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Encyclopedia > Music of the United Kingdom (1950s and 60s)

Indigenous styles of music production and performance dominated the United Kingdom until the late 1950s, when imported American rock and roll, pop-folk and rockabilly gained fans among British youth, while American roots music, especially the blues, found its own devoted fanbase. Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... American roots music is a broad category of music including country music, bluegrass, gospel, ragtime, jug bands, Appalachian folk, blues, Tejano and Cajun and Native American music. ... For the emotional state, see Depression (mood). ...

Music of the United Kingdom
History Ethnicities
Early popular music England
1950s and 60s Scotland
1970s Wales
1980s Ireland
1990s to present Jamaican and Indian
Genres: (Samples) Classical - Folk - Hip hop - Opera - Popular - Rock
Timeline: 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005
Awards Mercury
Charts UK Singles Chart, UK classical chart
Festivals Glastonbury festival
Media NME - Melody Maker
National anthem "God Save the Queen" ("Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau", "Scotland the Brave", "Flower of Scotland")
Regions and territories
Cornwall - Man - Manchester - Northumbria - Somerset

Anguilla - Bermuda - Cayman Islands - Gibraltar - Montserrat - Turks and Caicos - Virgin Islands Music from the United Kingdom has achieved great international popularity since the 1960s, when the British Invasion peaked. ... The diverse nations that now make up the United Kingdom were much more distinct from each other prior to modern times. ... England has a long and rich musical history. ... Scotland is a Celtic-Germanic country, located to the north of England on the island of Great Britain. ... In the 1970s, music from the United Kingdom further diversified. ... Wales is a part of the United Kingdom, but has had a long history as a culturally distinct Celtic country. ... In the early 1980s, the death of Sid Vicious (of the Sex Pistols) and the alleged selling-out of bands like The Clash and The Jam led to still-frequent cries that punk is dead. ... In the early 1990s, American alternative rock bands became mainstream in the US and achieved great popularity in the UK as well. ... British hip hop is an umbrella term for English hip hop, Welsh hip hop and Scottish hip hop. ... British opera is opera which was composed either in Britain or by a composer of British nationality. ... Music from the United Kingdom has achieved great international popularity since the 1960s, when the British Invasion peaked. ... Outside of its home in the United States, the UKs brand of rock is undoubtedly the most well-known and widespread. ... English Music Years 1500 - 1899 in English music Years 1900 - 1949 in English music Years 1950 - 1959 in English music Years 1960 - 1969 in English music Years 1970 - 1979 in English music Years 1980 - 1989 in English music Years 1990 - 1999 in English music Years 2000 - 2010 in English music... This is a summary of 1999 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2000 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2001 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2002 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2003 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of 2004 in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts from that year. ... This is a summary of the current year in music in the United Kingdom, including the official charts. ... The Mercury Music Prize is a music award given annually for the best British album of the previous 12 months. ... The UK Singles Chart is compiled by the Official UK Charts Company on behalf of the music industry. ... The UK classical chart is a commercial monitoring and marketing device used by the UK music industry to measure its effectiveness in promoting and selling CDs, nominally in the field of classical music. ... A music festival is a festival that presents a number of musical performances usually tied together through a theme or genre. ... The site from the stone circle on Thursday afternoon, 2004 The Glastonbury festival is a music festival that has been called a British Woodstock. ... The New Musical Express (better known as the NME) is a weekly magazine about popular music published in the UK. It is unlike many other popular music magazines due to its intended focus on guitar-based music and indie rock bands, instead of mainstream pop acts. ... Melody Maker, published in the United Kingdom, was (until its closure) the worlds oldest weekly music newspaper. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is formally recognized by a countrys government as their states official national song. ... God Save the Queen is a patriotic song written by Henry Carey. ... Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau (usually translated as The Land of My Fathers, but literally The old country of my fathers) is by tradition the national anthem of Wales. ... Scotland the Brave is, along with Flower of Scotland, the unofficial national anthem of Scotland. ... Flower of Scotland (technically the name The Flower of Scotland is correct, but is rarely used; Am Flùir na h-Alba in Gaelic) is the unofficial national anthem of Scotland, a role for which it competes against its more upbeat rival Scotland the Brave. ... Cornwall is a region in southwest England which has been historically Celtic, though Celtic-derived traditions had been moribund for some time before being revived during a late 20th century roots revival. ... The Isle of Man is a small island in between Great Britain and Ireland. ... For Mancunians, the popular musical heritage of the city has always been a source of great pride. ... Northumbria is a region of the United Kingdom, known for its distinctive smallpipe tradition. ... Somerset is a county in the southwest of England. ... The Turks and Caicos Islands are an overseas dependency of the United Kingdom. ...

The roots of British popular music for the rest of the 20th century and into the next were set during the 1950s. In the aftermath of World War 2, the economy was still performing poorly. Many consumer goods were not available, and there was little high-wage labor. American media was popular, and the British youth grew infatuated with the apparent wealth of their American counterparts. The economy of the United States was booming, and the images on TV made it appear as though American teens were able to purchase much that the British could not. At the same time, a legion of American musical innovators, including Elvis Presley and Chuck Berry, were adapting African American rock and roll for mainstream audiences, and American folk bands like The Weavers were fomenting a roots revival of old time music. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ... Definitions of consumer goods by Ben Murray New goods acquired by households for their own consumption. ... Overview The United States has the largest and the most technologically powerful economy in the world, with a per capita GDP of $40,100. ... Elvis Presley Elvis Aaron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock and Roll, or as just simply The King, was an American singer who had an effect on world culture rivaled only by The Beatles and Chuck Berry. ... Chuck Berry Charles Edward Anderson Berry (born October 18, 1926), better known as Chuck Berry, is an American guitarist, singer and composer. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Weavers were an immensely popular and influential folk music quartet from Greenwich Village, New York, United States. ... A roots revival (folk revival) is a trend which includes young performers popularizing the traditional musical styles of their ancestors. ... Old-time music, a traditional style of American music, has roots in Irish, Scottish and African folk music. ...

