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Encyclopedia > Music of Nova Scotia
Music of Canada
Maritime Provinces (NS, PEI, NB)
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Yukon
Prairie Provinces (AB, MB, SK)
First Nations (Inuit, Dene, Innu)
Ontario, British Columbia, Quebec
Genres: Blues - Celtic - Classical - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Pop - Rock
Timeline and Samples
Awards Junos, Félixes, Hall of Fame, ECMAs, WCMAs, CASBYs, CRMAs, CCMAs, MMVAs, CUMAs
Charts Jam!, Chart, Exclaim!
Festivals CMW, NXNE, Halifax Pop Explosion, VFMF, Caribana, Stanfest, Harvest J&B
Print media CM, CMN, Chart, Exclaim!, The Record, RPM, The Coast
Music television MuchMusic, MMM, CMT Canada, MusiquePlus, MusiMax
National anthem "O Canada"

Music is a part of the warp and weft of the fabric of Nova Scotia's cultural life. This deep and lasting love of music is expressed the through the performance and enjoyment of all types and genres of music. While popular music from many genres has experienced almost two decades of explosive growth and success in Nova Scotia, the province remains best known for its folk and traditional based music. Canadian music includes pop and folk genres; the latter includes forms derived from England, France (particularly in Quebec), Ireland, Scotland, and various Inuit and Indian ethnic groups. ... The Maritime Provinces of Canada are culturally marked by the strong influence of Scottish and Irish settlers. ... Prince Edward Island is a Canadian province. ... New Brunswick is a Canadian province. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Nunavat is a province of Canada, inhabited mostly by Inuits and other members of the First Nations. ... The Northwest Territories are a territory of Canada. ... Prior to the 1896 Gold Rush, the area now known as Yukon Territory was sparsely populated by the Inuits. ... The city of Edmonton is the musical center of the Prairie Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta; it is sometimes called the Nashville of the North due to the predominance of country music there. ... The following are some musical figures associated with the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Manitoba has been well known for producing some of Canadas most famous music ever since the early 1960s. ... Saskatchewan is one of the Prairie Provinces of Canada. ... There are hundreds of tribes of Native Americans (called the First Nations in Canada), each with diverse musical practices, spread across the United States and Canada (excluding Hawaiian music). ... The Inuit live across the northern sections of Canada, especially in Yukon, Nunavat and Northwest Territories, as well as in Alaska and Greenland. ... The Dene live in northern Canada. ... The Innu are among the First Nations of Canada. ... Ontario is a Canadian province. ... Popular music Popular music in British Columbia is strongly associated with the city of Vancouver. ... Being a modern cosmopolitan society, today, all types of music can be found in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Celtic music is primarily associated with the folk traditions of Ireland, Scotland and Wales, as well as the popular styles derived from folk culture. ... The term classical music in this article refers to the western or European classical music tradition. ... Canadian hip hop developed much more slowly than the rock music scene. ... Canada has been a source of rock and roll music for decades, beginning with rockabilly singer Jack Scott in the 1950s. ... The Juno Awards are awards of achievement presented to Canadian musical artists and bands. ... The Félix Award is a music award, given on an annual basis to artists in Quebec. ... The Canadian Music Hall of Fame honors Canadian musicians for their lifetime achievements in music. ... Desktop Wallpaper from the ECMA website with the ECMA logo. ... The CASBY Awards are a Canadian award for independent and alternative music, presented annually by Toronto radio station CFNY. The name CASBY stands for Canadian Artists Selected By You. ... The Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA) was founded in 1976 as the Academy of Country Music Entertainment to organize, promote and develop a Canadian country music industry. ... Michelle Trachtenberg at the MuchMusic Video Awards preshow, 2004 The MuchMusic Video Awards (or the MMVAs, as they are also known) are an annual music award presented by the Canadian music video channel MuchMusic to honour the years best music videos. ... Established in 1996, the Urban Music Association of Canada (UMAC) is the voice of Canadas urban entertainment scene. ... Jam! is a Canadian website, which covers entertainment news. ... Chart is a monthly Canadian music magazine. ... Exclaim! (a/k/a !*@#) is a monthly Canadian music magazine. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as; musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... CMW 2007 logo Canadian Music Week (or CMW) is an industry conference and music festival held over four days in various venues throughout Toronto. ... North by Northeast (or NXNE) is an annual 3-day live music festival and music conference in Toronto, Ontario held the second weekend each June. ... Featuring the very best in new and innovative music from Halifax, Canada and around the world, the Halifax Pop Explosion a small annual music festival that takes place every fall in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Founded in 1993, the Halifax Pop Explosion has actually been three different events that are... The Vancouver Folk Music Festival takes place in the third weekend of July. ... Caribana is a festival of Caribbean culture and traditions held each summer in the city of Toronto in Ontario, Canada. ... The Stan Rogers Folk Festival, informally known as Stanfest, is an annual three-day music festival held in Canso, Nova Scotia. ... The Harvest Jazz & Blues Festival is an anual music festival help in downtown Fredericton, New Brunswick that features Blues, Jazz & World music. ... Chart is a monthly Canadian music magazine. ... Exclaim! (a/k/a !*@#) is a monthly Canadian music magazine. ... RPM was a Canadian music industry publication that featured song and album charts for Canada. ... The Coast is a free weekly newspaper in Halifax Regional Municipality, Canada. ... MuchMusic (often called Much) is a Canadian cable television specialty channel dedicated to music and music related programs. ... MuchMoreMusic is a Canadian cable music specialty television channel, owned by CHUM Limited. ... Country Music Television or often just refered to as CMT is a Canadian cable specialty television channel, which airs programming devoted to country music; in the form of music videos, award shows, concerts, and more. ... MusiquePlus is a Canadian French language cable television music specialty channel that launched on September 4, 1986, owned by media conglomerate Astral Media and CHUM Limited with both companies holding a 50% stake in the channel. ... MusiMax is a Canadian French language cable television music specialty channel operating out of Montreal, Quebec. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogizing the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a nations government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... O Canada is the national anthem of Canada. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian... “Folk song” redirects here. ... A tradition is a story or a custom that is memorized and passed down from generation to generation, originally without the need for a writing system. ...


