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Encyclopedia > Music of Ukraine
Part of a series of articles on
Ukrainians

Culture
Literature · Music · Art · Cinema
Cuisine · Dance · Sport Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A performance of a traditional Ukrainian dance by Virsky dance ensemble The Culture of Ukraine is a result of influence over millenia from the West and East, with an assortment of strong culturally-identified ethnic groups. ... Ukrainian literature is literature written in the Ukrainian language. ... Ukraine is an Eastern European country, formerly part of the Soviet Union. ... Ukrainian cuisine has a rich history and offers a wide variety of dishes, partly borrowed from other cuisines like German, Turkish and Polish. ... A Ukrainian dance troupe at the BC Ukrainian Cultural Festival Ukrainian Dance most often to refers to Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance (as it is known by ethnographers and dance historians), a stylized form of a Folk Dance based in part on the movements contained in, and the actual traditional dances...

By region or country
Argentina · Armenia · Australia · Canada ·
Poland · Romania · Russia · United States ·
United Kingdom The term Ukrainian diaspora refers to the global community of ethnic Ukrainians, usually more specifically those who maintain some kind of connection, even if ephemeral, to the land of their ancestors and maintain their feeling of Ukrainian national identity within local community. ...

Closely related peoples
Boykos · Hutsuls · Lemkos ·
Rusyns · East Slavs Boyko or Boiko is the name for a distinctive group of Ruthenians (Ukrainian) montagnards of the Carpathian highlands. ... Travelling Hutsul, Galicia, 1872; lithograph Hutsuls (Ukrainian: , Romanian: HuÅ£uli, singular HuÅ£ul, Hutsul dialect: Hutsule, singular Hutsul; alternatively spelled Huculs, Huzuls, Hutzuls, Gutsuls, Guculs, Guzuls, or Gutzuls) are an ethno-cultural group of highlanders who for centuries have inhabited the Carpathian mountains, mainly in Ukraine, but also in the... Lemkos (Ukrainian: ) are one of four major ethnic groups who inhabit the Eastern Carpathian Mountains, and who speak the Lemko dialect/language. ... Rusyns, also called Ruthenians, Ruthenes, Rusins, Carpatho-Rusins, and Russniaks, are a modern group of ethnic groups that speak the Rusyn language and are descended from the minority of Ruthenians who did not adopt a Ukrainian national identity and become Ukrainians in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ... The East Slavs are a Slavic ethnic group, the speakers of East Slavic languages. ...

Religion
Eastern Orthodoxy (Ukrainian) ·
Roman Catholicism · Greek Catholicism ·
Lutheranism · Islam Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... The Roman Catholic Church in Ukraine is part of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and curia in Rome. ... The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (UGCC), also known as the Ukrainian Catholic Church, is one of the successor Churches to the acceptance of Christianity by Grand Prince Vladimir the Great (Ukrainian Volodymyr) of Kiev (Kyiv), in 988. ... The Ukrainian Lutheran Church or ULC is a Christian denomination of the Lutheran tradition based in the eastern European country of Ukraine. ... Muslims in Ukraine make up about 4% of the total population. ...

Languages and dialects
Ukrainian · Russian · Polish ·
Canadian Ukrainian · Rusyn · Surzhyk Ukrainians (Ukrainian: Українці, Ukrayintsi) are an East Slavic ethnic group primarily living in Ukraine, or more broadly- citizens of Ukraine (who may or may not be ethnic Ukrainians). ... Canadian Ukrainian (Ukrainian: украї́нська мо́ва, ukrayinska mova, ) is a variation (considered also as a dialect by some linguists) of the Ukrainian language specific to the Ukrainian Canadian community descended from the first two waves of historical Ukrainian emigration to Western Canada. ... Rusyn is an East Slavic language (along with Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian to which it shares a common linguistic ancestry) that is spoken by the Rusyns. ... Surzhyk (Ukrainian: , originally meaning ‘flour or bread made from mixed grains’, e. ...

Topics
History · Ukrainian famine ·
Rulers · Ukrainians History of Ukraine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Child victim of the Holodomor The Ukrainian famine (1932-1933), or Holodomor (Ukrainian: Голодомор), was one of the largest national catastrophes of the Ukrainian nation in modern history with direct loss of human life in the range of millions (estimates vary). ...

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Ukraine is a multi-national Eastern European state situated north of the Black Sea, formerly part of the Soviet Union. The country is named after the titular ethnic group which makes up approximately 71% of the population. Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ...


The current political borders do not accurately represent the lands on which ethnic Ukrainians live. A third of the ethnic Ukrainian population lives in the countries that surround Ukraine such as Belarus, Russia, Romania, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Moldova. There is a large diaspora, in countries like the United States, Canada, Argentina, Brazil, Australia, etc.


Ethnic Ukrainians can be classified into regional sub-groups such as the Lemkos, Rusyns, Hutsuls, Boiko's, Kozaks, Podoliany, Polissians etc. that speak distinct dialects. Apart from the Ukrainians there are also number of small non-slavic nationalities who are autochtonic to the current territory of Ukraine. These include the Karaim, Krymchaks, Crimean Tatars and Gagauz. Within Ukraine there are also significant populations of various ethnic minorities from neighbouring countries such as: Russians, Poles, Slovaks, Hungarians There are also significant populations of ethnic groups who have moved to Ukraine through various migrations: Greeks, Bulgarians, Armenians, Germans, Roma, Jews, etc. Lemkos (Ukrainian: ) are one of four major ethnic groups who inhabit the Eastern Carpathian Mountains, and who speak the Lemko dialect/language. ... Rusyns, also called Ruthenians, Ruthenes, Rusins, Carpatho-Rusins, and Russniaks, are a modern group of ethnic groups that speak the Rusyn language and are descended from the minority of Ruthenians who did not adopt a Ukrainian national identity and become Ukrainians in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ... Travelling Hutsul, Galicia, 1872; lithograph Hutsuls (Ukrainian: , Romanian: Huţuli, singular Huţul, Hutsul dialect: Hutsule, singular Hutsul; alternatively spelled Huculs, Huzuls, Hutzuls, Gutsuls, Guculs, Guzuls, or Gutzuls) are an ethno-cultural group of highlanders who for centuries have inhabited the Carpathian mountains, mainly in Ukraine, but also in the... Boyko or Boiko is the name for a distinctive group of Ukrainian montagnards of the Carpathian highlands. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Karaim, from the Hebrew word קראים, meaning readers, refers in the literal sense generally to practitioners of the Karaite sect of Judaism. ... The Krymchaks (sg. ... The Crimean Tatars (sg. ... The Gagauz are a Turkic people minority of southern Moldova (in Gagauzia) and of southwestern Ukraine (in Budjak) that numbers around 250,000. ...