Contents

Late 1950s rock

American rock and roll caught on among British youth, who soon made it their own. In contrast to American listeners, however, the British soon looked past the dance stars and R&B performers into the roots of rock, towards an American folk form called the blues. Lyrically and instrumentally simple, yet passionate, the blues seemed exotic, foreign and exciting. The blues soon became so popular in the UK that virtually unknown cult performers from the US were able to tour and record across the ocean, and a legion of bands imitating their style sprung up. Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... For the emotional state, see Depression (mood). ...


By the mid-1950s, American rock had spread across the globe. Few countries, however, were able to sustain their own rock traditions. The United Kingdom proved itself an exception, and British rock soon became more popular than American. In the late 50s, though, there were British R&B performers that saw major mainstream success that fed into the British Invasion and beat boom of the later 60s. Almost as soon as Elvis Presley broke into American audiences, Wee Willie Harris was topping the British charts with his own version of rock, followed by the more long-term success of Tommy Steele. Many of these earliest songs were simple covers that showed little innovation, sung by pop stars and teen idols like Johnny Gentle, Marty Wilde, Vince Eager, Adam Faith and Billy Fury (Sound of Fury). Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Tommy Steele (born Decemter 17th, 1936) is a British entertainer. ... A teen idol is a famous person who generates attention from large numbers of teenagers. ... Marty Wilde (b. ... Adam Faith (June 23, 1940 - March 8, 2003) was a British singer and actor. ... Billy Fury (April 17, 1940 - January 28, 1983) was a British pop singer of the 1960s. ...


Lonnie Donegan, however, soon emerged as a truly influential performer, launching the skiffle fad. Skiffle was extremely simple, and required only cheap instruments. Local bands sprouted up across the UK, especially in Manchester, including The Quarrymen (who eventually became The Beatles) and other musicians who became seminal British rock performers. Lonnie Donegan (April 29, 1931-November 3, 2002) was a skiffle musician, possibly the most famous of them all. ... Skiffle music is a type of folk music with a jazz and blues influence, usually using homemade or improvised instruments such as the washboard, tea-chest bass, kazoo, cigar-box fiddle, or a comb and paper, and so forth. ... The Beatles (L-R, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, John Lennon), in 1964, performing on The Ed Sullivan Show during their first United States tour, promoting their first U.S. hit song, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...


While skiffle was developing with only limited pop success, more well-respected and original British rock bands appeared. Cliff Richard & the Shadows ("Move It") are perhaps the most well-remembered of these bands, and saw considerable fame across the UK and abroad, in countries like Thailand. Tony Sheridan, Screaming Lord Sutch & the Savages, The Tornadoes ("Telstar") Johnny Kidd & the Pirates ("Shakin' All Over") and Vince Taylor ("Brand New Cadillac") were also respected performers who exerted considerable influence on the next generation of British rockers. Sir Cliff Richard (born Harry Webb in Lucknow, India, on October 14, UKs most popular singers. ... Tony Sheridan, born Andrew Esmond Sheridan McGinnity, (May 21, 1940), is an English rock and roll singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Screaming Lord Sutch (November 10, 1940 - June 16, 1999) was a British politician, musician and maverick. ... Tornados is a British instrumental group of the 1960s who acted as the in-house back-up group for many of Joe Meeks productions. ... Vince Taylor (born 1939) wrote The Clashs hit, Brand New Cadillac. ...


1960s: British blues and rock

Rock and roll is form of music that developed among African-Americans during the 1940s and 1950s. While rock music and its country-influenced cousin, rockabilly, topped the American charts, a group of blues musicians started to become very popular in the United Kingdom in the late 1950s and early 1960s. British blues soon became a distinct genre, while rock, rockabilly and other forms of popular music mixed, resulting teen crazes like mod and merseybeat. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or Black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to West and sub-Saharan Africa. ... Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s - 1940s - 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s Years: 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 Events and trends Technology First nuclear bomb First cruise missile, the V1 flying bomb and the first ballistic missile, the... Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Country music, once known as country and western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... Rockabilly is one of the component parts of rock and roll. ... For the emotional state, see Depression (mood). ... Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... The British blues is a type of blues music that originated in the late 1950s. ... Mod or MOD may refer to any of the following: Mod (or, to use its full name, Modernism) is a lifestyle based around fashion and music that developed in London in the late 1950s. ... Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ...


