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Encyclopedia > My Fair Lady

My Fair Lady is a musical with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe, based on George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion. The show's 1956 Broadway production was a smash hit, setting a new record for the longest run of any major theatre production in history. It was followed by a hit London production, a popular film version, and numerous revivals. It has been called "the perfect musical."[1] Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Alan Jay Lerner (August 31, 1918 – June 14, 1986) was an American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... Frederic Loewe, an Austrian-American composer (June 10, 1901 - February 14, 1988) worked with lyricist Alan J. Lerner in musical theater. ... George Bernard Shaw (born 26 July 1856, Dublin, Ireland died November 2, 1950, Hertfordshire, England) was an Irish writer. ... Play cover, depicting Mrs Campbell as Eliza Pygmalion (1913) is a play by George Bernard Shaw based on Ovids tale of Pygmalion. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... My Fair Lady is an Academy Award-winning 1964 film adaptation of the stage musical, My Fair Lady, based in turn on the play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. ...

Contents

Background and productions

In the mid 1930s, film producer Gabriel Pascal acquired the rights to produce film versions of several of George Bernard Shaw's plays, Pygmalion being one of them. He approached lyricist Alan Jay Lerner to write the musical adaptation, and Lerner agreed. He and writing partner Frederick Loewe began writing, but they quickly realized that the play seemed incapable of obeying the rules for the construction of a musical. First of all, there was no place for an ensemble. Secondly, there was no subplot or secondary love story. Pygmalion has just one story, and it is a non-love story. Many people, including Oscar Hammerstein II, told Lerner that converting the play to a musical was impossible, so he and Loewe abandoned the project for two years. During this time, the collaborators separated, Gabriel Pascal passed away, and the American musical theatre changed. When Lerner read Pascal's obituary, he found himself thinking about Pygmalion again, and when he and Loewe reunited everything seemed to fall into place. All the insurmountable obstacles that stood in their way two years earlier had disappeared with the transformation of the musical theatre, and they excitedly began writing the show. Gabriel Pascal (June 4, 1894 – July 6, 1954) was a film producer and director. ... George Bernard Shaw (born 26 July 1856, Dublin, Ireland died November 2, 1950, Hertfordshire, England) was an Irish writer. ... Alan Jay Lerner (August 31, 1918 – June 14, 1986) was an American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... Frederic Loewe, an Austrian-American composer (June 10, 1901 - February 14, 1988) worked with lyricist Alan J. Lerner in musical theater. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ...


The musical had its pre-Broadway tryout at New Haven's Shubert Theatre[1] and, starting on February 15, 1956, for four weeks, at the Erlanger Theatre in Philadelphia before opening on March 15, 1956 at the Mark Hellinger Theatre in New York City. It ran for 2,717 performances, a record at the time. The original cast, directed by Moss Hart and choreographed by Hanya Holm, included Rex Harrison, Julie Andrews, Stanley Holloway, Robert Coote, Cathleen Nesbitt, John Michael King, and Reid Shelton. Edward Mulhare and Sally Ann Howes replaced Harrison and Andrews later in the run. This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... The Shubert Theatre is a 1600 seat theatre in New Haven, Connecticut, originally opened in 1914. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States Commonwealth Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Government  - Mayor John F. Street (D) Area  - City 369. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (75th in leap years). ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Mark Hellinger Theatre, at 1655 Broadway and 237 West 51st Street in New York City, was built in 1930 and operated as a theatre (under various names) until 1989. ... “New York, NY” redirects here. ... Moss Hart (October 24, 1904 – December 20, 1961) was an American playwright and director of plays and musical theater. ... Choreography (also known as dance composition) is the art of making structures in which movement occurs, the term composition may also refer to the navigation or connection of these movement structures. ... Hanya Holm (1893 – 1992) dancer, choreographer and teacher Holm was one of the pioneers of modern dance. ... Sir Reginald Carey Rex Harrison (b. ... Dame Julia Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is a BAFTA, Emmy, Grammy and Academy Award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Stanley Augustus Holloway (October 1, 1890 - January 30, 1982) was a British actor and entertainer famous for his comic and character roles on stage and screen. ... Robert Coote (with Robert Ryan) in Berlin Express Robert Coote (February 4, 1909 - November 26, 1982) was a London-born film actor. ... Cathleen Nesbitt, CBE, born on (November 24, 1888 – and died on August 2, 1982) was an British actress of Welsh and Irish extraction. ... John Michael King (born May 13, 1926) is an American actor. ... Reid Shelton (born October 7, 1924, in Salem, OR, died June 8, 1997, in Portland, OR), was a Broadway and television actor. ... Edward Mulhare (April 8, 1923 - May 24, 1997) was a popular television leading man from 1956 to 1995. ... Sally Ann Howes as Truly Scrumptious in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang with Van Dyke as Caractacus Potts. ...