Nova Scotia's folk music is characteristically Scottish in character, and traditions from Scotland are kept very traditional in form, in some cases more so than in Scotland. This is especially true of the island of Cape Breton, one of the major international centers for Celtic music. Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada NASA landsat photo of Cape Breton Island Cape Breton Island (French: île du Cap-Breton, Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Cheap Breatuinn, Míkmaq: Únamakika, simply: Cape Breton) is an island on the Atlantic coast of North America. ... Celtic music is a term utilized by record companies, music stores and music magazines to describe a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic peoples of Western Europe. ...

Contents

Founding cultures

Nova Scotia is one of three Canadian Maritime Provinces, or simply, The Maritimes. When combined with Newfoundland and Labrador the region is known as the Atlantic Provinces, or Atlantic Canada. The Maritime provinces See also Maritime province for disambiguation. ... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Latin: Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Capital St. ... The four Canadian Atlantic provinces. ...


Despite the small population of the province, Nova Scotia's music and culture is influenced by several well established cultural groups, that are sometimes referred to as the "Founding Cultures."


Originally populated by the Mi'kmaq First Nation, the first European settlers were the French, who founded Acadia in 1604. Nova Scotia was briefly colonized by Scottish settlers in 1620, though by 1624 the Scottish settlers had been removed by treaty and the area was turned over to the French until the mid-1700s. After the defeat of the French and prior expulsion of the Acadians, settlers of English, Irish, Scottish and African descent began arriving on the shores of Nova Scotia. The Mikmaq The Mikmaq (; also spelled Míkmaq, Migmaq, Micmac or MicMac) are a First Nations people, indigenous to northeastern New England, Canadas Atlantic Provinces, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ... First Nations is the current title used by Canada to describe the various societies of the indigenous peoples, called Native Americans in the U.S. They have also been known as Indians, Native Canadians, Aboriginal Americans, Amer-Indians, or Aboriginals, and are officially called Indians in the Indian Act, which... The national flag of Acadia, adopted in 1884. ... Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 – Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ... Year 1620 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... Events and trends The Bonneville Slide blocks the Columbia River near the site of present-day Cascade Locks, Oregon with a land bridge 200 feet (60 m) high. ...