By the mid-1960s, British rock dominated charts over much of the world; this was known as the British Invasion. The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, The Animals and other artists played a form of pop rock, with some grit and swagger. After the disintegration of one of the grittiest, The Yardbirds, a group called Led Zeppelin formed. Led Zeppelin, along with contemporaries like Black Sabbath and American bands like The Velvet Underground and Blue Cheer, invented heavy metal music. By the end of the 1960s, British psychedelia was reaching its peak of influence with dark bands like The Doors and glam rock artists like David Bowie and Mott the Hoople and splitting into more experimental directions, such as in the Canterbury Scene and the further evolution and popularization of progressive rock bands like King Crimson, Procol Harum, Genesis and The Moody Blues. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... The British Invasion was an influx of rock and roll performers from Great Britan]] who became popular in the United States, Australia and elsewhere in 1964 ending the years immediately afterward. ... The Beatles (L-R, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, John Lennon), in 1964, performing on The Ed Sullivan Show during their first United States tour, promoting their first U.S. hit song, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... For other uses, see Rolling Stones (disambiguation) The Rolling Stones in 1964 The Rolling Stones are a British rock and roll band who rose to prominence during the mid-1960s. ... The Kinks The Kinks are a British rock and roll band, first gaining prominence in the mid-1960s as one of the most influential bands of the British Invasion. ... Yardbirds album cover The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock musics most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Led Zeppelin (clockwise from left: Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham, John Paul Jones) Led Zeppelin was a British band noted for their innovative, influential approach to heavy blues-rock and as one of the most popular and influential bands of all time. ... From left to right, Bill Ward, Tony Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne, Geezer Butler This article is about the British heavy metal band. ... The Velvet Underground and Nico in 1966 (from left to right: John Cale, Nico, Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison, and Maureen Tucker) The Velvet Underground (abbreviated as The Velvets or V.U.) was an American rock and roll band of the late 1960s. ... Blue Cheer was a San Francisco based rock music group of the late 1960s. ... Heavy metal is a form of music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Psychedelia is a term describing a category of music, visual art, fashion, and culture that is associated originally with the high 1960s, hippies, and the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco, California. ... The Doors self-titled debut, released in 1967 The Doors were a musical band of the 1960s and early 1970s, consisting of Jim Morrison (lead vocals), Ray Manzarek (organ, keyboard), Robby Krieger (guitar), and John Densmore (drums). ... Glam rock (less commonly glitter rock), a style of rock music popularized in the 1970s, was mostly a British phenomenon and confined to larger cities in the U.S., such as New York and Los Angeles. ... David Bowie David Robert Jones (born January 8, 1947), better known as David Bowie, is a British rock and roll musician, actor, and artist who has had a profound influence on rock and roll from the 1960s to the present. ... Mott the Hoople were a popular 1970s rock and roll band that maintained a large audience without ever achieving mainstream success. ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the town of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... The cover of King Crimsons debut album In the Court of the Crimson King (1969). ... Procol Harum Procol Harum is a British progressive rock band, formed in the early 1960s. ... Genesis is a progressive rock group that was formed in 1967 when founding members Peter Gabriel, Mike Rutherford, and Tony Banks were still students at Charterhouse School. ... The Moody Blues were best known for fusing an orchestral sound with rock and roll, as seen in one of their most popular songs, Nights in White Satin. ...


Though various permutations of rock dominated the British charts in the 60s, indigenous folk traditions remained vibrant and left a lasting influence on pop music. American folk musicians like Bob Dylan saw widespread success in both countries. Dylan and other American performers had been influenced by British folk, such as Dylan's old friends, the Irish folk band Clancy Brothers, and seminal archivist Martin Carthy. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Portrait photograph of Bob Dylan taken by Daniel Kramer Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman May 24, 1941) is widely regarded as one of Americas greatest popular songwriters. ... Irish folk music band, most popular in the 1960s, who are often credited with popularizing Irish traditional music in the United States. ... Martin Carthy (born May 21, 1941) is an English folk singer and guitarist who has remained one of the most influential figures in British traditional music, inspiring later artists such as Bob Dylan and Richard Thompson since he emerged as a young musician in the early days of the folk...


Folk music and roots revival

Inspired by Bob Dylan, some British youth were looking to their own folk traditions in the 60s. Perhaps the most popular performer of British folk-based pop was Donovan, who was unable to sustain popularity in any scene as he moved through pure pop, psychedelia and folk in the 1960s. Pure folk music of the time includes well-remembered performers like Shirley Collins, Davey Graham, Bert Jansch and Martin Carthy. These performers left a lasting influence on pop stars, such as Carthy's teaching Paul Simon one of his earliest hits, "Scarborough Fair", and Graham's teaching Simon "Anji". Simon & Garfunkel's folk-pop was influenced by both British and American folk music, and become popular on both sides of the Atlantic during the 60s, while Jansch influenced heavy metal pioneer Jimmy Page as well as Canadian folk-rock singer Neil Young. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Donovan Philips Leitch (usually known simply as Donovan) (born May 10, 1946) is a British musician. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Shirley Collins (born 1935, Sussex) is a blues and folk singer. ... Bert Jansch ( November 3, 1943 - ) is a Scottish folk musician and founding member of the band Pentangle. ... Martin Carthy (born May 21, 1941) is an English folk singer and guitarist who has remained one of the most influential figures in British traditional music, inspiring later artists such as Bob Dylan and Richard Thompson since he emerged as a young musician in the early days of the folk... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941 in Newark, New Jersey) is a renowned Jewish American songwriter, receiving Kennedy Center Honors in 2002. ... Bridge Over Troubled Water was Simon and Garfunkels last album; the title track was their only number one hit in the United Kingdom. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... James Patrick Page, known as Jimmy Page, (born January 9, 1944) is widely considered one of the greatest and most influential guitarists in rock and roll. ... Neil Young with guitar (from the 1991 Weld tour) Neil Young (born November 12, 1945) is a Canadian musician and filmmaker. ...