The original Playbill and cast recording sleeve featured artwork by Al Hirschfeld, who depicted Eliza as a marionette being manipulated by Henry Higgins, whose own strings are being pulled by a heavenly puppeteer resembling George Bernard Shaw. The cover of the Playbill issue about The Producers. ... A cast recording or original cast recording is a recording of a musical that is intended to document the songs as they were performed in the show and experienced by the audience. ... Al Hirschfeld photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1955 Albert Hirschfeld (June 21, 1903 – January 20, 2003) was an American caricaturist, best known for his simple black and white satirical portraits of celebrities and Broadway stars. ... Phillip Huber (L) and David Alexander of the Huber Marionettes perform with marionettes hand-made by Huber for scenes for the feature film Tillamook Treasure 2005 Marionette in Prague A marionette is a type of puppet moved by strings, as in a puppet show. ...


The West End production, in which Harrison, Andrews, Coote, and Holloway reprised their roles, opened on April 30, 1958 at London's Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, where it ran for 2,281 performances. West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in... April 30 is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The interior of the third and largest theatre to stand at Drury Lane, c. ...


The show has been revived on Broadway three times - in 1976, directed by Jerry Adler, with Ian Richardson, Christine Andreas, and George Rose; in 1981, with Harrison and Milo O'Shea; and in 1993, with Richard Chamberlain, Melissa Errico, and Paxton Whitehead. Jerry Adler (born February 4, 1929, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American television and film actor best known for his roles as Herman Hesh Rabkin on The Sopranos, Mr. ... Ian William Richardson CBE (7 April 1934 – 9 February 2007) was a Scottish actor best known for playing the Machiavellian politician Francis Urquhart in the House of Cards trilogy for the BBC. // Born in Edinburgh, Richardson was educated at Balgreen Primary School and Tynecastle High School in the city,[1... Christine Andreas on the cover of her CD Heres to the Ladies Christine Andreas (born October 1, 1951) is an American actress and singer. ... George Rose (17 June 1744 — 13 January 1818) was a British politician. ... Milo OShea (born June 2, 1926 in Dublin, Ireland) is a character actor, recognizable for his bushy eyebrows, resounding voice and impish smile. ... Richard Chamberlain, right, as John Blackthorne, and John Rhys-Davies, left, as the Portuguese Pilot Vasco Rodrigues in the Shogun television miniseries. ... On the cover of Blue Like That Melissa Errico (born March 23, 1970) is an American actress and singer. ... Paxton Whitehead (born October 17, 1937 in Kent, England) is an actor who made his professional debut in 1956. ...


