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Encyclopedia > Music of Spain
Music of Spain
Andalusia Aragon
Balearic Islands Basque Country
Canary Islands Castile, Madrid and Leon
Catalonia Extremadura
Galicia, Cantabria and Asturias Murcia
Navarre and La Rioja Valencia
Genres: Classical - Flamenco
Jazz - Folk - Hip hop - Opera - Pop - Rock
Timeline and Samples
Awards Amigo Awards
Charts AFYVE
Festivals Benidorm, Eurovision, Sonar
Media Fans, La Revista 40, Mundo Joven

Contents

Andalusia is a region in Spain that is best-known for flamenco, a form of music and dance that is mostly performed by Gypsy people and popular throughout the world. ... Aragon is a region in northeastern Spain. ... The Balearic Islands have become a center for musical innovation in the 20th century. ... The Basque language is unrelated to any other language family and its origins are unknown. ... The Canary Islands used to be inhabited by the Guanches which are related to Berbers; they mixed with Spaniards, who live on the islands now. ... Central Spain includes the cultural melting pot of Madrid and Castille. ... Catalonia (in Spain and France) has one of the oldest documented musical traditions in Europe, and has had a rich musical culture continuously for at least two thousand years. ... Extremadura is a region in Spain near Portugal. ... traditional Asturian dancers The traditional music of Galicia and Asturias has some similarities with the neighbouring areas of Cantabria, León, Castile and northern Portugal. ... Murcia is a region in Spain whose music is most famously the religious Auroras songs, which are derived from La Mancha and Andalusia. ... Navarre and La Rioja are relatively small regions bordered by Aragon and the Basque Country. ... Valencia is one of the musical centers in Spain, and is known for its own variety of jota distinct from the Aragonese version, as well as bandes found in almost every village in the region. ... Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance characterized by its powerful yet graceful execution, as well as its intricate hand and footwork. ... // Jazz in Spain began with an interest in Dixieland or New Orleans jazz. ... For many people, Spanish music is virtually synonymous with flamenco, an Andalucian-Gitano form of music. ... Spanish hip hop music began in the late 1980s. ... This article is about rock music from Spain, for rock music sung in Spanish see Rock en español Spain has produced a great variety of rock and roll, but the most distinctive style may be flamenco-rock. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... The Benidorm International Song Festival or Festival Internacional de la Canción de Benidorm (in Spanish) is an annual song contest which takes place each summer, since 1959, in the city of Benidorm, Spain. ... Spain debuted in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1961, finishing 9th. ...

Origins

Early history

In Spain, several very different cultural streams came together in the first centuries of the Christian era: the Roman culture, which was dominant for several hundred years, and which brought with it the music and ideas of Ancient Greece; early Christians, who had their own version of the Roman Rite; the Visigoths, an East Germanic tribe who overran the Iberian peninsula in the fifth century; Jews of the diaspora; and eventually the Arabs, or the Moors as the group was sometimes known. Determining exactly which spices flavored the stew, and in what proportion, is difficult after almost two thousand years, but the result was a number of musical styles and traditions, some of them considerably different from what developed in the rest of Europe. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... A votive crown belonging to Reccesuinth (653–672) The Visigoths (Latin: ) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe, the Ostrogoths being the other. ... The tribes referred to as East Germanic constitute a wave of migrants who moved from Scandinavia into the area between the Oder and Vistula rivers between 600 - 300 BC. In historical times these tribes were differentiated as Goths, Burgundians and Vandals among others. ... The Iberian Peninsula, or Iberia, is located in the extreme southwest of Europe, and includes modern day Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Languages Historical Jewish languages Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino, others Liturgical languages: Hebrew and Aramaic Predominant spoken languages: The vernacular language of the home nation in the Diaspora, significantly including English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Arabs and other Semitic groups For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. ... For other uses, see Diaspora (disambiguation). ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predominantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Alawite Islam, Druzism, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism Footnotes a Mainly in Antakya. ... For other uses, see moor. ...


Isidore of Seville wrote about music in the sixth century. His influences were predominantly Greek, and yet he was an original thinker, and recorded some of the first information about the early music of the Christian church. He perhaps is most famous in music history for declaring that it was not possible to notate sounds—an assertion which reveals his ignorance of the notational system of ancient Greece, so that knowledge had to have been lost by the time he was writing. Saint Isidore of Seville (Spanish: or , Latin: ) (c. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...


Under the Moors, who were usually tolerant of other religions during the seven hundred years of their influence, both Christianity and Judaism, with their associated music and ritual, flourished. Music notation developed in Spain as early as the eighth century (the so-called Visigothic neumes) to notate the chant and other sacred music of the Christian church, but this obscure notation has not yet been deciphered by scholars, and exists only in small fragments. The music of the Christian church in Spain is known as Mozarabic Chant, and developed in isolation, not subject to the enforced codification of Gregorian chant under the guidance of Rome around the time of Charlemagne. At the time of the reconquista, this music was almost entirely extirpated: once Rome had control over the Christians of the Iberian peninsula, the regular Roman rite was imposed, and locally developed sacred music was banned, burned, or otherwise eliminated. The style of Spanish popular songs of the time is presumed to be closely related to the style of Moorish music. Music of the King Alfonso X Cantigas de Santa Maria is considered likely to show influence from Islamic sources. Other important medieval sources include the Codex Calixtinus collection from Santiago de Compostela and the Codex Las Huelgas. The so-called Llibre Vermell de Montserrat (red book) is an important devotional collection from the fourteenth century. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Music notation is a system of writing for music. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christian... Mozarabic chant (also known as Hispanic chant, Old Hispanic chant, Old Spanish chant, or Visigothic chant) is the liturgical plainchant repertory of the Mozarabic rite of the Roman Catholic Church, related to but distinct from Gregorian chant. ... Gregorian chant is the central tradition of Western plainchant, a form of monophonic, unaccompanied sacred song of the Roman Catholic Church. ... For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... Alfonso X, El Sabio, or the Learned, (November 23, 1221 - April 4, 1284) was a king of Castile and León (1252 - 1284). ... Categories: Historical stubs | Music stubs | Illuminated manuscripts ... Detail from the Codex Calixtinus Folio 4r, showing Saint James the Great The Codex Calixtinus is a 12th century illuminated manuscript formerly attributed to Pope Callixtus II, though now believed to have been arranged by the French scholar Aymeric Picaud. ... Location Location of Santiago de Compostela Coordinates : , , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Santiago de Compostela (Galician) Spanish name Santiago de Compostela Postal code 15700 Website santiagodecompostela. ... A page from the manucript: note red staff and capital The Codex Las Huelgas (E-BUlh) is a music manuscript or codex from 1300 which originated in and has remained in the Cistercian convent of Santa María La Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos, in northwestern Spain, then Castile. ... The song Mariam matrem virginem, a leaf from the Llibre Vermell de Montserrat. ...


