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Encyclopedia > Music of New Zealand
Music of New Zealand v  d  e ]
Indigenous Māori music
Other main cultures Britain, Europe, Polynesia, Australia
Genres Classical · Hip hop · Jazz · Country · Rock · Indie · Reggae · Blues
Organisations RIANZ [1] · SOUNZ · CANZ
Awards "Tui" NZ Music Awards
Charts RIANZ offical chart
Festivals Big Day Out · Parachute · Nambassa · Tahora · Rhythm & Vines
Media Radio with Pictures · Radio Hauraki · Concert FM
Notable songs Po Kare Kare Ana · Slice of Heaven · Ka Mate · Not Given Lightly · Six Months in a Leaky Boat
National anthem God Defend New Zealand

(also God Save the Queen) The Māori are the native peoples of New Zealand. ... The music of Europe includes the music of Western Europe, Central Europe, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe. ... Polynesia is a group of island chains spread across much of the Pacific Ocean, and includes many countries and territories. ... Hip hop is originally an African American cultural movement, composed of four parts: rapping, DJing, graffiti art and breakdancing. ... Kiwi rock is a term used informally to describe New Zealand rock music and the culture surrounding rock music in New Zealand. ... New Zealand reggae is the New Zealand (Aotearoa) variation of the musical genre reggae. ... The history of blues in New Zealand dates from the 1960s. ... The Recording Industry Association of New Zealand (RIANZ) is a non-profit trade association of record producers, distributors and recording artists in New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Music Awards, colloquially known as the Tuis, have been awarded yearly since 1966 to outstanding New Zealand musicians and groups. ... Music Festivals have a long and chequered history in New Zealand. ... The Big Day Out (BDO) is an annual music festival that tours Australia and New Zealand which originated in Sydney in 1992. ... The Parachute Music Festival is held annually at Mystery Creek, Hamilton, New Zealand. ... Nambassa was a series of hippie-conceived festivals held between 1976 and 1981 on large farms around Waihi and Waikino in New Zealand. ... Tahora is the name of a couple of small settlements in New Zealand. ... Rhythm and Vines is a New Years Eve music festival held in Waiohika Estate vineyard, ten minutes from Gisborne city. ... Television New Zealand broadcast Radio with Pictures from 1977 to 1986 as a programme on popular and alternative music, presented by Phil OBrien, then by Karen Hay and finally by Dick Driver. ... Radio Hauraki is a New Zealand radio network, specialising in AOR and classic rock. ... Concert FM is a New Zealand radio network owned by Radio New Zealand. ... Slice Of Heaven is a single by New Zealand singer/songwriter Dave Dobbyn featuring Herbs, released in 1986 alongside the animated motion picture, Footrot Flat: The Dogs Tail Tale. ... Te Rauparaha, Ngāti Toa chief, 1840s This article is about a haka in its traditional context. ... Chris Knox in the music video for Not Given Lightly Chris Knox (born September 2, 1952) is a New Zealand rock and roll musician who emerged during the punk rock era with his bands The Enemy and Toy Love. ... Split Enz was a successful New Zealand band during the late 1970s and the early 1980s featuring brothers Tim Finn and Neil Finn. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogising the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognised either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... God Defend New Zealand is one of the national anthems of New Zealand, together with God Save the Queen. Although they both have equal status, only God Defend New Zealand is used, and most New Zealanders would be unaware that the country has two national anthems. ... Publication of an early version in The Gentlemans Magazine, 15 October 1745. ...

New Zealand music is a vibrant expression of the culture of New Zealand. As the largest nation in Polynesia, New Zealand's music is influenced by the indigenous Māori and immigrants from the Pacific region. The origins of New Zealand's musical culture lie in its British colonial history, with contributions from Europe and America. As the nation has grown and established its own culture, local artists have mixed these styles with local influences to create music that is uniquely New Zealand in style. There is no one culture of New Zealand. ... Carving from the ridgepole of a Māori house, ca 1840 Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ...


The most popular styles of the late twentieth century were rock and hip hop, both genres garnished with New Zealand's unique Pacific influences. By the twenty-first century, roots, reggae, dub and electronica were all popular with local artists. New Zealand has maintained a thriving alternative scene for several decades. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Roots reggae is a spiritual Rastafari subgenre of reggae music with lyrics that often include praise for Jah Ras Tafari Makonnen, Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia; the Emperor of Ethiopia. ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see Dub. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Electronic music. ... The term alternative rock or alternative music1 was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ...