The show also had a West End revival in 1979 at the Adelphi Theatre with Tony Britton, Liz Robertson, Dame Anna Neagle, Richard Caldicot, and Peter Land. Produced by Cameron Mackintosh, it was first directed by Robin Midgley and then by the Lerner himself, and choreographed by Gillian Lynne. Mackintosh again produced the show in 2001 at the Royal National Theatre and later the Theatre Royal Drury Lane, with Martine McCutcheon as Eliza Doolittle and Jonathan Pryce as Professor Henry Higgins. This revival won three Olivier awards: Best Actress in a Musical (Martine McCutcheon), Outstanding Musical Production and Best Theatre Choreographer (Matthew Bourne). West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in... The Adam brothers Adelphi Buildings in an 18th-century print; the terrace stood upon riverfront warehousing. ... Tony Britton (born June 9, 1924), is a veteran British film and television actor. ... Liz Robertson (born May 4, 1954) is a British actress and singer. ... Anna Neagle (October 20, 1904 - June 3, 1986) was a popular British actress and singer. ... Richard Caldicot (1908-1995) was a British actor famed for his role of Commander (later Captain) Povey in the BBC radio series The Navy Lark. ... Peter Land (July 9, 1953) is a New Zealand actor and singer born in Taihape who achieved notable stage success after moving to England in 1977. ... Sir Cameron Mackintosh (born 17 October 1946 in Enfield) is a successful British theatrical producer. ... Gillian Lynne as Claudine in the 1954 production of Can Can at the Coliseum Theatre, London. ... The Royal National Theatre from Waterloo Bridge The Royal National Theatre is a building complex and theatre company located on the South Bank in London, England immediately east of the southern end of Waterloo Bridge. ... The present-day Theatre Royal in Drury Lane, sketched when it was new, in 1813. ... Martine McCutcheon (born Martine Kimberley Sherri Ponting[1] on May 14, 1976) is an English singer and Olivier award-winning actress. ... Pryce as Sam Lowry in Brazil Jonathan Pryce (born June 1, 1947) is a Welsh actor who was born in Holywell, Flintshire, Wales. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ... Martine McCutcheon (born Martine Kimberley Sherri Ponting[1] on May 14, 1976) is an English singer and Olivier award-winning actress. ... Matthew Bourne is a choreographer. ...


In 2007 the New York Philharmonic held a full-costume concert presentation of the musical. The concert had a four day engagement from March 7th to 10th at Avery Fisher Hall. It starred Kelli O'Hara as Eliza Doolittle, Kelsey Grammer as Professor Henry Higgins, Charles Kimbrough as Colonel Pickering and Brian Dennehy as Alfred Doolittle. 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States. ... , Avery Fisher Hall in Lincoln Center. ... Kelli OHara (born April 16, 197?) is an American actress and singer. ... Allen Kelsey Grammer (born February 21, 1955 in St. ... Charles Kimbrough (born May 23, 1936) is an American character actor best known for playing the straight-faced anchor Jim Dial on Murphy Brown. ... Brian Dennehy in Death of a Salesman Brian Dennehy parodied in South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut Brian Dennehy (born July 9, 1938 in Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA) is an Irish-American actor who has appeared in movies, television shows, and stage productions. ...


Synopsis

Henry Higgins, an arrogant, irascible professor of phonetics, boasts to fellow linguist Colonel Pickering that he can train any woman to speak so properly that he could pass her off as a duchess, including Eliza Doolittle, a poor girl with a strong Cockney accent whom he encounters selling flowers in Covent Garden. (In the terms currently used by linguists, and which did not yet exist in the period of the show, Higgins proposed to take a speaker of basilect and teach her to speak acrolect.) Pickering is intrigued by Higgins's boast and wagers that he cannot make good on his claim. Higgins takes on the challenge and begins an intensive make-over of Eliza's speech, manners and dress in preparation for her appearance at the Embassy Ball. Phonetics (from the Greek word φωνή, phone meaning sound, voice) is the study of the sounds of human speech. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... St Mary-le-Bow The term cockney refers to working-class inhabitants of London, particularly east London, and the slang used by these people. ... Covent Garden is a district in central London and within the easterly bounds of the City of Westminster. ... In linguistics, a basilect is a dialect of speech that has diverged so far from the standard language that in essence it has become a different language. ... An acrolect is a register of a spoken language that is considered formal and high-style. ...


Complicating matters is Eliza's father, Alfred P. Doolittle (Stanley Holloway), a cheerfully amoral and drink-loving dustman, who shows up to extract money from Higgins for compromising Eliza's virtue. Higgins is impressed by the man's natural gift for language and his brazen lack of moral values ("Can't afford 'em!") and flippantly recommends Doolittle to an American millionaire who is seeking a lecturer on moral values. In the end, Doolittle gets a surprise bequest of four thousand pounds a year from the millionaire, raising him uncomfortably into middle-class respectability.