Renaissance and Baroque

In the early Renaissance, Mateo Flecha el viejo and the Castillian dramatist Juan del Encina rank among the main composers in the post-Ars Nova period. Some renaissance songbooks are the Cancionero de Palacio, the Cancionero de Medinaceli, the Cancionero de Uppsala (it is kept in Carolina Rediviva library), the Cancionero de la Colombina, and the later Cancionero de la Sablonara. The organist Antonio de Cabezón stands out for his keyboard compostions and mastery. Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance, approximately 1400 to 1600. ... Juan del Encina (1469-c. ... Ars nova was a stylistic period in music of the Late Middle Ages, centered in France, which encompassed the period from the publication of the Roman de Fauvel (1310 and 1314) until the death of Machaut (1377). ... The Cancionero de Uppsala(sic) is the title commonly given to a book that survives in a unique copy at the University of Uppsala: . A facsimile was published by Alamire (Peer, Belgium 1984). ... Carolina Rediviva is the library of Uppsala University in Sweden. ... Antonio de Cabezón (1510–March 26, 1566) was a Spanish composer and organist of the Renaissance. ...


Early 16th century polyphonic vocal style developed in Spain was closely related to the style of the Franco-Flemish composers. Melting of styles occurred during the period when the Holy Roman Empire and Burgundy were part of the dominions under Charles I(king of Spain from 1516 to 1556), since composers from the North both visited Spain, and native Spaniards travelled within the empire, which extended to the Netherlands, Germany and Italy. Music for vihuela by Luis de Milán, Alonso Mudarra and Luis de Narváez stands as one of the main achievements of the period. The Aragonese Gaspar Sanz was the author of the first learning method for guitar. The great Spanish composers of the Renaissance included Francisco Guerrero and Cristóbal de Morales, both of whom spent a significant portion of their careers in Rome. The great Spanish composer of the late Renaissance, who reached a level of polyphonic perfection and expressive intensity equal or even superior to Palestrina and Lassus, was Tomás Luis de Victoria, who also spent much of his life in Rome. Most Spanish composers returned home late in their careers to spread their musical knowledge in their native land or at the service of the Court of Philip II at the late 1500's. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... In music, the Dutch School refers, somewhat imprecisely, to the style of polyphonic vocal music composition in Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... The name Charles I is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles I of England, Scotland, and Ireland Charles I of France (also known as Charles the Bald) Charles I of Spain (also known as Charles V of the German Empire) Charles I of Romania Charles I... // Events March - With the death of Ferdinand II of Aragon, his grandson Charles of Ghent becomes King of Spain as Carlos I. July - Selim I of the Ottoman Empire declares war on the Mameluks and invades Syria. ... Events January 16 - Abdication of Emperor Charles V. His son, Philip II becomes King of Spain, while his brother Ferdinand becomes Holy Roman Emperor January 23 - The Shaanxi earthquake, the deadliest earthquake in history, occurs with its epicenter in Shaanxi province, China. ... Orpheus playing a vihuela. ... Luis de Milán (c. ... Alonso Mudarra (c. ... Luis de Narváez (c. ... Gaspar Sanz (April 4, 1640 - 1710) was a Spanish composer and priest born in Calanda in the region of Aragon. ... Francisco Guerrero (October 4 (?), 1528 – November 8, 1599) was a Spanish composer of the Renaissance. ... Cristóbal de Morales (c. ... Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (between 3 February 1525 and 2 February 1526[1] - 2 February 1594) was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. ... Orlande de Lassus, a. ... Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548 – August 20, 1611) was a gifted Spanish composer of the late Renaissance. ... Philip II may refer to: Philip II of Macedon (382–336 BC); Philip II of France (1165–1223); Philip II of Navarre and V of France (1293–1322); Philip II of Taranto (1329–1374); Philip II, Duke of Burgundy (1342–1404); Philip II of Spain and I of Portugal (1527...


18th to 20th centuries

Front cover of book: Escuela Música según la práctica moderna published in 1723-1724
Front cover of book: Escuela Música según la práctica moderna published in 1723-1724

By the end of the 17th century the "classical" musical culture of Spain was in decline, and was to remain that way until the 19th century. Classicism in Spain, when it arrived, was inspired on Italian models, as in the works of Antonio Soler. Some outstanding Italian composers as Domenico Scarlatti or Luigi Boccherini were appointed at the Madrid court. The short-lived Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga is credited as the main beginner of Romantic sinfonism in Spain. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Antonio Francisco Javier José Soler Ramos (baptised December 3, 1729 - December 20, 1783) was a Spanish composer. ... Giuseppe Domenico Scarlatti (October 26, 1685 – July 23, 1757) was an Italian composer who spent much of his life in Spain and Portugal. ... Luigi Boccherini Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini (February 19, 1743 – May 28, 1805) was a classical era composer and cellist from Italy, whose music retained a courtly and galante style while he matured somewhat apart from the major European musical centers. ... Juan Crisóstomo Jacobo Antonio de Arriaga y Balzola (January 27, 1806 – January 17, 1826) was a Spanish composer, nicknamed the Spanish Mozart, because he became known as a child prodigy. ...


Fernando Sor, Dionisio Aguado, Francisco Tárrega and Miguel Llobet are known as composers of guitar music. Fine literature for violin was created by Pablo Sarasate and Jesús de Monasterio. Fernando Sor Fernando Sor (baptized Joseph Fernando Macari Sors or José Fernando Macarurio Sors February 14, 1778 – July 10, 1839) was a Spanish guitarist and composer, born in Barcelona. ... Portrait of Dionysio Aguado Dionisio Aguado (April 8, 1784 — December 29, 1849) was a Spanish classical guitarist and composer. ... Francisco Tárrega (Francisco de Asís Tárrega y Eixea) (November 21, 1852 — December 15, 1909) was a Spanish composer, and one of the most influential guitarists the world has ever known. ... Miguel Llobet Solés (18 October 1878 - 22 February 1938) was a classical guitarist and composer, born in Barcelona. ... Pablo Martín Melitón de Sarasate y Navascuéz (March 10, 1844 - September 20, 1908) was a Spanish violinist and composer. ...