Māori have also developed a popular music scene, and incorporated reggae, rock and roll and other influences, most popularly including Te Vaka, who have Māori, white and other Polynesian members. New Zealand reggae bands like Herbs, Katchafire and Fat Freddy's Drop are highly popular. The 1990s saw the rise of hip hop groups like Moana & the Moahunters and the Upper Hutt Posse, primarily based out of South Auckland (see below). Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Te Vaka is an Oceanian musical group. ... New Zealand reggae is the New Zealand (Aotearoa) variation of the musical genre reggae. ... The Herbs were a New Zealand reggae vocal group from 1979 until 1995. ... Katchafire are a contemporary New Zealand reggae band. ... Fat Freddys Drop Fat Freddys Drop are a 7 piece New Zealand roots/dub/reggae/jazz/soul band. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Moana and the Moahunters was a Maori hip-hop group from New Zealand, led by Moana. ... The Upper Hutt Posse is a musical group named after the city of Upper Hutt in Wellington (region), New Zealand. ... South Auckland is a common name for a part of Auckland, New Zealand. ... New Zealand music is a vibrant expression of the culture of New Zealand. ...


In the traditional styles, New Zealand's geographic isolation and cultural milieu perhaps contributed to the slow growth of formal traditions based on European classical music, however these styles have also gained broad recognition. Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ...

Contents

Rock

Dave Dobbyn in the music video for Loyal.

Distanced from overseas cultural centers, the New Zealand rock scene began in earnest[1][2] during the 1960s, when the British Invasion reached the country's musicians. A number of garage bands were formed, all with a high-energy performing style. Though few became internationally (or even nationally) famous, they stirred into life a number of fertile local scenes, full of musicians and fans. Much of their material has been collected by John Baker for his Wild Things collections. Single frame from the music video for Dave Dobbyns song Loyal. ... Single frame from the music video for Dave Dobbyns song Loyal. ... Dave Dobbyn (born January 3, 1957) is a musician, singer-songwriter and record producer from New Zealand. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... Wild Things is a 1998 erotic crime film starring Matt Dillon, Kevin Bacon, Denise Richards, Neve Campbell and Bill Murray. ...


Perhaps the most well-known contribution by a New Zealander to the world of popular music is the enduring Rocky Horror Show musical, written by Richard O'Brien, and first performed on stage in London during 1973. The Rocky Horror Show was a long running stage musical (in London initially, on June 16, 1973) which inspired the movie The Rocky Horror Picture Show. ... Richard OBrien (born Richard Timothy Smith on March 25, 1942 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England) is an English writer, actor, television presenter and theatre performer. ...


Back home, a more mainstream hard rock sound had developed in New Zealand by the early 1970s, exemplified by bands like Human Instinct with Billy T.K., Space Farm, Living Force, Dragon, and Hello Sailor. “Hard Rock” redirects here. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Billy TK (Billy Te Kahika) is a Māori guitarist, born in Palmerston North, New Zealand. ... Dragon was the name of a popular New Zealand rock band, led by lead singer Marc Hunter and his brother Todd Hunter. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


New Zealand's size meant that many of the country's more prominent mainstream bands found their largest audiences in Australia. Of these, perhaps the most successful has been Split Enz, founded by Tim Finn and Phil Judd in the early 1970s. The addition of Tim's younger brother Neil after Judd's departure led to a more accessible style and several big hits. After the demise of Split Enz, Neil Finn went on to found the highly successful Crowded House. Split Enz was a successful New Zealand band during the late 1970s and the early 1980s featuring brothers Tim Finn and Neil Finn. ... Live in Dublin 2007 Brian Timothy “Tim” Finn OBE (born June 25, 1952) is a singer and songwriter. ... Philip Judd is a singer/songwriter & one of New Zealands most acclaimed musicians. ... Neil Mullane Finn OBE (born May 27, 1958 in Te Awamutu, New Zealand) is a singer and songwriter and one of New Zealands foremost musicians. ... Crowded House is a rock group formed in Melbourne, Australia, and led by New Zealand musician and singer-songwriter Neil Finn. ...


In the mid-1990s, the Otara, Auckland group OMC, led by Pauly Fuemana, scored a worldwide hit with the song "How Bizarre," which to this day is noted for its beats-and-acoustic-guitar production. Locally, the single sold over 35,000 copies (3½ times platinum), a figure not exceeded in New Zealand as of 2005. Otara is a suburb of Manukau City, one of the cities which make up the Auckland metropolitan area in the North Island of New Zealand. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... OMC is a music group from Otara, Auckland, New Zealand which had a worldwide hit with the song How Bizarre in 1996. ...

Promotional image for Bic Runga's album Birds.

