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Encyclopedia > Musical theater

Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. It is closely related to opera, frequently being distinguished by the use of popular music of various forms (and thus usually different instrumentation), the use of unaccompanied dialogue (though some musicals are entirely accompanied, such as Les Misérables, and some operas have spoken dialogue, such as Carmen), and the avoidance of many operatic conventions. Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Music Look up Music on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikisource, as part of the 1911 Encyclopedia Wikiproject, has original text related to this article: Music MusicNovatory: the science of music encyclopedia The Virginia Tech Multimedia Music Distionary, with definitions, pronunciations, examples... A song is a relatively short musical composition for the human voice (possibly accompanied by other musical instruments), which features words (lyrics). ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance (from Old French dance, further history unknown) generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression (see also body language) or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... The term dialogue (or dialog) expresses basically reciprocal conversation between two or more persons. ... The foyer of Charles Garniers Opéra, Paris, opened 1875 Opera refers to a dramatic art form, originating in Europe, in which the emotional content is conveyed to the audience as much through music, both vocal and instrumental as it is through the lyrics. ... Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and mostly distributed commercially. ... Les Misérables programme from Palace Theatre purchased for £3 in July 2003. ... Poster from the 1875 premiere of Carmen Carmen is a French opera by Georges Bizet. ...


The musical components of a musical are generally referred to as the score, with sung lines considered the lyrics and the spoken lines the book, or occasionally the libretto (a term also frequently applied to text of an opera, it incorporates the words of both dialogue and lyric). Score can mean one of several things: Look up score in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lyrics are the written words in a song. ... In musical theater, a plays spoken lines are known as its book. ... A libretto is the complete body of words used in an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, sacred or secular oratorio and cantata, musical, and ballet. ... The foyer of Charles Garniers Opéra, Paris, opened 1875 Opera refers to a dramatic art form, originating in Europe, in which the emotional content is conveyed to the audience as much through music, both vocal and instrumental as it is through the lyrics. ...


Many familiar musical theater works have been the basis for successful musical films, or were adapted for television presentations. While some popular television programs have set one single episode in the style of a musical as a play on their usual format (examples include episodes of Ally McBeal, Buffy the Vampire Slayer's episode Once More with Feeling, or Oz's Variety) -- or have suddenly begun singing and dancing in a musical-theater style during an episode (several episodes of The Simpsons, South Park and Family Guy) -- the television series Cop Rock, which extensively used the musical format, was not a success. A musical film belongs to a film genre that features songs, sung by the actors, interwoven into the narrative. ... Time magazine, June 29, 1998. ... Buffy, the Vampire Slayer was a U.S. television series based on the original script for the 1992 movie of the same name. ... Oz was the first one-hour dramatic television series to be produced by HBO. The show, which aired for six seasons (1997-2003), is set in a maximum-security prison in an unspecified American state. ... Homer, a safety inspector at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant, is a generally well-meaning buffoon whose short attention span often draws him into outrageous schemes and adventures. ... South Park is a comedy animated series created by Matt Stone and Trey Parker. ... Family Guy is an animated television series created by Seth MacFarlane for FOX in 1999. ... Cop Rock was a very short-lived Steven Bochco television series on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) in 1990. ...


While musical theater works are performed around the world, they are perhaps most frequently produced on Broadway in New York and in the West End in London. Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... New York City, officially named the City of New York, is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... West End is the name of some places in the world, including: The West End of London, England West End Theatre, is where many of Londons major theatres are located and premier cinema screenings take place. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ...


A musical can be anywhere from a few minutes to several hours long; however, most musicals range from two hours to two hours and forty-five minutes. Musicals today are typically presented with one intermission ten to fifteen minutes in length. A musical will usually have around twenty to thirty songs of varying lengths (including reprises and underscoring) interspersed with book (dialogue) scenes. Some musicals, however, are "sung-through" and do not have any spoken dialogue. This can blur the line between musical theatre and opera. I LOVE UUUUUU greatest dramatic intensity are often performed in song. Proverbially, "when the emotion becomes too strong for speech, you sing; when it becomes too strong for song, you dance." A song must be crafted to suit the character (or characters) and their situation within the story. A show usually opens with a song that sets the tone of the musical, introduces some or all of the major characters, and shows the setting of the play. Within the compressed nature of the musical, the writers must develop the characters and the plot. In music a reprise is the repetition or return of the opening material later in a composition such as occurs in the recapitulation of sonata form, though it originally (18th century) was simply any repeated section, such as is indicated by beginning and ending repeat signs. ...


Music provides an excellent way to express emotion. However, on average, fewer words are sung in a five-minute song than are spoken in a five-minute block of dialogue. Therefore there is less time to develop drama than in a straight play of equivalent length, since a musical may have an hour and a half or more of music in it.

Contents


Musical collaboration

Musical theater/theatre is a collaborative craft with a long history of traditional forms and structures, although new writing in musicals is constantly stretching and testing the enormous flexibility of the artform, taking it to previously unexplored places. Musicals are most commonly recognised to be a combination of sung lyric and spoken dialogue.


The authors

There are usually several authors of a musical. Very few musicals are written entirely by one person. A collaborative partnership of composer (music), lyricist (lyrics) and bookwriter (script) are generally involved, although one person may serve as composer/lyricist, lyricist/bookwriter (also called librettist) or bookwriter/composer. There can be multiple bookwriters, lyricists and/or composers on any one musical. A composer is a person who writes music. ... A lyricist is an author of song lyrics. ... Lyrics are the written words in a song. ... Bookwriter is a term used to describe the playwright, or person who writes the spoken dialogue, of a musical. ... Libretto can also refer to a sub-notebook PC manufactured by Toshiba. ...


There is no easy answer to the most frequently-asked question about musical theatre: "Which comes first, the music or the lyric?" Each collaboration works in a different way, and tends to be unique to the specific collaborators involved. Sometimes a melody inspires a lyric. Sometimes a lyric inspires a melody. However, the strongest inspiration for all the authors is the driving theme of the main story of the show.


The initial idea for a new musical can come from the authors themselves, or they might be commissioned by a producer to write a musical on a specific subject. Musical theatre has a long tradition of adapting plays, books and other source material into this new genre.


History

In the beginning

The first theater piece that conforms to the modern conception of a musical is generally considered to be The Black Crook - with book by Charles M. Barras and musical adaptations by Giuseppe Operti - which premiered at Niblo's Gardens in New York on September 12, 1866. The production was a staggering five-and-a-half hours long, but despite its length kept theatergoers mesmerized enough to run for 474 performances. The Black Crook (1866) was the first prototype of the modern American musical. ... September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ...


Operetta

Probably the best-known composers of operetta were W. S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, whose prolific output - including The Mikado, Pirates of Penzance, and Princess Ida - remains popular to this day, and was frequently revived by London's recently defunct (2003) D'Oyly Carte Opera Company which was dedicated to presenting their work at the Savoy Theatre. Much of their legacy served as an inspiration for the likes of Victor Herbert (Babes in Toyland, 1903), Franz Lehár (The Merry Widow, 1907), and Oskar Straus (The Chocolate Soldier, 1910). Operetta (literally, little opera) is a performance art-form similar to opera, though it generally deals with less serious topics. ... Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (November 18, 1836 – May 29, 1911) was a British dramatist and librettist best known for his operatic collaborations with the composer Sir Arthur Sullivan. ... Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (May 13, 1842 – November 22, 1900) was a British composer best known for his operatic collaborations with librettist William S. Gilbert. ... The Mikado, or The Town of Titipu, is a comic Gilbert and Sullivan operetta in two acts. ... The Pirates of Penzance, or The Slave of Duty, is a Gilbert and Sullivan comic operetta in two acts. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Princess Ida Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Princess (Tennyson) Princess Ida, or Castle Adamant, is the eighth operetta written by Gilbert and Sullivan. ... Richard DOyly Carte (May 3, 1844 – April 3, 1901) was a London theatrical impresario during the latter half of the nineteenth century. ... Savoy Theatre London, December 2003 The Savoy Theatre, which opened on 10 October 1881, was built by Richard DOyly Carte (1844 - 1901) on the site of the old Savoy Palace in London as a showcase for the works of Gilbert and Sullivan, which became known as the Savoy Operas... Victor Herbert (February 1, 1859 - May 26, 1924) was a popular composer of light opera. ... Victor Herberts 1903 operetta Babes in Toyland wove together various characters from Mother Goose nursery rhymes into a musical-- mainly because librettist Glen MacDonough wanted to cash in on the Wizard of Oz phenomena sweeping Broadway that year. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... Franz Lehár (30 April 1870 - 24 October 1948) was a Hungarian composer, mainly known for his operettas. ... The Merry Widow is a musical comedy or operetta of 1905, by the Austro-Hungarian composer, Franz Lehár. ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Chocolate Soldier is an operetta by Oscar Straus based on George Bernard Shaws 1894 Arms and the Man. ... 1910 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The Roaring Twenties

The musical developed from opera and operetta, but early musicals in the Roaring Twenties ignored plot in favor of emphasizing star actors and actresses, big dance routines, and popular songs (throughout the first half of the twentieth century, popular music was dominated by theater writers). Many shows were revues with little plot. Typical of the times were lighthearted productions like Lady Be Good, Sunny, Tip Toes, No, No, Nanette, Oh, Kay, and Funny Face. Their books may have been forgettable, but they produced enduring standards from George Gershwin, Cole Porter, Vincent Youmans, and Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, among others. The Roaring Twenties refers to the North American historical period of the 1920s, which has been described as one of the most colorful decades in American history. ... Lady Be Good is a 1924 song by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin, as well as the title of the Broadway show which the song was featured in. ... Sunny can refer to several things: Look up sunny on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... No, No, Nanette - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Funny Face is an American musical film released in 1957, based on the 1927 broadway version by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin. ... George Gershwin photograph by Edward Steichen in 1927. ... Cole Porter Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter. ... Vincent Youmans (September 27, 1898 - April 5, 1946) was an American popular composer and Broadway producer. ... An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers Richard Rodgers (June 18, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. ... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ...


