendance and profits the park has ever seen. Several locals have written songs expressing their sadness or anger towards the subject such as "Its Hard to Say Goodbye" and "Why do You Want to Tear the Pavilion Down"[1] Near the time Burroughs and Chapin announced the closing of the Pavilion, Hard Rock Park (also in Myrtle Beach) was announced as being almost ready to construct. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1089 × 816 pixel, file size: 289 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mad Mouse at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion in Myrtle Beach, SC. Photo by Ryan Painter, http://photos. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1089 × 816 pixel, file size: 289 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mad Mouse at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion in Myrtle Beach, SC. Photo by Ryan Painter, http://photos. ... Mad Mouse was a very compact roller coaster located at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion. ... Hurricane: Category 5 was a wooden roller coaster located at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion. ... Hard Rock Park will be 140 acre rock n roll theme park located in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. ...


It was announced that the park's historic carousel and the Baden Band Organ will be saved and relocated. [2]


It was announced that the Haunted Hotel, as well as, the multi-million dollar Hurricane will be demolished and not relocated [3] Hurricane: Category 5 was a wooden roller coaster located at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion. ...


Burroughs & Chapin (owners of the Pavilion) have announced that some of the rides as well as the German Baden Band Organ from the closed Myrtle Beach Pavilion are going to be relocated to Broadway at the Beach. The mini-park is going to be called Pavilion Nostalgia Park which is slated to open during the summer of 2007.


As of March 23, 2007, The Hurricane is no more. The structure itself was torn down and the Trains went to Kings Island to be used on the Son of Beast.


External Links

  • Photos of the Pavilion's "Last Ride" Event
  • Photos of the Pavilion's "Last Ride" Event
  • Photos of the Pavilion's "Last Ride" Event
  • A Video of the Pavilion's "Last Ride" Event.

 
 

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