Meanwhile, Eliza endures speech therapy, endlessly repeating phrases such as "In Hertford, Hereford and Hampshire, hurricanes hardly ever happen” (to demonstrate that "h"s must be aspirated) and "The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain" (to emphasize the "a"). Just as things seem hopeless, she suddenly "gets it" after Higgins eloquently speaks of the glory of the English language, and thereafter her speech is transformed into an impeccable upper class English accent. For her first public tryout, Higgins takes her to Ascot Racecourse, where she makes a good impression with her polite manners but shocks everyone by her vulgar Cockney attitudes and slang (thus establishing one of the show's themes, that good elocution is only "skin deep.") However, she still captures the heart of an eager young man named Freddy Eynsford-Hill. Ascot Racecourse is a racecourse, located in the village of Ascot in the English county of Berkshire used for thoroughbred horse racing. ...


The final test hinges on Eliza's passing as a lady at the Embassy Ball, which she does successfully, despite the presence of a Hungarian phonetics expert who seeks to unmask her identity. After the ball, Higgins's ungrateful boasting of his triumph and his pleasure that the experiment is now over leave Eliza feeling used and abandoned. She walks out on him, leaving the seemingly clueless Higgins mystified by her ingratitude. But Higgins soon realizes his feelings for her--that he has "grown accustomed to her face." When Eliza tentatively returns to him, the musical ends on an ambiguous moment of possible reconciliation between teacher and pupil.


Song list

Act I

Act II Wouldnt It Be Loverly is a popular song by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, written for the 1946 Broadway play My Fair Lady. ... The Rain in Spain is a popular song. ... I Could Have Danced All Night is a song which originated from the musical My Fair Lady and was supposedly sung by Audrey Hepburn in the film version of the musical. ... On the Street Where You Live is a popular song. ...

  • "You Did It"
  • "Just You Wait" (Reprise)
  • "On the Street Where You Live" (Reprise)
  • "Show Me"
  • "Wouldn't It Be Loverly?" (Reprise)
  • "Get Me to the Church on Time"
  • "A Hymn to Him"
  • "Without You"
  • "I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face"

Awards and nominations

Original Production

  • Tony Award for Best Musical (winner)
  • Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical (Harrison, winner)
  • Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical (Andrews, nominee)
  • Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical (Coote and Holloway, nominees)
  • Tony Award for Best Scenic Design (winner)
  • Tony Award for Best Costume Design (winner)
  • Tony Award for Best Choreography (nominee)
  • Tony Award for Best Conductor and Musical Director (winner)
  • Tony Award for Best Direction (winner)
  • Theatre World Award (John Michael King, winner)

1976 Revival What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Theatre World Award is an American honor given annually to an actor or an actress in recognition of an outstanding breakout performance in their New York City stage debut. ...

  • Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical (Rose, winner; Richardson, nominee)
  • Theatre World Award (Andreas, winner)
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Musical (Richardson, winner)
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical (Rose, winner)
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Director of a Musical (nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Revival (nominee)

1981 Revival Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ...

  • Tony Award for Best Reproduction of a Play or Musical (nominee)

1993 Revival

  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Musical Revival (nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actress in a Musical (Errico, nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design (nominee)

Film adaptation

An Oscar-winning film version was made in 1964 with Harrison again in the part of Higgins. Controversy surrounded the casting of Audrey Hepburn instead of Julie Andrews for the part of Eliza. Hepburn had to be dubbed for the Cockney scenes and songs, and Andrews got the last laugh when she won that year's Oscar for Best Actress in Mary Poppins. Lerner in particular hated the film version of the play because it did not live up to the standards of Moss Hart's original direction. He also was very upset with the fact that the film was shot entirely on the Warner Bros. backlot, rather than in its native London, as he would have preferred. Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... My Fair Lady is an Academy Award-winning 1964 film adaptation of the stage musical, My Fair Lady, based in turn on the play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Audrey Hepburn (May 4, 1929 – January 20, 1993) was an Academy Award-winning actress of film and theatre, Broadway stage performer, ballerina, fashion model, and humanitarian. ... For the 2004 stage musical, see Mary Poppins (musical). ... Warner Bros. ... A backlot is an area behind or adjoining a movie studio with permanent exterior sets for outdoor scenes in motion picture and/or television productions. ...