The first production to most resemble the musical as we know it today - a complete integration of book and score - was Show Boat, which premiered on December 27, 1927 at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York. Up to this point, Florenz Ziegfeld had been known for his spectacular song-and-dance revues featuring extravagant sets and elaborate costumes, but there was no common theme tying the various numbers together. Show Boat, with a book and lyrics adapted from Edna Ferber's novel by Oscar Hammerstein II and P. G. Wodehouse and music by Jerome Kern, presented a new concept that was embraced by audiences immediately. Despite some of its startling themes - miscegenation among them - the original production ran a total of 572 performances. Show Boat is a musical with music by Jerome Kern and book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II (with the notable exception of Bill, the lyrics of which were written by P. G. Wodehouse). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1928 Time cover featuring Ziegfeld Florenz Ziegfeld (March 21, 1869–July 22, 1932) was a Broadway impresario who achieved fame by perfecting the United States revue. ... Edna Ferber (August 15, 1885 - April 16, 1968), Jewish-American novelist, author, and playwrite. ... (For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein) Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was an American born Jewish writer and producer of musical comedies for almost forty years. ... Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American popular composer. ...


The Thirties

Encouraged by the success of Show Boat, creative teams began following the "format" of that popular hit. Of Thee I Sing (1931), a political satire with music by George Gershwin and lyrics by Ira Gershwin and Morrie Ryskind, was the first musical to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize. The Band Wagon (1931), with a score by Arthur Schwartz and Howard Dietz, starred dancing partners Fred Astaire and his sister Adele. While it was primarily a revue, it served as the basis for two subsequent film versions that were "book" musicals in the truest sense. Porter's Anything Goes (1934) affirmed Ethel Merman's position as the First Lady of musical theater - a title she maintained for many years. Gershwin's Porgy and Bess (1935) was closer to opera than it was to the typical musical, but in style and scope it foreshadowed such contemporary productions as Evita and Les Misérables. The Cradle Will Rock (1937), with a book and score by Marc Blitzstein and directed by Orson Welles, was a highly political piece that, despite the controversy surrounding it, managed to run for 108 performances. Kurt Weill's Knickerbocker Holiday brought to the musical stage New York City's early history, using as its source writings by Washington Irving. Clearly, musical theater was evolving into something beyond feathers and beads worn by statuesque showgirls. Of Thee I Sing is a musical with music and lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin, to a book by George S. Kaufman and Morrie Ryskind. ... 1931 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... George (left) and Ira Gershwin Ira Gershwin (born Israel Gershowitz) (December 6, 1896 - August 17, 1983) American lyricist, collaborator with, and brother of George Gershwin He is interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery, Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. ... Morrie Ryskind [Morris Ryskind] (20 October 1895 in New York City, New York, USA - 24 August 1985 in Washington), was a Hollywood and Broadway writer, lyricist, and director. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-13, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Band Wagon is a musical comedy film, released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1953, which tells the story of an aging musical star who wants to star in a Broadway play that will restart his career. ... Arthur Schwartz (November 25, 1900 - September 3, 1984) was an American composer of popular music. ... Howard Dietz (September 8, 1896 - July 30, 1983) was an American lyric writer and librettist. ... Fred Astaire Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska, was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Anything Goes is a musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 - February 15, 1984) was a star of stage and film musicals, well known for her incredible vocal range and diction, and comic acting (although she could do drama also). ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... 1935(MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The cover of the 1979 American Broadway Original Cast Recording of Evita starring Patti Lupone as Eva Peron, Mandy Patinkin as Che Guevara, and Bob Gunton as Juan Peron. ... Les Misérables programme from Palace Theatre purchased for £3 in July 2003. ... The 1937 musical The Cradle Will Rock by Marc Blitzstein was originally a part of the Federal Theatre Project. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Marc Blitzstein (March 2, 1905 - January 22, 1964) was an American composer. ... Orson Welles, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) is generally considered one of Hollywoods greatest directors, as well as a fine actor, broadcaster and screenwriter. ... Kurt Weill, a photo taken in Salzburg, Austria, 1934 Kurt Julian Weill (March 2, 1900 – April 3, 1950), born in Dessau, Germany and died in New York, was a German composer active from the 1920s until his death. ... Knickerbocker Holiday was a Broadway musical written by Kurt Weill (music) and Maxwell Anderson (book and lyrics); it was directed by Joshua Logan. ... Washington Irving Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American author of the early 19th century. ...


The Golden Age (1940s/1950s/1960s)

The Golden Age of the Broadway musical is generally considered to have begun with Oklahoma! (1943) and to have ended with Hair (1968). Oklahoma! (1943) was the first musical play written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II, working together. ... 1943 is a common year starting on Friday. ... The original poster for the show. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...


Rodgers' and Hammerstein's Oklahoma! had a cohesive (if somewhat slim) plot, songs that furthered the action of the story, and featured dream ballets which advanced the plot and developed the characters, rather than using dance as an excuse to parade scantily-clad women across the stage. It defied musical conventions by raising its first act curtain not on a bevy of chorus girls, but rather on a woman churning butter, with an off-stage voice singing the opening lines of Oh, What a Beautiful Morning. It was the first "blockbuster" Broadway show, running a total of 2,212 performances, and remains one of the most frequently produced of the team's projects. The two created an extraordinary collection of some of musical theater's best loved and most enduring classics, including Carousel (1945), South Pacific (1949), The King and I (1951), and The Sound of Music (1959). Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... South Pacific is a musical play, written with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II that opened on Broadway on April 7, 1949, and ran for more than five years. ... 1949 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Julie Andrews as Maria, seeks guidance from the Mother Abbess, played by Peggy Wood, in this scene from the 1965 film version. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Americana was the time during the "Golden Age" when the wartime cycle of shows were beginning to arrive. An example of this would be "On The Town" (1944), written by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, composed by Leonard Bernstein and choreographed by Jerome Robbins. The musical is set during wartime, where a group of three sailors are on a 24 hour shore leave in New York. During their day, they each meet a wonderful woman. The women in this show have a specific power to them, as if to be saying, "Come here! I need a man!" The show also gives the impression of a country with an uncertain future, as the sailors also have with their women before leaving. On the Town is a musical that opened on Broadway at the Adelphi Theatre on December 28, 1944, with music by Leonard Bernstein, book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, direction by George Abbott, and choreography by Jerome Robbins. ... 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Comden and Green was the writing duo of Betty Comden and Adolph Green. ... Adolph Green (December 2, 1914 - October 23, 2002) was an American lyricist and playwright, who penned most of his songs, plays, and movies with Betty Comden. ... Bernstein with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, at the 1974 Charles Ives Centenary Concert in Danbury, Connecticut. ... Jerome Robbins (October 11, 1918–July 29, 1998) was an American choreographer whose work has included everything from classical ballet to contemporary musical theater. ...


Oklahoma! inspired others to continue the trend. Irving Berlin used sharpshooter Annie Oakley's career as a basis for his Annie Get Your Gun (1946, 1,147 performances); Burton Lane, E. Y. Harburg, and Fred Saidy combined political satire with Irish whimsy for their fantasy Finian's Rainbow (1947, 725 performances); Cole Porter found inspiration in William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew for Kiss Me, Kate (1948, 1,077 performances); Damon Runyan's eclectic characters were at the core of Frank Loesser's and Abe Burrows' Guys and Dolls, (1950, 1,200 performances); and the Gold Rush was the setting for Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe's Paint Your Wagon (1951). Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989), born Israel Isidore Baline, in Tyumen, Siberia (or Mahilyow (Mogilev), Belarus), was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... Annie Oakley (birth name Phoebe Anne Oakley Mozee, 13 August 1860 – 3 November 1926) was a United States sharpshooter in the American West. ... Annie Get Your Gun is a stage musical loosely based on the life of sharpshooter Annie Oakley. ... 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Burton Lane (February 2, 1912, New York City - January 5, 1997, New York City) was a composer and lyricist. ... E. Y. Yip Harburg (April 8, 1896 - March 5, 1981) was a lyricist who worked with many well-known composers. ... Petula Clark in the 1968 Warner Brothers film version Finians Rainbow, with music by Burton Lane and lyrics by E.Y. Harburg, opened on Broadway in 1947, with Ella Logan and David Wayne in the lead roles. ... 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... Kiss Me, Kate is a stage musical by Samuel and Bella Spewack (book) and Cole Porter (music and lyrics) that ran for 1,077 performances and was first performed in New York on December 30, 1948. ... 1948 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Damon Runyon Damon Runyon (October 4, 1884 - December 10, 1946) was a newspaperman and writer. ... Frank Loesser (June 29, 1910, New York City - July 26, 1969, New York City) was a composer and lyricist. ... Abe Burrows (1910- 1985) noted author and director for the stage, particularly Broadway. ... Guys And Dolls is a successful 1950 musical. ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Gold rush handbill The California Gold Rush was a period in American history marked by mass hysteria concerning a gold discovery in Northern California. ... Alan Jay Lerner was a Jewish-American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... Frederic Loewe, an Austrian-American composer (June 10, 1901 - February 14, 1988) worked with lyricist Alan J. Lerner in musical theater. ... Paint Your Wagon is a 1951 Broadway musical comedy, with book and lyrics by Alan J. Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe, set in a mining camp in Gold Rush-era California. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ...