Other mainstream rock acts from New Zealand to have achieved success include Th'Dudes, Shona Laing, The Exponents and Dave Dobbyn. More recent mainstream bands include The Mutton Birds, Strawpeople, Bic Runga, Shihad, The Feelers, Zed, Goodshirt, The Hybrid, Pluto, The Datsuns, Evermore, The Bleeders, and Blindspott. Image File history File links Bic-Runga-Birds2. ... Image File history File links Bic-Runga-Birds2. ... Briolette Kah Bic Runga (born 13 January 1976) MNZM is a New Zealand singer-songwriter whose first solo album, Drive, debuted at number one in the New Zealand charts, and has since become one of the highest-selling New Zealand artists of our time. ... ThDudes were a late 1970s and early 1980s pop/rock band from New Zealand. ... Shona Laing is a New Zealand born musician. ... The Exponents are a New Zealand rock group. ... Dave Dobbyn (born January 3, 1957) is a musician, singer-songwriter and record producer from New Zealand. ... The Mutton Birds are a band from New Zealand formed in 1991 by Don McGlashan, Ross Burge, and David Long. ... Briolette Kah Bic Runga (born 13 January 1976) MNZM is a New Zealand singer-songwriter whose first solo album, Drive, debuted at number one in the New Zealand charts, and has since become one of the highest-selling New Zealand artists of our time. ... Shihad is an alternative rock and post heavy metal band (with elements of Industrial Rock) originally from Wellington, New Zealand, where they formed in 1988. ... The Feelers are a New Zealand Rock band formed in the early 1990s in Christchurch by James Reid (singer/guitarist), Matthew Thomas (Bass) and Hamish Gee (Drums). ... Zed are a pop/rock four-piece from Christchurch, New Zealand. ... Goodshirt was an innovative New Zealand pop/rock band from Grey Lynn, Auckland. ... Pluto is a New Zealand rock band from Auckland. ... The Datsuns are a New Zealand hard rock band formed in 2000. ... Evermore is a New Zealand alternative rock band. ... The Bleeders on the cover of their single So Lonely The Bleeders are a Punk/Hardcore band from New Zealand. ... Blindspott is a popular nu metal/alternative metal band from Waitakere, New Zealand. ...


Following international trends, New Zealand's own hard rock scene became popular in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Among the most active cities in modern New Zealand rock and punk are Christchurch, Palmerston North, Wellington, and Auckland. Important bands include Elemeno P, The Mint Chicks, The Rock and Roll Machine, Deja Voodoo, and The Checks. Christchurch (Māori: ) is the regional capital of Canterbury, New Zealand. ... Palmerston North (Māori: ) is the main city of the Manawatu-Wanganui region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... For the first Duke of Wellington, see Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... Elemeno P are a New Zealand based band. ... The Mint Chicks are an experimental Powerpop group from Auckland, New Zealand. ... Deja Voodoo began as the fictional house band for the New Zealand show Back Of The Y Masterpiece Television. ...


Hip hop

Main article: New Zealand hip hop
Che Fu's music has topped New Zealand's charts for a decade.

The genesis of New Zealand hip hop began from such elements as the release of the 1979 US gangster movie The Warriors, and the rise of the breakdancing craze, both of which emanated from New York City. Breakdancing was one of the five elements of the original hip hop culture. The others were graffiti, rapping, DJing and beatboxing. Hip hop is originally an African American cultural movement, composed of four parts: rapping, DJing, graffiti art and breakdancing. ... Image File history File links Chefu. ... Image File history File links Chefu. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... The Warriors is a 1979 film directed by Walter Hill and based on the 1965 novel by Sol Yurick. ... A breakdancer performing a one-handed freeze (also known as a pike) in the streets of Paris. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A breakdancer performing a one-handed freeze (also known as a pike) in the streets of Paris. ... For other uses, see Graffiti (disambiguation). ... Main article: Hip hop music For the English folk dance, see Rapper sword. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ...


Considered by most to be the first hip-hop record, The Sugarhill Gang's "Rapper's Delight" had been a surprise American hit in 1979 and was released in New Zealand a year later, where it stayed on the charts for some time. Breakdancing and graffiti art had become relatively common in urban areas, like Wellington and Christchurch by 1983. The Sugarhill Gang is an American hip hop group, known mostly for one hit, Rappers Delight, the first hip hop single to become a Top 40 hit. ... Rappers Delight is a 1979 single by American hip hop trio The Sugarhill Gang; it was one of the first hip hop hit singles. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ...


Most of the first hip hop performers from the country, such as Dalvanius Prime, whose "Poi E" was a major hit, were Māori. "Poi E" had no rapping and was not pure hip hop. It was basically a novelty record intended as a soundtrack for dancing. Even so, it marked a shift from reggae and funk as the previously most favoured genre of Māori musicians. Maui Dalvanius Prime (January 16, 1948 – October 3, 2002) was a New Zealand entertainer and songwriter. ... Main article: Hip hop music For the English folk dance, see Rapper sword. ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ...


