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Encyclopedia > Music of Russia
Music of Russia
Genres classical — folk — psytrance — pop — hip hoprock
History (Timeline and Samples)
Awards MTV Russia Music Awards
Charts
Festivals Bard Music Festival
Media
National anthem "Hymn of the Russian Federation"
Regional music
AdygeaAltai - Astrakhan - BashkortostanBuryatiaChechnya — Chukotka — Chuvashia — DagestanEvenkia - IngushetiaIrkutskKaliningradKalmykia — Kamchatka — KareliaKhakassia — Khantia-Mansia - Komi Republic - Krasnodar — Mari El — MordoviaNenetsiaOssetiaRostovEthnic RussianSakha — Sakhalin — TatarstanTuvaUdmurtia

Russia is a large and extremely culturally diverse country, with dozens of ethnic groups, each with their own forms of folk music. During the period of Soviet domination, music was highly scrutinized and kept within certain boundaries of content and innovation. After the fall of the USSR, western-style rock and pop music became the most popular musical forms in Russia. Some native artists broke through. Dark psytrance (also dark psy or simply dark, sometimes horror trance or killer psytrance) is a darker and distorted form of psychedelic trance music that is made mostly in Russia and Germany, and more & more in other countries worldwide from last years. ... Russian hip hop is hip hop music produced in Russia and/or in the Russian language. ... Rock and roll became known in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and quickly broke free from its western roots. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as; musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogizing the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a nations government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Flag of Russia The Hymn of the Russian Federation (Russian: , Gimn Rossiyskaya Federatsiya) is the national anthem of Russia. ... Adygea is a region in Russia. ... Altai is a region in Russia, composed primarily of ethnic Russians and Altaians. ... Astrakhan is a Caucasian region of Russia with a rich musical history. ... The first major study of the music of Bashkortostan appeared in 1897, when ethnographer Rybakov S.G. wrote Music and Songs of the Urals Muslims and Studies of Their Way of Life. ... Buryatia is a part of the Russian Federation. ... Native musical instruments: The pondur is the oldest of musical instruments of the Chechens, comprising of three chords and a wooden casing. ... Dagestan is a region of Russia. ... Evenkia is a part of Russia, located in Asia. ... Traditional Ingush musical instruments include the zurna (similar to a clarinet), dekhch-pandr (similar to a balalaika), kekhat pondur (accordion, played mostly by girls), violin (with three strings), drums and tambourine. ... Irkutsk is a Russian oblast and city that has produced several famous popular musicians and has a number of styles of folk music. ... The modern city and region of Kaliningrad is home to the Kaliningrad Regional Philharmonic and Symphony Orchestra, the Lik male chamber choir and the Garmonika Russian music ensemble [1], as well as the Kaliningrad Chamber Orchestra [2]. References [3] [4] Categories: Music genre stubs | Music of Russian subdivisions | Kaliningrad ... Kalmykia is a national republic within the Russian Federation. ... Map showing the parts Karelia is traditionally divided into. ... Khakassia is a region in Russia. ... The Komi Republic is a region of Russia. ... Krasnodar is both a krai and a city within it, in Russia. ... Mordovia is a region of Russia. ... Nenetsia is a region in Russia, inhabited by the Nenets. ... Ossetia is a region, split into South Ossetia in Georgia and North Ossetia in Russia. ... Rostov Oblast is a region of Russia, which contains the city of Rostov-on-Don. ... Ethnic Russian music includes many varieties of folk, popular and classical traditions. ... The Sakha Republic is a part of Russia in Asia. ... Tatarstan is a part of Russia, inhabited by the Tatars. ... Tuva is a part of Russia, inhabited by a people related to the nearby Mongolians. ... Udmurtia is a Russian region. ... Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate), generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and for the common people. ... Motto: Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) Translation: Workers of the world, unite!) Anthem: The Internationale (1922-1944) Hymn of the Soviet Union (1944-1991) Capital (and largest city) Moscow Official languages None; Russian de facto Government Socialist Republic/Federation of Soviet Republics  - Last President Mikhail Gorbachev  - Last Premier Ivan Silayev... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Classical, opera and ballet

See also: Music of the Russian Enlightenment, Opera of the Russian Enlightenment and Russian Opera Mikeshins Monument to Catherine the Great in front of the Alexandrine Theatre in St. ... Mikeshins Monument to Catherine the Great in front of the Alexandrine Theatre in St. ... A Russian Warrior, Bilibins costume design for Borodins Prince Igor, 1930) See also Russian opera articles for the details and additional information Russian opera (Russian: Ру́сская о́пера) is the art of opera in Russia. ...