My Fair Lady Playbill with Julie Andrews and Rex Harrison
My Fair Lady Playbill with Julie Andrews and Rex Harrison

The fairly brief run - 289 performances - of that show didn't discourage them from collaborating again, this time on an adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion - My Fair Lady (1956), with Rex Harrison and Julie Andrews, which at 2,717 performances held the long-run record for many years. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... George Bernard Shaw (July 26, 1856 – November 2, 1950) was an Irish playwright and winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925. ... Pygmalion is a play by George Bernard Shaw, written in 1913. ... The original poster for the Broadway production of the show designed by Al Hirschfeld My Fair Lady is a 1956 musical theater production with lyrics and book by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederic Loewe, adapted from George Bernard Shaws Pygmalion. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rex Harrison Sir Reginald Carey Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908–June 2, 1990) was a British theatre and film actor. ... Julie Andrews as Maria, with the Von Trapp children in The Sound of Music. ...


As in Oklahoma!, dance was an integral part of West Side Story (1957), which transported Romeo and Juliet to modern day New York City and converted the feuding Montague and Capulet families into warring gangs, the Sharks and the Jets. The book was adapted by Arthur Laurents, with music by Leonard Bernstein and lyrics by newcomer Stephen Sondheim. It was embraced by the critics but failed to be a popular choice for the "blue-haired matinee ladies," who preferred the small town River City, Iowa of Meredith Willson's The Music Man to the alleys of Manhattan's Upper West Side. Apparently Tony Award voters were of a similar mind, since they favored the latter over the former. West Side Story had a respectable run of 732 performances (1,040 in the West End), while The Music Man ran nearly twice as long, with 1,375. West Side Story is a musical written by Arthur Laurents (book), Leonard Bernstein (music), and Stephen Sondheim (lyrics), and was originally produced, choreographed, and directed by Jerome Robbins. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arthur Laurents (born July 14, 1918) is an American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, librettist and stage director. ... Bernstein with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, at the 1974 Charles Ives Centenary Concert in Danbury, Connecticut. ... Stephen Sondheim Stephen Joshua Sondheim (born March 22, 1930) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... Robert Meredith Willson {18 May 1902 - 15 June 1984) was an American composer and playwright, best known as the writer of The Music Man. ... The Music Man is a musical play written by Meredith Willson and Franklin Lacey, which premiered on Broadway in 1957 famously starring Robert Preston as Professor Harold Hill (in his musical debut) and revived in 1976 with Ian Richardson. ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater. ...


Laurents and Sondheim teamed again for Gypsy (1959, 702 performances), with Jule Styne providing the music for a backstage story about the most driven stage mother of all-time, stripper Gypsy Rose Lee's mother Rose. The original production ran for 702 performances, but proved to be a bigger hit in its three subsequent revivals, with Angela Lansbury, Tyne Daly, and Bernadette Peters tackling the role made famous by Ethel Merman. Gypsy: A Musical Fable is a musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jule Styne (December 31, 1905 – September 20, 1994) was a British born United States songwriter. ... The Screaming Mimi (1958) Gypsy Rose Lee (February 9, 1911 - April 26, 1970) was an American actress and burlesque entertainer. ... Angela Lansbury, CBE (born October 16, 1925) is a British-born actress, the granddaughter of British Labour politician George Lansbury. ... Ellen Tyne Daly (born February 21, 1946 in Madison, Wisconsin) is an American Tony and Emmy Award winning actress. ... Bernadette Peters Bernadette Peters is the stage name of Bernadette Lazarra (born February 28, 1948 in Ozone Park, Queens, New York), an actress and singer. ...


Stephen Sondheim would be one of the most important composer/lyricists from 1960 on. His first project for which he wrote both music and lyrics was A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1962, 964 performances), with a book based on the works of Plautus by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart, and starring Zero Mostel. Sondheim was not one to concentrate on the romantic plots typical of productions of the time; his work tended to be darker, exploring the grittier sides of life both present and past. Some of his earlier works are Anyone Can Whistle (1964, which - at a mere nine performances, despite having star power in Lee Remick and Angela Lansbury - is a legendary flop), Company (1970), Follies (1971), and A Little Night Music (1973), which featured the only standard ever to emerge from the extensive Sondheim catalogue, Send in the Clowns. He has found inspiration in the most unlikeliest of sources - the opening of Japan to Western trade for Pacific Overtures, a legendary murderous barber - Sweeney Todd - seeking revenge in the Industrial Age of London, the paintings of Georges Seurat for Sunday in the Park with George, and a collection of individuals intent on eliminating the American President in Assassins. His works are generally known for their lyrical sophistication and musical complexity, which many critics argue has led to his works receiving very little popularity among the general public. Stephen Sondheim Stephen Joshua Sondheim (born March 22, 1930) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart. ... 1962 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Titus Maccius Plautus (born at Sarsina, Umbria in 254 B.C.) was a comic playwright in the time of the Roman Republic. ... Burt Shevelove (1915 - 8 April 1981) was an American musical theater writer, lyricist, librettist, and director. ... Larry Gelbart (b. ... Zero Mostel in Ulysses in Nighttown, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 Zero Mostel (February 25, 1915 – September 8, 1977) was a Tony Award-winning stage actor. ... Anyone Can Whistle is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Arthur Laurents. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Lee Remick Lee Remick (December 14, 1935 - July 2, 1991), was an American actress admired for her versality and her great beauty. ... Angela Lansbury, CBE (born October 16, 1925) is a British-born actress, the granddaughter of British Labour politician George Lansbury. ... Company is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by George Furth. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Follies is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by James Goldman. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... A Little Night Music is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Hugh Wheeler. ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... Pacific Overtures was an ambitious 1976 musical by Stephen Sondheim, with a libretto by John Weidman, and additional material by Hugh Wheeler, set in 1853 Japan. ... Sweeney Todd is a fictional barber and serial killer appearing as a character in various English-language works starting in the mid-19th century. ... Industrialisation (or industrialization) or an industrial revolution (in general, with lowercase letters) is a process of social and economic change whereby a human society is transformed from a pre-industrial to an industrial state . ... Le Chahut was painted by Seurat from 1889 to 1890. ... Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by James Lapine. ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Assassins is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by John Weidman and was based on an idea by Charles Gilbert, Jr. ...


Jerry Herman, too, has played a significant role in American musical theater, beginning with his first Broadway production, Milk and Honey (1961, 563 performances), about the founding of the state of Israel, and continuing with the smash hits Hello, Dolly! (1964, 2,844 performances), Mame (1966, 1,508 performances), and La Cage aux Folles (1983, 1,761 performances). Even his less successful shows like Dear World (1969) and Mack & Mabel (1974) have had memorable scores (Mack & Mabel was later reworked into a London hit). Writing both words and music, many of Herman's showtunes have become popular standards, including "Hello, Dolly!", "If He Walked Into My Life", "We Need a Little Christmas", "I Am What I Am", "Mame", "Shalom", "The Best of Times", "Before the Parade Passes By", "Put On Your Sunday Clothes", "It Only Takes a Moment", "It's Today!", "Open a New Window", "Bosom Buddies", "I Won't Send Roses", and "Time Heals Everything", recorded by such luminaries as Louis Armstrong, Eydie Gorme, Barbra Streisand, Petula Clark and Bernadette Peters. Herman's songbook has been the subject of two popular musical revues, Jerry's Girls (Broadway, 1985), and Showtune (off-Broadway, 2003). Jerry Herman is to traditional musical comedy what Stephen Sondheim is to the avant-garde. Jerry Herman (born Gerald Herman on July 10, 1933 in New York City) is an American composer/lyricist of the Broadway musical theater. ... Milk And Honey is a posthumous album by John Lennon first released in 1984. ... Hello, Dolly! is a Broadway musical with a book by Michael Stewart and a score by Jerry Herman. ... MAME is a computer software program for personal computers. ... La Cage aux Folles is both a 1978 French film and a 1983 Broadway musical. ... Dear World is a Broadway musical, set in Paris, produced in 1969, with book by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, and music and lyrics by Jerry Herman. ... Mack & Mabel is a Broadway musical play. ... Mack & Mabel is a Broadway musical play. ... One of the most famous Broadway showtunes ever written, Hello, Dolly! is the title song of the popular 1964 musical Hello, Dolly!. The music and lyrics were written by Jerry Herman who also wrote the scores for many other popular musicals including Mame and La Cage aux Folles. ... Showtune (New York production 2003) is a popular musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman, the composer and lyricist of the Broadway musicals Milk and Honey (1961), Hello, Dolly! (1964), Mame (1966), Dear World (1969), Mack & Mabel (1974), The Grand Tour (1979), and La Cage aux Folles... Bosom Buddies was an American sitcom starring Tom Hanks and Peter Scolari. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nicknames Satchmo and Pops) was an American jazz musician. ... Eydie Gorme (real name Edith Gormezano) (born August 16, 1931 in The Bronx, New York City, United States), is an American singer, and wife of Steve Lawrence. ... Barbra Streisand - Guilty Pleasures. ... Petula Clark on the cover of her latest DVD/CD release Petula Sally Olwen Clark (born November 15, 1932), CBE, is a British singer, actress, and composer, best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... Bernadette Peters Bernadette Peters is the stage name of Bernadette Lazarra (born February 28, 1948 in Ozone Park, Queens, New York), an actress and singer. ... Jerrys Girls is a Broadway musical revue based on the songs of composer Jerry Herman. ... Showtune (New York production 2003) is a popular musical revue celebrating the words and music of Jerry Herman, the composer and lyricist of the Broadway musicals Milk and Honey (1961), Hello, Dolly! (1964), Mame (1966), Dear World (1969), Mack & Mabel (1974), The Grand Tour (1979), and La Cage aux Folles...