With John Renbourn, Jansch formed a group called Pentangle that made them perhaps the first folk-rock fusion in British history. The folk scene at the time was just beginning to incorporate progressive elements inspired by psychedelia, resulting in the spacey folk fusions of groups like the Incredible String Band and Fairport Convention. Fairport Convention is often said to be the first folk-rock group, and their 1969 Liege and Lief was enormously influential, heralding a roots revival in British popular culture that inspired a wave of more folk-based musicians like Richard Thompson, Steeleye Span, Fotheringay, Sandy Denny and Ian Matthews. John Renbourn is a British guitarist and songwriter. ... Pentangle is a British folk-rock band. ... The iconic cover of the bands 2nd album designed by The Fool The Incredible String Band were (and are) a Scottish acoustic band who way back in the 1960s built a popular following among the British counter culture, and are considered psych folk music pioneers. ... Fairport Convention is often credited with being the first British folk-rock band. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... A roots revival (folk revival) is a trend which includes young performers popularizing the traditional musical styles of their ancestors. ... Richard Thompson (born April 3, 1949) is a musician, best-known as a guitar player and songwriter. ... Steeleye Span is a British folk-rock band that has been active since 1970. ... The folk rock group Fotheringay was formed in 1970 by singer Sandy Denny upon her departure from Fairport Convention. ... Alexandra Elene McLean Denny (January 6, 1947- April 21, 1978) was a British vocalist who recorded several albums under the name Sandy Denny. ... Iain Matthews (known in the 1960s first as Ian MacDonald, and from the late 1960s until 1989 as Ian Matthews) is a British musician and songwriter. ...


Early 60s

In the late 1950s, British artists had begun slavishly imitating American performers of the blues. The 60s, however, saw the evolution of a distinctly British version that drew on American pioneers like Howlin' Wolf and B.B. King. Eric Clapton was perhaps the most influential of these musicians, and he inspired a legion of fans who were so devoted to him that they famously graffitied the sentence Clapton is God in major cities. By the middle of the decade, British blues and other trends, like skiffle and merseybeat, had coalesced into British rock. The early 60s had seen only some British flirtation with true rock; artists like Cliff Richard were popular, and played a distinct variation of rock, but without the stylistic innovation that was soon to define British rock. "The House of the Rising Sun" (1964) by the Animals was one of the first number one singles to be over 3 minutes long. It reached number one in the USA as well. It was also one of the first traditional songs to be performed with electric guitar. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Howlin Wolf album cover Howlin Wolf (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976) was an African American blues singer, songwriter, guitarist and harmonica player. ... Riley B. King aka B. B. King (b. ... Eric Clapton Eric Clapton CBE (born Eric Patrick Clapp on March 30, 1945) is a British guitarist and composer, nicknamed slowhand. ... Skiffle music is a type of folk music with a jazz and blues influence, usually using homemade or improvised instruments such as the washboard, tea-chest bass, kazoo, cigar-box fiddle, or a comb and paper, and so forth. ... Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... Outside of its home in the United States, the UKs brand of rock is undoubtedly the most well-known and widespread. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Sir Cliff Richard (born Harry Rodger Webb in Lucknow, India, on October 14, 1940) is the stage name of one of the UKs most popular singers. ...


Skiffle

Skiffle was a form of music based on American Appalachian folk music, with distinctively British characteristics. Skiffle bands were led by a guitarist, who was accompanied by a percussion instrument or washboard. Some were guitar and banjo duos who looked and sounded like updated versions of 1920s and 30s jug bands. This music was wild and energetic, and often rough and unpolished. Of the many brief skiffle stars, Lonnie Donegan arose as perhaps the most influential, inspiring numerous imitators and the genre's flirtation with mainstream success. Appalachian folk music is a distinctive genre of folk music originating in the Appalachia region of the United States of America. ... A washboard (left) and a piano player The Washboard is, literally, a clothes-cleaning washboard. ... Sometimes referred to as the Roaring Twenties or the Jazz Age. ... Events and trends Technology Jet engine invented First atom was split with a particle accelerator Golden Age of radio begins in U.S. Disney adopts a three-color Technicolor process for cartoons First Kit Kat in UK The photocopier is invented by Carlson Air mail service across the Atlantic Science... A jug band is a band employing a jug player and other traditional and homemade instruments, such as rhythm guitar, washtub bass, washboard, jug, mandolin, and kazoo. ... Lonnie Donegan (April 29, 1931-November 3, 2002) was a skiffle musician, possibly the most famous of them all. ...


Mod

Mod was more a subculture than a genre of music, though it was closely associated with bands that shared sonic characteristics. Teens who dressed in fashionable, neo-Italian clothing and listened to American R&B, the mods were fans particularly of Motown's stable of artists. Though the first mod bands played covers, they soon began writing their own songs that were extremely swift in comparison to their American counterparts. Small Faces and The Who were probably the most popular of these bands. In biology, a subculture in a population of a microorganism is when one microbe colony in such a population is transferred onto blank growth medium and allowed to freely reproduce. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Motown Record Company, L.P., also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label specializing in the musical genres of R&B, pop, soul music, and hip-hop music. ... The Small Faces were a British rock and roll band of the 1960s, led by Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane with Kenny Jones and original organist Jimmy Winston. ... The Who in 1968. ...


Merseybeat

Merseybeat was a fusion of skiffle with American rock and R&B that peaked in about 1963 -- the beat boom. British performers like Gerry & the Pacemakers and Billy J. Kramer, and some of The Beatles' earlist material, became phenomenally successful at home and found audiences in the US, Canada and Australia, as well as elsewhere. Pure merseybeat was short-lived, but it left a lasting influence on bands like The Kinks and The Yardbirds. 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Gerry & the Pacemakers was a British rock and roll group during the 1960s, and one of the few groups to challenge the Beatles in popularity. ... Billy J. Kramer (born August 19, 1943) was a British Invasion merseybeat singer. ... The Beatles (L-R, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, John Lennon), in 1964, performing on The Ed Sullivan Show during their first United States tour, promoting their first U.S. hit song, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... The Kinks The Kinks are a British rock and roll band, first gaining prominence in the mid-1960s as one of the most influential bands of the British Invasion. ... Yardbirds album cover The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock musics most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. ...