Settlement was greatly accelerated by the resettlement of Loyalists in Nova Scotia during the period following the end of the American revolutionary war. It was during this time that a large African Nova Scotian community took root, populated by freed slaves and Loyalist blacks and their families, who had fought for the crown in exchange for land. This community later grew when the Royal Navy began intercepting slave ships destined for the United States, and deposited these free slaves on the shores of Nova Scotia. For the township in Canada, see Loyalist, Ontario In general, a loyalist is an individual who is loyal to the powers that be. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries French Monarchy Spanish Empire Dutch Republic Oneida and Tuscarora tribes Polish volunteers Prussian volunteers Kingdom of Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy Hessian mercenaries Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert de La Fayette Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz Kościuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben Sir... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ...


Later, in the 1800s the Irish Famine and Scottish Highland Clearances resulted in large influxes of migrants with Celtic cultural roots, which helped to define the dominantly celtic character of Cape Breton and the north mainland of the province. This Celtic, or Gaelic culture was so pervasive that at the outset of World War I reporters from London, England were horrified when some of the first regiments to arrive in England from Canada piped themselves ashore, styled themselves as "Highland Regiments" and spoke Scots Gaelic as their primary language. Beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (1805 - 1815). ... Starvation during the famine The Irish Potato Famine, also called The Great Famine or The Great Hunger (Irish: An Gorta Mór), is the name given to a famine which struck Ireland between 1846 and 1849. ... The Highland Clearances (Scottish Gaelic: Fuadaich nan Gàidheal, the expulsion of the Gael) is a name given to the forced displacement of the population of the Scottish Highlands from their ancient ways of warrior clan subsistence farming, leading to mass emigration. ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ...


Traditional music in the modern era

Scottish traditional music has remained vibrant on Cape Breton into the 21st century, and has produced several performers of international renown. The first major musician from the island was Rita MacNeil, a mainstream singer whose music did not draw deeply on Celtic traditions. She was followed by Stan Rogers, who was born in Ontario to a Nova Scotian family, and sang ballads of sea-going Maritimers, though again little reflecting the area's Scottish traditions. The 21st century is the present century of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Rita MacNeil (born May 28, 1944) is a Canadian country and folk singer from the community of Big Pond on Nova Scotias Cape Breton Island. ... Stanley Allison Rogers (November 29, 1949 – June 2, 1983) was a Canadian folk musician and songwriter. ...


The first popular musician who showed Nova Scotia's Celtic heritage was John Allan Cameron, a singer and guitarist, and son of legendary fiddler Katie Ann Cameron, who was herself the sister of the music collector Dan Rory MacDonald. John Allan Cameron CM (16 December 1938 - 22 November 2006) was a Canadian folk singer, known as The Godfather of Celtic Music in Canada. ... The term fiddle refers to a violin when used in folk music. ... Dan Rory MacDonald (1911 - 1976), born in Judique, Inverness County on Cape Breton Island, became one of Cape Bretons most prolific composers of fiddle tunes. ...


More recent performers with a Celtic sound in their music include the pop crooning of Sarah McLachlan from Halifax, Mary Jane Lamond and flautist Chris Norman. Sarah Ann McLachlan, OC, OBC (born January 28, 1968) is a Canadian musician, singer and songwriter. ... Motto: {{Unhide = {{{}}}}} E Mari Merces (Wealth from the Sea) Logo: Location City Information Established: April 1, 1996 Area: urban area 79. ... Mary Jane Lamond is a Canadian folk musician who performs renditions of traditional Gaelic folk songs from Cape Breton Island. ... The flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ...


Cape Breton has a well-known bagpipe tradition, and has produced some well-known pipers, including Angus MacDonald, Barry Shears and Jamie MacInnes. A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... The names Angus Macdonald, Angus MacDonald, or Angus McDonald may mean: Angus Peter McDonald (1813-1889), Canadian Conservative MP for Middlesex West Angus McDonald (politician) (1867-1926), Canadian independent MP for Timiskaming Angus Lewis Macdonald (1890-1954), Canadian liberal MP for Kingston, and Premier of Nova Scotia Angus Ronald Macdonald...