At first apolitical fun-rhyming, many hip-hop raps developed a social conscience in the second half of the 1980s. Inspired by the example of US outfit Public Enemy, Hip hop's new 'political' messages of persecution and racism resonated with many Māori musicians. The first entire album of locally-produced hip hop was Upper Hutt Posse's E Tu EP, from 1988. E Tu was partially in Māori and partially in English, and its lyrics were politically-charged. Public Enemy, also known as PE, is a hip hop group from Long Island, New York, known for their politically charged lyrics, criticism of the media, and active interest in the concerns of the African American community. ... The Upper Hutt Posse is a musical group named after the city of Upper Hutt in Wellington (region), New Zealand. ... // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


In the twenty-first century, New Zealand hip hop went from strength to strength with the added input of Pacific Island musicians, creating a local variant style known as Urban Pasifika. 'Protest' content was still present, but lyrical and musical emphasis had largely evolved into a 'sweet', chart-friendly sound. Artists such as Che Fu and, more recently, Nesian Mystik and Scribe have carried the ideas and themes to new heights. In 2004, Scribe became the first New Zealand artist to achieve the double honour of simultaneously topping the New Zealand singles and album charts. →this is tuff i mean kyle carters tuff Tuamotu, French Polynesia The Pacific Ocean contains an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 islands; the exact number has not been precisely determined. ... Urban Pasifika is a sub-genre of hip-hop which combines American style hip-hop or R&B rhyming and beats with Pacific Island or Maori instrumentation (such as ukelele samples) and Pacific Island or Maori language singing/rapping. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Nesian Mystik is a New Zealand hip hop group formed in 1999. ... Scribe is the stage name of New Zealand rapper Malo Luafutu. ...


In 2005, Savage, another NZ hip hop artist, had back to back number one hits with Swing and Moonshine, the latter featuring a USA artist called Akon. Both of the songs stayed in the number one spot for eight weeks each. Demetrius Savage Savelio (born 1981) is a New Zealand rapper, who is a member of hip hop music group Deceptikonz. ... Swing is the first solo single from Savages debut album, Moonshine released in 2005 // Song information Track listings ’Swing (Radio Edit)’ ’Swing (Album Version)’ ’Swing (Sol Messiah Remix)’ ’Swing (Instrumental)’ ’Swing (Bump City Remix)’ ’Swing (Crooked Eye Remix)’ ’Swing (Nate D Remix)’ Comprehensive charts Stats (NZ) International External links... Moonshine is a single by Savage featuring Akon, released in 2005. ... Kishan Aliaune Damala Bouga Time Puru Nacka Badara Akon Thiam,[1][2] often going by the shorter Aliaune Thiam[3] (born October 14, 1981),[4] and better known by his stage name Akon, is an American R&B singer, rapper, songwriter, record producer, and record executive. ...


Hip hop went in a new direction in the twenty-first century when it mixed with electronica, reggae and dub music to create a sound known as Roots. The Roots scene had strong roots in Wellington.


Alternative/Indie

Chris Knox in the music video for Not Given Lightly.

New Zealand's alternative and independent music scene has been favourably regarded abroad despite frequent marginalization locally. As well as gaining international critical acclaim, many of New Zealand's alternative artists have been cited as influences by American groups such as Pavement, Yo La Tengo and Sonic Youth. A willingness to experiment, a keen sense of melody, and a DIY attitude are characteristic of New Zealand's independent artists. Geographical isolation and the reliance on inexpensive equipment are also frequently cited as influential factors. Single frame from the music video for Chris Knoxs song Not Given Lightly. ... Single frame from the music video for Chris Knoxs song Not Given Lightly. ... Chris Knox in the music video for Not Given Lightly Chris Knox (born September 2, 1952) is a New Zealand rock and roll musician who emerged during the punk rock era with his bands The Enemy and Toy Love. ... Pavement was an influential American indie rock band in the 1990s. ... Yo La Tengo is an American indie rock band, based in Hoboken, New Jersey. ... Sonic Youth is a seminal American alternative rock group formed in New York City in 1981. ... The DIY punk ethic refers to the idea of doing it yourself, i. ...


Independent music in New Zealand began in the latter half of the 1970s, with the development of a local punk rock scene[3] . This scene spawned several bands of note, including The Scavengers, the Suburban Reptiles, Proud Scum and Nocturnal Projections. The most important New Zealand punk band was The Enemy, formed by lo-fi pioneer Chris Knox. After a reshuffle of personnel, many of the band's songs were recorded over 1979-1980 as Toy Love. The same musicians formed the basis for later groups such as The Bats and Tall Dwarfs. The Suburban Reptiles and The Scavengers were the first punk bands to form in New Zealand. ... Nocturnal Projections were a rock band from New Plymouth, New Zealand that began recording in 1981 and split up in 1983. ... For the English band, see The Enemy (English band). ... Lo-fi — from Low Fidelity — describes a sound recording which contains accidental artifacts, like distortion, or environmental noise, or a recording which has a limited frequency response. ... Chris Knox in the music video for Not Given Lightly Chris Knox (born September 2, 1952) is a New Zealand rock and roll musician who emerged during the punk rock era with his bands The Enemy and Toy Love. ... Toy Love was a New Zealand rock and roll band fronted by Chris Knox. ... The Bats are an influential New Zealand rock band formed in 1982 in Christchurch by Paul Kean (bass), Malcolm Grant (drums), Robert Scott (guitar, vocals) and Kaye Woodward (vocals, other instruments). ... Tall Dwarfs are a New Zealand rock band formed in 1979 by Chris Knox and Alec Bathgate who, through their do-it-yourself ethic, helped pioneer the lo-fi style of rock music. ...


