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Encyclopedia > Musical staff

In musical notation, the staff or stave is a set of five horizontal lines on which note symbols are placed to indicate pitch and time.


The staff is read left to right: one note to the right of another means that it is to be played later. The vertical position of the notehead on the staff indicates which note is to be played: notes that are higher in pitch are marked higher up on the staff. The notehead can be placed in the gap between two lines, or centred vertically on a line. Each rise to the next position, be it line or space, represents a rise of one step in the diatonic scale. Notes which fall outside the range of the staff are placed on or between leger lines, lines the width of the note they need to hold, added above or below the staff.


The staff alone does not represent any specific notes without a clef, although a clefless staff may be used to represent a set of percussion sounds. The clef fixes one particular position as being a specific note, for example the treble clef puts the G above middle C on the first line up from the bottom.


When a staff in treble clef and a staff in bass clef are joined by a brace, a grand staff is created. There used to be a line between the two clefs, but it was removed for simplicity. The middle C is between the two clefs in the grand staff. When playing the piano, the upper staff is normally played with the right hand and the lower staff with the left hand.


Once fixed by a clef, the notes represented by the positions on the staff can be modified by the key signature, or by accidentals on individual notes. Unmodified, the positions on the staff give the scale of C major.


The application of a time signature groups notes on the staff into measures.


The musical staff can be thought of as a graph of pitch with respect to time; pitches are roughly given by their vertical position on the staff, and notes on the left are played before notes to their right.


Examples

The following is a grand staff (to be played by, for example, a piano). Each staff has seven notes and one rest.


A simple grand staff


Here is an example image with some typical music notation

Typical music notation. See the image page for an explanation of the symbols.
Typical music notation. See the image page for an explanation of the symbols.

External Links

Musical notation

edit  (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Musical_notation&action=edit)
Staff : Clef | Key signature | Time signature | Note | Rest | Tempo | Dynamics | Leger lines
Note length : Longa | Breve (Double whole note) | Semibreve (Whole Note) | Minim (Half Note) | Crotchet (Quarter Note) | Quaver (Eighth Note) | Semiquaver (Sixteenth note) | Demisemiquaver (Thirty-second note) | Hemidemisemiquaver (Sixty-fourth note) | Quasihemidemisemiquaver (128th note)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Staff (music) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (636 words)
The musical staff can be thought of as a graph of pitch with respect to time; pitches are roughly given by their vertical position on the staff, and notes on the left are played before notes to their right.
Music on the staff is read from left to right: one note to the right of another means that it is to be played later; how much later depends on its note value and the tempo.
Exactly which notes are represented by which staff positions is determined by a clef placed at the beginning of the staff; the clef identifies a particular line as a specific note, and all other notes are determined relative to that line.
Staff (music) - definition of Staff (music) in Encyclopedia (444 words)
In musical notation, the staff or stave is a set of five horizontal lines on which note symbols are placed to indicate pitch and time.
Notes which fall outside the range of the staff are placed on or between leger lines, lines the width of the note they need to hold, added above or below the staff.
The staff alone does not represent any specific notes without a clef, although a clefless staff may be used to represent a set of percussion sounds.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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