Each of these ethnic groups have their own unique musical traditions and some have developed specific musical traditions in association with the land in which they live.

Contents

Traditional Ukrainian Music

Traditional ethnic Ukrainian music - In general

The most striking general characteristic of authentic Ukrainian folk music is that most folk songs are based on minor modes or keys. This is an indication that the major-minor system developed in Western European music did not become as entrenched or sophisticated in Ukraine. Ukraine found itself at the crossroads of Asia and Europe and this is reflected within the music in a perplexing mix of exotic melismatic singing with chordal harmony which does not always easily fit the rules of modern Western harmony.


Rhythmically the music rarely uses complex time-signatures, but compound meters are common, and the music can be extremely complex harmonically.

  • Ritual songs show the greatest tendency to preservation. They are frequently in recitative style, essentially monodic, based on notes in the range of a third or a fourth. An example of this style is the theme for the Shchedrivka "Shchedryk" known in the West as "Carol of the Bells".
  • A large group of Ukrainian ritual melodies fall within a perfect fourth with the main central tone as the lowest note. Many of the ritual Easter melodies fall known as Hayivky fall into this category. The tetrachordal system is also found in wedding and harvest songs. Folk dances often have melodies based on two tetrachords fused together.
  • The Pentatonic scale in anhemitonic form is common in spring songs known as Vesnianky.
  • The bulk of Ukrainian folk songs melodies are based on scales identical to mеdieval modes, but differ in melodic structure. The Mixolydian and Dorian modes are used more often than Ionian and Aolian modes. This is a feature of traditional paraliturgical Koliadky.
  • The augmented 2nd interval is found, as well as the raising of the fourth and seventh degree of the scale. It is often used for melodic expression. This melodic manner gives an effect that is described as adding severe tension or sadness in some Ukrainian songs. The phenomena is not found in Russian folk songs and is thought to have been introduced or developed in the 1600s.

Caccini, Le Nuove musiche, 1601, title page In poetry, monody is a poem in which one person laments anothers death. ... Shchedryk (from the Ukrainian word shchedryy; “bountiful”) is a Ukrainian shchedrivka, or Epiphany carol. ... Carol of the Bells (also known as the Ukrainian Bell Carol) was adapted from Shchedryk by Mykola Dmytrovych Leontovych, which was first performed in December 1916 by students at Kiev University. ... Vesnianky (Ukrainian: ; also referred to as Hahilky, Hayilky, Hayivky, Yahilky, or Rohulky) are spring dances performed in the lands of present-day Ukraine which have been performed for thousands of years. ... The tetrachord is a concept of music theory borrowed from ancient Greece. ... Vesnianky (Ukrainian: ; also referred to as Hahilky, Hayilky, Hayivky, Yahilky, or Rohulky) are spring dances performed in the lands of present-day Ukraine which have been performed for thousands of years. ... The Mixolydian mode is a musical mode or diatonic scale. ... Due to historical confusion, Dorian mode can refer to two very different musical modes or diatonic scales. ... The Ionian mode is a musical mode or diatonic scale. ...

Traditional ethnic Ukrainian vocal music and performers

Ukrainian folk song singing style can be divided into a number of broad aesthetic categories.


1. Solo singing - primarily ritual songs including holosinnya sung at wakes.


2. Solo singing of instrumental accompaniment by professional itinerant singers known as kobzari or lirnyky. The highest form of development of this style of singing can be seen in the lyric historical folk epics known as dumy sung to the accompaniment of the bandura, kobza or lira. Dumy were sung primarily in the dorian mode For the collection of poems by Taras Shevchenko, see Kobzar (book). ... Ukrainian lira Blind lirnyk Pavlo Chemersky, Kyiv 1982 Ukrainian lirnyk with kobzari Kharkiv, 1902 Ukrainian lirnyk with kobzari Okhtyrka, 1911 The lirnyk (pl:lirnyky) was an itinerant Ukrainian musician who performed religious, historical and epic songs to the accompaniment of a lira, - the Ukrainian version of the hurdy-gurdy. ... A Duma (Дума in Ukrainian) is an epic poem of 16th and 17th century Cossack Ukraine. ... A Bandura and a Torban, at the Royal College of Music Julian Kytasty, plays a prima Chernihiv bandura The Experimental Bandura Тrio: Jurij Fedynsky, Julian Kytasty,and Michael Andrec Ken Bloom, plays a Kharkiv bandura Yuri Singalevych(Lviv) playing a diatonic bandura c. ... Kobza (Ukrainian: ) is a traditional Ukrainian stringed musical instrument, from the lute family, and more specifically a relative of Central European mandora. ... Lira is the name of the monetary unit of a number of countries, as well as the former currency of Italy, San Marino and the Vatican City. ...


3. The third is an archaic type of modal "a cappella" vocal style in which a phrase sung by a soloist is answered by a choral phrase in 2- or 3- voice vertical polyphony/heterophony/harmony. The vocal inflection here is quite mediaeval in character, and some peculiarities of distinctly Ukrainian flavor are noticeable, such as parallel fifths and octaves, and several types of plagal cadences. This type of song, once dominant, after 1650 has ceded its hegemony to the newer tonal types, but can still be found in isolated villages.


4. *The other vocal styles are marked by the influences exerted by European music, by paraliturgical music of Danylo Tuptalo and his circle in the early 18th century, and later by classical music and urban culture.


Ukrainian vocal musics exhibit a wide variety of forms – monodic, heterophonic, homophonic, harmonic and polyphonic.


One of the most active proponents of these styles of Ukrainian vocal music is Nina Matviyenko. In recent time groups have been established dedicated to preservation to Ukrainian traditional polyphony, notably "Bozhychi", "Hurtopravci", "Volodar", "Korali" and "Drevo". Nina Mytrofanivna Matviyenko (uk. ...