It is, however, the fiddling tradition which Nova Scotia and Cape Breton is best known for, and the biggest name in this tradition is Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald from Cape Breton. Also of his generation were a litany of names now known in the international scene, though renown came late for most; these include Joe MacLean, Bill Lamey, Buddy MacMaster, Alex Francis MacKay, Dan Joe MacInnes, Angus Chisholm, Dan Hughie MacEachern, Donald Angus Beaton, Theresa MacLellan, Joe Cormier and Paddy LeBlanc. Many of these were first given distribution outside of the area by American folk label Rounder Records, which began a Cape Breton unit in the early 1970s. Winston Scotty Fitzgerald (1914-1987) was a renowned Cape Breton fiddler. ... Hugh Alan Buddy MacMaster, CM , ONS , LL.D (born October 18, 1924) is one of the most renowned artists in the tradition of Cape Breton fiddle music. ... Angus Chisholm was a Cape Breton fiddler. ... Rounder Records, originally of Cambridge, Massachusetts but now based in Burlington, is an independent record label founded in 1970 by Ken Irwin, Bill Nowlin and Marian Leighton-Levy, while all three were still university students. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ...


The Rankin Family did more than any group to bring Cape Breton folk music to mainstream audiences in Canada and abroad. They had performed as a family since childhood, playing traditional music that gradually became more modern as their fame grew. The Rankin Family is a Canadian folk music family group from Mabou, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. ...


Perhaps the most well-known modern Cape Breton fiddler is Natalie MacMaster, who comes from a line of musicians that includes Buddy MacMaster, Wendy MacIsaac and Ashley MacIsaac. Her cousin, Ashley MacIsaac, is notable for having achieved success playing both traditional music and radical musical fusions, exemplified by his Hi™ How Are You Today? (1995), a landmark recording. Natalie MacMaster (born 1973) is an award-winning fiddler from the rural community of Troy in Inverness County, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... Hugh Alan Buddy MacMaster, CM , ONS , LL.D (born October 18, 1924) is one of the most renowned artists in the tradition of Cape Breton fiddle music. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hiâ„¢ How Are You Today? is an album by Ashley MacIsaac, released in 1995 on A&M Records Ancient Music imprint. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Popular music of Nova Scotia

Despite the dominance of traditional based music, both as a form of cultural expression, and as a means to brand the tourism experience for visitors to Nova Scotia, the province also has a long history of producing successful popular music acts. Many notable, internationally known artists are from Nova Scotia, in a wide variety of genres. Tourists on Oʻahu, Hawaii Tourism is travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes, and also refers to the provision of services in support of this act. ...


The early years

As early as the 1930s the music of Nova Scotia was entertaining the world. Hank Snow, born and raised in Brooklyn, Nova Scotia, was signed to RCA Records in 1936, but became famous in 1950 when he was invited to appear at the Grand Ole Opry. That was also the year he released "I'm Movin' On," his first massive hit single. The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Clarence Eugene Snow (May 9, 1914 – December 20, 1999), better known as Hank Snow, was a Hall of Fame country music singer and songwriter. ... RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Portia White of Truro, Nova Scotia, one of the greatest contralto voices in the history of Canadian classical music, made her stage debut in 1941. White went on to become an internationally known and respected performer. Portia May White (June 24, 1911-February 13, 1968), was a singer who achieved international fame because of her voice and stage presence. ... One of Truros tree sculptures Truro (2001 population 11,457; area population 44,276) is a town in central Nova Scotia, Canada. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ...