Russia has a long history of classical music innovation. The first important Russian composer was Mikhail Glinka (1804-1857), who added religious and folk elements to classical compositions, composing pioneering operas like A Life for the Tsar and Ruslan and Lyudmila; though these operas were distinctively Russian, they were based on the Italian tradition. Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka (Russian: Mihail Ivanovič Glinka) (June 1, 1804 [O.S. May 20] - February 15, 1857 [O.S. February 3]), was the first Russian composer to gain wide recognition inside his own country, and is often regarded as the father of Russian classical music. ... A Life for the Tsar (Russian: Žizn’ za carâ) is a patriotic-heroic tragic opera in five acts with an epilogue by Mikhail Glinka. ... Ruslan and Lyudmila (Russian: , transliteration: Ruslan i Lyudmila) is an opera in five acts (eight tableaux) composed by Mikhail Glinka between 1837 and 1842. ... Italian opera can be divided into three periods, the Baroque, the Romantic and the modern. ...

Lidiya Ruslanova performing for Soviet soldiers during the Great Patriotic War.
Lidiya Ruslanova performing for Soviet soldiers during the Great Patriotic War.

Glinka and the composers who made up The Mighty Handful after him (Rimsky-Korsakov, Mussorgsky, Balakirev, Borodin and César Cui) were often influenced by Russian folk music and tales. This same period saw the foundation of the Russian Music Society in 1859, led by composers Anton and Nikolay Rubinstein. The Mighty Handful and the Russian Music Society were rivals, with the former embracing a Russian national identity and the latter musically conservative. Among the Mighty Handful's most notable compositions were the operas The Snow Maiden (Snegurochka), Sadko, Boris Godunov, Prince Igor and Khovanshchina, and the symphonic suite Scheherazade. Image File history File linksMetadata Ruslanova. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Ruslanova. ... Lidiya Ruslanova performing for Soviet soldiers during the Great Patriotic War. ... The Eastern Front1 was the theatre of combat between Nazi Germany and its allies against the Soviet Union during World War II. It was somewhat separate from the other theatres of the war, not only geographically, but also for its scale and ferocity. ... The Mighty Handful, also known as The Five in English-speaking countries (and by comparable translation of such in other languages), was a label applied in 1867 by the critic Vladimir Stasov to a loose collection of Russian classical composers brought together under the leadership of Mily Balakirev with the... Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: , Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov), also Nikolay, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 6 (O.S. March 18), 1844 – June 8 (O.S. June 21) 1908) was a Russian composer, one of five Russian composers known as The Five, and was later a teacher of harmony and... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Balakirevs grave at Tikhvin Cemetery. ... Alexander Porfiryevich Borodin (Russian: , Aleksandr Porfirevič Borodin) (31 Oct. ... César Antonovitch Cui (Russian: Цезарь Антонович Кюи) (January 6/18, 1835 – March 13, 1918) was a Russian composer and music critic of French and Lithuanian descent. ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Rubinsteins portrait by Ilya Repin. ... Nikolai Rubinstein Born Nikolai Grigoryevich Rubinstein (2 June 1835–23 March 1881) was a Russian pianist and composer. ... The Snow Maiden (дипломник in Russian, Snegurochka in transliteration) is an opera in four acts by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov to a Russian libretto by the composer, based on the play by Alexandr Ostrovsky. ... Sadko, Palekh painting Sadko (Russian: ) was a legendary hero of a Russian bylina (epic tale) with the same name, a merchant and gusli musician from Novgorod. ... Modest Mussorgsky in 1870 Boris Godunov (Russian: , Borís Godunóv) is an opera by Modest Mussorgsky. ... Prince Igor (Russian: Knâz Igor) is an opera in four acts with a prologue by Alexander Borodin. ... Modest Mussorgsky in 1876 Khovanshchina (Russian: , Hovánščina, sometimes rendered The Khovansky Affair) is an opera (also referred to as a national music drama) in five acts by Modest Mussorgsky. ...


