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Encyclopedia > Music of the Isle of Man

The Isle of Man is a small island nation in the Irish Sea, between Great Britain and Ireland. Its culture is Celtic in origin, influenced historically by its neighbours, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. The island is not part of the United Kingdom, but Manx music has been strongly affected by English folk song as well as British popular music. The Irish Sea (Irish: Muir Éireann) separates the islands of Ireland and Great Britain. ... A Celtic cross. ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government Constitutional monarchy (as part of the UK)  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP... Motto: (Welsh for Wales for ever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) English, Welsh Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779 km² (3rd... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi   - Water (%) Population... Music from the United Kingdom has achieved great international popularity since the 1960s, when a wave of British musicians helped to popularize rock and roll. ...

Music of the United Kingdom Celtic music
England Brittany and Northern Spain
Scotland Cornwall
Wales Man
Northern Ireland Ireland
Caribbean and Indian Celtic Canada and Celtic America

A roots revival of Manx folk music began late in the 20th century, alongside a general revival of the Manx language and culture. The 1970s revival was kickstarted, after the 1974 death of the last native speaker of Manx, by a music festival called Yn Chruinnaght in Ramsey [1]. Music from the United Kingdom has achieved great international popularity since the 1960s, when a wave of British musicians helped to popularize rock and roll. ... Celtic music is a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic peoples of Western Europe. ... Template:Englishmusic England has a long musical history. ... Brittany is a Celtic country rich in its cultural heritage. ... traditional Asturian dancers The traditional music of Galicia is probably the least related to the rest of the Iberian Peninsula, although some similarities exist with the neighbouring areas of Asturias and Cantabria or Castille and northern Portugal and it is characterized by an extensive use of bagpipes. ... Scotland is a Celtic-Germanic country, located to the north of England on the island of Great Britain. ... Cornwall has been historically Celtic, though Celtic-derived traditions had been moribund for some time before being revived during a late 20th century roots revival. ... Wales is a part of the United Kingdom, but is a culturally and politically separate Celtic country. ... An Irish band playing in the Hetzel Union Building, Penn State University. ... Jamaican music in the United Kingdom // White Reggae White reggae has very low artistic credibility, but it laid a path for genuine reggae in Britain. ... Celtic music is primarily associated with the folk traditions of Ireland, Scotland and Wales, as well as the popular styles derived from folk culture. ... Irish and Scottish music have long been a major part of American music, at least as far back as the 19th century. ... A roots revival (folk revival) is a trend which includes young performers popularizing the traditional musical styles of their ancestors. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Manx (Gaelg or Gailck), also known as Manx Gaelic, is a Goidelic language spoken on the Isle of Man. ... The word culture, from the Latin colo, -ere, with its root meaning to cultivate, generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A music festival is a festival that presents a number of musical performances usually tied together through a theme or genre. ... Yn Chruinnaght is a cultural festival in the Isle of Man which celebrates Manx music, Manx language and culture, and links with other Celtic cultures. ... Ramsey (Rhumsaa) is a town in the Isle of Man. ...


Prominent musicians of the Manx musical revival include Emma Christian (Ta'n Dooid Çheet - Beneath the Twilight), whose music includes the harp and tin whistle, and harpist and producer Charles Guard (Avenging and Bright), an administrator at the Manx Heritage Foundation, MacTullagh Vannin (MacTullagh Vannin) and the duo Kiaull Manninagh (Kiaull Manninagh). Modern bands include The Mollag Band, King Chiaullee and Paitchyn Vannin [2]. Emma Christian is a prominent artist in the recent revival of traditional Manx folk music. ... The harp is a stringed instrument which has its strings positioned perpendicular to the soundboard. ... Tin whistles in a variety of makes and keys. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the performers, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... The Manx Heritage Foundation, or Undiyns Eiraght Vannin, as it is known in Manx, was established by the Isle of Man Government to promote Manx culture, heritage and language. ...