Zarzuela, a native form of light opera, is a secular musical form which developed in the early 17th century. Some beloved zarzuela composers are Ruperto Chapí, Federico Chueca and Tomás Bretón. For other uses, see Zarzuela (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Ruperto Chapí (b. ... Federico Chueca (Madrid, 5 May 1846 - 20 July 1908) was a Spanish composer of zarzuelas and author of La gran vía along with Joaquín Valverde in 1886. ... Tomás Bretón (December 29, 1850 – December 2, 1923), was a Spanish musician and composer. ...


Musical creativity mainly moved into areas of folk and popular music until the nationalist revival of the late Romantic era. Spanish composers of this period include Felipe Pedrell, Isaac Albéniz, Enrique Granados, Joaquín Turina, Manuel de Falla, Jesús Guridi, Ernesto Halffter, Federico Mompou, Salvador Bacarisse, and Joaquín Rodrigo. Felipe Pedrell (February 19, 1841 - August 19, 1922), was a Spanish composer. ... Isaac Albéniz Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz (IPA: ) (May 29, 1860 – May 18, 1909) was a Spanish pianist and composer best known for his piano works based on Spanish folk music. ... Enrique Granados Enrique Costanzo Granados y Campiña (July 27, 1867 – March 24, 1916) was a Spanish pianist and composer of classical music; he is commonly considered to be a representative of musical Nationalism, and as such his music is in a uniquely Spanish style. ... Joaquín Turina (December 9, 1882 – January 14, 1949) was a Spanish composer of classical music. ... Manuel de Falla y Matheu (November 23, 1876 – November 14, 1946) was a Spanish composer of classical music. ... Ernesto Halffter (16th Jan, 1905 - 5th July, 1989) was a Spanish composer and conductor. ... Federico Mompou (April 16, 1893–June 30, 1987) was a Catalan composer. ... Salvador Bacarisse, (Madrid, September 12, 1898 - Paris, August 5, 1963), studied music at the Real Conservatorio de Música in Madrid, student of Manuel Fernández Alberdi (piano) and Conrado del Campo (composition). ... Joaquín Rodrigo Vidre (22 November 1901 – 6 July 1999) was a Spanish composer of classical music and a virtuoso pianist. ...


Pop Music

Main article: Spanish Popular Music

Spanish pop radio flourished at the end of Francisco Franco's regime. By the late 1950s, a generation of performers were coming of age. At the same time American and British music, especially rock and roll, was having an impact on Spanish audiences. The Benidorm International Song Festival was founded in [1959] in [Benidorm], a seaside town attempting to boost local tourism. Inspired by the Italian San Remo Music Festival, it was followed by a wave of similar music festivals in places like Barcelona, Majorca and the Canary Islands. Many of the major Spanish pop stars of the era rose to fame through these music festivals. An injured Real Madrid player-turned-singer, for example, became the world-famous Julio Iglesias. During the 1960s and early 70s, tourism boomed, bringing yet more musical styles from the rest of the continent and abroad. This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde (December 4, 1892 - November 20, 1975), commonly known as Francisco Franco (pronounced ) or Francisco Franco y Bahamonde was leader of Spain from October 1936, as regent of Kingdom of Spain from 1947 until his death in 1975. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Benidorm International Song Festival or Festival Internacional de la Canción de Benidorm (in Spanish) is an annual song contest which takes place each summer, since 1959, in the city of Benidorm, Spain. ... The Festival della canzone italiana (in English: Italian song festival) is a popular Italian song contest running since 1951 and held annually in the city of Sanremo. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... Majorca (Spanish and Catalan: ) is the largest island of Spain. ... This article is about the islands in the Atlantic Ocean. ... Real Madrid Club de Fútbol is a Spanish sports club most widely known for its professional football team based in Madrid. ... This page is about the singer Julio Iglesias. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Ye-Yé

Main article: Yé-yé

From the English pop-refrain words "yeah-yeah", ye-yé was a French-coined term which Spanish language appropriated to refer to uptempo pop music. It mainly consisted of a fusion of American rock from the early 60s (such as twist) and British beat music. Concha Velasco, a singer and movie star, launched the scene with her 1965 hit "La Chica Ye-Yé", though there had been hits earlier by female singers like Karina (1963). The earliest stars were an imitation of French pop, at the time itself an imitation of American and British pop and rock. Flamenco rhythms, however, sometimes made the sound distinctively Spanish. From this first generation of Spanish pop singers, Rosalia's 1965 hit "Flamenco" sounded most distinctively Spanish. Yé-yé is a style of pop music, popular in France in the 1960s. ... The word Twist has the following meanings: The Twist, 1960s dance Wing twist, change of the cross-section shape of a wing along the span. ... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... Concepción Velasco Varona, known as Concha Velasco or Conchita Velasco, is a famous Spanish film actress, theatre actress, singer, and tv conductor. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Karina (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Santa Rosalia is the patron saint of Palermo, Sicily. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


Performers

Main article: List of Spanish musicians
Main article: List of bands from Spain

Some of Spain's most famous singers in alphabetical order are: For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ...