Other prominent Russian composers include Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, and in the 20th century Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Scriabin, Shostakovich and Alfred Schnittke. Of these, Tchaikovsky remains the most well-known outside Russia, and his fame as the country's most famous composer is unquestioned. He is best known for ballets like Swan Lake and The Nutcracker. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian: Пётр Ильич Чайкoвский, Pëtr Il’ič ÄŒajkovskij or Pyotr Ilich Chajjkovskijj;  ) (7 May [O.S. 25 April] 1840 – 6 November [O.S. 25 October] 1893), also transliterated Piotr Ilitsch Tschaikowski, Petr Ilich Tschaikowsky, Piotr Illyich Tchaikovsky, as well as many other versions, was a Russian composer... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (Russian: , Sergej Vasil’evič Rachmaninov, 1 April 1873 (N.S.) or 20 March 1873 (O.S.) – 28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer who first achieved international fame with three ballets commissioned by the impresario Serge Diaghilev and performed by Diaghilevs Ballets Russes (Russian Ballet): LOiseau de feu (The Firebird) (1910), Petrushka (1911... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: , Sergej Sergejevič Prokof’ev; 15/April 271, 1891–March 5, 1953) was a Russian composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin (Russian: Александр Николаевич Скрябин; sometimes transliterated as Skryabin) (6 January 1872 – 27 April 1915) was a Russian composer and pianist. ... Dmitri Dmitrievich Shostakovich   (Russian: , Dmitrij Dmitrievič Å ostakovič) (September 25 [O.S. September 12] 1906–August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ... Alfred Schnittke April 6, 1989, Moscow Alfred Garyevich Schnittke (Russian: Альфре́д Га́рриевич Шни́тке, November 24, 1934 Engels - August 3, 1998 Hamburg) was a Russian composer. ... Act 4 of Swan Lake: choreography by Petipa and Nureyev, music by Tchaikovsky. ... Altynai Asylmoratova as Odette in the Kirov/Mariinsky Ballets production of Swan Lake, St. ... (left to right)Sergei Legat, as the Nutcracker, an unidentified child as a gingerbread soldier, and Lydia Rubtsova as Marianna in Vsevolozhskys costumes for the Ivanov/Petipa/Tchaikovsky The Nutcracker, St. ...


During the 19th century, Count Uvarov led a campaign of nationalist revival which initiated the first professional orchestra with traditional instruments, beginning with Vassily Andreyev, who used the balalaika in an orchestra late in the century. Just after the dawn of the 20th century, Mitrofan Pyatnitsky founded the Pyatnitsky Choir, which used rural peasant singers and traditional sounds. By the time of the Soviet Union, however, it had become one of many groups playing sanitized folk music, now often called fakelore. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Count Sergey Semionovich Uvarov (Уваров, Сергей Семенович in Russian) (September 5, 1786 – September 16, 1855) was an influential Imperial Russian statesman. ... Balalaika The balalaika (Russian: балала́йка; IPA ) is a stringed instrument of Russian origin, with a characteristic triangular body and 3 strings (or sometimes 6, in pairs). ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Fakelore is inauthentic, manufactured folklore which is created in the hope that it will be accepted as genuine and/or legitimate. ...


Soviet Era

Leonid Utyosov, one of the most popular singers of Soviet era.
Leonid Utyosov, one of the most popular singers of Soviet era.

In the 1910s romances (in exotic Russian, Caucasian, Gypsy and Italian styles) became very popular. The greatest and most popular singers of romances usually sang in operas at the same time. The most popular was Fyodor Shalyapin. Singers usually composed music and wrote the lyrics, such as Alexander Vertinsky, Konstantin Sokolsky, Pyotr Leshchenko. Image File history File links Utesov. ... Image File history File links Utesov. ... Utyosov in Jolly Fellows (1934). ... // Events and trends The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginnings during the second half of the 19th Century. ... The Russian opera singer Feodor Ivanovich Chaliapin () (February 13 (February 1, Old Style), 1873–April 12, 1938) was the most famous bass in the first half of the 20th century. ... Aleksandr Nikolayevich Vertinsky (Russian: Александр Вертинский, 21 March 1889 in Kiev — 21 May 1957 in Leningrad) was a Russian artist, poet, singer, composer, cabaret artist and actor who exerted seminal influence on the Russian tradition of artistic singing. ... Image:Example. ... Pyotr Konstantinovich Leshchenko (Russian: ; 14 June 1898 - 16 July 1954), a Russian singer, universally considered the King of Russian Tango and specifically known for his rendition of Serdtse—the most famous tango song not in the Spanish language—was born a citizen of the Russian Empire in Isaeva (now part...