R&B

In London in the early 60s, British teens were discovering American R&B pioneers through imports that were difficult to find. This formed an important part of the repertoire of bands of the beat boom like the Rolling Stones and The Animals. Alexis Korner acted as a mentor for many of the earliest British R&B performers, including the Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds and the Graham Bond Organization. Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley were the two biggest influences on British R&B. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... This article is about the rock band. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Alexis Korner (1928 - 1984) was an English blues musician. ... Yardbirds album cover The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock musics most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. ... Chuck Berry Charles Edward Anderson Berry (born October 18, 1926), better known as Chuck Berry, is an American guitarist, singer and composer. ... Bo Diddleys emphasis on rhythm largely influenced popular music, especially that of rock and roll in the 1960s. ...


With the beat boom in 1963, Liverpool became the center for British rock, but the grittier London bands like the Rolling Stones quickly established themselves as a part of the British scene and were second in popularity only to The Beatles. Alongside the Rolling Stones came bands like the Pretty Things, Manfred Mann and The Yardbirds. The Yardbirds featured the legendary British guitarist Eric Clapton at the time, though they saw little success until he was replaced by Jeff Beck. Eric Burdon's The Animals, Stevie Winwood's Spencer Davis Group and Van Morrison's Them also revolutionized the genre, adding new lyrical ideas and instruments like the organ. Other bands added strong jazz influences, including Graham Bond Organization (featuring future Cream members Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce), Zoot Money (with future The Police member Andy Summers) and Georgie Fame, while John Mayall's Bluesbreakers used R&B as a major component of their blues-based recordings. Many of these bands have been criticized as watering-down the music of African Americans for mainstream and middle-class audiences, though they often produced R&B that was indistinguishable outside of the British accent and just as often added their own distinctive takes on R&B, such as The Yardbirds' improvised guitar "rave-ups". 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Beatles (L-R, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, John Lennon), in 1964, performing on The Ed Sullivan Show during their first United States tour, promoting their first U.S. hit song, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... The Pretty Things are a 1960s and 1970s rock and roll band from London. ... Cock-A-Hoop Groovin Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after the keyboard player. ... Eric Clapton Eric Clapton CBE (born Eric Patrick Clapp on March 30, 1945) is a British guitarist and composer, nicknamed slowhand. ... Jeff Beck The electric guitarist Jeff Beck (born June 24, 1944) is a British rock musician who played in a number of influential bands in the 1960s. ... Eric Victor Burdon (born 11 May 1941, Walker-on-Tyne, Northumberland) was the lead singer of The Animals and later of War. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Stephen Laurence (Steve) Winwood (born May 12, 1948) in Birmingham England, was a part of the Birmingham Rhythm and blues scene from a young age, playing the Hammond organ and guitar, backing blues singers like Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, T-Bone Walker, Howlin Wolf, B. B. King, Sonny Boy... You Put the Hurt On Me The Spencer Davis Group was formed in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s as The Rhythm and Blues Quartet. ... Astral Weeks, Van Morrison (1968) Van Morrison (b. ... Them was a British-Irish band formed in Belfast in 1963, featuring Van Morrison on vocals and harmonica, Billy Harrison on guitar, Eric Wrixen on piano and keyboards, Alan Henderson on bass, and Ronnie Millings on drums. ... This article or section should be merged with Pipe organ The Casavant pipe organ at Notre-Dame de Montréal Basilica, Montreal The organ is a type of keyboard musical instrument, distinctive because the sound is not produced by a percussion action, as on a piano or celesta, or by... Jazz is a musical art form characterized by blue notes, syncopation, swing, call and response, polyrhythms, and improvisation. ... Cream album cover Cream was a seminal 1960s rock band which featured the guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce, and drummer Ginger Baker. ... Peter Edward Ginger Baker (born August 19, 1939, Lewisham, London), British percussionist who gained fame as a member of Cream from 1966 until 1968 with Jack Bruce and Eric Clapton, and later joined Clapton and Steve Winwood in the 1969 group Blind Faith. ... Jack Bruce (born May 14, 1943) is a musician (bass guitar, cello and occasional piano), singer and songwriter. ... The Police was a three-piece British pop band which was strongly influenced by reggae. ... Musician and composer Andy Summers (born Andrew James Summers) was born on December 31, 1942 in Poulton-le-Fylde, Lancashire, England. ... Georgie Fame is a British R&B singer whose real name is Clive Powell. ... John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton album cover John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers was a pioneering British blues band that included such luminaries as: Eric Clapton and Jack Bruce (both later in Cream), Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood (later all in Fleetwood Mac), Mick Taylor (later in... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ...


Most of the British R&B bands began writing their own material early in their career, though most of their early hits were covers. Songwriting quickly became a major part of the repertoire of The Yardbirds and the Rolling Stones, while The Animals, Pretty Things and most of the other bands had only sporadic success with original works. In the wake of The Beatles' and other bands tremendous growth in songwriting, some bands focused more on self-written material. Many of these songs crossed the line into rock and roll, such as Them's "Gloria" and the Rolling Stones' "Satisfaction". By the end of 1965, almost all the R&B bands had switched to rock or soul and used almost entirely self-penned songs. 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ...