Also in alpahebetical order, some of the most famous Spanish pop groups include: Luis Eduardo Aute (born Manila, 1943) [1] is a Spanish musician, singer-songwriter, film director, painter and poet. ... Paloma Berganza was born in Madrid, she studied guitar, solfege and harmony at the Real Conservatorio Superior de Música in Madrid. ... David Bisbal (born June 5, 1979) is a Spanish singer. ... Miguel Luchino González Bosé (or Borlani?) (April 3, 1956, Aries, Panama), is a Latin Grammy-winning Spanish musician and actor. ... Enrique Ortiz de Landázuri Izardui (a. ... Camarón de la Isla (born December 5, 1950, Cádiz, Spain; Died July 2, 1992, Barcelona, Spain), stage name of flamenco singer José Monge Cruz. ... For the town in the United States, see Chenoa, Illinois. ... Sergio Dalma is a Spanish pop singer. ... Paco De Lucia on the cover of El Duende Flamenco de Paco de Lucia (1972). ... Pepe de Lucía (1945 - ) Born José Sánchez Gómez, in Algeciras (Cádiz (province), Spain). ... Jose Luis Cantero, (born August 20, 1937, in Madrid), known professionally as El Fary, is a Spanish singer and actor. ... Paco Ibáñez is a spanish singer and musician born in Valencia in 1934. ... This article is about the singer/songwriter. ... This page is about the singer Julio Iglesias. ... María Jiménez Gallego (Seville, 1950) is a Spanish singer. ... Jose Antonio Labordeta is a Spanish singer and composer originally from Zaragoza, Spain. ... Lluís Llach i Grande (born May 7, 1948 in Girona, Catalonia, Spain) is a Catalan composer and songwriter. ... This article is about the Spanish singer. ... Antonio Molina Born in Málaga, 1930 - Madrid, 1996. ... Enrique Morente Cotelo, known as Enrique Morente, born in Granada, 1942 is a flamenco singer and controversial figure of contemporary flamenco. ... Mónica Naranjo Carrasco (born May 23, 1974) is a Spanish singer born in Figueras, a village in Catalonia near Cadaques, Spain. ... Isabel Pantoja (María Isabel Pantoja Martín b. ... Rocío Jurado Maria del Rocio Trinidad Mohedano Jurado [1] (September 18, 1944 – June 1, 2006) was a Spanish singer and actress. ... Rocío Dúrcal Rocío Dúrcal (October 4, 1944 - March 25, 2006), born as María de los Ángeles de Las Heras Ortiz, was a Spanish singer and actress. ... Paloma San Basilio (born on November 22, 1947 in Madrid, Spain) is a singer. ... Don Rafael Martos Sánchez (born May 5, 1945), Ilustrísimo Señor de la Orden de Cisneros, Comendador de Isabel La Católica, oftentimes simply referred to as Raphael, is a famous Spanish singer and television, film and theatre actor. ... Miguel Ríos (Chauchina, Granada, Spain June 7 de 1944) is a Spanish singer, composer, actor and one of the pioneers of Rock & Roll in Spain. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Marta Sánchez is a Spanish female vocalist. ... Alejandro Sanz, born Alejandro Sánchez Pizarro on December 18, 1968 in Madrid, is a Spanish pop/ballad musician. ... Joan Manuel Serrat i Teresa (born December 27, 1943 in Barcelona) is a Spanish singer-songwriter. ... Ana Torroja (born December 28, 1959) is a Spanish vocalist and the lead singer of the million-selling trio Mecano. ... Álex Ubago (born January 21, 1981) is a Spanish-Basque singer-songwriter. ... Víctor Manuel San José Sánchez is a famous spanish singer-songwriter Hes married to the famous spanish singer and actress Ana Belén since 1972. ...

Also from Spain was the famous trio of singing clowns Gaby, Fofó y Miliki. Amaral is a music group from Zaragoza, Spain. ... AVIADOR DRO is an electronic band from Spain. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... La Buena Vida (The Good Life) is an indie pop group from San Sebastián, Spain. ... Burning may refer to any of the following: Combustion The use of a CD burner The Burning Man festival Burning-in of Photographic paper Immolation An insult (slang term) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... ¡Qué Grande Es Esto Del Amor! Album cover Café Quijano is a Spanish pop music band. ... El Canto del Loco is a Spanish pop rock band. ... Dover is a Spanish rock band from Madrid that sings in English in most of their songs. ... Duncan Dhu is a Spanish group created in San Sebastián in 1984. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In 2005, Estopa signed a global music publishing deal with BMG Music Publishing. ... Categories: Disambiguation | Stub ... The Gipsy Kings are a group from Arles and Montpellier in France. ... Héroes del Silencio (sometimes referred to as just Héroes) were a Spanish rock band from Zaragoza (Aragon, Spain) formed by Juan Valdivia. ... Hidrogenesse is a Spanish pop band whose members are Carlos Ballesteros (singer) and Genís Segarra (keyboards). ... Hombres G are a Spanish rock band that have had tremendous success in Spain and the Americas. ... Jarabe de Palo is a Latin rock group from Spain led by Pau Donés (1966), singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Ketama is also a locality in Morocco infamous of its hash cultivation. ... For the toy construction material, see Meccano. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ojos de Brujo (Eyes of A Wizard in English[1]) is an eight-piece band from Barcelona, Spain, who describe their style as hiphop flamenkillo (hip-hop with a little flamenco) [1]. The band sold over 100,000 copies of their self-produced Barí album, and has received several awards... La Oreja de Van Gogh (Spanish: Van Goghs Ear) was a Latin Grammy winner Spanish pop band from Donostia-San Sebastian. ... Pereza is a Spanish Pop/Rock group. ... Pignoise is a Spanish punk rock group with pop influences comprising three members: Álvaro on guitar and voice, Polo on drums, and Pablo on bass. ... Los Planetas (The Planets) is a Spanish pop-rock group from the city of Granada which started out in the second of half of the 1990s and continue now through the 2000s. ... lo mejor del pop español junto con Mecano. ... La Quinta Estación is a band composed of three Spanish musicians: Natalia Jiménez (lead singer and harmonica), Ángel Reyero (guitar) and Pablo Domínguez (guitar and bass). ... Radio Futura is a pop rock Spanish group. ... Los Rodríguez was a rock band composed by two Spaniards and two Argentinians, that played during the 90s. ... El Sueño de Morfeo is a Spanish Celtic/pop/rock band. ... Tequila was a Spanish rock band from the 70s. ... Los Toreros Muertos are a musical group of the new wave/power pop/punk movement on the Spanish-speaking music scene known as Movida Madrileña. ... Triana are a Spanish progressive rock band heavily influenced by flamenco, hailing from Andalucia. ... El Último de la Fila (formerly Los Burros) was a Spanish music group created in the mid 1980s in Barcelona, Spain. ...


Flamenco

Main article: Flamenco

Flamenco is an Andalusian traditional folk music. It consists of three forms: the song (cante), the dance (baile) and the guitar (guitarra). The first reference dates back to 1774, from Cadalso's "Cartas Marruecas". Flamenco probably originated in Cádiz, Jérez de la Frontera and Triana, and could be a descendant of musical forms left by Moorish during the 8th-17th century. Influences from the Byzantine church music, Egypt, Pakistan and India could also have been important in shaping the music. The word flamenco is most commonly considered derived from the Spanish word for Flemish. Some claim that Spanish Jews in Flanders were allowed to perform their music without oppression, and Gypsies that had fought there with distinction in war on behalf of Spain were rewarded by being allowed to settle in Andalusia. Main stream scholars recognize all these early influences but consider flamenco as an earlier 19th century performance stage music as tango or fado. Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance characterized by its powerful yet graceful execution, as well as its intricate hand and footwork. ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Location Location of Cádiz Coordinates : Time Zone : General information Native name Cádiz (Spanish) Spanish name Cádiz Postal code – Website http://www. ... Jerez de la Frontera is a city and municipality in the province of Cádiz in the autonomous community of Andalusia in southern Spain. ... Triana might refer to: A large neighborhood of Seville, Spain, on the west bank of the Guadalquivir river, that is famous for Flamenco music and traditional tilemaking. ... For other uses, see moor. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The Byzantine Rite, sometimes called Constantinopolitan, is the liturgical rite used (in various languages) by all the Eastern Orthodox Churches and by several Eastern Catholic Churches. ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ... Tango is a style of music that originated among European immigrant populations of Argentina and Uruguay. ... Fado (translated as destiny or fate) is a music genre which can be traced from the 1820s in Portugal, but probably with much earlier origins. ...