The musical started to diverge from the relatively narrow confines of the 1950s. Rock music would be used in several Broadway musicals, perhaps the most significant of which was Hair, which featured not only rock music but also nudity and controversial opinions about the Vietnam War. Other important rock musicals of the 1960s and 1970s included Jesus Christ Superstar, Godspell, and Two Gentlemen of Verona. The musical also went in other directions. Shows like Raisin, Dreamgirls, Purlie, and The Wiz brought a significant African-American influence to Broadway. More and more different musical genres were turned into musicals either on or off-Broadway. Automotive companies and other types of corporations hired Broadway talent to write corporate musicals, private shows which were only seen by their employees. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The original poster for the show. ... Nudity or nakedness is the state of wearing no clothing. ... Jesus Christ Superstar is a rock opera by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber. ... Godspell is a musical based on the Gospel of Saint Matthew with music and new lyrics by Stephen Schwartz and book by John Michael Tebelak. ... The Two Gentlemen of Verona is a comedy by Shakespeare from early in his career. ... Raisin was a musical theatre adaptation of the Lorraine Hansberry play A Raisin in the Sun, and was first performed on Broadway on October 18, 1973. ... Dreamgirls is an award-winning Broadway musical, which opened on December 20, 1981 at the Imperial Theatre on Broadway and ran for 1522 performances. ... Purlie is a Broadway musical with music by Gary Geld, lyrics by Peter Udell and book by Ossie Davis, Peter Udell and Philip Rose. ... The Wiz is both a 1975 Broadway musical and a 1978 film urbanized adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, featuring an all-African-American/Latino cast. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... An industrial musical is a musical performed for the employees of a business, intended to create a feeling of being part of a team, and/or to educate and motivate the management and salespeople to improve sales and profit. ...


More recent eras

1976 brought one of the great contemporary musicals to the stage. A Chorus Line emerged from recorded group therapy-style sessions Michael Bennett conducted with gypsies - those who sing and dance in support of the leading players - from the Broadway community. From hundreds of hours of tapes, James Kirkwood and Nick Dante fashioned a book about an audition for a musical, incorporating into it many of the real-life stories of those who had sat in on the sessions - and some of whom eventually played variations of themselves or each other in the show. With music by Marvin Hamlisch and lyrics by Edward Kleban, A Chorus Line first opened at Joseph Papp's Public Theater in lower Manhattan. Advance word-of-mouth - that something extraordinary was about to explode - boosted box office sales, and after critics ran out of superlatives to describe what they witnessed on opening night, what initially had been planned as a limited engagement eventually moved to the Shubert Theater uptown for a run that seemed to last forever. The show swept the Tony Awards and won the Pulitzer Prize, and its hit song, What I Did for Love, became an instant standard. 1976 (MCMLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... A Chorus Line is a Broadway musical that opened at the Shubert Theatre July 25, 1975 and closed there April 28, 1990 after 6,137 performances. ... Michael Bennett (April 8, 1943 - July 2, 1987) was an American musical theater director, choreographer, and dancer. ... James Kirkwood (August 22, 1930 - April 22, 1989) was an American playwright and author. ... Marvin Hamlisch (born June 2, 1944) is one of the most successful composers of the twentieth century. ... Edward Kleban (c. ... Joseph Papp (1921 - 1991) was an American theatre producer and director. ... The Public Theater is a New York City arts organization. ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Shubert Theatre, Boston The Shubert Organization was founded by the Shubert brothers, Sam Shubert, Lee Shubert, and Jacob J. Shubert of Syracuse, New York in the late 19th century in upstate New York, entering into New York City productions in 1900. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-13, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ...


Clearly, Broadway audiences were eager to welcome musicals that strayed from the usual style and substance. John Kander and Fred Ebb explored pre-World War II Nazi Germany in Cabaret and Prohibition-era Chicago, which relied on old vaudeville techniques to tell its tale of murder and the media. Pippin, by Stephen Schwartz, was set in the days of Charlemagne. Federico Fellini's autobiographical film became Maury Yeston's Nine. But old-fashioned values were embraced, as well, in such hits as Annie, 42nd Street, My One and Only, and popular revivals of No, No, Nanette and Irene. John Kander (born March 18, 1927) is the composer of a series of musical theatre successes as part of the songwriting team of Kander and Ebb. ... Fred Ebb (April 8, 1933 - September 11, 2004) was a musical theatre lyricist. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-twentieth-century conflict that engulfed much of the globe. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Nazism. ... Cabaret is a 1966 Broadway musical, based on John Van Drutens play I Am a Camera, based in its turn on stories by Christopher Isherwood, with book by Joe Masteroff, lyrics by Fred Ebb, and music by John Kander, produced and directed by Hal Prince and starring Bert Convy... Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... Chicago is a musical, first performed in 1975, based on the play Chicago by Maurine Dallas Watkins. ... Vaudeville was a style of multi-act theater which flourished in North America from the 1880s through the 1920s. ... Pippin is a stage musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz and book by Roger O. Hirson. ... Stephen Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... Charlemagne (ca. ... Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was an Italian film-maker and director and one of the key film auteurs of the second half of the twentieth century. ... 8½ is a 1963 film by Italian director Federico Fellini. ... Maury Yeston is a Jewish-American composer and lyricist educated at Yale and Clare College, Cambridge. ... Nine is a musical with music and lyrics by American composer Maury Yeston. ... Annie is a musical based upon the popular Harold Gray comic strip Little Orphan Annie. ... 42nd Street is a hugely successful Broadway stage musical, loosely based on the movie of the same name. ... Irene is a musical/comedy play that first opened on Broadway at the Vanderbilt Theatre November 18, 1919, and ran for 670 performances. ...


The 1980s and 1990s saw the influence of European "mega-musicals" or "pop operas," which typically featured a pop-influenced score and had large casts and sets and were identified as much by their notable effects - a falling chandelier, a helicopter landing on stage - as they were by anything else in the production. Many were based on novels or other works of literature. The most important writers of mega-musicals include the French team of Claude-Michel Schoenberg and Alain Boublil, responsible for Les Misérables and Miss Saigon (inspired by Madame Butterfly); and the British composer Andrew Lloyd Webber, who wrote Evita, based on the life of Argentina's Eva Perón, Cats, derived from the poems of T. S. Eliot, The Phantom of the Opera, and Sunset Boulevard (from the classic film of the same name). These decades also saw the influence of large corporations that produced musicals. The most important has been Disney, which adapted some of their animated movie musicals - such as Beauty and the Beast and The Lion King (which is said to have been responsible for the revitalization of 42nd Street between Broadway and Eighth Avenue, previously a strip of tourist trap souvenir shops, arcades, peep shows, and porn theaters) for the stage - and also created original stage productions like Aida with music by Elton John. Alain Boublil is a librettist, best known for his collaborations with the composer Claude-Michel Schönberg. ... Les Misérables programme from Palace Theatre purchased for £3 in July 2003. ... Miss Saigon is a musical by Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil. ... Madama Butterfly (or sometimes Madame Butterfly in English) is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini, set in Japan. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born March 22, 1948) is a highly successful British composer of musical theatre. ... The cover of the 1979 American Broadway Original Cast Recording of Evita starring Patti Lupone as Eva Peron, Mandy Patinkin as Che Guevara, and Bob Gunton as Juan Peron. ... During her 1947 Rainbow Tour of Europe, Eva Perón became the only South American first lady in history to grace the cover of Time Magazine, a distinction she holds to this day. ... CATS The Musical is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber (ALW) in 1981 based on Old Possums Book of Practical Cats by T. S. Eliot. ... T.S. Eliot (by E.O. Hoppe, 1919) Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965) was an American-born poet, dramatist, and literary critic, whose works, such as The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, The Waste Land and Four Quartets, are considered major achievements of twentieth... Original poster for The Phantom of the Opera. ... Sunset Boulevard is a musical play based on the movie of the same title. ... Disney empire The name Disney may refer to several aspects of the entertainment empire of The Walt Disney Company: The Walt Disney Company Walt Disney Pictures, the companys flagship motion picture studio Walt Disney Feature Animation, part of Walt Disney Pictures and The Walt Disney Company Walt Disney Studios... Beauty and the Beast is one of Broadways longest running productions, devised and produced by Disney Theatrical, a fully owned subsidary of The Walt Disney Company. ... The Lion King is the 32nd film in the Disney animated feature canon, and the highest-grossing traditionally animated feature film ever released in the United States. ... Aida is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Antonio Ghislanzoni, based on a story by Auguste Mariette. ... Elton John Sir Elton Hercules John, CBE (born March 25, 1947) is a rock music singer, composer, and pianist, and is one of the most successful solo artists in music history. ...