The Soviet Era produced many prominent musicians in spite of oppression from the government. Some émigrés remained popular abroad, like pianist Vladimir Horowitz, whose 1986 performance in Moscow, the first in his native land, was a landmark event. Portrait of Vladimir Horowitz, captured from the documentary The Last Romantic. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the 1960s, Vyacheslav Shchurov organized concerts featuring folk singers from across Russia, beginning in 1966. Shchurov thus inspired a wave of singing ethnomusicologists who appeared among the urban intellectuals and recorded rural folk musicians. Perhaps the most important group to follow in Shchurov's wake was the Dmitri Pokrovsky Ensemble. A group of musicians called bards arose at the same time. Generally ignored by the state, bards like Vladimir Vysotsky helped lead a popular return to traditional music. The 1960s also saw the beginning of Alla Pugacheva's music career which continues to this day. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Ethnomusicology (from the Greek ethnos = nation and mousike = music), formerly comparative musicology, is the study of music in its cultural context, cultural musicology. ... Bulat Okudzhava, a pioneer of the Bard genre For other meanings of the word, see Bard (disambiguation). ... Vladimir Vysotsky Vladimir Semyonovich Vysotsky (Влади́мир Семёнович Высо́цкий) (January 25, 1938 – July 25, 1980) was a Russian singer, song-writer, poet, and actor, whose career has had an immense and enduring effect on Russian culture. ... Alla on the Star Factory television show, 2004 Alla Borisovna Pugachyova (А́лла Бори́совна Пугачёва), pronounced Pougachiova and commonly anglicized as Pugacheva, born April 15, 1949 in Moscow, Russia, is perhaps the best known musical performer in Russia, her career having started in 1965 and continuing to this day. ...


The same period saw the birth of Russian rock with the band Pojuschie Gitary who created a style called VIA and later released the first Russian rock opera, Orpheus and Eurydice. Other rock bands of the era included Tcvety, Sinyaya Ptica and Golubiye Gitary. Pojuschie Gitary (Поющие гитары, The singing Guitarists) Were The Soviet Unions first offical rock band. ... There are four companies that go by the name VIA: VIA Technologies, a Taiwanese manufacturer of integrated circuits VIA Rail, a Canadian passenger rail company Via, a New York based media collective Via Training, an e-learning and blended training development company based in Portland, Oregon VIA is also an... The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera or rock musical is a musical production in the form of an opera or a musical in a modern rock and roll style rather than more traditional forms. ... Tcvety (Цветы,Tsveti(alternate), flowers) were an early russian rock group. ...


By the 1980s, popular folk-oriented groups had arisen. The Cossack Kazachy Krug and Pesen Zemli became most popular. A musical underground (magnitizdat) also arose, where poetic and satirical musicians like Bulat Okudzhava and Vladimir Vysotskiy gained black market fame playing their self played songs. The 1980s refers to the years of 1980 to 1989. ... Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks to Sultan Mehmed IV of Ottoman Empire. ... Samizdat, book published by Pathfinder Press containing a collection of forbidden Trotskyist Samizdat texts. ... Russian bard Bulat Okudzhava Bulat Okudzhava Bulat Shalvovich Okudzhava (or Boulat Okudjava/Okoudjava/Okoudzhava; Russian: ) (May 9, 1924 - June 12, 1997) was one of the founders of the Russian genre called authors song (авторская песня, avtorskaya pesnya). ... Vladimir Semyonovich Vysotsky (Влади́мир Семёнович Высо́цкий) (January 25, 1938 – July 25, 1980) was a Russian singer, poet, theatre and movie actor, and writer. ...


Perestroika Music

Main article: Russian rock

Many underground rock bands arose during early 80x in Moscow (Mashina Vremeni, Center), Leningrad (Aquarium, Zoopark), Sverdlovsk (Urfin Dzhyus, Trek) and other cities. Poster showing Mikhail Gorbachev, with the slogan perestroika Perestroika ( , Russian: IPA: ) is the Russian term (which passed into English) for the economic reforms introduced in June 1987 by the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. ... Rock and roll became known in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and quickly broke free from its western roots. ... The band, from the book All is very simple Mashina Vremeni (Маши́на вре́мени, Russian for Time Machine) is a legendary Russian rock group formed in the late 1960s in the Soviet Union. ... Center (or Tsentr, Russian: Центр) is a Russian-speaking band, which can be described as eclectic and experimental. ... Leningrad (Russian: Ленинград) may mean: St. ... Aquarium [Аква́риум] is a Russian rock group, formed in Leningrad in 1972 by Boris Grebenshchikov, then a student of Applied Mathematics at Leningrad State University, and Anatoly George Gunitsky, then a playwright and absurdist poet. ... Photograph of snow-covered Yekaterinburg Yekaterinburgs Church on the Blood, built on the spot where the Tsar and his family were murdered. ... In South African history, the Great Trek was an eastward and north-eastward migration of the Boers, descendants primarily of immigrants from western mainland Europe. ...