Regional folk music

Spain's autonomous regions have their own distinctive folk traditions. There is also a movement of folk-based singer-songwriters with politically active lyrics, paralleling similar developments across Latin America and Portugal. While the bulk of today's Spanish traditional music can only be traced as far back as early 19th century, a handful of ritual religious music can be dated back to renaissance and middle age eras. So-called Iberian, Celtic, Roman, Greek or Phoenician music influence only exists in the minds of fanciful dilettanti. Singer and composer Eliseo Parra (b 1949) has recorded folk music of the Basques and of Salamanca. Folk song redirects here. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ...


Andalusia

Main article: Music of Andalusia

Though Andalusia is best known for flamenco music (see below for more information), folk music features a strong musical tradition for gaita rociera (tabor pipe) in Western Andalusia and a distinct violin and plucked-strings band known as panda de verdiales in Málaga. Andalusia is a region in Spain that is best-known for flamenco, a form of music and dance that is mostly performed by Gypsy people and popular throughout the world. ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ... Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance characterized by its powerful yet graceful execution, as well as its intricate hand and footwork. ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... Location of Málaga Government  - Mayor Francisco de la Torre Prados Area  - Total 385. ...


The region has also produced singer-songwriters like Javier Ruibal and Carlos Cano, who revived a traditional music called copla. Catalan Kiko Veneno and Joaquín Sabina are popular performers in a distinctly Spanish-style rock music, while Sephardic musicians like Aurora Moreno, Luís Delgado and Rosa Zaragoza keep alive-and-well Andalusian Sephardic music. The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Sephardic Jews are one of the three main ethnicities among Diaspora Jews, the others being the Ashkenazi and Mizrahi. ... Luís Manuel Ferreira Delgado, better known as Delgado (born 1 November 1979 in Luanda, Angola), is an Angolan football left defender who played for Petro Atletico and rivals Primeiro de Agosto the best two major football teams in Angolan Championship Girabola. ...


Aragon

Main article: Music of Aragon

Jota, popular across Spain, could have historical roots in the Southern part of Aragon. Jota instruments include the castanets, guitar, bandurria, tambourines and sometimes the flute. Aragonese music can be characterized by a dense percussive element, that some tried to attribute as an inheritance from North African Berbers. The guitarro, a unique kind of small guitar also seen in Murcia, seems Aragonese in origin. Besides its music for stick-dances and dulzaina (shawm), Aragon has its own gaita de boto (bagpipes) and chiflo (tabor pipe). As in the Basque country, Aragonese chiflo can be played along to a chicotén string-drum (psaltery) rhythm. Aragon is a region in northeastern Spain. ... The jota is a dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon. ... Anthem: Himno de Aragón Capital Zaragoza Official languages Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 4th  47,719 km²  9. ... Renoirs 1909 painting Dancing girl with castanets Castanets The castanets are a percussion instrument (idiophone), much used in Moorish music, Roma music, Spanish music and Latin American music. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... The bandurria is a plectrum plucked chordophone from Spain, similar to the cittern, primarily used in Spanish folk music. ... “Buben” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Flute (disambiguation). ... Percussion redirects here. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... Language(s) Berber languages Religion(s) Islam (mostly Sunni), Christianity (mostly protestant), Judaism Imazighen(in Kabyle and other Berber languages: Imaziγen) are the indigenous peoples of North Africa west of the Nile Valley. ... The Guitarro is a small, baroque, five-stringed guitar from Aragon, slightly larger than the requinto or cavaquinho. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... For the band, please see Dulzaina (band) The dulzaina is a Spanish double reed instrument in the oboe family. ... The shawm was a Renaissance musical instrument of the woodwind family, made in Europe from the late 13th century until the 17th century. ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... A psaltery is a stringed musical instrument of the harp or the zither family. ...


Asturias, Cantabria and Galicia

traditional Asturian dancers
traditional Asturian dancers

Northwest Spain (Galicia, Asturias and Cantabria) is home to a distinct tradition of bagpipe music that some tried to connect to the 1970s commercial label of Celtic-derived culture. All the languages in this area are of Latin origin but local festivals celebrating the area's Celtic influence are common, with Ortigueira's Festival del Mundo Celta being especially important. Drum and bagpipe groups are the most beloved kind of Galician folk music, and include popular bands like Milladoiro. Groups of pandereteiras are another traditional set of singing women that play tambourines. Bagpipe virtuoso Carlos Núñez is an especially popular performer; he has worked with Ireland's The Chieftains and Sinéad O'Connor, United States' Ry Cooder and Cuba's Vieja Trova Santiaguera. traditional Asturian dancers The traditional music of Galicia and Asturias has some similarities with the neighbouring areas of Cantabria, León, Castile and northern Portugal. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1671x1232, 171 KB) Description: Traditional asturian dancers, at Interceltic Festival of Avilés (july 2004). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1671x1232, 171 KB) Description: Traditional asturian dancers, at Interceltic Festival of Avilés (july 2004). ... Galicia (Spain) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Anthem: Asturias, patria querida Capital Oviedo Official language(s) Spanish; Asturian has special status Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 10th  10,604 km²  2. ... For the Mesozoic island Cantabria, see Cantabria (Mesozoic island). ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family that comprises all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... Image:Ortigueira Shield. ... From left to right: Nando Casal, Antón Seoane, Roi Casal, Harry C., Moncho García, Manú Conde, Xosé V. Ferreirós, Xosé A. Mendez Milladoiro is a music band from Galicia, Spain. ... Carlos Núñez (Vigo, 1971) is Galician musician who plays the gaita or gita, a kind of bagpipes. ... The Chieftains are a Grammy-winning Irish musical group founded in 1963, known for performing and popularizing Irish traditional music. ... Sinéad Marie Bernadette OConnor (pronounced [1]) (born December 8, 1966) is a Grammy Award winning Irish singer and songwriter. ... Ryland Ry Peter Cooder (born 15 March 1947, in Los Angeles, California) is an American guitarist, singer and composer, known for his slide guitar work, his interest in the American roots music and, more recently, for his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries. ... La Vieja Trova Santiaguera is a Cuban musical band that formed in 1994 and became successful in Europe. ...


Galician folk music includes characteristical alalas songs. Alalas, that may include instrumental interludes, are believed to be chant-based popular songs with a long history.