Les Misérables: The logo seen 'round the world
Les Misérables: The logo seen 'round the world

The growing scale (and cost) of musicals led to some concern that musicals were eschewing substance in favor of style. The 1990s and 2000s have seen many writers create smaller musicals (Falsettoland, Passion); the topics vary widely and the music ranges from Sondheimesque to pop, but they generally are produced off-Broadway and feature much smaller casts (and thus much lower costs). This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Les Misérables (1862) is a novel by French novelist Victor Hugo. ... Passion is a musical play, first staged on Broadway in 1994, adapted from Ettore Scolas film Passione dAmore (which was, in its turn, based on Igino Tarchettis novel Fosca). ...


There also had been the concern that the musical had lost touch with the tastes of the general public in America and that the musical was increasingly doomed to be something viewed by a smaller and smaller audience. One of the most important writers who attempted to increase the popularity of musicals among a younger audience was Jonathan Larson, whose musical Rent (based on the opera La Bohème) featured a cast of twentysomethings and whose score was heavily rock-influenced. The musical would be a smash success, but its composer died of an aortic aneurysm before he could ever see it reach Broadway. Other writers who have attempted to bring a taste of modern rock music to the stage include Jason Robert Brown. Another trend has been to create a plot to fit a collection of songs that have already been hits - thus Mamma Mia! (featuring songs by ABBA), Movin' Out (based on the tunes of Billy Joel), Good Vibrations (the Beach Boys), and All Shook Up (Elvis Presley). Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 - January 25, 1996) was a composer from New York City who created musicals including Rent and tick, tick. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... La Bohème, French for The Bohemians, is an opera in four acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on La Vie de Bohème by Henri Murger. ... Jason Robert Brown is a musical theater composer and lyricist. ... The Prince Edward Theatre on Old Compton Street Mamma Mia! on Broadway (Winter Garden Theatre, New York City, February 2003) Mamma Mia!, a musical written by British playwright Catherine Johnson, is based on the songs of ABBA. The title of the musical is taken from the groups 1975 chart... ABBA (clockwise from top left: Anni-Frid (Frida), Benny, Agnetha, Björn) on the cover of their single Summer Night City. ... Movin Out is a hit song written and recorded by Billy Joel. ... Billy Joel was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999. ... For the human experience of good vibrations or good vibes see good vibrations, for the song by Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, see Good Vibrations (Marky Mark song). ... The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the twenty-first century. ... All Shook Up is one of the many hit songs of Elvis Presley. ... Elvis Presley Elvis Aaron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock and Roll (sometimes shortened to The King) was an American singer and actor. ...


Familiarity may breed contempt - but it's also embraced by producers anxious to guarantee they recoup their very considerable investments, if not show a healthy profit. Some are willing to take chances on the new and unusual, such as Avenue Q (which utilizes puppets to tell its very adult-themed story) or Bombay Dreams (about the "Bollywood" musicals churned out by Indian cinema). But the majority prefer to hedge their bets by sticking with the familiar - revivals of family fare like Wonderful Town or Fiddler on the Roof or proven hits like La Cage aux Folles. Today's composers are finding their sources in already proven material - cult films like The Producers or Hairspray; classic literature such as Little Women and Dracula - hoping they'll have a built-in audience as a result. Avenue Q is a Broadway musical. ... Bombay Dreams is a musical with music by A. R. Rahman, lyrics by Don Black. ... Logo for the New Broadway Revival Wonderful Town is a musical with lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and music by Leonard Bernstein. ... Fiddler on the Roof Poster 1964 Fiddler on the Roof is one of the great stage and film musicals. ... The Producers is a 1968 feature length comedy film set in New York City in which two con-men attempt to cheat theatre angels (investors) out of their investment money. ... This article is about Hairspray, the musical that started performances on Broadway in 2002. ... Little Women is a novel by Louisa May Alcott published on September 30, 1868, concerning the lives and loves of four sisters (from oldest to youngest: Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy) growing up during the American Civil War. ... Bela Lugosi as Dracula; U.S. postage stamp Count Dracula is a fictional character, unarguably the most famous vampire in literature. ...


At the present time (late 2004), the musical is being pulled in a number of different directions. Gone are the days when a sole producer - a David Merrick or a Cameron Mackintosh - backs a production. Corporate sponsors dominate Broadway, and often alliances are formed to stage musicals which require an investment of $10 million or more. In 2002, the credits for Thoroughly Modern Millie listed ten producers, and among those names were entities comprised of several individuals. Typically, off-Broadway and regional theaters tend to produce smaller and therefore less expensive musicals, and in recent times more and more development of new musicals has taken place outside of New York. Wicked, for example, first opened in San Francisco, and its creative team relied on the mostly mediocre reviews to assist them in retooling the show before it reached Broadway, where it ultimately became a healthy hit. 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Merrick (November 27, 1911 - April 25, 2000) was an American theatrical producer and director, associated with both musicals and dramas, brilliant successes and embarrassing fl ops. ... Sir Cameron Mackintosh (born October 17, 1946) is a British theatrical producer. ... 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thoroughly Modern Millie is a musical comedy. ... ... The downtown San Francisco skyline, looking east from the central part of the city. ...