Popular culture

The musical has been spoofed by or served as an inspiration for episodes of numerous television programs, including The Andy Griffith Show, Family Guy, The Simpsons, Duckman, The Nanny, Will & Grace, Doctor Who, Arthur, Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, ¡Mucha Lucha!, Animaniacs and Star Trek: Voyager. The Andy Griffith Show is an American television series that aired from 1960 to 1968. ... Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Nanny was an American sitcom that aired from November 3, 1993 to June 23, 1999 on CBS. It starred Fran Drescher as the nanny named Fran (as Ann Hampton Callaway sang in the theme she wrote). ... Will & Grace was a popular Emmy Award winning and Golden Globe nominated American television sitcom that focused on Will Truman, a gay lawyer and his best friend Grace Adler, a straight Jewish woman who runs her own interior design firm, as well as Karen Walker, a very rich socialite and... Doctor Who is a long-running British science fiction television programme (and a 1996 television movie) produced by the BBC. The programme shows the adventures of a mysterious time-traveller known as the Doctor, who explores time and space in his TARDIS time ship with his companions, solving problems and... Arthur is an American and Canadian educational children’s television series which airs primarily on PBS in the United States, and on CBC, Knowledge Network, and TVO in Canada, although it has been syndicated to numerous other stations throughout the world. ... Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends (sometimes called Fosters for short, and abbreviated as FHIF/FHFIF) is an Emmy award-winning, American animated television series created and produced at Cartoon Network Studios by animator Craig McCracken, who also created The Powerpuff Girls. ... ¡Mucha Lucha! is the first animated television series created with Macromedia Flash, a program usually used for Internet cartoons. ... Steven Spielberg Presents Animaniacs, usually referred to as the shorter title Animaniacs, is an American animated television series, distributed by Warner Bros. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ...


On Seinfeld, Elaine Benes's close talker boyfriend Aaron takes her, Morty Seinfeld and Helen Seinfeld to see My Fair Lady in "The Raincoats, Part 1". This article is about the sitcom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mortimer Morty Seinfeld, played by Barney Martin, is a fictional character on the US television sitcom Seinfeld (1989-1998). ... Helen Seinfeld, played by Liz Sheridan, is a fictional character on the US television sitcom Seinfeld (1989-1998). ... The Raincoats, Part One is the name of a 1994 episode of the American sitcom Seinfeld, it is the first part of a two part episode. ...


In the Danny Phantom episode Splitting Images, the Box Ghost attacked him with "costumes and props from the broadway classic, My Fair Lady." Splitting Images is the fifth episode of the TV series Danny Phantom. ... The Box Ghost is a generally harmless ghost from the animated series Danny Phantom. ...


Also in an episode of Sesame Street, Oscar the Grouch sings a parody called "I've Grown Accustomed To Her Fur" after he orders a breed of dog called a Rotten-Doodle and it turns out to be a sweet and helpful female dog ironically named Cranky. In another episode, Rosita is teased about her Spanish accent and wishes that she could sound like everyone else. A pig named Henry Piggins tries to teach her how to speak by repeatedly saying "The pig is big and did a wiggly jig". Eventually she improves, and Piggins, Rosita, and Big Bird sing a parody of "The Rain in Spain" called "The Pig Is Big." Then Piggins says that he is on his way to the theatre to see PIGmailion. Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... The Rain in Spain is a popular song. ...


Trivia

The show's title was derived from one of Shaw's provisional titles for Pygmalion, Fair Eliza. However, when Rex Harrison protested that Lerner and Loewe's originally proposed title, Fair Lady, was too femininely sympathetic, the show's authors added the possessive pronoun "My" to appease the temperamental star. This also made for a pun on "Mayfair lady", which is how the title sounds when pronounced with a Cockney accent. Play cover, depicting Mrs Campbell as Eliza Pygmalion (1913) is a play by George Bernard Shaw based on Ovids tale of Pygmalion. ... Sir Reginald Carey Rex Harrison (b. ... Mayfair is an area in the City of Westminster London, named after the fortnight-long May Fair that took place there from 1686 until it was banned in that location in 1764. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
My Fair Lady - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1101 words)
The bet depends on Eliza's passing as a lady at the 'embassy ball', which she does successfully despite the presence of a Hungarian phonetics expert, who is completely taken in.In the party,she even had a chance to dance with the Crown Prince himself.
My Fair Mandy, an episode of The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy, is a parody of My Fair Lady.
My So-Called Wife, an episode of Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, is a parody of My Fair Lady.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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