They formed active musical comminities. During Perestroika they became mainstream, notable bands of that time include Kino, Nautilus Pompilius, Alisa, Aria, DDT. Some of them are still active today. Poster showing Mikhail Gorbachev, with the slogan perestroika Perestroika ( , Russian: IPA: ) is the Russian term (which passed into English) for the economic reforms introduced in June 1987 by the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. ... Kino (Russian: Кино́, often written uppercase) was a Russian rock band headed by Viktor Tsoi. ... Nautilus Pompilius (Russian: ), sometimes abbreviated as Nau (Russian: ), was a prominent Russian rock band formed in Sverdlovsk (now Ekaterinburg) and active between 1983 and 1997. ... Alisa (АЛИСА) is a Russian rock music band. ... Aria (Russian: Ария) is a popular Russian heavy metal band that formed in 1985. ... DDT, 1987 For other uses: see DDT (disambiguation). ...


Lesser known but still popular bands playing in diverse styles were common, too. Notable examples are Zvuki Mu and Televizor. Russian rock band founded in Moscow in the early 1980s. ...


Post-Soviet Music

Middle 90x showed decline for Russian rock due to economical problems, changes in mentality and mass media reorientation. Rock and roll became known in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and quickly broke free from its western roots. ...


Still, there are many popular rock bands including Mumiy Troll, Zemfira, Splean and many still-functioning 80x bands. Mumiy Troll (Му́мий Тро́лль ) is a Russian rock group, founded in 1984 in Vladivostok by linguist Ilia Lagutenko (Илья Лагутенко). The literal name of the band, mummy troll, has no specific meaning in Russian, and is reminiscent of the Tove Jansson characters, the Moomintrolls. ... Poster advertising a Zemfira concert in St Petersburg in November 2005 Zemfira Talgatovna Ramazanova (Russian: ) is the leader and lead vocalist of the Russian rock group Zemfira (Zемфира, formerly Земфира). The group was formed in 1998 and has been immensely popular in Russia and other former Soviet republics. ... Splean (also transliterated Splin) (Cyrillic: спЛин) is a popular Russian rock band. ...


Heavy Metal: While Aria and its offspring Kipelov are still the most popular, new bands arose in genres like Power Metal (Catharsis, Epidemy), Progressive Metal (Orgia Pravednikov, Mechanical Poet), Pagan Metal (Butterfly Temple, Temnozor). Aria (Russian: Ария) is a popular Russian heavy metal band that formed in 1985. ... Kipelov (Кипелов) is a Russian heavy metal rock band. ... Catharsis is a russian power metal band. ... An epidemic is generally a widespread disease that affects many individuals in a population. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline for Music. ... Temnozor was formed in Obninsk, Russia, to express the pride of its members of being slavic, and also to express their hate towards judeo-christianity. ...


Alternative scene arose with bands such as Amatory, Psichea, 7000$.


Some folk rock bands (Melnitsa, Pelagaia) risen to popularity recently. Melnitsa (English translation - The Mill, Russian Мельница) - popular russian (Moscow) neo-folk-rock band. ...


Pop/Rock: t.A.T.u., Linda t. ... Svetlana Lyvovna Geiman (Russian: Светлана Львовна Гейман) (born April 29, 1975, in Kentau, a town on the border of China and Kazakhstan, known as Linda, is the vocalist of her own band, also named Linda. ...


Death Metal: Mortem, Hieronimus Bosch(musician), Hatecraft


Classical crossover: Ariaphonics


Electronic: Fizzarum, Solar X, Elochnyie Igrushki, SCSI-9, Gromov, ADD, Messer Für Frau Müller, Zvuki Mu, KLUtCh Russian rock band founded in Moscow in the early 1980s. ...


Ska Punk: Distemper, 7 Rasa, Elisium, Leningrad Leningrad (Ленинград in Russian) is a Russian ska punk band from Saint Petersburg (former Leningrad). ...


Folk music

Adygea

Main article: Music of Adygea Adygea is a region in Russia. ...