By this time the Flying Nun label had risen to prominence in New Zealand. The Clean, hailing from Dunedin, was the first major band to emerge from the Flying Nun roster. The South Island cities of Dunedin and Christchurch provided most of the first wave of Flying Nun's artists. During the early 1980s the label's distinctive jangle-pop sound was established by leading lights such as The Chills, The Verlaines, Sneaky Feelings, The Bats and The Jean-Paul Sartre Experience. Other prominent bands to emerge later via Flying Nun included The Headless Chickens, Straitjacket Fits, The 3Ds, Bailter Space, the Able Tasmans and The D4. Strangely, a revival of emo/punk-pop bands has started here, fronted by bands like Goodnight Nurse. As well as that, New Zealand has a developing punk rock scene. This includes bands like Kitsch, Cobra Khan, City Newton Bombers as well as ska bands such The WBC and The Managers. Flying Nun Records is probably the most influential independent record label in New Zealand. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... The Clean were an influential first-wave punk band that formed in Dunedin, New Zealand in 1978. ... Dunedin (Ōtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... Christchurch (Māori: ) is the regional capital of Canterbury, New Zealand. ... Taking a leaf out of the Beatles Help!, the Chills signal COLD in semaphore on the cover of their first studio album. ... The Verlaines was a band from Dunedin, New Zealand, signed to Flying Nun Records. ... Sneaky Feelings were a 1980s New Zealand pop/rock band, led by Matthew Bannister, who recorded on the Flying Nun label. ... The Bats are an influential New Zealand rock band formed in 1982 in Christchurch by Paul Kean (bass), Malcolm Grant (drums), Robert Scott (guitar, vocals) and Kaye Woodward (vocals, other instruments). ... The Jean-Paul Sartre Experience, later renamed JPS Experience after a lawsuit by the estate of Jean-Paul Sartre, were an indie rock band on New Zealands Flying Nun Records. ... Flying Nun Records is probably the most influential independent record label in New Zealand. ... The Headless Chickens are a New Zealand band. ... Lotsofissues 07:37, 7 May 2005 (UTC) History Since forming in Flying Nuns spiritual home, the southern New Zealand city of Dunedin, in 1986, Straitjacket Fits have established themselves as the labels prime purveyors of rocknroll in its primal, blistering and downright sensual form. ... The 3Ds was an alternative pop/rock band from Dunedin, New Zealand, together from 1988 to 1994. ... Bailter Space is a noise rock group that formed in Christchurch, New Zealand in 1987. ... The Able Tasmans were an indie band from Auckland, New Zealand. ... The D4 is a rock band from Auckland, New Zealand. ... Emo is a genre of rock music. ... Punk pop, often also called pop punk, refers to popular or mainstream punk music. ... Goodnight Nurse are a pop punk band from Auckland, New Zealand. ...


As a response to Flying Nun's increasing commercialism in the 1990s, New Zealand's alternative pop tradition found a new home with independent labels such as IMD and Arclife in Dunedin, Failsafe Records and She'll Be Right Records in Christchurch, Capital Recordings, Stink Magentic and Loop in Wellington and Arch Hill Recordings, Lil' Chief Records and Powertool Records in Auckland. The new alternative pop sound is typified by the likes of The Brunettes, The Phoenix Foundation, Lawrence Arabia and George and Queen. A Low Hum magazine has had a big influence bringing new artists to the attention of alternative music fans in New Zealand putting on nationwide tours and selling fanzine style booklets with free CDs. Failsafe Records is a record label that was founded in 1984 in Christchurch, New Zealand. ... Shell Be Right Records is a Christchurch New Zealand based label formed by Jody Lloyd of Hiphop act Darktower. ... Capital Recordings is a small record label formed in November, 2001 based in Wellington, New Zealand. ... Arch Hill Recordings, formerly Arch Hill Studios, is a New Zealand recording studio and record label in Auckland. ... Lil Chief Records is an New Zealand based indie pop label which was formed in 2002. ... The Brunettes The Brunettes are an indie pop or twee pop group from New Zealand formed in 1998. ... The Phoenix Foundation are an indie rock band formed in Wellington, New Zealand. ... Lawrence Arabia is the musical guise of New Zealand artist James Milne. ... A Low Hum is New Zealands most prolific and, some would say, most important on-going concert tour for rising bands and alternative music groups. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular subject for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ...


Independent music in New Zealand has mainly been supported by student radio stations such as bFM and RDU, and fanzines like Opprobium and Clinton. Internationally, New Zealand's alternative music has come to recognition via labels such as Homestead, Merge, Drunken Fish, and Father Yod. . The initial letter is shown capitalized due to technical restrictions. ... Father Yod is a record label run by music critic Byron Coley. ...