Traditional ethnic Ukrainian instrumental folk music and performers

Common traditional instruments include: the kobza (lute), bandura, torban (bass lute), violin, basolya (3-string cello), the relya or lyra (hurdy-gurdy) and the tsymbaly; the sopilka (duct flute), floyara (open, end-blown flute), trembita (alpenhorn), fife, koza (bagpipes); and the buben (frame drum), tulumbas (kettledrum), resheto (tambourine) and drymba/varghan (Jaw harp). Traditional instrumental ensembles are often known as troïstï muzyki (from the ‘three musicians’ that typically make up the ensemble, e.g. violin, sopilka and buben). When performing dance melodies instrumental performance usually includes improvisation. Kobza (Ukrainian: ) is a traditional Ukrainian stringed musical instrument, from the lute family, and more specifically a relative of Central European mandora. ... A medieval era lute. ... A Bandura and a Torban, at the Royal College of Music Julian Kytasty, plays a prima Chernihiv bandura The Experimental Bandura Тrio: Jurij Fedynsky, Julian Kytasty,and Michael Andrec Ken Bloom, plays a Kharkiv bandura Yuri Singalevych(Lviv) playing a diatonic bandura c. ... The torban or teorban is an Eastern European musical instrument that combined features of the Baroque lute with those of the psaltery. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... It is also possible that you want to know about the Cymbal instrument. ... Fife from the American Civil War A fife is a small, high-pitched, transverse flute that is similar to the piccolo, but louder and shriller due to its narrower bore. ...


The traditional dances of Ukraine include: the Kozak, Kozachok, Tropak, Hopak, Hrechanyky, Kolomiyka and Hutsulka, Metelytsia, Shumka, Arkan, Kateryna (La Mantovana) and Chabarashka. Dances originating outside the Ukrainian ethnic region but which are also popular include: the Polka, Mazurka, Krakowiak, Csárdás, Waltz, Kamarynska and Barynya. Ukrainian instrumental and dance music has also influenced Jewish and Gypsy music. This article needs cleanup. ... The Kozachok is a popular folk dance from Ukraine. ... Trepak (Russian: ) (Ukrainian: ) refers to one of the most distinguished and celebrated dances in Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovskys ballet The Nutcracker. ... Hopak is a Ukrainian folk dance and the corresponding musical style. ... The Hutsulka is a popular folk dance from western Ukraine. ... Metelytsia (Ukrainian: ) is a popular folk dance from Ukraine. ... Željko Ražnatović or in Serbian Cyrillic writing Жељко Ражњатовић, (April 17, 1952 - January 15, 2000), widely known as Arkan or Аркан, was a Serbian paramilitary leader, nationalistic politician, assembly... Street musicians in Prague playing a polka Polka is a type of dance, and also a genre of dance music. ... The mazurka (Polish: mazurek, named after Polands Masuria district[1]) is a Polish folk dance in triple metre with a lively tempo, containing a heavy accent on the third or second beat. ... The Krakowiak is a fast, syncopated Polish dance in duple time from the region of Krakow and Little Poland. ... Czardas or Csárdás (Hungarian csárdás, from csárda, a tavern, beer house) is a traditional Hungarian folk dance. ... A waltz (German: , Italian: , French: , Spanish: , Catalan: ) is a ballroom and folk dance in   time, done primarily in closed position. ... Barynya is a fast Russian folk dance and music. ...


Early in the 20th century, Pavlo Humeniuk of Philadelphia became famous in the USA for his fiddle music. Pawlo Humeniuk (c. ...


Traditional vocal-instrumental folk music and performers

Ostap Veresai, the most famous Ukrainian kobzar of the 19th century, and his wife Kulyna
Ostap Veresai, the most famous Ukrainian kobzar of the 19th century, and his wife Kulyna

Although most instrumental dance music in Ukraine can be sung to, there exist in Ukraine a group of professional folk musicians who sing to their own accompaniment. These itinerant musicians were generically called kobzari, and accompanied their singing with the kobza, bandura or lira. Although their origins stretch back to antiquity, their repertoire and customs directly date back to the 17th century, the period of the conflicts between the Kozaks and various foreign oppressors. Many of them were blind, and this stereotype remains in folk memory. Image File history File links Ostap Veresai, the most famous Ukrainian bandurist of the 19th century, and his wife Kulyna. ... Image File history File links Ostap Veresai, the most famous Ukrainian bandurist of the 19th century, and his wife Kulyna. ... A kobzar (kобзар in Ukrainian) was a Ukrainian wandering bard of Cossack times, who played a stringed instrument called a kobza to accompany the recitation of epic dumas. ... Kobza (Ukrainian: ) is a traditional Ukrainian stringed musical instrument, from the lute family, and more specifically a relative of Central European mandora. ... A Bandura and a Torban, at the Royal College of Music Julian Kytasty, plays a prima Chernihiv bandura The Experimental Bandura Тrio: Jurij Fedynsky, Julian Kytasty,and Michael Andrec Ken Bloom, plays a Kharkiv bandura Yuri Singalevych(Lviv) playing a diatonic bandura c. ... Lira is the name of the monetary unit of a number of countries, as well as the former currency of Italy, San Marino and the Vatican City. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


The kobzari organized themselves into regional professional guild-like structures, known as a "Kobzar Guild". Kobzarskyi Tsekh (Ukrainian: , Kobzarskyi Tsekh) is a guild of kobzars. ...


During Soviet era almost all of the traditional kobzari were killed, the bulk perishing during Stalin's "purges" during 1930's.


Under the inspiration of noted traditional bandurist Heorhy Tkachenko a Kobzar Guild was re-established in 1991 in Kyiv by Mykola Budnyk in order to revive and foster the ancient kobzar traditions. The Guild unites many fine singer-musicians in Ukraine and the Ukrainian Diaspora. Many of its members are not formerly Conservatory trained. H. Tkachenko 1983 Heorhy Kyrylovych Tkachenko (May 5, 1898 v. ... Kobzarskyi Tsekh (Ukrainian: , Kobzarskyi Tsekh) is a guild of kobzars. ...