Asturias is also home to popular musicians such as José Ángel Hevia (a virtuoso bagpiper), and famous Celtic group Llan de Cubel. Circle folk dances using a 6/8 tambourine rhythm are also a hallmark of this area. Vocal asturianadas show melismatic ornamentations similar to those of other parts of the Iberian Peninsula. There are many festivals, such as "Folixa na Primavera" (April, in Mieres), "Intercelticu d'Avilés" (Interceltic festival of Avilés, in July), as well as many "Celtic nights" in Asturias. Anthem: Asturias, patria querida Capital Oviedo Official language(s) Spanish; Asturian has special status Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 10th  10,604 km²  2. ... Hevia on stage at Lorient, Brittany in 2003 Hevia, or José Ángel Hevia Velasco, is a Spanish bagpiper – specifically, an Asturian gaita piper, born in 1967 in Villaviciosa, Asturias. ... Llan de Cubel are a celtic folk band from Asturias (Spain) which specializes in playing Asturian folk music. ... Principality of Asturias Demonym  â€¢ Spanish Mierense Capital Mieres del Camino Coordinates Judicial district Mieres Parishes 16 Population (2005)  â€¢ Total  â€¢ Density  â€¢ % of Asturias Rank: 6 45,943 inhabitants 319. ... Capital Avilés Area  - total  - % of Asturias Ranked 71st 25. ... Capital Avilés Area  - total  - % of Asturias Ranked 71st 25. ... Celtic music is a term utilized by artists, record companies, music stores and music magazines to describe a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic peoples of Northern Europe. ...


As in the Basque Country, Cantabrian folk music features intrincate arch and stick dances but tabor pipes did not play such a predominant role. Aside with a rich tradition for rebec, a popular instrumental setting encompasses drum and alto clarinet (here known as pito or requinto) players. For the Mesozoic island Cantabria, see Cantabria (Mesozoic island). ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... The rebec in Virgin among Virgins (1509), by Gerard David. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ...


Balearic Islands

In the Balearic Islands, Xeremiers or colla de xeremiers is a traditional ensemble that consists of flabiol (a five-hole tabor pipe) and xeremies (bagpipes). Majorca's Maria del Mar Bonet was one of the most influential artists of nova canço, known for her political and social lyrics. Tomeu Penya, Biel Majoral, Cerebros exprimidos and Joan Bibiloni are also popular. The Balearic Islands have become a center for musical innovation in the 20th century. ... Capital Palma de Mallorca Official language(s) Spanish and Catalan Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 17th  4,992 km²  1. ... Flabiol (right) together with a Tamborí (left) The flabiol, (also known as flaviol, flubiol or fabirol), a woodwind instrument which also is normally played one-handed with a drum [1] [2] [3]. It is one of the 12 instruments of cobla. ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... Majorca (Spanish and Catalan: ) is the largest island of Spain. ... Maria del Mar Bonet is a Spanish singer from the island of Majorca. ...


Basque Country

Main article: Basque music

The Basques have a unique language, unrelated to any other in the world except according to some uncertain theories. The most popular kind of Basque folk music is called after the dance trikitixa, which is based on the accordion and tambourine. Popular performers are Joseba Tapia and Kepa Junkera. Very appreciated folk instruments are txistu (similar to Occitanian galoubet recorder), alboka (a double clarinet played in circular-breathing technique, similar to other Mediterranean instruments like launeddas) and txalaparta (a huge xylophone, similar to the Romanian toacă and played by two performers in a fascinating game-performance). As in many parts of the Iberian peninsula, there are ritual dances with sticks, swords and vegetal arches. Other popular dances are fandango, jota and 5/8 zortziko. The Basque language is unrelated to any other language family and its origins are unknown. ... Language(s) Basque - few monoglots Spanish - 1,525,000 monoglots French - 150,000 monoglots Basque-Spanish - 600,000 speakers Basque-French - 76,000 speakers other native languages Religion(s) Traditionally Roman Catholic The Basques (Basque: ) are an ethnic group who inhabit parts of north-central Spain and southwestern France. ... The trikitixa or eskusoinu (hand sound) is a two-row Basque diatonic button accordion, with right-hand rows keyed a fifth apart and twelve unisonoric bass buttons. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... “Buben” redirects here. ... Kepa Junkera (born 1965 in Bilbao, Euskadi) is a Basque musician and composer. ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... The alboka is a double clarinet coming from the Basque region of Northern Spain. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... The launeddas, triple clarinet or triplepipe is a typical Sardinian woodwind instrument, consisting of three pipes. ... The txalaparta is a specialized Basque device of wood or stone. ... Kulintang a Kayo, a Philippine xylophone The xylophone (from the Greek meaning wooden sound) is a musical instrument in the percussion family which probably originated in Indonesia. ... Fandangos is a style of flamenco music and dance, probably derived from the jota[]. Philologists link it to the ancient Roman erotic dance known as the cordax (called iconici motus by the poet Horace and the playwright Plautus). ... Jota is a Spanish music and dance. ...


Canary Islands

In the Canary Islands, Isa, a local kind of Jota, is now popular, and Latin American musical (Cuban) influences are quite widespread, especially in the presence of the charango (a kind of guitar). Timple, the local name for ukulele / cavaquinho, is commonly seen in plucked string bands. A popular set in El Hierro island consists of drums and wooden fifes (pito herreño). Tabor pipe is customary in some ritual dances in Tenerife island. The Canary Islands used to be inhabited by the Guanches which are related to Berbers; they mixed with Spaniards, who live on the islands now. ... This article is about the islands in the Atlantic Ocean. ... The jota is a dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon. ... Latin American music, sometimes simply called Latin music in The United States, includes the music of all countries in Latin America and comes in many varieties. ... Visit the Guitar Portal A Bolivian charango This article is about an instrument. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... The timple is a traditional instrument of the Canary Islands and Murcia. ... The ukulele (from Hawaiian: , pronounced ), variantly spelled ukelele (particularly in the UK), or alternately abbreviated uke, is a chordophone classified as a plucked lute; it is a subset of the guitar family of instruments, generally with four strings or four courses of strings. ... The cavaquinho is a small string instrument (like the ukulele) of the European guitar family with four wires or gut strings. ... Hierro redirects here. ... Fife from the American Civil War A fife is a small, high-pitched, transverse flute that is similar to the piccolo, but louder and shriller due to its narrower bore. ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... Flag of Tenerife Tenerife in the Canary Islands chain. ...