Since the early 1980s, several small independent labels have been established in New Zealand, including Xpressway and Failsafe Records. Failsafe released a series of compilations that included many artists (Notably JPSE, Double Happys Nocturnal Projections, Loves Ugly Children) that later appeared on Flying Nun, Major Labels, or other larger indies. It continues on till today as the home of a long list of archival releases of historically important post punk bands, while still releasing material from alternative guitar rock on a smaller scale. Important Xpressway artists included This Kind Of Punishment, Alastair Galbraith, The Terminals, Peter Jefferies and The Dead C. All of these artists became part of an emerging international underground scene, and were typically more popular with foreign collectors than local enthusiasts. Xpressway was a record label run by New Zealand musician Bruce Russell. ... Failsafe Records is a record label that was founded in 1984 in Christchurch, New Zealand. ... This Kind Of Punishment were a band from New Zealand. ... Alastair Galbraith is a musician from Dunedin, New Zealand. ... The Terminals were a band from New Zealand. ... Peter Jefferies is a musician from New Zealand. ... The Dead C are a New Zealand based noise rock trio made up of members Bruce Russell, Michael Morley and Robbie Yeats. ...


Many more small independent labels were formed after Xpressway's demise in 1992, such as Bruce Russell's Corpus Hermeticum label, Campbell Kneale's Celebrate Psi Phenomenon label, and Crawlspace Records. These labels tended to focus on esoteric forms like free noise, psych-rock and improvisation. Artists such as Thela, Omit, Empirical, Dadamah, Flies Inside The Sun, Birchville Cat Motel and Rosy Parlane are successful proponents of this new dynamic. In the late 1980s, Peter King established King Worldwide, which specialised in lathe-cut polycarbonate records. This operation specialised in small-run editions, and thus attracted numerous underground bands such as The Dead C, Birchville Cat Motel, and Thela. Corpus Hermeticum is a New Zealand based record label. ... Birchville Cat Motel is a one-man experimental music group formed by Campbell Kneale from Wellington, New Zealand. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Psychedelia in music (or also psychedelic music, less formally) is a term that refers to a broad set of popular music styles, genres and scenes, that may include psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, psychedelic techno, and others. ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... Thela were a short-lived rock band from New Zealand. ... Marcel Bear is an engineer and musician from New Zealand. ... Dadamah were a band from New Zealand, active during the early 1990s. ... Flies Inside The Sun were a band from New Zealand. ... Birchville Cat Motel is a one-man experimental music group formed by Campbell Kneale from Wellington, New Zealand. ... Rosy Parlane is a musician from New Zealand. ... King Worldwide is a New Zealand record manufacturing plant run by Peter King. ... Polycarbonates are a particular group of thermoplastic polyesters. ... The Dead C are a New Zealand based noise rock trio made up of members Bruce Russell, Michael Morley and Robbie Yeats. ... Birchville Cat Motel is a one-man experimental music group formed by Campbell Kneale from Wellington, New Zealand. ... Thela were a short-lived rock band from New Zealand. ...


Electronica

See also: New Zealand reggae

The club scene in New Zealand has led to an upswing in dance-based electronica, of which the leading exponents are probably Salmonella Dub. Drum and bass, espoused by Concord Dawn, Pitch Black, Shapeshifter, State Of Mind, Bulletproof and roots/reggae like Katchafire, The Black Seeds, Breaks Co-op or Trinity Roots, are very popular. Many of New Zealand's electronic artists are attempting, often successfully, to bridge the gap between diverse genres by including musical influences such as rock, jazz, soul and hip hop. New Zealand reggae is the New Zealand (Aotearoa) variation of the musical genre reggae. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Electronic music. ... Salmonella Dub are a Dub/Drum n Bass/Reggae/Roots band from Christchurch, New Zealand. ... Drum and bass (commonly abbreviated to d&b, DnB, dnb, dnb, drum n bass and drum & bass) is a type of electronic dance music also known as jungle. ... Concord Dawn, Matt Harvey (AKA Matty C) & Evan Short (AKA Kiljoy), are a renowned drum and bass duo originally from Auckland, New Zealand, with popular tracks such as Dont Tell Me in conjunction with Tiki and Get Ready featuring rapper Scribe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Shapeshifter was a program wich would allow you to edit and make your own themes for the mac computers but this is now out of date ... Katchafire are a contemporary New Zealand reggae band. ... The Black Seeds The Black Seeds are a band from Wellington, New Zealand. ... Breaks Co-op is a New Zealand band, formed in 1997, first through music company FMR and more recently with EMI. The band members are Andy Lovegrove, Zane Lowe and Hamish Clark. ... Trinity Roots (1998-2005) were a successful band from Wellington, New Zealand. ...


Folk music

Māori culture group at 1981 Nambassa festival.