Ritual instrumental music

Although not precisely definable as music, there are signals played on the trembita (a type of alpenhorn, to signify death, birth, a marriage or another significant event) by the Hutsuls in the Carpathian mountains. 1921 photo of a shepherd with a trâmbiţă, in Giuleşti (Maramureş) A mural in Voroneţ Monastery showing an angel playing a bucium at the onset of the Last Judgment The Bucium (also called trâmbiţă or tulnic) is a type of Alpenhorn used by mountain dwellers in Romania. ... Travelling Hutsul, Galicia, 1872; lithograph Hutsuls (Ukrainian: , Romanian: Huţuli, singular Huţul, Hutsul dialect: Hutsule, singular Hutsul; alternatively spelled Huculs, Huzuls, Hutzuls, Gutsuls, Guculs, Guzuls, or Gutzuls) are an ethno-cultural group of highlanders who for centuries have inhabited the Carpathian mountains, mainly in Ukraine, but also in the... Satellite image of the Carpathians. ...


Fakeloric music

With the establishment of the Soviet regime in Ukraine a policy based on state atheism was instituted which gradually grew to an intolerance to organized religion. Religious music was not supported by the regime and in time was purged from performance. Many aspects of classical music were also branded as being bourgeois and decadent. Fakelore is inauthentic, manufactured folklore which is created in the hope that it will be accepted as genuine and/or legitimate. ...


A movement was started in the 20's for "Proletarian songs" - music of the working people. Most of these mass songs were primitive and vulgar. Many were not in Ukrainian. In time it was noticed that this music only catered for the working classes in the cities and did not take into account the large percentage of Ukrainian peasants living in village setting. As a result songs of the village were also defined as being also from the working class. As a result of this reclassification the Soviet government began to give significant support to this form of music. As a result various "fakeloric" ensembles came into existence. After WWII huge resources continued to be given to support this style of music in order to displace the onslaught of mass culture from the West.


Numerous Folk choirs were established such as the Veriovka folk choir directed by Hryhory Veriovka. A stylized dance troupe was established by Pavel Virsky based on a synthesis of ethnographic dance and ballet. Particularly popular were the numerous Bandurist Capellas. These particular pseudo-folk forms blending ethnographic materials in an art setting have also become popular in the Ukrainian Diaspora in North America.


Traditional music and Bandura

In North America pseudo-folk or "reconstructive" bandurists such as Zinoviy Shtokalko, Hryhory Kytasty, Julian Kytasty, Victor Mishalow, et al. have played an important role in defining Ukrainian ethnicity in the New World, while fusing traditional musical material with new possibilities offered by contemporary instruments. Zinoviy Shtokalko (25/5/1920-28/6/1968) Amongst the more renown performers of bandura art, one of the prominent is that of bandurist virtuoso Zinoviy Shtokalko. ... Hryhory Trokhymovych Kytasty (Ukrainian: Григорій Трохимович Китастий) (January 17, 1907 - April 6, 1984) was a Ukrainian émigré composer and conductor. ... Julian Kytasty is an Ukrainian-American composer, singer, kobzar, bandurist and flute player. ... Victor Mishalow is a Canadian composer, conductor, bandurist, kobzar, recording artist and ethomusicologist. ...


Traditional Music of non-Ukrainain ethnic minorities in Ukraine

Of the traditional musics of non-Ukrainian ethnic minorities living in Ukraine possibly the richest and most developed is that of Jewish Klezmer music which can trace most of its origins to the Jewish Pale of Settlement and to South-western Ukraine. It is estimated that one third of the total Jewsih population of Europe lived on Ukrainian ethnic territory at the turn of the 19th century Klezmer (from Yiddish כּלי־זמיר, etymologically from Hebrew kli zemer כלי זמר, musical instrument) is a musical tradition which parallels Hasidic and Ashkenazic Judaism. ... The Pale of Settlement (Russian: ЧерTа оседлости — cherta osedlosti) was a western border region of Imperial Russia in which permanent residence of Jews was allowed, extending from the pale or demarcation line, to live near the border with central Europe. ...


Russian music has also had a strong base for development in Ukraine. Many of the early performers on Russian folk instruments came from Ukraine and these performers often included Ukrainian melodies in their repertoire. The 4 string Russian domra continues to be used and taught in Ukraine despite the fact that it has been replaced by the 3 string domra in Russia proper. Russia is a large and extremely culturally diverse country, with dozens of ethnic groups, each with their own forms of folk music. ... Domra Domra (домра) is a long-necked Russian string instrument with three or four steel strings and a round resonator. ... Domra Domra (домра) is a long-necked Russian string instrument with three or four steel strings and a round resonator. ...


Classical Music

Ukrainian Art (Classical) Music can be divided up into ethnic sub-categories:

  • 1) Ukrainian composers and performers (by Ukrainian ethnicity) living in Ukraine.
  • 2) Ukrainian composers and performers (by territory, ie not ethnically Ukrainian) who were born or were active in Ukraine.
  • 3) Composers and performers living outside of Ukraine in the Ukrainian diaspora.

The music of the various groups differs considerably, as did the audiences for whom they catered. In the first category are closely tied with the Ukrainian national school of music spearheaded by Mykola Lysenko. It includeds such compsers as Kyrylo Stetsenko. {{Mykola Leontovych]], {Levko Revutsky]]. Most of their music contains Ukrainian folk figures and are composed to Ukrainian texts. For other uses, see Diaspora (disambiguation). ... Mykola Vitaliyovych Lysenko (1842-03-10 – 1912-10-24 N.S., 1842-03-22 – 1912-11-06 O.S.) was a Ukrainian composer, pianist, conductor and folksong collector. ... Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922) was a prolific Ukrainian composer and championed Kyivin. ...


The second category is of particular importance and international visibility, because of the large percentage of ethnic minorities in Ukraine. This category includes such composers as Franz Xavier Mozart, Isaak Dunayevsky, Rheinhold Gliere, Yuli Meitus, performers Vladimir Horowitz, David Oistrakh, Sviatoslav Richter. The music of these composers rarely contains any Ukrainian folk motives and more often is written to the texts of Russian or Polish poets. Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart The two sons of Wolfgang Amadeus and Constanze Mozart: Carl Thomas (r) and Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart (l) (painting of Hans Hansen, Vienna, 1800) Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart (July 26, 1791 – July 29, 1844) was a composer and pianist, a son of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and... Isaak Dunayevsky Isaak Osipovich Dunayevsky also Dunaevsky or Dunaevski (Russian: ; 30 January [O.S. 18 January] 1900 Lokhvitsa, Poltava - 25 July 1955, Moscow) was a Soviet composer and conductor, who specialized in light music for operetta and film comedies, frequently working with the film director Grigory Aleksandrov. ... Yuli Sergeievitch Meitus (1903-1997) was a distinguished Ukrainian composer, famous for his many operas. ... Vladimir Samoylovich Horowitz (Russian: ; Ukrainian: ) (1 October 1903 – 5 November 1989) was a Russian-American classical pianist. ... David Fyodorovich Oistrakh (Russian: , David Fiodorovič Ojstrah; September 30 [O.S. September 17] 1908 – October 24, 1974) was a Jewish Soviet violinist who made many recordings and was the dedicatee of numerous violin works. ... Sviatoslav Teofilovich Richter (Russian: , Svjatoslav Teofilovič Rikhter) (March 20 [O.S. March 7] 1915 – August 1, 1997) was a Soviet pianist, widely recognized as one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. ...