Castile, Madrid and León

Main article: Music of Castile, Madrid and León

A large inland region, Castile, Madrid and Leon had predominantly Celtiberian and Celtic cultural background before the Roman rule. The area has been a melting pot, however, and Gypsies, Portuguese, Jewish, Roman, Visigothic and sources could have left a mark on the region's music. Central Spain includes the cultural melting pot of Madrid and Castile. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Capital Madrid Official language(s) Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 12th  8,030. ... León province León (Llión in Asturian-leonese language) is a province of northwestern Spain, in the northwestern part of the autonomous community of Castile and León. ... The Celtiberians dwelt in the Iberian Peninsula and spoke a Celtic language. ... The Six Nations considered the heartland of the modern Celts Celtic nations are areas of Europe inhabited by members of Celtic cultures, specifically speakers of Celtic languages. ... 19th century print of Roma musicians Typically nomadic, the Roma have long acted as wandering entertainers and tradesmen. ... Languages Historical Jewish languages Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino, others Liturgical languages: Hebrew and Aramaic Predominant spoken languages: The vernacular language of the home nation in the Diaspora, significantly including English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Arabs and other Semitic groups For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... A votive crown belonging to Reccesuinth (653–672) The Visigoths (Latin: ) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe, the Ostrogoths being the other. ...


Jota is popular, but uniquely slow in Castile and Leon. Instrumentation also varies here much from the one in Aragon. Northern León, that shares a language background with the Portuguese town of Miranda do Douro and Asturias, also has Galician influences. There are also gaita (bagpipe) and tabor pipe traditions. The Maragatos people, of uncertain origin, have a unique musical style and live in Leon, around Astorga. All over Castile there is also a strong tradition of dance music for dulzaina (shawm) and rondalla groups. Popular rhythms include 5/8 charrada and circle dances, jota and habas verdes. As in many other parts of the Iberian peninsula, ritual dances include paloteos (stick dances). Salamanca is known as the home of tuna, a serenade played with guitars and tambourines, mostly by students dressed in medieval clothing. Madrid is known for its chotis music, a local variation to the European tradition of 19th century schottische dance. Flamenco is also popular among some urbanites. The jota is a dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon. ... District or region Bragança Mayor   - Party Manuel Martins PSD Area 487. ... Anthem: Asturias, patria querida Capital Oviedo Official language(s) Spanish; Asturian has special status Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 10th  10,604 km²  2. ... Galicia (Spain) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Gaita is the Spanish and Portuguese name for the bagpipe used in Galicia, Asturias and northern Portugal. ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... Episcopal Palace of Astorga Astorga is a town in Spain, in the province of León. ... For the band, please see Dulzaina (band) The dulzaina is a Spanish double reed instrument in the oboe family. ... The shawm was a Renaissance musical instrument of the woodwind family, made in Europe from the late 13th century until the 17th century. ... The jota is a dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon. ... Salamanca (population 160,000) is a city in western Spain, the capital of the province of Salamanca, which belongs to the autonomous community (region) of Castile-Leon (Castilla y León). ... A Tuna is a musical group in Spain, Portugal, Mexico where it is known as an estudiantina, or South America, made up of university students. ... Serenade by Judith Leyster. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... “Buben” redirects here. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... The Schottische is a partnered country dance, Bohemian in origin, that is two short runs and a hop followed by four turning hop steps: step step step hop, step step step hop, step hop step hop step hop step hop. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance characterized by its powerful yet graceful execution, as well as its intricate hand and footwork. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Catalonia

Main article: Music of Catalonia

Though Catalonia is best known for sardana music played by a cobla, there are other traditional styles of dance music like ball de bastons (stick-dances), galops, ball de gitanes. Music takes forefront personality in cercaviles and celebrations similar to Patum in Berga. Flabiol (a five-hole tabor pipe), gralla or dolçaina (a shawm) and sac de gemecs (a local bagpipe) are traditional folk instruments that make part of some coblas. The havaneres singers remain popular. Nowadays, young people cultivate Rock Català popular music, as some years ago the Nova Cançó was relevant. Catalan gipsies have created their own style of rumba called rumba catalana. Catalonia (in Spain and France) has one of the oldest documented musical traditions in Europe, and has had a rich musical culture continuously for at least two thousand years. ... This article is about the Spanish Autonomous Community. ... The sardana (Catalan plural sardanes) is a type of circle dance typical of Catalonia. ... The cobla is a traditional music ensemble of Catalonia, the north-eastern region of Spain. ... The ball de bastons (Catalan: ) is a kind of folk dance from Catalonia. ... In dance, the galop, named for the fastest running gait of a horse (see gallop), a shortened version of the original term galoppade, is a lively country dance, introduced in the late 1820s to Parisian society by the duchesse de Berry and popular in Vienna, Berlin and London. ... Berga is the capital of the comarca (county) of Berguedà, in the province of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... Flabiol (right) together with a Tamborí (left) The flabiol, (also known as flaviol, flubiol or fabirol), a woodwind instrument which also is normally played one-handed with a drum [1] [2] [3]. It is one of the 12 instruments of cobla. ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... For the band, please see Dulzaina (band) The dulzaina is a Spanish double reed instrument in the oboe family. ... The shawm was a Renaissance musical instrument of the woodwind family, made in Europe from the late 13th century until the 17th century. ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... The cobla is a traditional music ensemble of Catalonia, the north-eastern region of Spain. ... The habanera is a musical style or genre from Cuba with a characteristic Habanera rhythm; it is one of the oldest mainstays of Cuban music and the first of the dances from Cuba to be exported all over the world. ... La Nova Cançó (The New Song in Catalan) was a movement that promoted Catalan music during Francoism. ... The Rroma people (pronounced rahma, singular Rrom) along with the closely related Sinti people are commonly known as Gypsies. ... Rumba Flamenca, Rumba Flamenco, Flamenco Rumba, or Gypsy Rumba is a style of Rumba music from Southern Spain. ...


Extremadura

Main article: Music of Extremadura

Having long been the poorest part of Spain, Extremadura is a largely rural region known for Portuguese influence on its music. As in Northern regions of Spain, there is a rich repertoire for tabor pipe music. The zambomba drum (similar to Portuguese sarronca or Brazilian cuica) is played by pulling on a rope which is inside the drum. It is found throughout Spain but is characteristic of Extremadura. The jota is common, here played with triangles, castanets, guitars, tambourines, accordions and zambombas. Extremadura is a region in Spain near Portugal. ... Capital Mérida Official languages Spanish; Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 5th  41,634 km²  8. ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... Cuíca is a Brazilian friction drum often used in Samba music. ... The jota is a dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon. ... The triangle is an idiophonic musical instrument of the percussion family. ... Renoirs 1909 painting Dancing girl with castanets Castanets A castanet is a percussion instrument (idiophone), much used in oriental (Moorish and Ottoman music), Roman music, Spanish music and Latin American music. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... “Buben” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ...