Mid to late 60s

The earliest British rock performers quickly moved from innovative interpretations of American rock to romantic ballads and pop songs. While these performers, like Cliff Richard, Joe Brown and Billy Fury, remained popular among mainstream audiences, they fueled a backlash among many of the British youth, who wanted more energetic and original musicians that were more like their unorthodox American stars, Buddy Holly and Chuck Berry. With the success of The Beatles in 1963 (Please Please Me), major labels began signing hard rock bands that were previously considered unsignable. Originally centered in The Beatles' Liverpool, other cities produced their own stars, many of whom emerged from the poverty-stricken urban areas of major cities. This wave of British popular rock bands became popular across the world, especially in the United States at first, but soon spreading to all the corners of Asia, Latin America, Africa and continental Europe; this became known as the British Invasion. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Sir Cliff Richard (born Harry Rodger Webb in Lucknow, India, on October 14, 1940) is the stage name of one of the UKs most popular singers. ... There have been several well-known people named Joe Brown or Joseph Brown, including: Joe Brown (boxer) Joe Brown (judge) Joe Brown (singer) Joe E. Brown Joseph E. Brown Joe Brown (climber) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Billy Fury (April 17, 1940 - January 28, 1983) was a British pop singer of the 1960s. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936–February 3, 1959), better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of Rock and Roll. ... Chuck Berry Charles Edward Anderson Berry (born October 18, 1926), better known as Chuck Berry, is an American guitarist, singer and composer. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Please Please Me was the title of the Beatles first international hit single (Love Me Do was successful mainly in Liverpool, their home town) and also the title of their first album. ... The following is a partial list of record labels, both past and present. ... Liverpools skyline, as seen from the River Mersey. ... The British Invasion was an influx of rock and roll performers from Great Britan]] who became popular in the United States, Australia and elsewhere in 1964 ending the years immediately afterward. ...

Liverpool and London were perhaps the two most important scenes of the British rock bands. Liverpool's merseybeat revolution was short-lived, but inspired a passionate local scene. London's bands tended to be harder and more R&B-influenced, though pure American folk blues was popular as well, especially Muddy Waters and Bo Diddley. London had been the center of the British blues movement, which produced bluesmen like Cyril Davies and Alexis Korner. These were the pioneers that inspired the Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Who and The Yardbirds. Their rebellious attitude earned these London bands much controversy, which soon spread to The Beatles and everywhere else the British Invasion went. Location within the British Isles. ... Them was a British-Irish band formed in Belfast in 1963, featuring Van Morrison on vocals and harmonica, Billy Harrison on guitar, Eric Wrixen on piano and keyboards, Alan Henderson on bass, and Ronnie Millings on drums. ... Astral Weeks, Van Morrison (1968) Van Morrison (b. ... The city from above Centenary Square. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... The Moody Blues were originally a British rhythm and blues-based band; they later became best known for psychedelic music and early progressive rock. ... The Move is a 1960s rock music band from Birmingham, England, led by guitarist, singer and songwriter Roy Wood. ... Liverpools skyline, as seen from the River Mersey. ... Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... Billy J. Kramer (born August 19, 1943) was a British Invasion merseybeat singer. ... The Searchers were a British rock band that took their name from the 1956 John Wayne movie of the same name. ... Gerry & the Pacemakers was a British rock and roll group during the 1960s, and one of the few groups to challenge the Beatles in popularity. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Location within the British Isles. ... The Hollies The Hollies are a British rock and roll band formed in the early 1960s. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 – April 30, 1983) is better known as Muddy Waters. ... Bo Diddleys emphasis on rhythm largely influenced popular music, especially that of rock and roll in the 1960s. ... Cyril Davies was a British harmonica player and blues musician. ... Alexis Korner (1928 - 1984) was an English blues musician. ... The Kinks The Kinks are a British rock and roll band, first gaining prominence in the mid-1960s as one of the most influential bands of the British Invasion. ... The Who in 1968. ... Yardbirds album cover The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock musics most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. ...


British Invasion

Only some of the British Invasion bands were able to maintain their artistic integrity throughout the 60s. Many folded due to internal rivalries, including The Zombies and The Yardbirds, and their members went on to form side projects and solo careers. The Who, Rolling Stones and Beatles were able to maintain international popularity and critical acclaim through the 60s and beyond, while The Kinks became a long-running band that was popular primarily in the UK. The Kinks' Ray Davies is often considered a quintessential British performer, whose influence defined the next thirty years of British rock-pop. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... For the undead creature of Vodun lore, see zombie. ... Yardbirds album cover The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock musics most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Raymond Douglas Davies (born June 21, 1944 in Muswell Hill, London) is the singer, rhythm guitarist and main songwriter with The Kinks. ...


Members of the bands who folded in the face of the pressures of sudden stardom became the root of many of the late 60s' most popular bands. Traffic and Cream arose out of the ashes of other bands, featuring yet more innovative songwriting and experimental elements, as well as cohesive albums of original material. Still others, like Pink Floyd, had little in common with their forebears, but nevertheless emerged as pioneers taking British rock to new heights of experimentalism. By 1966, the major wave of the British Invasion was over. British bands remained popular abroad, but many British teens took to those that found relatively little success in the States, especially The Kinks. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Traffic on the cover of their eponymous 1968 album. ... Cream album cover Cream was a seminal 1960s rock band which featured the guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce, and drummer Ginger Baker. ... Pink Floyd c. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...