Contents


History

Prior to the 15th century, little can be determined about the character of music on the Isle of Man. There are many carved crosses from this era, but they depict a total of two musicians, one lur player and a harpist. Songs from this era may have had Scandinavian origins; some also bear similarities to Irish and Scottish music. The song "Reeaghyn dy Vannin" (the Manx sword dance), is very similar to a lullaby from the Hebrides and is also said to have been a ritual dance during the Scandinavian era. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... See Lurs for other uses Lur is a name given to two distinct types of wind musical instrument. ... The harp is a stringed instrument which has its strings positioned perpendicular to the soundboard. ... Nordic music is a generic term for the multiple genres of the Nordic nations. ... Scotland is a Celtic-Germanic country, located to the north of England on the island of Great Britain. ... Although sometimes treated as a form of morris dance, sword dancers are proud of their own tradition and often wish to be treated as a traditional dance category in its own right. ... A lullaby is a soothing song sung to children before they go to sleep. ... The Hebrides The Hebrides comprise a widespread and diverse archipelago off the west coast of Scotland, and in geological terms are composed of the oldest rocks in the British Isles. ... Ceremonial dance is a major category or classification of dance forms or dance styles, where the purpose is ceremonial or ritualistic. ...


The earliest written evidence describes fiddle music and a variety of folk dances. There was no harp tradition as was otherwise prevalent in Celtic music. English folk songs were very popular, later including broadside ballads, jigs and reels. Also extant were traditional Gaelic psalm-singing and other church music. The fiddle is a violin played as a folk instrument. ... The harp is a stringed instrument which has its strings positioned perpendicular to the soundboard. ... Celtic music is a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic peoples of Western Europe. ... Template:Englishmusic England has a long musical history. ... Printed lyrics of folk songs were extremely popular from the 16th century until the early 20th century. ... The jig (sometimes seen in its French language or Italian language forms gigue or giga) is a folk dance type as well as the accompanying dance tune type, popular in Ireland and Scotland. ... The reel is a folk dance type as well as the accompanying dance tune type. ... Goidelic is one of two major divisions of modern-day Celtic languages (the other being Brythonic). ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ...


19th century

Church music is the most documented Manx music of the 19th century. Lining out was a common technique, as it was throughout Britain and Ireland. West Gallery musicians performed for special occasions, using locally-composed or well-known compositions. Organs were a later importation that became standard in most of the island's churches. The first collection of Manx church songs was printed in 1799, and was followed by many other collections. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section should be merged with Pipe organ The Casavant pipe organ at Notre-Dame de Montréal Basilica, Montreal The organ is a type of keyboard musical instrument, distinctive because the sound is not produced by a percussion action, as on a piano or celesta, or by... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


20th century

Though West Gallery music continued into the 1950s, by the 20th century instrumental music accompanied most worship on the Isle of Man. Later in the 20th century, Manx church musical traditions slowly declined. The legacy of immigration, from England and elsewhere, has brought in many new styles of music to the island. The 1950s were the decade that traditionally speaking, spanned the years 1950 through 1959. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi   - Water (%) Population...


Future

The Manx Heritage Foundation have established a Manx Music Coordinator to encourage the use and development of the vernacular music. 2005 saw many releases by Manx bands of traditional music in Manx, English, and other Celtic languages. The Manx Heritage Foundation, or Undiyns Eiraght Vannin, as it is known in Manx, was established by the Isle of Man Government to promote Manx culture, heritage and language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, spoken by ancient and modern Celts alike. ...


References

  • Mathieson, Kenny. "Wales, Isle of Man and England". 2001. In Mathieson, Kenny (Ed.), Celtic music, pp. 88-95. Backbeat Books. ISBN 0-87930-623-8
  • article on Manx music history by Fenella Bazin
  • Article on Manx traditional music

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The World Factbook 2004 -- Man, Isle of (727 words)
Part of the Norwegian Kingdom of the Hebrides until the 13th century when it was ceded to Scotland, the isle came under the British crown in 1765.
High Court of Justice (justices are appointed by the Lord Chancellor of England on the nomination of the lieutenant governor)
red with the Three Legs of Man emblem (Trinacria), in the center; the three legs are joined at the thigh and bent at the knee; in order to have the toes pointing clockwise on both sides of the flag, a two-sided emblem is used
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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