Murcia

Main article: Music of Murcia

Murcia is a dry region which has very strong Moorish influences, as well as Andalusian. Flamenco and guitar-accompanied cante jondo is especially associated with Murcia as well as rondallas (plucked-string bands). Murcia is a region in Spain whose music is most famously the religious Auroras songs, which are derived from La Mancha and Andalusia. ... This article is about the Spanish city. ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ... Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance characterized by its powerful yet graceful execution, as well as its intricate hand and footwork. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... An unspoiled form of Andalusian folk music also known as deep song. Cante Jondo is a vocal style in flamenco. ...


Navarre and La Rioja

Navarre and La Rioja are small regions with diverse cultural elements. Northern Navarre is Basque in language, while the Southern section shares more Aragonese features. The jota is also known in both Navarre and La Rioja. Both regions have rich dance and dulzaina (shawm) traditions. Txistu (tabor pipe) and dulzaina ensembles are very popular to public celebrations in Navarra. Navarre and La Rioja are relatively small regions bordered by Aragon and the Basque Country. ... “Navarra” redirects here. ... Capital Logroño Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 16th  5 045 km²  1,0% Population  â€“ Total (2005)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 17th   301 084  0,7%  59,68/km² Demonym  â€“ English  â€“ Spanish  â€”  riojano/a Statute of Autonomy June 9, 1982 Parliament  â€“ Congress seats  â€“ Senate seats  4  1 President Pedro Sanz... Language(s) Basque - few monoglots Spanish - 1,525,000 monoglots French - 150,000 monoglots Basque-Spanish - 600,000 speakers Basque-French - 76,000 speakers other native languages Religion(s) Traditionally Roman Catholic The Basques (Basque: ) are an ethnic group who inhabit parts of north-central Spain and southwestern France. ... Anthem: Himno de Aragón Capital Zaragoza Official languages Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 4th  47,719 km²  9. ... The jota is a dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon. ... For the band, please see Dulzaina (band) The dulzaina is a Spanish double reed instrument in the oboe family. ... The shawm was a Renaissance musical instrument of the woodwind family, made in Europe from the late 13th century until the 17th century. ... Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. ... For the band, please see Dulzaina (band) The dulzaina is a Spanish double reed instrument in the oboe family. ...


Valencia

Main article: Music of Valencia

Traditional music from Valencia is characteristically mediterranean in origin. Valencia also has its local kind of Jota. Moreover, Valencia has a high reputation for musical innovation, and performing brass bands called bandes are common, with one appearing in almost every town. Dolçaina (shawm) is widely found. Valencia also shares some traditional dances with other Iberian areas, like for instance, the ball de bastons (stick-dances). The group Al Tall is also well-known, experimenting with the Berber band Muluk El Hwa, and revitalizing traditional Valencian music, following the Riproposta Italian musical movement. Valencia is one of the musical centers in Spain, and is known for its own variety of jota distinct from the Aragonese version, as well as bandes found in almost every village in the region. ... Capital Valencia Official language(s) Valencian and Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 8th  23,255 km²  4. ... The jota is a dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ... The shawm was a Renaissance musical instrument of the woodwind family, made in Europe from the late 13th century until the 17th century. ...


Samples

  • Download recording of "Venid pastores", a Spanish-American Christmas song from the Library of Congress' California Gold: Northern California Folk Music from the Thirties Collection; performed by Aurora Calderon on April 10, 1939 in Oakland, California
  • Download recording - "Alfonso Doce" Spanish-language song in a version from Minorca preserved at the Library of Congress' Florida Folklife from the WPA Collections; performed by Maria Hugas de Aceval on September 26, 1939 in St. Augustine, Florida

is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Oakland redirects here. ... Alfonso XII of Spain (November 28, 1857–November 25, 1885), was king of Spain, reigning from 1875 to 1885, after a coup détat restored the monarchy and ended the ephemeral First Spanish Republic. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in St. ...

References

  • Fairley, Jan "A Wild, Savage Feeling". 2000. In Broughton, Simon and Ellingham, Mark with McConnachie, James and Duane, Orla (Ed.), World Music, Vol. 1: Africa, Europe and the Middle East, pp 279-291. Rough Guides Ltd, Penguin Books. ISBN 1-85828-636-0
  • Fairley, Jan with Manuel Domínguez. "A Tale of Celts and Islanders". 2000. In Broughton, Simon and Ellingham, Mark with McConnachie, James and Duane, Orla (Ed.), World Music, Vol. 1: Africa, Europe and the Middle East, pp 292-297. Rough Guides Ltd, Penguin Books. ISBN 1-85828-636-0
  • Alan Lomax: Mirades Miradas Glances. Photos and CD by Alan Lomax, ed. by Antoni Pizà (Barcelona: Lunwerg / Fundacio Sa Nostra, 2006) ISBN 84-9785-271-0

External links

  • Spanish language music Traditional and contemporary Spanish-language music, with genre descriptions, representative artists, CDs & audio samples.
  • MIDI samples of traditional music from the Iberian peninsula * Mirror site
  • Learn Spanish with songs Morkol will help you to learn Spanish with songs. Listen to the songs while you read the lyrics.
  • Foundation for Iberian Music at The City University of New York [1]
  • Spanish music videos Spainmusictv.com
The list of unrecognized countries enumerates those geo-political entities which lack general diplomatic recognition, but wish to be recognized as sovereign states. ...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... The borders of the continents are the limits of the several continents of the Earth, as defined by various geographical, cultural, and political criteria. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ...  The African plate, shown in pinkish-orange The African Plate is a tectonic plate covering the continent of Africa and extending westward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Spain: National Geographic World Music (1032 words)
Spain is a nation of intense regional identities, with 17 autonomous administrative regions (and two autonomous cities) reflecting the country's medieval history as a peninsula of small, competing kingdoms.
Flamenco is Spain's signature musical export, and is as close to a "national music" as the nation comes.
Spain is also the home of a burgeoning pop music industry, which began to take off in the 1980s with la movida—a cultural reawakening that shook off the long, dull years of Franco's fascist rule.
Music of Spain: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com (234 words)
Flamenco, an originally Gypsy art-form strongly influenced by Andalusian music, consists of three forms: the song (cante), the dance (baile) and the guitar (guitarra).
Flamenco probably originated in Cadiz, Jerez de la Frontera[?] and Triana[?], and is a descendent of musical forms left by Moorish invaders during the 8th-14th century.
Also from Spain was the famous trio of singing clowns Gaby Fofo Y Miliki[?], and the humorist Arévalo[?].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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