Psychedelic rock

Psychedelic rock emerged late in the 1960s, both in the United Kingdom and United States, as the music of a youth-led revolution. The counterculture inspired political and social activism, and a challenge to British cultural norms. The degree of influence that recreational drug use, like cannabis and LSD, had on psychedelic rock is hotly debated. That drugs, especially LSD, were an important part of the counterculture, is certain. The degree to which they inspired the well-meaning activism of the countercultural youth as well as the degree to which they caused its failure is less certain. Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe a cultural group whose values and norms are at odds with those of the social mainstream. ... Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational rather than medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ... Cannabis is a plant genus which includes the species Cannabis sativa and is also known as hemp, marijuana, marihuana, dope, pot, weed, grass or Mary Jane. ... D-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide, commonly called acid, LSD, or LSD-25, is a powerful semisynthetic drug that can function either as a hallucinogen or a psychedelic entheogen. ...


British psychedelia was generally less dark than its American counterpart. Spacy lyrics with poetic imagery were common, as were experimental fusions of rock with the English folk tradition, jazz and Indian music. Psychedelic bands showed a rough and forceful image, though their music and lyrics were playful and accessible, showcasing a pride in British culture that was unusual in a time when globalized media was just beginning to dominate British society. Psychedelia is usually said to have evolved in 1966, drawing out of revolutionary recordings from the previous year like The Who's "My Generation". Almost immediately, Indian influences crept into British popular music, with The Kinks' "See My Friends" and "Heart Full of Soul", and the sitar on The Beatles' Rubber Soul among the earliest. The Yardbirds' "Shapes of Things" is considered the true beginning of psychedelic rock. The Yardbirds were not the pop stars The Beatles were, but they were extremely popular and their songs' dark and sludgey sound set the stage for heavy metal music as well as American psychedelia. The Beatles also released numerous early psychedelic recordings, many of which saw great popularity but were obscured by lighter pop fare and experimental recordings. Revolver, for example, featured both early psychedelia with a dark tone as well as light and catchy orchestral songs inspired by The Beach Boys proto-psychedelic Pet Sounds. In spite of its sylistic variation, Revolver 's sheer complexity and cohesion as an album made it an influential psychedelic recording. Though less well-remembered today, Donovan emerged during the same period with Sunshine Superman, a stylistic leap for the pop star that saw him incorporating English and American folk in a Bob Dylan-inspired fashion. Jazz is a musical art form characterized by blue notes, syncopation, swing, call and response, polyrhythms, and improvisation. ... The music of India includes multiples varieties of folk, popular, pop, and classical music. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Premla Shahane playing a sitar, 1927 A sitar The sitar is a Hindustani classical music instrument. ... The album Rubber Soul, released by The Beatles in 1965, was recorded in just seven weeks to make the Christmas market, but was nonetheless a major achievement, gaining wide critical and market success. ... Heavy metal is a form of music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ... Revolver was the Beatles seventh album in three years, released on August 5, 1966. ... The Beach Boys The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the twenty-first century. ... Pet Sounds is the title of the 1966 LP recorded by American pop group the Beach Boys. ... Donovan Philips Leitch (usually known simply as Donovan) (born May 10, 1946) is a British musician. ... Sunshine Superman is the title of a 1965 song written and recorded by British popular musician Donovan; it is also became title track of his 1966 album of the same name. ... Portrait photograph of Bob Dylan taken by Daniel Kramer Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman May 24, 1941) is widely regarded as one of Americas greatest popular songwriters. ...


The darker sounds of early psychedelia inspired American bands like The Doors, while The Kinks and other British bands preferred the lighter and simpler riffs of The Beatles and Donovan. Symphonic elements were introduced, and songs became yet more and more complex, eventually resulting in bands like Moody Blues and The Nice innovating a classical-inspired revolution in psychedelia called progressive rock. The darker edge of psychedelia dominated the American scene of the late 60s, but soon lost its edge there in favor of light pop singer-songwriters like John Denver and James Taylor. The same sound, however, in British psychedelia never grew popular enough to gain a reputation for bloated and pretentious attitudes, instead inspiring the modern, yet simple passion of early heavy metal music and bands like Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath. Alongside the psychedelic revolution of progressive rock came the concept album, associated with The Pretty Things, P.F. Sorrow, The Kinks' Face to Face and The Who's A Quick One. Bands that represent perhaps the pinnacle of British psychedelia include the quirky experimentation of Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd, the typically English character sketches of Tomorrow and the jazzier Soft Machine, who helped to inspire the unique Canterbury Scene of psychedelia. Californian expatriates Misunderstood were also influential. The Beatles' 1967 "Penny Lane"/"Strawberry Fields Forever" and their Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart's Club Band-era and The Kinks Village Green Preservation Society also showcased British psychedelia at its most characteristic. The Doors self-titled debut, released in 1967 The Doors were a musical band of the 1960s and early 1970s, consisting of Jim Morrison (lead vocals), Ray Manzarek (organ, keyboard), Robby Krieger (guitar), and John Densmore (drums). ... The Moody Blues were originally a British rhythm and blues-based band; they later became best known for psychedelic music and early progressive rock. ... The Nice are a progressive rock band from the 1960s, known for their unique blend of rock, jazz and classical music. ... Classical music is music considered classical, as sophisticated and refined, in a regional tradition. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... John Denver John Denver (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. ... James Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter, born in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Heavy metal is a form of music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ... Led Zeppelin (clockwise from left: Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham, John Paul Jones) Led Zeppelin was a British band noted for their innovative, influential approach to heavy blues-rock and as one of the most popular and influential bands of all time. ... From left to right, Bill Ward, Tony Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne, Geezer Butler This article is about the British heavy metal band. ... Usually, in popular music, an album of an artist or group simply consists of a number of unconnected songs that the members of the group or the artist have written or have chosen to cover. ... The Pretty Things are a 1960s and 1970s rock and roll band from London. ... Face to Face is an album released by The Kinks in 1966 on Reprise Records in the United States and Pye Records in the United Kingdom. ... A Quick One (1966) was the second album released by rock band The Who. ... Syd Barrett in concert Roger Keith Barrett (born January 6, 1946 in Cambridge, England), known as Syd, was one of the founder members of the psychedelic/progressive rock group Pink Floyd. ... Pink Floyd c. ... Tomorrow (previously known as The In Crowd) were a 1960s psychedelic rock band. ... The Soft Machine is the title of a novel by William S. Burroughs, and a rock band that took its name from the book. ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the town of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Penny Lane is a street in the English city of Liverpool. ... Sgt. ... This article or section should be merged with The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society Village Green Preservation Society is a folk-rock and psychedelia album by British rock band The Kinks. ...