  • In the third category we have a number of prominent individuals who are often not part of the mainstream Ukrainian culture but who have made a significant impact on music in Ukraine, while living outside its borders. These include historic inividuals such as: Bortnyansky, Berezovsky, Vedel, Tuptalo and Titov. In North America we have Myklola Zfomenko, Yuri Oliynyk. Zenoby Lawryshyn.

Dmytro Stepanovych Bortniansky (Ukrainian: , Dmitro Stepanovych Bortnians’kyi; Russian: , Dmitrij Stepanovič Bortnjanskij; also referred to as Dmitry or Dmitri Bortnyansky; 1751-1825) was a Ukrainian composer in Imperial Russia. ... This article is about Boris Berezovsky the Russian businessman, and not Boris Berezovsky the pianist. ... Titov or Titova is a Russian last name which may refer to people: Alexey Nikolayevich Titov, a composer Egor Titov, a soccer player German Titov, an ice hockey player Gherman Titov, a cosmonaut Konstantin Titov, a politician, leader of the Social Democratic Party of Russia Lyudmila Titova, a Russian speed...

Baroque and Classical music

During the Baroque period, music was an important disipline for those that had received a higher education in Ukraine. It had a place of considerable importance in the curriculum of the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. Much of the nobility was well versed in music with many Ukrainian hetmans such as (Mazepa, Paliy, Holovatyj, Sirko) being accomplished players of the the kobza, bandura or torban. National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, NaUKMA (Ukrainian: Національний університет «Києво-Могилянська ак&#1072... Kobza (Ukrainian: ) is a traditional Ukrainian stringed musical instrument, from the lute family, and more specifically a relative of Central European mandora. ... A Bandura and a Torban, at the Royal College of Music Julian Kytasty, plays a prima Chernihiv bandura The Experimental Bandura Тrio: Jurij Fedynsky, Julian Kytasty,and Michael Andrec Ken Bloom, plays a Kharkiv bandura Yuri Singalevych(Lviv) playing a diatonic bandura c. ... The torban or teorban is an Eastern European musical instrument that combined features of the Baroque lute with those of the psaltery. ...


In the course of the 18th century in the Russian Empire court musicians were typically trained at the music academy in Hlukhiv, and largely came from Ukraine. Notable performers of the era include Timofiy Bilohradsky who later studied lute under Sylvius Leopold Weiss in Dresden, his daughter Yelizaveta who was a famous operatic soprano, and Olexiy Rozum, a court bandurist and the morganatic husband of Empress Elizabeth. Hlukhiv, (Ukrainian: Глухів, Glukhov in Russian), is a historic city in Sumy region of Ukraine, just south from the Russian border. ... Timofy Bilohradsky (Ukrainian: ) also (Belogradsky, Pelogradsky) (approximately 1710 — c. ... A medieval era lute. ... Sylvius Leopold Weiss. ... Count A. G. Razumovsky Count Alexei Grigorievich Razumovsky (Russian: , Ukrainian: ) (1709–1771), was a Ukrainian Cossack who rose to become lover and, probably, a secret spouse of the Russian Empress Elizaveta Petrovna. ... A morganatic marriage is a type of marriage which can be contracted in certain countries, usually between persons of unequal social rank (unebenbürtig in German), which prevents the passage of the husbands titles and privileges to the wife and any children born of the marriage. ... Charles van Loo. ...

  • The first professional music academy was set up in Hlukhiv, Ukraine in 1738 and students were taught to sing, play violin and bandura from score. As a result many of the earliest composers and performers within the Russian empire were ethnically Ukrainian, having been born or educated in Hlukhiv, or had been closely associated with this music school.

See: Bortnyansky, Maxim Berezovsky, Artemy Vedel'. Dmytro Stepanovych Bortniansky (Ukrainian: , Dmitro Stepanovych Bortnians’kyi; Russian: , Dmitrij Stepanovič Bortnjanskij; also referred to as Dmitry or Dmitri Bortnyansky; 1751-1825) was a Ukrainian composer in Imperial Russia. ... Maksym Sozontovych Berezovsky (Ukrainian: Максим Созонтович Березовский, circa 1745 to 1777) was a Ukrainian-Russian composer, opera singer and violinist. ... Artem (Artemy) Vedel (1767-1808) was one of the most prominent Ukrainian composers of the 18th century. ...


Romantic and Nationalist schools

Mykola Lysenko, Mykola Leontovych, Kyrylo Stetsenko, Stepovyj Mykola Vitaliyovych Lysenko (1842-03-10 – 1912-10-24 N.S., 1842-03-22 – 1912-11-06 O.S.) was a Ukrainian composer, pianist, conductor and folksong collector. ... Mykola Leontovych (December 1, 1877–January 22 or January 23, 1921) was a Ukrainian musician. ... Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922) was a prolific Ukrainian composer and championed Kyivin. ...


Soviet Romantic school

Rheinhold Gliere, Boris Liatoshinsky, Lev Revutsky, Anatoly Kos-Anatol'sky, Andry Stoharenko, Mykola Dremliuha . Levko Mykolayevich Revutsky was born on February 20, 1889 and died March 30, 1977. ...


Soviet modernist school

Myroslav Skoryk, Yevhen Stankovich, Ivan Karabits, Myroslav Skoryk (Ukrainian: , born July 12, 1938 in Lviv) is a famous Ukrainian composer with very diverse and impressive compositions. ...