The 1970s & 1980s

The pop and country sounds of the 1970s were exemplified by Springhill, Nova Scotia native Anne Murray. She had a series of top 10 hits world-wide starting with "Snowbird" in 1970, and continues to be a major concert performer. Possibly the most famous rock band from the 1970s was progressive rockers April Wine, but other bands such as Peppertree, Dutch Mason and Matt Minglewood enjoyed a great degree of national and international success. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ... Springhill is a small Canadian town in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. ... Anne Murray CC, ONS (born Morna Anne Murray June 20, 1945), is a Canadian singer born in Springhill, Nova Scotia, known for her rich alto voice and her taste in choosing songs that appeal to Pop, Country and Adult Contemporary listeners alike. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... April Wine is a Canadian rock band formed in 1969. ... Species Many, including: Schinus angustifolius Schinus antiarthriticus Schinus areira Schinus bituminosis Schinus huigan Schinus occidentalis Schinus mellisii Schinus molle Schinus terebinthefolius Schinus is a genus of trees in the Family Anacardiaceae comprising the pepper trees, most notably Schinus molle, the Peruvian pepper tree and S. terebinthefolius, the Brazilian pepper tree... Prime Minister Of The Blues, Norman Dutch Mason (born February 19, 1938 in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, died December 23, 2006 in Truro, Nova Scotia) was a Canadian singer, guitarist, and pianist. ... Matt Minglewood (born Roy Alexander Batherson, 31 January 1947 in Moncton, New Brunswick) is a Canadian musician whos style can be described as a blend of country, blues, folk, roots and rock. ...


As the music scene in Nova Scotia started to coalesce around Halifax and its emerging underground scene, new sounds and new styles of music started to be heard. Both the punk and New Wave movements found fertile ground in Halifax, the latter producing a band whose lead singer, Sarah McLachlan, would be snapped up in the 1980s and moved to Vancouver, to later become a huge international star. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... New Wave is a term that has been used to describe many developments in music, but is most commonly associated with a movement in Western popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s inspired by the punk rock movement. ... Sarah Ann McLachlan, OC, OBC (born January 28, 1968) is a Canadian musician, singer and songwriter. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


It was toward the end of the 1980s that the music scene in Nova Scotia seemed to truly become an industry, with Nova Scotians leading the creation of the East Coast Music Awards as well as establishing the Music Industry Association of Nova Scotia. Performers as diverse as rock band Blackpool, hip hop artists MC G and Cool J, and celtic pop darlings the Rankin Family all achieved national radio & video play, major label record deals, and national media recognition. Desktop Wallpaper from the ECMA website with the ECMA logo. ...


1990s and beyond

This was followed by the Halifax music explosion of the 1990s, which saw bands such as Sloan, Eric's Trip, Jale, Thrush Hermit and Newfoundland emigres The Hardship Post obtain international recognition and recording deals with labels such as DGC and Sub Pop. It was during this time that the internationally known Halifax Pop Explosion music festival was founded (in 1993). For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Sloan is a power pop quartet from Halifax, Nova Scotia. ... Erics Trip were a Canadian indie rock band hailing from Moncton, New Brunswick. ... Jale was a rock band from Halifax, Nova Scotia, on the east coast of Canada. ... Thrush Hermit was a Halifax, Nova Scotia based alternative rock band formed in 1992 by Joel Plaskett (vocals, guitar), Rob Benvie (vocals, guitar), Ian McGettigan (vocals, bass), and Michael Catano (drums). ... Hardship Post, later The Hardship Post, was a rock band that formed in Newfoundland and moved to Halifax during the Halifax Pop Explosion of the 1990s. ... Geffen Records DARPA Grand Challenge ... Sub Pop is a record label in Seattle, Washington that achieved fame in the 1990s for first signing Nirvana, Soundgarden, Mudhoney and many other bands from the local Seattle music scene. ... Featuring the very best in new and innovative music from Halifax, Canada and around the world, the Halifax Pop Explosion a small annual music festival that takes place every fall in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Founded in 1993, the Halifax Pop Explosion has actually been three different events that are...


Though the initial excitement generated during this time has abated, Nova Scotia remains at the forefront of the internationally successful Canadian music wave, with artists who came out of that era, such as Joel Plaskett and hip hop hero Buck 65 continuing to gain world-wide respect and attention. Other acts such as Antigonish's The Trews, and Halifax based Jimmy Swift Band have all experienced considerable success nationally. Joel Plaskett is a Canadian rock musician, born and raised in Halifax, Nova Scotia. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The Trews are a Canadian rock group from Antigonish, Nova Scotia, consisting of vocalist Colin MacDonald, guitarist John-Angus MacDonald, bassist Jack Syperek, and drummer Sean Dalton. ... The Jimmy Swift Band (JSB) is a Rock/Jam/Electronica band based out of Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada. ...