Progressive rock

Progressive rock began its evolution as early as 1965, and elements could be found in even earlier compositions. American and British artists added instruments like the mellotron and adopted longer and longer suites of complex music. Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone", from Highway 61 Revisited, was the first major pop song to became a hit in spite of a running time of more than three minutes. Though Dylan and other American artists were influential, it was a wave of British artists that formed the vanguard of progressive rock, which peaked in mainstream success from 1971 to 1976. 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... The Mellotron is an electromechanical polyphonic keyboard musical instrument originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... Portrait photograph of Bob Dylan taken by Daniel Kramer Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman May 24, 1941) is widely regarded as one of Americas greatest popular songwriters. ... Like a Rolling Stone is a song by Bob Dylan, from the album Highway 61 Revisited. ... Highway 61 Revisited was the sixth album released by folk musician Bob Dylan. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The two most influential bands of early progressive rock were The Nice and the Moody Blues. The Nice formed when P.P. Arnold needed a backing band, which featured Keith Emerson on keyboards. The Nice soon outshined Arnold herself, and they began a career of their own, using classical music and jazz to spice up compositions written by everyone from Bob Dylan to Italian soundtrack composer Ennio Morricone. Their first album was The Thoughts of Emerlist Davjack, released in 1967, just as Pink Floyd was beginning to make a name for themselves in the London club scene. Pink Floyd featured Syd Barrett's spaced-out, simple nursery rhyme-style lyrics with instrumental jams; the band was originally psychedelic, but with the departure of Barrett became less song-focused and included more jams and cohesive albums, becoming a progressive rock band. Procol Harum's "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" was extremely popular, and launched the band's career as a pioneering progressive rock band, in spite of the song having been recorded by a studio band only lated fronted by Procol Harum. "A Whiter Shade of Pale" paved the way for the Moody Blues, who had released several R&B singles (including a huge hit, "Go Now") before being chosen by their label, English Decca, to be paired with an orchestra in a recording of Dvorak's New World Symphony. The Dvorak idea was soon scrapped, and the band instead released the surprise success Days of Future Passed. The Nice are a progressive rock band from the 1960s, known for their unique blend of rock, jazz and classical music. ... The Moody Blues were originally a British rhythm and blues-based band; they later became best known for psychedelic music and early progressive rock. ... Keith Emerson (born November 2, 1944) is a British keyboard player and composer. ... Classical music is music considered classical, as sophisticated and refined, in a regional tradition. ... Jazz is a musical art form characterized by blue notes, syncopation, swing, call and response, polyrhythms, and improvisation. ... Generally speaking, the term soundtrack refers to the recorded sound in a motion picture. ... Ennio Morricone (born November 10, 1928) is an Italian composer, especially noted for his film scores. ... The Thoughts of Emerlist Davjack is a 1967 early progressive rock album by The Nice. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pink Floyd c. ... Syd Barrett in concert Roger Keith Barrett (born January 6, 1946 in Cambridge, England), known as Syd, was one of the founder members of the psychedelic/progressive rock group Pink Floyd. ... A nursery rhyme is a traditional song or poem taught to young children, originally in the nursery. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Procol Harum Procol Harum is a British progressive rock band, formed in the early 1960s. ... A Whiter Shade Of Pale was released in 1967 by the band Procol Harum, and was written by Gary Brooker and Keith Reid. ... . Antonín Dvořák Antonín Leopold Dvořák  listen (September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of classical music. ... The New World Symphony is: the popular name of Antonin Dvoraks ninth symphony see Symphony No. ... Not to be confused with the X-Men story arc Days of Future Past Days of Future Passed, The Moody Blues second album (released in 1967), was also their first of what would be a succession of concept albums. ...


In the wake of the Moody Blues psychedelia/proto-progressive stylings came some other bands, like the Dutch Ekseption, the acoustic Providence (Ever Sense the Dawn), Barclay James Harvest and Giles, Giles & Fripp, soon to regroup as legendary band King Crimson. Aside from the sporadic success of the Moody Blues and other bands, progressive rock saw little mainstream success until the 1970s. Providence was a six-piece music group out of Portland, Oregon, USA, circa 1971—1974. ... Barclay James Harvest was a British rock band specialising in Melodic Rock with classical influences. ... The cover of King Crimsons debut album In the Court of the Crimson King (1969). ... Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of transition between the turbulent 1960s and the more conservative 1980s and 1990s, many of the trends that are associated widely with the Sixties, from the Sexual Revolution...


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