Avantgarde music

Ukraine and its diaspora have also produced a great number of fine avant-garde composers with widely varying degrees of affinity with the folk idioms (Virko Baley, Valentin Silvestrov, Leonid Hrabovsky). There are also musicians that are difficult to categorize, one such notable is Virko Baley (1938-) is a renowned Ukrainian-American composer, conductor, and pianist. ... Photo of Valentin Silvestrov Valentin Silvestrov (born September 30, 1937 in Kiev) is a contemporary composer of classical music. ... Leonid Grabovsky (Hrabovsky) (1935-) is the most famous and influential contemporary Ukrainian composer to emerge in Kiev during the 1950s. ...

Mariana Sadovska is a singer, harmonium-player, actress, composer and recording artist. ...

Early Music revival

There are also musicians (Kostyantyn Chechenya, Wolodymyr Smishkewych, Vadym Borysenko and Roman Turovsky and who have been preserving Ukrainian music of the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Eras. Early music is commonly defined as European classical music from the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Baroque. ... Roman Turovsky-Savchuk Roman Turovsky-Savchuk is a painter and lutenist-composer. ...


Pop music

See separate section on Pop music in Ukraine. == Popular music in Ukraine == Western influenced pop music in its various forms has been growing in popularity in Ukraine since the 1960s. ...


Ukrainian musicians and composers

  • Mykola Lysenko. 1842-1912. Composer. He is considered the father of Ukrainian classical music.
  • Semen Hulak Artemovsky. 1813-1873. Composer of opera "Zaporozhetz za dunayem" (Kozaks beyond the Danube).
  • Mykola Leontovich. 1877-1921. Composer. Best known for his arrangement of Shchedryk, which became known in North America as "Carol of the Bells."
  • Dmytro Bortnyansky [1], [2]. 1751-1825. Ukrainian liturgical composer. Born Hlukiv, Ukraine.
  • Reinhold Gliere. 1875-1956. Composer. Born in Kyiv.
  • Myroslav Skoryk. Ukrainian classical composer.
  • Volodymyr Ivasiuk. 1949-1979. Ukrainian popular song composer. His best known song is Chervona Ruta.
  • Valentin Silvestrov

Dmytro Stepanovych Bortniansky (Ukrainian: , Dmitro Stepanovych Bortnians’kyi; Russian: , Dmitrij Stepanovič Bortnjanskij; also referred to as Dmitry or Dmitri Bortnyansky; 1751-1825) was a Ukrainian composer in Imperial Russia. ... Photo of Valentin Silvestrov Valentin Silvestrov (born September 30, 1937 in Kiev) is a contemporary composer of classical music. ...

Works by non Ukrainian composers using Ukrainian folk material

  • Karol Szymanowski. 1882-1937. Composer. Born in Ukraine.
  • Stepan Rak. 1945- . Prolific Czech composer and guitarist. "... identifies the village Chust in Ukraine as the place where the newborn infant, who was later christened as Stepan Rak, was found by Soviet soldiers in a bomb-wrecked house."
  • Béla Bartók - Rhapsody no 2. for violin
  • Beethoven, Ludwig van - Razumovsky Quartets, Opus 59 No. 1-3, Air de la Petite Russe,
  • Boccherini Luigi -
  • Brahms, Johannes -
  • Dargomyzhsky A. - Kozachok
  • Dvorak, Antin - Dumky trios
  • Glazunov A. - Hopak
  • Gliere, Reinhold -
  • Glinka, Mikhail -
  • Mikhail Goldstein
  • Haydn, Josef Franz - String quartet no. 20. opus 9 no. 2
  • Ignaz von Held
  • Hummel, N. - Trio op. 78 in A major
  • Kabalevsky, Dmitri - Violin concerto
  • Hans Kockelmans
  • Leoffler, C. M. - Memories of My Childhood (Life in a Russian village) Symphonic poem, Nights in Ukraine,
  • Liszt Franz- Mazeppa Symphonic poem No. 6, Ballade d'Ukraine
  • Miaskovsky, N. -
  • Moniuszko, S. _
  • Mozart Franz Xavier -
  • Mussorgsky, Modest - Opera: Sorochynsky Yarmarok
  • Piston Walter - Ukrainian Suite for orchestra
  • Porter Quincy - Ukrainian suite for strings
  • Prokofiev, Sergei -
  • Rakhmaninov, Sergei - Piano Concerto no 3.
  • Rimsky-Korsakoff N. -
  • Serov, A. -
  • Szymanowski, K. -
  • Andrey Sychra
  • Taneev S. -
  • Tchaikovsky Peter Tchaikowsky Peter. 1840-1893. Born in Russia to a Ukrainian father and a French mother. His Symphony #2 is nicknamed "Ukrainian Symphony" because of its use of Ukrainian folk themes. He wrote an opera "Mazepa" based on Pushkin's poem. His family owned estates in Ukraine and he collected Ukrainian folk music. Piano concerto Bb, Op. 23
  • Weber C. M. von - Variation for Piano op. 40

Béla Bartók in 1927 Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Luigi Boccherini Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini (February 19, 1743 – May 28, 1805) was a classical era composer and cellist from Italy, whose music retained a courtly and galante style while he matured somewhat apart from the major European musical centers. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of the Romantic period. ... The Kozachok is a popular folk dance from Ukraine. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Hopak is a Ukrainian folk dance and the corresponding musical style. ... Mikhail Goldstein (pen name Mikhailo Mykhailovsky) (Odesa - Hamburg) Soviet composer and violinist of Ukrainian-Jewish origin. ... Hans Kockelmans is a Dutch composer, teacher, and performer of classical and electronic music. ... Mazeppa is the name of several places in the United States: Mazeppa in Minnesota Mazeppa Township in Minnesota Mazeppa Township in South Dakota Ivan Mazepa, known also as Mazeppa was a Cossack Hetman. ...

Ukrainian performers and composers in North America

  • Virko Baley. Composer. Conductor of Las Vegas Symphony.
  • Dmitri Tiomkin. 1899-1979. Born Poltava, Ukraine. American film composer (academy award for score of movie High Noon, also best song from that movie "Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darling"). A U.S.A. postage stamp was issued in his honor.
  • Gary Kulesha. Ukrainian-Canadian composer.
  • Victor Mishalow
  • Julian Kytasty
  • Roman Turovsky
  • [http://www.fata-morgana-band.com/ Oleksij Kerekesha & FATA MORGANA BAND

A Ukrainian Canadian is a person of Ukrainian descent or origin who was born in or immigrated to Canada. ... Victor Mishalow is a Canadian composer, conductor, bandurist, kobzar, recording artist and ethomusicologist. ... Julian Kytasty is an Ukrainian-American composer, singer, kobzar, bandurist and flute player. ... Roman Turovsky-Savchuk Roman Turovsky-Savchuk is a painter and lutenist-composer. ...