Image File history File linksMetadata 1981_Maori_Culture_group. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 1981_Maori_Culture_group. ... Māori culture is a distinctive part of New Zealand culture. ... Nambassa was a series of hippie-conceived festivals held between 1976 and 1981 on large farms around Waihi and Waikino in New Zealand. ...

Māori music

Main article: Māori music

In summary, pre-European Māori singing was micro-tonal, with a repeated melodic line that did not stray far from a central note. Group singing was in unison or at the octave. Instrumental music was played on a variety of blown, struck and twirled instruments. Missionaries brought harmony, a wider compass and their instruments which were gradually adopted in new compositions. The action song (waiata-ā-ringa) was largely developed in the early twentieth century. Since colonisation, Māori music has developed in parallel and in interaction with styles from overseas, generating a rich brew of new styles.[4] The Māori are the native peoples of New Zealand. ...


Pioneer folk music

The early European (Pākehā) settlers had folk music similar to, and shared with Australia's. The tradition is invigorated with several festivals, especially the annual Tahora gathering. http://www.michealyoung.com/musicFestivals.htm Pākehā is a Māori term generally used to describe New Zealanders of British or European ancestry, but it can also be used to refer to any non-Māori person. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... Tahora is the name of a couple of small settlements in New Zealand. ...


Brass bands

Twilight bagpipe band practice, Napier.
Twilight bagpipe band practice, Napier.

New Zealand has a proud history of Brass Bands, which hold regular provincial contests, and often celebrate cultural events. The NZ National Band has earned international accolades. http://www.brassnz.co.nz/ Image File history File links Download high resolution version (993x660, 229 KB) Summary Twilight bagpipe band practice (26 January 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (993x660, 229 KB) Summary Twilight bagpipe band practice (26 January 2005. ...


http://www.nznationalband.com/


Highland pipe bands

New Zealand is said to have more pipebands than Scotland; historical links are maintained by Caledonian Societies throughout the country. The nation is often reminded of its colonial heritage by the stirring sounds of bagpipes at military commemorations and parades. This article is about the country. ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ...


Classical Composers

Isolated geographically from the rest of the world, the formal traditions of European classical music took a long time to develop in New Zealand. Composers such as Alfred Hill were educated in Europe and brought late Romantic Music traditions to New Zealand. He attempted to graft them on to New Zealand themes with one notable success, the popular "Waiata Poi". Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Australian composer, conductor and teacher (1870-1960). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The era of Romantic music is defined as the period of European classical music that runs roughly from the early 1800s to the first decade of the 20th century, as well as music written according to the norms and styles of that period. ...


Douglas Lilburn, working predominantly in the third quarter of the 20th century, is often credited with being the first composer to 'speak' with a truly New Zealand voice and gain international recognition for it. He has had some influence on the direction of New Zealand music since then. Douglas Gordon Lilburn (2 November 1915 - 6 June 2001) was a prolific and influential New Zealand composer. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... A composer is a person who writes music. ...


With significant acceleration New Zealanders have found their own style and place, with people such as Larry Pruden, David Farquhar, Jenny McLeod, Jack Body, Gillian Whitehead, Dorothy Buchanan, Anthony Ritchie, Ivan Zagni, Martin Lodge, Nigel Keay, and Ross Harris leading the way. Jenny McLeod is a composer and former Professor of Music at Victoria University of Wellington. ... Jack Body (Born 1944) is a New Zealand composer, photographer, artist and ethnomusicologist. ... Gillian Karawe Whitehead (born 1941) is a New Zealand composer. ... Biography Nigel Keay was born in Palmerston North, New Zealand in 1955. ...


Diverse musical currents in the world from the European avant-garde to American minimalism have influenced particular New Zealand composers to varying degrees. Increasingly, there are more cross-over composers fusing Pacific, Asian and European influences along with electronic instruments and techniques into a new sound, Gareth Farr, Phil Dadson and composer co-operative Plan9 among them. The latter provided much of the ambient music used in the The Lord of the Rings film trilogy. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Minimalism describes movements in various forms of art and design, especially visual art and music, where the work is stripped down to its most fundamental features. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Gareth Farr ONZM (born February 29, 1968) is a New Zealand composer and percussionist. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action fantasy epic films; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). ...


In 2004, Wellington composer John Psathas achieved the largest audience for New Zealand-composed music when his fanfares and other music were heard by billions at the opening and closing ceremonies of the Athens Olympiad. In the same year, he took the Tui Award for Best Classical Recording at the Vodafone NZ Music Awards and the SOUNZ Contemporary Award at the APRA Silver Scrolls. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the first Duke of Wellington, see Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... John Psathas (born 1966) is a New Zealand composer. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... An Olympiad is a period of four years, associated with the Olympic Games of Classical Greece. ... APRA could refer to the: American Popular Revolutionary Alliance, a Peruvian political party Australian Prudential Regulation Authority Australasian Performing Rights Association This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


There are several twelve-month Composer-in-Residence positions available in New Zealand, notably with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra and at the University of Otago (Mozart Fellowship). The Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra was established in the mid 1980s, and although essentially a regional orchestra it has become one of New Zealands major performing organisations. ... The University of Otago (Māori: ) in Dunedin is New Zealands oldest university with over 20,000 students enrolled during 2006. ... The Mozart Fellowship is a 12-month composer residency attached to the Music Deparment of the University of Otago. ...