In recent years, Adygea has seen the formation of a number of new musical institutions. These include two orchestras, one of which (Russkaya Udal), uses folk instruments, and a chamber music theater. The Republic of Adygea (Russian: ; Adyghe: ) is a federal subject of Russia (a republic) enclaved within Krasnodar Krai. ...


Adygea's national anthem was written by Iskhak Shumafovich Mashbash; music—by Umar Khatsitsovich Tkhabisimov. Hymn of the Adygeya is the national anthem of the Republic of Adygeya in the Russian Federation. ...


Altay

Main article: Music of Altay Altay Republic is a region in Russia, composed primarily of ethnic Russians and Altaians. ...


Altay is a Central Asian region, known for traditional epics and a number of folk instruments. The Altai is a mountain range in central Asia, where Russia, China, Mongolia and Kazakhstan come together, and where the great rivers Irtysh, Ob and Yenisei have their sources. ...


Bashkir

Main article: Music of Bashkortostan The first major study of the music of Bashkortostan appeared in 1897, when ethnographer Rybakov S.G. wrote Music and Songs of the Urals Muslims and Studies of Their Way of Life. ...


The first major study of Bashkir music appeared in 1897, when ethnographer Rybakov S.G. wrote Music and Songs of the Ural's Muslims and Studies of Their Way of Life. Later, Lebedinskiy L.N. collected numerous folk songs in Bashkortostan beginning in 1930. The 1968 foundation of the Ufa State Institute of Arts sponsored research in the field. The Bashkirs, a Turkic people, live in Russia, mostly in the republic of Bashkortostan. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Republic of Bashkortostan, or Bashkiria (Russian: or ; Bashkir: ) is a federal subject of Russia (a republic). ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...


The kurai is the most important instrument in the Bashkir ensemble.


Buryatia

Main article: music of Buryatia Buryatia is a part of the Russian Federation. ...


The Buryats of the far east is known for distinctive folk music which uses the two-stringed horsehead fiddle, or morin khur. The style has no polyphony and has little melodic innovation. Narrative structures are very common, many of them long epics which claim to be the last song of a famous hero, such as in the Last Song of Rinchin Dorzhin. Modern Buryat musicians include the band Uragsha, which uniquely combines Siberian and Russian language lyrics with rock and Buryat folk songs. The Buryats, numbering approximately 436,000, are the largest ethnic minority group in Siberia and are mainly concentrated in their homeland, the Buryat Republic. ... Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Chechnya

Main article: Music of Chechnya Native musical instruments: The pondur is the oldest of musical instruments of the Chechens, comprising of three chords and a wooden casing. ...


Alongside the Chechen rebellion of the 1990s came a resurgence in Chechen national identity, of which music is a major part. People like Said Khachukayev became prominent promoting Chechen music.


The Chechen national anthem is said to be "Death or Freedom", an ancient song of uncertain origin. A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogizing the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a nations government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Death or Freedom(Russian : Смерть или свобода) is Chechen Republic of Ichkeria National anthem. ...


Dagestan

Main article: Music of Dagestan Dagestan is a region of Russia. ...


Dagestan's most famous composer may be Gotfrid Hasanov, who is said to be the first professional composer from Dagestan. He wrote the first Dagestani opera, Khochbar, in 1945, and recorded a great deal of folk music from all the peoples of Dagestan. The Republic of Dagestan IPA: (Russian: ), older spelling Daghestan, is a federal subject of the Russian Federation (a republic). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ...


Karelia

Main article: Music of Karelia Map showing the parts Karelia is traditionally divided into. ...


Karelians are Finnish, and so much of their music is the same as Finnish music. The Kalevala is a very important part of traditional music; it is a recitation of Finnish legends, and is considered an integral part of the Finnish folk identity. Map showing the parts Karelia is traditionally divided into. ... Genres Folk - Pop - Opera - Rock (Suomirock) - Hip hop - Trance Finno-Ugric music Estonia - Finland - Hungary - Khantia-Mansia - Komi Republic - Mari El - Mordovia - Nenetsia - Udmurtia Much of the music of Finland is influenced by Karelian traditional tunes and lyrics, as comprised in the Kalevala. ... The Kalevala is an epic poem which Elias Lönnrot compiled from Finnish folk lore in the 19th century. ...


The Karelian Folk Music Ensemble is a prominent folk group.


Russia

Main article: Ethnic Russian music Ethnic Russian music includes many varieties of folk, popular and classical traditions. ...