Famous composers/writers

Lee Adams - Lynn Ahrens - Maxwell Anderson - Harold Arlen - Howard Ashman - Burt Bacharach - Lionel Bart - Irving Berlin - Leonard Bernstein - Marc Blitzstein - Jerry Bock - Alain Boublil - Leslie Bricusse - Mel Brooks - Jason Robert Brown - Sammy Cahn - Petula Clark - George M Cohan - Cy Coleman - Betty Comden - Marc Connelly - Noel Coward - Gretchen Cryer - Micki Grant - Fred Ebb - Ben Elton - Edna Ferber - Dorothy Fields - William Finn - Stephen Flaherty - George Forrest - Noel Gay - George Gershwin - Ira Gershwin - Ricky Ian Gordon - Adolph Green - Adam Guettel - Marvin Hamlisch - Oscar Hammerstein II - Otto Harbach - E. Y. Harburg - Sheldon Harnick - Lorenz Hart - Moss Hart - Jerry Herman - Elton John - Tom Jones - John Kander - George S. Kaufman - Jerome Kern - Saxon Kling - Michael Kunze - Michael John LaChiusa - Burton Lane - Jonathan Larson - Carolyn Leigh - Mitch Leigh - Alan Jay Lerner - Andrew Lippa - Andrew Lloyd Webber - Frank Loesser - Frederic Loewe - Robert Lopez - Galt MacDermot - Jeff Marx - Johnny Mercer - Lionel Monckton - Anthony Newley - Ivor Novello - Richard O'Brien - Cole Porter - Tim Rice - Mary Rodgers - Richard Rodgers - Sigmund Romberg - Harold Rome - Willy Russell - Carole Bayer Sager - Claude-Michel Schönberg - Harvey Schmidt - Stephen Schwartz - Julian Slade - Stephen Sondheim - Charles Strouse - Leslie Stuart - Jule Styne - Harry Tierney - Kurt Weill - Frank Wildhorn - Meredith Willson - Sandy Wilson - P. G. Wodehouse - Robert Wright - Vincent Youmans Lee Adams (born August 14, 1924 in Mansfield, Ohio) is a Jewish-American lyricist best known for his collaboration with Charles Strouse in the musical theatre. ... Lynn Ahrens (born 1st October 1948) is an American musical theatre lyricist who most frequently works with Stephen Flaherty. ... (James) Maxwell Anderson (15 December 1888 - 28 February 1959) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, author, poet, reporter and lyricist, and a founding member of The Playwrights Company (which included, at various times, Maxwell Anderson, S.N. Behrman, Elmer Rice, Robert E. Sherwood, Sidney Howard, Roger L. Stevens, John F... Harold Arlen, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1960 Harold Arlen (February 15, 1905 - April 23, 1986) was an American composer of popular music. ... Howard Ashman (May 3, 1950 – March 14, 1991), born Howard Elliott Gershman in Baltimore, Maryland, was an American playwright and movie music lyricist. ... Burt Bacharach (born May 12, 1928 in Kansas City, Missouri) is a Jewish-American pianist and composer. ... Lionel Bart (1930-1999) was a British composer of songs musicals, best known for Oliver! Bart was born Lionel Begleiter in London to Galician Jews, and grew up in Stepney. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989), born Israel Isidore Baline, in Tyumen, Siberia (or Mahilyow (Mogilev), Belarus), was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... Bernstein with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, at the 1974 Charles Ives Centenary Concert in Danbury, Connecticut. ... Marc Blitzstein (March 2, 1905 - January 22, 1964) was an American composer. ... Jerry Bock (born 1928) is a Jewish-American musical theatre composer best known for his collaboration with lyricist Sheldon Harnick on shows such as Fiddler on the Roof. ... Alain Boublil is a librettist, best known for his collaborations with the composer Claude-Michel Schönberg. ... Leslie Bricusse (born January 29, 1931) is a British lyricist. ... Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is a Jewish-American actor, writer director, and theatrical producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and parodies. ... Jason Robert Brown is a musical theater composer and lyricist. ... Sammy Cahn (June 18, 1913 - January 15, 1993) was a songwriter and musician, playing the piano and violin. ... Petula Clark on the cover of her latest DVD/CD release Petula Sally Olwen Clark (born November 15, 1932), CBE, is a British singer, actress, and composer, best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... George Cohan George Michael Cohan (July 1878–November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, songwriter, actor, singer, and dancer. ... Cy Coleman (1929 - 2004) was an American composer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. ... Comden and Green was the writing duo of Betty Comden and Adolph Green. ... Marc Connelly photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Marcus Cook Connelly (December 13, 1890 - December 21, 1980) was a member of the Algonquin roundtable and composed several musicals with playwright George S. Kaufman: 1921 Dulcy 1922 Merton of the Movies 1925 Beggar on Horseback Categories: 1890 births | 1980 deaths ... Noël Coward Sir Noel Peirce Coward (spelling his forename Noël with the diaeresis was an affectation of later life, and Peirce is the correct spelling) (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) was an English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ... Gretchen Cryer is an American writer, actress, and lyricist. ... Micki Grant is an American singer (soprano) actress, writer and composer She performed in Having our Say (as Sadie Delaney), Tambourines to Glory and Jericho-Jim Crow, The Gingham Dog and Don’t Bother Me, I Can’t Cope and has received three Tony Award nominations for her writing. ... Fred Ebb (April 8, 1933 - September 11, 2004) was a musical theatre lyricist. ... Ben Elton (born May 3, 1959) is an English comedian and writer. ... Edna Ferber (August 15, 1885 - April 16, 1968), Jewish-American novelist, author, and playwrite. ... Dorothy Fields (July 15, 1905 - March 28, 1974) was an American librettist and lyricist who wrote well over 400 songs for Broadway musicals and films. ... William Finn (* 28 February 1952), Tony-winning American composer, especially of musicals. ... Stephen Flaherty (born 1960) is an American composer of musical theatre in collaboration with Lynn Ahrens, and best known for the show Once On This Island, which was nominated for eight Tony Awards. ... People named George Forrest include: George Forrest (author) (1915-) - American author and musician George Forrest (botanist) (1873-1932) - British botanist and plant collector George Forrest (businessman) - Belgian businessman established in Katanga This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Noel Gay born Reginald Armitage (July 15, 1898 - March 3, 1954) was one of the most successful British composers of popular music of the 1930s and 1940s. ... George Gershwin photograph by Edward Steichen in 1927. ... George (left) and Ira Gershwin Ira Gershwin (born Israel Gershowitz) (December 6, 1896 - August 17, 1983) American lyricist, collaborator with, and brother of George Gershwin He is interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery, Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. ... Ricky Ian Gordon (born May 15, 1956) is a New York City-based composer known for his lyrical approach to theatre and art song. ... Adolph Green (December 2, 1914 - October 23, 2002) was an American lyricist and playwright, who penned most of his songs, plays, and movies with Betty Comden. ... Adam Guettel, son of Mary Rodgers and grandson of Richard Rodgers, is a Jewish-American musical theater composer. ... Marvin Hamlisch (born June 2, 1944) is one of the most successful composers of the twentieth century. ... (For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein) Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was an American born Jewish writer and producer of musical comedies for almost forty years. ... E. Y. Yip Harburg (April 8, 1896 - March 5, 1981) was a lyricist who worked with many well-known composers. ... Sheldon Harnick (born 1924) is an American lyricist best known for his collaboration with composer Jerry Bock on hit musicals such as Fiddler on the Roof. ... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ... playwright and director of plays and musical theater. ... Jerry Herman (born Gerald Herman on July 10, 1933 in New York City) is an American composer/lyricist of the Broadway musical theater. ... Elton John Sir Elton Hercules John, CBE (born March 25, 1947) is a rock music singer, composer, and pianist, and is one of the most successful solo artists in music history. ... Tom Jones (born in 1928 in Texas) is lyricist of musical theatre, best known for the longest running musical in history, The Fantasticks, which has been running off-Broadway since 1960. ... John Kander (born March 18, 1927) is the composer of a series of musical theatre successes as part of the songwriting team of Kander and Ebb. ... George Simon Kaufman (November 16, 1889 - June 2, 1961) was a playwright, director, producer, humorist, and drama critic noted for his many collaborations with other writers and his contributions to 20th century American comedy. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American popular composer. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Michael John LaChiusa is a musical theatre composer and lyricist best known for his unusual sounding compositions for shows in the post-modern school. ... Burton Lane (February 2, 1912, New York City - January 5, 1997, New York City) was a composer and lyricist. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 - January 25, 1996) was a composer from New York City who created musicals including Rent and tick, tick. ... Carolyn Leigh (born August 21, 1926 New York, NY, died November 19, 1981 New York, NY) was a lyricist and composer for Broadway and movies. ... Mitch Leigh (born January 30, 1928 in Brooklyn, New York) is a Jewish-American writer of musical theatre and theatrical producer best known for the show Man Of La Mancha. ... Alan Jay Lerner was a Jewish-American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... Andrew Lippa Andrew Lippa is an American composer, lyricist, book writer, performer and producer, and the resident artist at the Ars Nova Theater in New York City. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born March 22, 1948) is a highly successful British composer of musical theatre. ... Frank Loesser (June 29, 1910, New York City - July 26, 1969, New York City) was a composer and lyricist. ... Frederic Loewe (June 10, 1901 - February 14, 1988) was a highly successful Austrian-American composer. ... Marx (left) and Lopez (right) Robert Lopez (born February 23, 1975) is a composer and lyricist of musicals. ... Galt MacDermot (born December 18, 1928 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian writer of musical theater, best known for the show Hair, which ran for nearly 2000 performances in both London and New York and was later made into a film in 1979. ... Marx (left) and Lopez (right) Jeff Marx (born September 10, 1970) is a composer and lyricist of musicals. ... Johnny Mercer (November 18, 1909 - June 25, 1976) was a pop music composer. ... Lionel Monckton (December 18, 1861 - September 15, 1924) was a British writer and composer of musical theatre. ... George Anthony Newley (b. ... Ivor Novello David Ivor Davies (January 15, 1893 – March 6, 1951), better known as Ivor Novello, was one of the most popular entertainers of the 20th century. ... Richard OBrien (born Richard Smith on March 25, 1942) is a stuntman, actor and writer. ... Cole Porter Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter. ... Sir Tim Rice (born November 10, 1944, in Amersham, Buckinghamshire, England, and educated at St Albans School and Lancing College) is a lyricist for musical theater, a radio presenter, television gameshow panelist and an author. ... Mary Rodgers (born January 11, 1931) is a composer of musicals, an author of childrens books, and daughter of Richard Rodgers. ... An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers Richard Rodgers (June 18, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. ... Sigmund Romberg (July 29, 1887 - November 9, 1951) was a composer best known for his operettas. ... Harold Jacob Rome (1908 - 1993) was a U.S. composer, lyricist, songwriter, and writer of musicals. ... William Martin Russell (born 23 August 1947) is a British playwright, lyricist and composer. ... Carole Bayer Sager (born March 8, 1947 in New York City, New York) is an American lyricist, songwriter and singer best-known for writing the lyrics to many popular songs performed on Broadway and in Hollywood films. ... Claude-Michel Schönberg is a French record producer, actor, singer, popular songwriter, and musical theatre composer, best known for his collaborations with the librettist Alain Boublil. ... Harvey Schmidt (born Texas, 1929) is a writer of musical theatre, best known for the longest running musical in history, The Fantasticks, which has been running off-Broadway since 1960. ... Stephen Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... Julian Penkivil Slade (born London, May 28, 1930) is an English writer of musical theatre best-known for the show Salad Days, which became the UKs longest-running show of the 1950s, and Trelawny. ... Stephen Sondheim Stephen Joshua Sondheim (born March 22, 1930) is an American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... Charles Strouse (born 7 June 1928) is a Jewish-American composer and three-time winner of the Tony Award for Best Musical. ... Leslie Stuart (1864-1928) was an English composer of early musical theatre, best known for the hit show Florodora (1899). ... Jule Styne (December 31, 1905 – September 20, 1994) was a British born United States songwriter. ... Harry Tierney (1890-1965) was an American composer of musical theatre, best known for long-running hits such as Irene, Broadways longest-running show of the era, and Rio Rita, one of the first musicals to be turned into a talking picture. ... Kurt Weill, a photo taken in Salzburg, Austria, 1934 Kurt Julian Weill (March 2, 1900 – April 3, 1950), born in Dessau, Germany and died in New York, was a German composer active from the 1920s until his death. ... Frank Wildhorn is a Jewish-American composer. ... Robert Meredith Willson {18 May 1902 - 15 June 1984) was an American composer and playwright, best known as the writer of The Music Man. ... Sandy Wilson (born May 19, 1924) is a British composer and lyricist, best known for his musical, The Boyfriend (1954). ... Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ... Robert Wright (born Daytona Beach, Florida, September 25, 1914; died Miami, Florida, October 10, 1999) was a United States writer of musical theatre best known for the show Kismet, adapted from the works of Alexander Borodin. ... Vincent Youmans (September 27, 1898 - April 5, 1946) was an American popular composer and Broadway producer. ...