For more information, links and resources about NZ Composers and compositions, the SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music at sounz.org.nz has comprehensive services.


Orchestras and choirs

New Zealand has a number of world-class orchestras and choirs, notably the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra (NZSO), the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra (APO), the Tower New Zealand Youth Choir and Tower Voices New Zealand. This 90 player orchestra is a Crown Entity owned by the Government of New Zealand. ... The Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra was established in the mid 1980s, and although essentially a regional orchestra it has become one of New Zealands major performing organisations. ...


There are also a number of semi-professional regional orchestras presenting their own concert series each year. These include the Southern Sinfonia in Dunedin and the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra. Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ...


Chamber music and other ensembles

New Zealand has one full-time professional string quartet, the New Zealand String Quartet. Other string quartets include the Nevine String Quartet and the Jade String Quartet. There are several groups performing new music from local and overseas composers. These include the Karlheinz Company, Stroma, 175 East, Strike and Okta. String Quartet in Wellington formed in 1995 from the ranks of the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. ...


Chamber Music New Zealand is an organisation that promotes concerts throughout New Zealand providing a performing platform for local and international artists.

Soloists

Prominent New Zealand musicians performing at home and abroad include Kiri Te Kanawa, Michael Houstoun, David Guerin and Jeffrey Grice. Dame Kiri Janette Te Kanawa IPA: , ONZ, AC, DBE, (born March 6, 1944) is an internationally famous New Zealand opera singer. ... Michael Houstoun (20 October 1952 —) is a concert pianist from New Zealand. ... A New Zealander, long resident in France, Jeffrey Grice has performed regularly in Europe and France as a soloist and chamber musician. ...


See also

Music Festivals have a long and chequered history in New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Music Awards, colloquially known as the Tuis, have been awarded yearly since 1966 to outstanding New Zealand musicians and groups. ... Natures Best is a two-disc compilation album of thirty New Zealand popular music songs, selected by a panel to have been the top thirty New Zealand songs of all time. ... The history of blues in New Zealand dates from the 1960s. ...

References

  1. ^ Dix, John (1988). Stranded in Paradise: New Zealand Rock'n'roll 1955-88. Palmerston North, NZ: Paradise Publications. ISBN 0-14-301953-8 ISBN 0-473-00638-3.
  2. ^ Eggleton, David (2003). Ready to fly: The story of New Zealand rock music. Nelson, NZ: Craig Potton Publishing. ISBN 1-877333-06-9.
  3. ^ Churton, Wade Ronald (1999, 2001). Have You Checked The Children? Punk and Postpunk Music in New Zealand, 1977-1981 Christchurch, New Zealand: Put Your Foot Down Publishing. ISBN 0-473-06196-1
  4. ^ Linkels, Ad (2000). "The real music of paradise". In Broughton, S., & Ellingham, M. (eds.), World music, vol. 2: Latin & North America, Caribbean, India, Asia and Pacific, pp 218-229. Rough Guides Ltd, Penguin Books. ISBN 1-85828-636-0.

External links

  • SOUNZ - Centre for New Zealand Music.
  • RIANZ - New Zealand's official weekly singles and albums chart.
  • KiwiFolk - Information on the NZ Folk Music Scene; clubs, festivals, artists etc.
  • Bruce Sergent's personal site - The 60's, 70's and early 80's.
  • New Zealand Blues and Views - A selection of New Zealand Blues and R&B artists, New Zealand Blues scene and concert reviews.
  • Research in New Zealand Performing Arts - A free online research journal that discusses New Zealand music and related arts.
  • NZ Music Search Engine - Search engine for New Zealand music.
  • NZ Music Month - includes '31 reasons to love New Zealand music'
  • National Library of New Zealand Legal Deposit Website - Preserving New Zealand's musical cultural heritage
Polynesian music
Easter Island - Fiji - Hawaii - Samoa - Tonga - Tuvalu - Wallis and Futuna

French Polynesia: Austral - Marquesas and Tahiti - Tuamotus
New Zealand: Chatham Islands - Cook Islands - Maori - Niue - Tokelau Polynesia is a group of island chains spread across much of the Pacific Ocean, and includes many countries and territories. ... Easter Island is located in the Pacific Ocean. ... The music of Hawaii includes an array of traditional and popular styles, ranging from native Hawaiian folk music to modern rock and hip hop. ... The Austral Islands are part of the territory of French Polynesia. ... Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the music of Tahiti was dominated by festivals called heiva. ... The Maori are the native peoples of New Zealand. ...


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