Carnival in Petrograd in about 1919
Carnival in Petrograd in about 1919

Archeology and direct evidence (such as the frescoes at the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev) show a variety of musical instruments in ancient Russia. Authentic folk instruments include the livenka (accordion) and woodwinds like zhaleika, svirel and kugikli, as well as numerous percussion instruments: buben, bubenci, kokshnik, korobochka, lozkhi, rubel, treschetka, vertushka and zvonchalka. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (627x640, 44 KB) From the Library of Congress TITLE: Musicians, Russian carnival, Petrograd CALL NUMBER: STEREO FOREIGN GEOG FILE - Russia--Petrograd [item] [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-67984 (b&w film copy neg. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (627x640, 44 KB) From the Library of Congress TITLE: Musicians, Russian carnival, Petrograd CALL NUMBER: STEREO FOREIGN GEOG FILE - Russia--Petrograd [item] [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-67984 (b&w film copy neg. ... Present exterior is the result of 17th-century remodeling. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Categories: Music stubs | Keyboard instruments | Free reed aerophones | Sets of free reeds ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation) This article is about the instrument as a whole. ... A woodwind instrument is a musical instrument in which sound is produced by blowing through a mouthpiece against an edge or by a vibrating reed, and in which the pitch is varied by opening or closing holes in the body of the instrument. ... Zhaleika (Жалейка in Russian, a. ... A percussion instrument can be any object which produces a sound by being struck with an implement, shaken, rubbed, scraped, or by any other action which sets the object into vibration. ... Kocek with tambourine 19th c. ...


Chastushkas are a kind of Russian folk song with a long history. They are typically rapped, and are humorous or satiric. Chastushka (часту́шка), a type of traditional Russian poetry, is a single quatrain in trochaic tetrameter with an abab or abcb rhyme scheme. ... who cares ...


Sakha

Main article: Music of Sakha The Sakha Republic is a part of Russia in Asia. ...


Shamanism remains an important cultural practice of the ethnic groups of Siberia and Sakhalin, where several dozen groups live. The Yakuts are the largest, and are known for their olonkho songs and the khomus, a Jew's harp. A shaman doctor of Kyzyl. ... Location of Sakhalin in the Western Pacific Sakhalin, GOST transliteration Sahalin, (Russian: , Korean: Traditional Chinese: 庫頁島; Simplified Chinese: 库页岛; pinyin: kùyèdÇŽo Japanese: 樺太 romaji: karafuto), also Saghalien, is a large elongated island in the North Pacific, lying between 45° 50 and 54° 24 N. It is part of the Russian... The Sakha (Yakutia) Republic (Russian: Респу́блика Саха́ (Яку́тия); Yakut: Саха Республиката) is a federal subject of... It has been suggested that Morsing be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Morsing be merged into this article or section. ...


Tatarstan

Main article: Music of Tatarstan Tatarstan is a part of Russia, inhabited by the Tatars. ...


Tatar folk music have rhythmic peculiarities and pentatonic intonation in common with nations of the Volga area, who are ethnically Finno-Ugric and Turkic. Singing girls, renowned for their subtlety and grace, are a prominent component of Tatar folk music. Instruments include the kubyz (violin), kurai (flute) and talianka (accordion). For other meanings of the word Volga see Volga (disambiguation) Волга Length 3,690 km Elevation of the source 225 m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed 1. ... Geographical distribution of Finno-Ugric (Finno-Permic in blue, Ugric in green). ... This article is about the various peoples speaking one of the Turkic languages. ... Jews harp, from an American Civil War camp near Winchester, Virginia Jews harp, Slovakia, Central Europe The Jews harp is one of the oldest musical instruments in the world. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... The flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation) This article is about the instrument as a whole. ...


Tuva

Main article: Music of Tuva Tuva is a part of Russia, inhabited by a people related to the nearby Mongolians. ...