External links

Public Domain scores of Ukrainian music on-line:

References

  • Alexis Kochan and Julian Kytasty. "The Bandura Played On". 2000. In Broughton, Simon and Ellingham, Mark with McConnachie, James and Duane, Orla (Ed.), World Music, Vol. 1: Africa, Europe and the Middle East, pp 308-312. Rough Guides Ltd, Penguin Books. ISBN 1-85828-636-0
  • Victor Mizynec, Folk Instruments of Ukraine. 1987. Bayda Books, Doncaster, Australia. ISBN 0-908480-19-9
  • Roman Turovsky, "TORBAN: The Lute in Ukraine": http://polyhymnion.org/torban

BIBLIOGRAPHY

§1: Folk music §1a: Important Folk song collections

  • Dey, O.I. and S.Y. Hrytsa, eds.: Spivanky-khroniky (Kiev, 1972)
  • Goshovsky, V.L. : Ukrainskiye pesni Zakarpat'ya [Ukrainian songs of Transcarpathia] (Moscow, 1968)
  • Hnatyuk, V.M. , Y.Rozdol's'ky and F. Kolessa: Hayivky (Lemberg, 1909) [with Ger. summary]
  • Khredorovnich, A. , A.Konoshchenko and B. Arsen: Ukraïns'ki pis'ni z notamï [Ukrainian songs with music] (Odessa, 1900–04)
  • Kolberg, O. : Pokucie: obraz etnograficzny [Ethnographic sketch of Pokucie] (Kraków, 1882–8/R)
  • Kolberg, O. : Chełmskie: obraz etnograficzny [Ethnographic sketch of Chełmskie] (Kraków, 1890–91/R)
  • Kolberg, O. : Przemyskie: zarys etnograficzny (Kraków, 1891/R)
  • Kolberg, O. : Wołyń obrzędy, melodye, pieş'ni [Rituals, melodies, songs], ed. J. Tretyak (Kraków, 1907/R)
  • Kolessa, F.M. : Melodiï ukraïns'kikh narodnykh dum [Tunes of Ukrainian historical epics] (Lemberg, 1910–13, 2/1969)
  • Kostyuk, Yu. : Ukrayins'ki narodni pisni Pryashivs'koho krayu (Bratislava, 1958)
  • Kvitka, K. : Ukraïns'ki narodni melodiï [Ukrainian folksongs] (Kiev, 1922)
  • Kvitka, K. : Narodni melodiï z holosu Lesi Ukraïnky [Folksongs from the voice of Lesya Ukrayinka] (Kiev, 1917–18, enlarged 2/1973 by S.Y. Hrytza and O.J. Dey, 3/1977)
  • Lipinski, K. : Muzyka do piesni polskich i russkikh ludu galitsyskiego [Music to the songs of the Polish and Russian people of Galicia] (Lemberg, 1833)
  • Lysenko, M.V. : Ukraïns'ki narodni pisni [Ukrainian folksongs] (Kiev, 1868–1906); rev. in Zibrannya tvoriv, xv–xviii (1953–8)
  • Pravdyuk, O.A. and M.M. Shubravs'ka: Vesillya (Kiev, 1970)
  • Revuts'ky D. : Zoloti klyuchi (Kiev, 1926–9, 2/1964)
  • Rubets, A. : 216 narodnïkh ukrainskikh napevov [216 Ukrainian folk melodies] (Moscow, 1872, 2/1882)
  • Shubravs'ka, M.M. and H.J. Ivanyc'ky: Vesilni pisni: u dvokh knyhakh (Kiev, 1982)
  • Tansyura, H. : Pisni Yavdokhy Zuyikhy, ed. V.A. Yusvenko and M.T. Yatzenko (Kiev, 1965)
  • Tsimbora, Yu. : Ukrayins'ki narodni pisni Skhiddnoyi Slovachchyny (Prešov, 1963)

Ukraine, §1b: Ethnomusicological studies

  • Kirdan, B.P. ed.: Ukrainskiye narodnïye dumï (Moscow, 1962, enlarged 2/1972 by V.M. Gatsak)
  • Goshovsky, V.L. : U istokov narodnoy muzïki slavyan [The sources of Slavonic folk music] (Moscow, 1971)
  • Harasymchuk, R. : Tantse hutsulskiye (L'viv, 1939)
  • Hordiychuk, M.M. ed.: Ukraïns'ke narodne bahatoholossya: zbirkny pisen' (Kiev, 1963)
  • Hrinchenko, M.O. : Vybrane, ed. M.M. Hordiychuk (Kiev, 1959)
  • Hrytsa, S. ed.: Muzychniy fol'klor z Polissya v sapysach F. Kolessy ta K. Moshyns'koho (Kiev,1995)
  • Hrytsa, S.Y. : Melos ukrayins'koï narodnoï ėpiky (Kiev, 1979, enlarged 2/1990 as Ukrainskaya pesennaya epika)
  • Ivanyc'kyj, A.I. : Ukrayins'ka narodna muzychna tvorchist' (Kiev, 1990)
  • Kolessa, F.M. : Rytmika ukrayins'kykh narodnykh pisen' [The rhythm of Ukrainian folksongs] (Lemberg, 1906–7)
  • Kolessa, F.M. : ‘Über den melodischen und rhythmischen Aufbau der ukrainischen (kleinrussischen) rezitierenden Gesänge, der sogenannten “Kosakenlieder”’, IMSCR: III Vienna 1909, 276
  • Kolessa, F.M. : ‘Das ukrainische Volkslied, sein melodischer und rhythmischer Aufbau’, Österreichische Monatsschrift für den Orient, xlii (1916), 218
  • Kolessa, F.M. : Pro genezu ukrayins'kykh narodnykh dum [On the origin of the Ukrainian folk epics] (Lwów, 1921)
  • Kolessa, F.M. : Narodni pisni z Halyts'koï Lemkivshchyny [Folksongs from west Galicia, Lemky country] (Lwów, 1929)
  • Kolessa, F.M. : ‘Narodni pisni z Pidkarpats'koï Rusi’ [Folksongs from Subcarpathian Ruthenia], Naukoviy zbirnyk tovarystva ‘Prosvita’ v Uzhgorodi, xiii–xiv (1938), 49–149
  • Kolessa, F.M. : Fol'klorystychni pratsi [Works on folklore], ed. V.A. Yuzvenko (Kiev, 1970)
  • Kolessa, F.M. : Muzykoznavchi pratsi [Musicological works], ed. S.Y. Hrytsa (Kiev, 1970)
  • Kvitka, K.L. : Izbrannïye trudï [Selected works], ed. V.L. Goshkovsky (Moscow, 1971–3)
  • Mierczyński,S. ed.: Muzyka Huculszczyzny [Music of the Hucuły region] (Kraków, 1965)
  • Vasylenko, Z.I. ed.: Zakarpatski narodni pisni (Kiev, 1962)
  • Yashchenko, L.I. : Ukraïns'ke narodne bahatoholossya (Kiev, 1962)