Famous choreographers

George Balanchine - Michael Bennett - Gower Champion - Agnes de Mille - Ron Field - Bob Fosse - Peter Gennaro - Michael Kidd - Jerry Mitchell - Susan Stroman - Tommy Tune - Jerome Robbins - Onna White George Balanchine (January 9 (O.S.) = January 22 (N.S.), 1904–April 30, 1983) was one of the 20th centurys foremost choreographers, and one of the founders of American ballet. ... Michael Bennett (April 8, 1943 - July 2, 1987) was an American musical theater director, choreographer, and dancer. ... Gower Champion was an American theatre director, choreographer, and dancer. ... Agnes de Mille in “3 Virgins and a Devil”, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 Agnes George de Mille (September 18, 1905 – October 7, 1993) was an American dancer and choreographer. ... Ron Field (1934 - 1989) was an American choreographer, director, and dancer. ... Bob Fosse, early promotional image. ... Peter Gennaro (1919-2000) was a Tony Award-winning American dancer and choreographer. ... Michael Kidd (born Milton Greenwald 12 August 1919) is an Jewish-American film and stage choreographer. ... Jerry Mitchell is a three-time Tony nominated choreographer. ... Susan Stroman is a Broadway director, choreographer, and performer. ... Thomas James Tune (born February 28, 1939) is a famous actor, dancer, singer, and choreographer. ... Jerome Robbins (October 11, 1918–July 29, 1998) was an American choreographer whose work has included everything from classical ballet to contemporary musical theater. ... Onna White (March 24, 1922 – April 8, 2005) was a Canadian choreographer and dancer, nominated for eight Tony Awards. ...