Tuvan throat singing, or xoomii, is famous world-wide, primarily for its novelty. The style is highly unusual and foreign to most listeners, who typically find it inaccessible and amelodic. In throat singing, the natural harmonic resonances of the lips and mouth are tuned to select certain overtones. The style was first recorded by Ted Levin, who helped catalogue a number of different styles. These are include borbannadir (which is compared to the sound of a flowing river), sygyt (similar to whistling), xoomii, chylandyk (likened to chirping crickets) and ezengileer (like a horses trotting). Of particular international fame are the group Huun-Huur-Tu and master throat singer Kongar-ool Ondar. Throat singing, also known in the western world as overtone singing, harmonic singing, or harmonic chant; and many other regional names, is a type of singing that manipulates the harmonic resonances (or formants) created as air travels through the human vocal folds and out the lips. ... Xöömej (Tuvan language: Хөөмей, Mongolian:choomi, Simplified Chinese:呼麦, Traditional Chinese:呼麥), also spelled Xoomii, Khoomei, Khöömei, or Höömey, is a type of throat singing used in folk music from Tuva and Mongolia. ... An overtone is a sinusoidal component of a waveform, of greater frequency than its fundamental frequency. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Throat singing. ... Whistling is the production of sound by means of a constant breath of air from the mouth. ... Xöömej (Tuvan language: Хөөмей, Mongolian:choomi, Simplified Chinese:呼麦, Traditional Chinese:呼麥), also spelled Xoomii, Khoomei, Khöömei, or Höömey, is a type of throat singing used in folk music from Tuva and Mongolia. ... Physical representation of first (O1) and second (O2) overtones. ... Subfamilies See text Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as true crickets), are insects somewhat related to grasshoppers and more closely related to katydids or bush crickets (order Orthoptera). ... Ezengileer is a pulsing singing used in Tuvan folk music, mimicking the rhythms of horseback riding. ... Huun-Huur-Tu is a Tuvan throat singing group from Tuva, the region between Russia and Mongolia. ... Kongar-ool Ondar Kongar-ool Ondar is a master Tuvan throatsinger and a member of the Tuvan Parliament. ...


Ukrainian music

Main article: Music of Ukraine Ukraine is an Eastern European country, formerly part of the Soviet Union. ...


Though Ukraine is now an independent country, Ukrainians constitute the second-largest minority in Russia. The bandura is the most important and distinctive instrument of the Ukrainian folk tradition, and was utilized by the famous 15th century kobzars, a kind of wandering performing who composed dumy, or folk epics. A Bandura and a Torban, at the Royal College of Music Julian Kytasty, plays a prima Chernihiv bandura The Experimental Bandura Тrio: Jurij Fedynsky, Julian Kytasty,and Michael Andrec Ken Bloom, plays a Kharkiv bandura Yuri Singalevych(Lviv) playing a diatonic bandura c. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... A kobzar (kобзар in Ukrainian) was a Ukrainian wandering bard of Cossack times, who played a stringed instrument called a kobza to accompany the recitation of epic dumas. ... A Duma (Дума in Ukrainian) is an epic poem of 16th and 17th century Cossack Ukraine. ... The epic is a broadly defined genre of poetry, and one of the major forms of narrative literature. ...

Music of Eastern Europe

Belarus - Moldova - Russia - Ukraine Categories: Eastern European music | Music stubs ...

References

  • Broughton, Simon and Didenko, Tatiana. "Music of the People". 2000. In Broughton, Simon and Ellingham, Mark with McConnachie, James and Duane, Orla (Ed.), World Music, Vol. 1: Africa, Europe and the Middle East, pp 248-254. Rough Guides Ltd, Penguin Books. ISBN 1-85828-636-0

External links

  • Russian music
  • Community of Russian Music fans (in English)
  • MoscowComposer.com
  • Russian Chamber Jazz

  Results from FactBites:
 
Various Artists: The Rough Guide to the Music of Russia - PopMatters Music Review (1177 words)
The music on this CD is not that music, the officially sanctioned music created by those who had been streamed into the State-sponsored schools for their music education.
The pop music on this CD is difficult for a Western listener like me to absorb, first off because many of the techniques and flourishes that have found their way in from Western pop music were more than a bit out-dated before they were imported.
Her music, carried by her rich husky alto voice in front of folk choruses and instrumentation, is expansive and dignified, the sound honestly dramatic and deep, full of rich harmonies, and surprising melodic resolutions.
Music In Russia (1207 words)
The subject was national, the contrast between Polish and Russian subjects in the music was brilliant, and actual or simulated folk songs gave a local coloring highly grateful to the Russian audience.
The boy Anton showed such talent for music under the skillful and affectionate teaching of his mother, that at the age of ten he was brought before various musical authorities in Paris for opinions concerning his talent.
But his love for music asserted itself, and after a short career as pupil in the St. Petersburgh conservatory, he was appointed teacher of harmony in that institution, and entered upon his career as composer.
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