§1c: Organology

  • K. Vertkov, G.Blagodatov and E. Yazovitskaya, eds.: Atlas muzïkal'nïkh instrumentov narodov SSSR [Atlas of the musical instruments of the peoples of the USSR] (Moscow, 1963, 2/1975 with 4 discs)
  • Humenyuk, A.I. : Ukraïns'ki narodni muzychni instrumenty [Ukrainian folk musical instruments] (Kiev,1967)

§2: Art music - general references

  • Yu. V. Keldïsh, ed.: Muzïkal'naya ėntsiklopediya (Moscow, 1973–82)
  • V. Kudryts'ky, ed.: Mysteztvo Ukrainy: Ėntsyklopedia (Kiev, 1995–)
  • V. Kudryts'kyi, ed.: Mysteztvo Ukrainy: Biohrafichniy dovidnyk (Kiev, 1997)

§2a: Art music - general

  • Arkhimovych, L. and others: Narysy z istorïï ukraïns'koï muzyky [Outline of the history of Ukrainian music] (Kiev, 1964)
  • Arkhimovych, L. ed.: Istoriya Ukraïns'koï Radyans'koï muzyky [The history of Soviet Ukrainian music] (Kiev,1990)
  • Barvyns'ky, V. : ‘Ohliad istorïï ukraïns'koï muzyky’ [A survey of the history of Ukrainian music], Instoriya ukraïns'koï kultury, ed. I. Kryp'yakevych (Lwów, 1937)
  • Dovzhenko, V. : Narysy z istorïi ukrains'koï radyanskoï muzyky [Study of the history of Soviet Ukrainian music] (Kiev, 1957–67)
  • Hordiychuk, M. and others, eds.: Istoriya ukraïns'koï muzyky (Kiev 1989–)
  • Hordiychuk, M. : Ukraïns'ka radyans'ka symfonichna muzyka [The symphonic music of the Soviet Ukraine] (Kiev, 1969)
  • Hrinchenko, M.: Istoriya ukrainskoï muzyky (Kiev, 1922; Eng. trans., 1961)
  • Kozyts'ky, P. : Spiv i muzyka v Kivsky akademïïza 300 rokivïï isnuvannya (1917) [Singing and music at the Kiev Academy during its 300 years of existence] (Kiev, 1971)
  • Rudnytsky, A. : Ukraïns'ka muzyka: istorychno-krytychny ohlyad [Ukrainian music: a historical and critical outline] (Munich, 1963)
  • Samokhvalov, V. : Chertïy muzïkal'nogo mïshleniya B. Lyatoshinskogo (Kiev, 1970, 2/1977, as Chertï simfonizma B. Lyatoshinskogo)
  • Shreier-Tkatchenko, O. : Istoriya ukrayns'koy dozhovtnevoy muzïkï [The history of Ukrainian music before the October Revolution] (Kiev, 1969)
  • Shreier-Tkatchenko, O. ed.: Istoryia ukraïns'koï muzyky (Kiev, 1980)

§2: Art music - specific

  • O. Zin'kevïch: Dinamika obnovleniya: ukrainskaya simfoniya na sovremennoy ėtapye v svete dialektiki traditsii i novatorstva (1970–1980-kh godov) [The dynamics of revival: Ukrainian contemporary symphonic music as part of the dialectics of tradition and innovation, in the period 1970–80] (Kiev, 1986)
  • Y. Stanishevsky: Operny teatr Radyans'koï Ukrainy [Opera theatre in Soviet Ukraine] (Kiev,1988)
  • Y. Rozdol's'ky and S. Lyudkevich: Halyts'ko-rus'ki narodni mel'odiyi (Lemberg, 1906–8)
  • P.P. Sokal'sky: Russkaya narodnaya muzïka, Velikorusskaya i Malorusskaya, v yey stroyeni melodicheskom i ritmicheskom [Russian folk music, Great Russian and Little Russian in its melodic and rhythmic construction] (Khar'kiv, 1888; Ukrainian trans., 2/1959)

§3: Religious music

  • Herasymova-Persyds'ka N. : Partesniy kontsert v istorii muzïkal'noy kul'turï [The Partesny concerto in the history of musical culture] (Moscow, 1983)
  • Herasymova-Persyds'ka, N. : Khorovyi kontsert na Ukraini v XVII–XVIII st. [The choral concerto in Ukraine during the 17th and 18th centuries] (Kiev, 1978)
  • Kudryk, B. : Ohlyad istorïi ukrains'koï tserkovnoï muzyky [Outline of the history of Ukrainian church music] (Lwów, 1937)

§4: Books and articles

  • Ukrains'ke Muzykoznavstvo [Ukrainian musicology] (Kiev, 1963–98)
  • D. Saunders: The Ukrainian Impact on Russian Culture, 1750–1850 (Downsview, ON, 1985)
  • M. Stepanenko, ed.: Ukraïns'kiy Muzuchniy Archkiv, i: Tsentrmuzinform (Kiev, 1995)
  • Musicae Aes Et Scientia. Naukovyi Visnyk, Vypusk 6 [Scholarly Herald, Volume 6], *Natzional'na Akademiya Ukrainy [National Music Academy of Ukraine], Kyiv, 1999

§5: Sources in English

Music of Eastern Europe

Belarus - Moldova - Russia - Ukraine Categories: Eastern European music | Music stubs ...


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