Famous performers

Julie Andrews - Beatrice Arthur - Lucie Arnaz - Fred and Adele Astaire - Lauren Bacall - Pearl Bailey - Lucille Ball - Michael Ball - John Barrowman - Gene Barry - Steve Barton - Gary Beach - Herschel Bernardi - Theodore Bikel - Kelly Bishop - Vivian Blaine - Ray Bolger - Sarah Brightman - Matthew Broderick - Yul Brynner - Jack Buchanan - Carol Burnett - Betty Buckley - Richard Burton - Kerry Butler - Norbert Leo Butz - Liz Callaway - Len Cariou - Carolee Carmello - Nell Carter - Richard Chamberlain - Carol Channing - Kristin Chenoweth - Petula Clark - Glenn Close - George M. Cohan - Barbara Cook - Michael Crawford - John Cullum - Jim Dale - Yvonne DeCarlo - Tyne Daly - Alfred Drake - Linda Eder - Hunter Foster - Sutton Foster - Helen Gallagher - Malcolm Gets - Robert Goulet - Joel Grey - Barbara Harris - Rex Harrison - Heather Headley - George Hearn - Ruthie Henshall - Jennifer Holliday - Linda Hopkins - Dee Hoty - Ken Howard - Madeline Kahn - Lainie Kazan - Ruby Keeler - Gene Kelly - Larry Kert - KJ - Robert Klein - Kevin Kline - Jane Krakowski - Judy Kuhn - Nathan Lane - Angela Lansbury - Carol Lawrence - Gertrude Lawrence - Michelle Lee - Norm Lewis - Priscilla Lopez - Brenden J. Lovett - Patti LuPone - Robert LuPone - Mary Martin - Millicent Martin - Jessie Matthews - Marin Mazzie - Andrea McArdle - Audra McDonald - Howard McGillin - Donna McKechnie - Idina Menzel - Ethel Merman - Liza Minnelli - Brian Stokes Mitchell - Melba Moore - Robert Morse - Zero Mostel - Donna Murphy - Bebe Neuwirth - Christiane Noll - Jill O'Hara - Jerry Orbach - Elaine Paige - Sarah Jessica Parker - Adam Pascal - Bernadette Peters - Robert Preston - Faith Prince - Jonathan Pryce - John Raitt - Sheryl Lee Ralph - Anthony Rapp - Charles Nelson Reilly - Debbie Reynolds - Alice Ripley - Chita Rivera - Patricia Routledge - Daphne Rubin-Vega - Lea Salonga - Phil Silvers - Emily Skinner - Barbra Streisand - Elaine Stritch - Tommy Tune - Leslie Uggams - Gwen Verdon - Ben Vereen - Anthony Warlow - Colm Wilkinson Julie Andrews as Maria, with the Von Trapp children in The Sound of Music. ... Beatrice Arthur (born Bernice Frankel on May 13, 1923), is an Emmy-winning American actress and comedienne with a distinctive deep voice, acid wit, and height, standing 5 ft 10 in (1. ... Lucie Arnaz (born Lucie Desiree Arnaz, July 17, 1951 in Hollywood, California) is an American actress. ... Fred Astaire Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska, was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Adele Astaire (September 10, 1896 -January 25, 1981) was an American dancer and entertainer. ... Lauren Bacall (born 16 September 1924) is an American film and stage actress and a former model. ... Pearl Bailey in “St. ... Lucille Ball Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 - April 26, 1989) was an American actress, comedian and star of I Love Lucy. ... There are several people named Michael Ball: Michael Ball (singer), a singer and actor Michael Ball (footballer), an English football (soccer) player (A gay) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... John Barrowman (publicity portrait). ... Gene Barry (born June 14, 1921) is an American actor. ... Steve Barton (June 26, 1954 - July 21, 2001) was an actor, singer, dancer, choreographer, stage director and teacher. ... Gary Beach is an American actor, primarily in Broadway musical theatre. ... Theodore Bikel. ... Kelly Bishop (born February 28, 1944 in Colorado Springs, Colorado) is an American actress best known for her portrayal of Emily Gilmore in the television series Gilmore Girls. ... Bolger, circa early 1930s Ray Bolger (January 10, 1904 – January 15, 1987) was an American entertainer of stage and screen, best known for his portrayal of the Scarecrow in the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. ... Sarah Brightman in La Luna: Live in Concert (2001) Sarah Brightman (born 14 August 1960 in Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire) is an English soprano and actress. ... Matthew Broderick (born March 21, 1962 in New York, New York) is an American film and stage actor who is perhaps most widely known for his role as the protagonist in Ferris Buellers Day Off although the most successful film where he has a starring role is The Lion... Yul Brynner Yul Brynner (July 7, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was a Russian Hollywood and Broadway actor. ... Jack Buchanan (April 2, 1891 - October 20, 1957) was a British actor and singer. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933) was one of the most successful female comedians on American television, thanks largely to her variety show that ran on CBS from 1967 through 1978. ... Betty Lynn Buckley (born July 3, 1947) in Fort Worth, Texas, is an American theater, film, and television actress. ... Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984) was a Welsh actor from the late 1940s through the 1980s. ... Norbert Leo Butz is an American stage actor. ... Len Cariou (born September 30, 1939 in Saint Boniface, Manitoba) is a Canadian actor. ... Carolee Carmello is an American actress best known for her performances in Broadway musical. ... Nell Carter, as Nell Harper on Gimme a Break! Nell Carter (September 13, 1948–January 23, 2003) was an American singer and actress. ... George Richard Chamberlain (born March 31, 1934 in Beverly Hills, California to parents Chuck and Elsa Chamberlain) is an American actor who became a teen idol in the title role of the television show Dr. Kildare. ... Carol Channing photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1956 Carol Channing (born January 31, 1921 in Seattle, Washington) is a United States actress whose career was built largely on two roles, Lorelei Lee in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Dolly Gallagher Levi in Hello Dolly!. She is easily recognized by her distinctive... Kristen Chenoweth. ... Petula Clark on the cover of her latest DVD/CD release Petula Sally Olwen Clark (born November 15, 1932), CBE, is a British singer, actress, and composer, best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947 in Greenwich, Connecticut) is an American film and stage actress. ... George M. Cohan George Michael Cohan (July 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ... Barbara Cook (b. ... Michael Crawford as the Phantom of the Opera, wearing the now famous half-mask, in the 1986 musical by Andrew Lloyd Weber. ... John Cullum is an American actor and singer. ... Jim Dale MBE (born James Smith on August 15, 1935) is a British singer, songwriter, and actor. ... Yvonne De Carlo (born September 1, 1922) is an Canadian film and television actress. ... Ellen Tyne Daly (born February 21, 1946 in Madison, Wisconsin) is an American Tony and Emmy Award winning actress. ... Alfred Drake (born Alfred Capurro) (October 7, 1914 - July 25, 1992) is a Broadway theater performer best known for his appearances in the musicals Babes in Arms, Oklahoma!, Kiss Me, Kate, and Kismet. ... Linda Eder Linda Eder (born February 3, 1961) is a singer and Broadway star who has released several successful albums and has starred in shows like Jekyll & Hyde. ... Hunter Foster is a Broadway actor, singer, and playwright. ... Sutton Foster is an American actress, singer, and dancer. ... Helen Gallagher (born July 19, 1926 in New York City) is an American actress, dancer and singer. ... Malcolm Gets is an American actor born on December 28, 1964. ... Robert Goulet Robert Goulet (born November 26, 1933) was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, as the only son of French Canadian parents, Joseph Georges Andre Goulet and Jeanette Gauthier. ... Joel Grey today. ... The Toys were an R&B trio, a girl group, from New York who formed in 1961 and disbanded in 1968. ... Rex Harrison Sir Reginald Carey Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908–June 2, 1990) was a British theatre and film actor. ... Heather Headley on the cover of her 2002 debut album This Is Who I Am Heather Headley (born October 5, 1974) is a Grammy nominated R&B singer from Trinidad. ... George Hearn is an American actor, primarily in Broadway musical theatre. ... Ruthie Henshall is a British singer, dancer, and actress. ... Jennifer Holliday (born October 19, 1960 in Riverside Texas) is a R&B and dance music singer and actress who gained fame when she won the Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Musical for her portrayal of Effie White in the Broadway musical Dreamgirls. ... Linda Hopkins (born Melinda Helen Mathews, December 14, 1924) is an American blues and gospel singer. ... Ken Howard (born Kenneth Joseph Howard, Jr. ... Madeline Kahn Madeline Kahn (September 29, 1942 – December 3, 1999) was an American actress of movie, television, and theater. ... Lainie Kazan (born Lainie Levine on May 15, 1940 in New York City) is an American actress and singer. ... Ruby Keeler, born Ethel Hilda Keeler, (August 25, 1910 - February 28, 1993), was an actress, singer, and dancer. ... Gene Kelly (1912-1996) Eugene Curran Kelly, August 23, 1912 - February 2, 1996 Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was an American dancer, actor, singer, director, producer, and choreographer. ... Larry Kert (1930-1991) was an American actor, singer, and dancer. ... KJ KJ (Born August 3 in Chicago, Illinois) is a singer and actor. ... Robert Klein (born February 8, 1942) is an American stand-up comedian and occasional actor. ... Kevin Kline with his wife, Phoebe Cates. ... Jane Krakowski (née Krajkowski, October 11, 1968, Parsippany, New Jersey) is an American actress of Polish descent. ... Judy Kuhn is an American actress and singer. ... Nathan Lane (born February 3, 1956) is a contemporary, award-winning American actor of the stage and screen. ... Angela Lansbury, CBE (born October 16, 1925) is a British-born actress, the granddaughter of British Labour politician George Lansbury. ... Carol Lawrence (born September 5, 1932 in Melrose Park, Illinois) is a musical theater actress, who has also made numerous appearances in film and television. ... Gertrude Lawrence (June 4, 1898 - September 6, 1952) was an actress and musical performer popular in the 1930s-40s, appearing on stage in London and on Broadway, and in several films. ... Michelle Leslie (born 1981), who also works under the name Michelle Lee, is an Australian actress and model. ... Priscilla Lopez is an American singer, dancer, and actress. ... Patti LuPone in her Tony Award winning role as Eva Peron in the Broadway musical Evita. ... Mary Martin photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1949 Mary Martin born (December 1, 1913 – November 3, 1990) in Weatherford, Texas was an American star of (mainly stage) musicals. ... Millicent Martin (born June 8, 1934) is an English actress, singer and comedienne. ... Jessie Matthews, OBE (March 11, 1907 - August 19, 1981) was a popular British actress and singer of the 1930s, whose career continued into the post-war period. ... Andrea McArdle is an Irish-American singer and actress. ... AudraMcDonald Audra McDonald is an American singer and actress. ... Donna McKechnie is an American musical theater dancer, singer, and actress. ... Idina Menzel. ... Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 - February 15, 1984) was a star of stage and film musicals, well known for her incredible vocal range and diction, and comic acting (although she could do drama also). ... Liza Minnelli. ... Brian Stokes Mitchell (b. ... Melba Moore Melba Moore is an African-American R&B singer. ... Robert Morse, (born May 18, 1931) is an American actor. ... Zero Mostel in Ulysses in Nighttown, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 Zero Mostel (February 25, 1915 – September 8, 1977) was a Tony Award-winning stage actor. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Bebe Neuwirth Beatrice Bebe Neuwirth (born December 31, 1958) is an American theater, television and film actress. ... Jerry Orbach as Detective Lennie Briscoe in Law & Order Jerome Bernard Jerry Orbach (October 20, 1935 – December 28, 2004) was an American actor best known for his starring role as the street-smart, wisecracking NYPD Detective Lennie Briscoe in the Law & Order television series and for his musical theater roles. ... On the cover of Elaine Paige Tour Programme 2004 Elaine Paige (born Elaine Bickerstaff on March 5, 1948 in Barnet, Hertfordshire) is a world-renowned British singer and actor, primarily in musicals. ... Sarah Jessica Parker circa 2001 Sarah Jessica Parker (born March 25, 1965) is an internationally recognised American Actress with an extensive portfolio of both television and movie work. ... Adam Pascal (born October 25, 1970) is an American actor, and an original cast member in the Jonathan Larson musical Rent, playing Roger. ... Bernadette Peters Bernadette Peters is the stage name of Bernadette Lazarra (born February 28, 1948 in Ozone Park, Queens, New York), an actress and singer. ... Robert Preston (1918 - 1987) was an American actor. ... Faith Prince (born 5 August 1957) is an American actress. ... Jonathan Pryce (b. ... John Emmett Raitt (January 19, 1917, Santa Ana, California, USA - February 20, 2005, Pacific Palisades, California) was a star of the musical theater stage. ... Anthony Rapp is an American stage and film actor. ... Charles Nelson Reilly (born January 13, 1931) is an American actor, director and drama teacher best known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, and animated cartoons. ... Debbie Reynolds in 1954 Debbie Reynolds (born April 1, 1932) is an American actress and singer. ... Chita Rivera (born Dolores Conchita Figueroa del Rivero on January 23, 1933 in Washington, D.C.) is a Broadway musical actress and dancer of Puerto Rican and Scottish descent, and the first Hispanic woman to receive a Kennedy Center Honors award. ... Patricia Routledge as Hyacinth Bucket Patricia Routledge, CBE (born 17 February 1929) is a popular British actress, best known for television roles such as Hyacinth Bucket in Keeping Up Appearances. ... Daphne Rubin-Vega (also known simply as Daphne) is a dance music singer and actress born November 18, 1969 in Panama City, Panama. ... Lea Salonga (born February 22, 1971 in Manila) is an actress and singer from the Philippines and has achieved international recognition. ... Phil Silvers TV Guide cover Phil Silvers (May 11, 1911 – November 1, 1985) was an American entertainer and comedy actor. ... Barbra Streisand - Guilty Pleasures. ... Elaine Stritch, (born on February 2, 1925 in Detroit, Michigan) is a tall, lanky American actress and singer with a rough voice known for her brash, vocal characters. ... Thomas James Tune (born February 28, 1939) is a famous actor, dancer, singer, and choreographer. ... Leslie Uggams (born May 25, 1943 in New York City) is an African American actress and singer, best known for her Tony Award-winning work in Hallelujah, Baby! Uggams first started in show business in 1950, playing the niece of Ethel Waters on the television series Beulah. ... Gwen Verdon (January 13, 1925 - October 18, 2000) was an acclaimed Tony Award winning American dancer and actress. ... Ben Vereen (born October 10, 1946) is an American actor. ... Anthony Warlow (born November 18, 1961) in Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia, is an Australian star of opera and musical theater. ... Colm Wilkinson (born June 5, 1944 in Dublin) is an Irish musical theatre actor and singer, probably best known for playing the role of Jean Valjean in Les Misérables. ...


See also

Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... This is a general list of musicals, including Broadway musicals, West End musicals and film musicals, whose titles fall into the A-L alphabetic range. ... This is a List of notable musical theatre productions that have been performed on Broadway. ... A cast recording or original cast recording is a recording of a musical that is intended to document the songs as they were performed in the show and experienced by the audience. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ...

References

Mordden, Ethan (1999). Beautiful Mornin', Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-512851-6.


  Results from FactBites:
 
NEA American Masterpieces: Musical Theater (1858 words)
Through this component, musical theater work of the highest quality -- that otherwise would not be available -- will be experienced by Americans in communities across the nation.
Organizations will be selected to present musical theater work in their home locations or touring venues.
A limited number of organizations may be selected to tour musical theater works of excellence and significance to three to five college and university presenting houses.
Musical Theater at Kids 'N Dance (221 words)
Musical Theater at Kids'N Dance teaches vocal, dance and acting skills, in a creative, supportive and FUN environment, culminating in stage performances for each level of study.
Beginning Musical Theater is open to anyone between the ages of 6-10.
This is a class for children who have done very little theater and are just beginning to develop their acting skills, projecting techniques, memorization capabilities.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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