In the past decade, a number of independent record labels, have emerged to support the growth of the indie rock. Dependent Music publishes music by popular acts such as Wintersleep, Jill Barber, and Holy Fuck. BelowMeMusic promotes the Jimmy Swift Band, Slowcoaster, and Grand Theft Bus. An independent record label is variously described as a record label operating without the funding (or outside the organizations) of the major record labels, and/or a label that subscribes to indie philosophies such as DIY and anti-corporate art. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Dependent Music is a Canadian independent record label, owned and operated by musician Brian Borcherdt. ... Wintersleep are a Canadian indie rock band from Halifax, Nova Scotia also band member Ross Andrews hometown amherst. ... Jill Barber is an award-winning Canadian singer-songwriter based in Halifax; her 2005 album was nominated for two ECMAs. ... Holy Fuck is a lo-fi improvisational electronica band from Toronto, Canada. ... Slowcoaster is a Canadian indie rock band from Sydney, Nova Scotia. ... Grand Theft Bus is a rock band from various regions of New Brunswick, Canada. ...


Emergence of hip hop

While historically isolated from the Toronto-centric Canadian hip hop scene, Nova Scotia has an increasing number of nationally known acts. In the 1980s, bands such as Down By Law, MC G and Cool J, and Hip Club Groove experienced degrees of national success.


In the 1990s and early 21st century, many artists have achieved national success. Buck 65, from Mount Uniacke, has released several well received records internationally. Sixtoo is signed to and released several records on Montreal label Ninjatune. Universal Soul have seen considerable national exposure since being nominated for two MuchMusic Video Awards in 2003. Classified is an MC and producer nominated for a 2004 CUMA. The Goods, with members Kunga 219 and Gordski, have successfully toured across North America. Kaleb Simmonds achieved a national reputation after a showing in the Top Ten on the first season of Canadian Idol. Scratch Bastid came in second in the 2004 Canadian DMC finals in Winnipeg and won the 2004 Scribble Jam in Cincinnati. This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Mount Uniacke is a town in Hants County, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... Vaughn Robert Squire, aka Sixtoo (formerly CL S.C.A.R.R.) is a hip hop artist originally from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who now lives in Montreal, Quebec. ... Michelle Trachtenberg at the MuchMusic Video Awards preshow, 2004 The MuchMusic Video Awards (or the MMVAs, as they are also known) are an annual music award presented by the Canadian music video channel MuchMusic to honour the years best music videos. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Canadian Idol is a reality television show on the Canadian television network CTV, based on the popular British show Pop Idol and its American counterpart American Idol. ...


See also

A Quiet Revolution - Halifax Music Blog Cape Breton fiddling is a lively regional violin style which falls within the Celtic Music idiom. ... Featuring the very best in new and innovative music from Halifax, Canada and around the world, the Halifax Pop Explosion a small annual music festival that takes place every fall in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Founded in 1993, the Halifax Pop Explosion has actually been three different events that are...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Music of Nova Scotia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1518 words)
Music is a part of the warp and weft of the fabric of Nova Scotia's cultural life.
Nova Scotia's folk music is characteristically Scottish in character, and traditions from Scotland are kept very traditional in form, in some cases more so than in Scotland.
Nova Scotia was briefly colonized by Scottish settlers in 1620, though by 1624 the Scottish settlers had been removed by treaty and the area was turned over to the French until the mid-1700s.
Explore Nova Scotia Music - Celtic, Acadian, Traditional and Contemporary (369 words)
There is a tradition of music here in our province that began in kitchens and barns and has grown to impact the globe.
Rob had a vision that our music should have a means to elevate it to a larger audience, a launch pad, if you will, to gain the attention of people outside of our region and as a way to celebrate our musical accomplishments and honor our heritage.
Explore Nova Scotia is a proud sponsor of Communities in Bloom.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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