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Encyclopedia > Music of Minnesota
Music of the United States
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Institutions
Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra - Minnesota Opera - Minnesota Music Academy - Minnesota Orchestra - St. Paul Chamber Orchestra
Organizations
Minnesota Bluegrass and Old-Time Music Association - Twin Cities Jazz Society
Venues
Pence Opera House - Target Center - Xcel Energy Center - First Avenue
Festivals
10,000 Lakes Festival - Bayfront Blues Festival - Minnesota Bluegrass and Old-Time Music Festival - Minnesota Folk Festival - Moondance Jam - Twin Cities Celebration of Hip Hop - WE Fest
State song "Hail! Minnesota"
Other topics List of Minnesota musicians

The music of Minnesota has played a role in the historical and cultural development of Minnesota. As with the culture of Minnesota in general, the state's music scene centers on the Minneapolis-Saint Paul area, and most of the Minnesotan artists who have become nationally popular either came from that area or debuted there. Rural Minnesota has also produced a flourishing folk music scene, with a long tradition of traditional Swedish, Finnish and Norwegian music.[1] Minnesota's modern local music scene is home to thousands of local bands, many of which perform with some regularity.[2] Some performers from nearby regions of neighboring states, such as western Wisconsin and Fargo, North Dakota, are often considered a part of the Minnesota music scene. The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... Alaska is a state of the United States. ... Alabama has played a central role in the development of both blues and country music. ... Arkansas is a Southern state of the United States. ... The Samoas are a Polynesian island chain, currently divided between the independent state of Samoa (formerly Western Samoa) and an American territory called American Samoa. ... Arizonas musical history has been heavily influenced by Mexican immigrants. ... In the United States, California is commonly associated with the film, music, and arts industries; there are numerous world-famous Californian musicians. ... Colorado is a state of the United States, and has a notable reputation for music. ... Connecticut is a state of the United States in the New England region. ... The music of Washington D.C. is known for two primary scenes, hardcore and associated derivatives and a hip hop-dance music hybrid called go go. ... Delaware is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. ... Floridas ethnic diversity has led to a myriad of musical styles from punk rock to salsa and heavy metal being popular in various parts of the state. ... Georgias musical output includes Southern rap groups like Outkast and Goodie Mob, as well as a wide variety of rock, pop and country artists. ... Guam is an unincorporated territory of the United States. ... The music of Hawaii includes an array of traditional and popular styles, ranging from native Hawaiian folk music to modern rock and hip hop. ... The music of Iowa includes such notable musicians as Slipknot, Stallions Versus Unicorns, Bix Beiderbecke and Greg Brown, as well as Meredith Willson, composer of The Music Man, and Alice Ettinger who was renowned enough to perform in Europe in the 1890s. ... Idaho has produced a number of musicians, including pop star Paul Revere and Doug Martsch of Built to Spill. ... Illinois, which includes Chicago, the third-largest city in the United States, has a wide musical heritage. ... The music of Indiana was strongly influenced by a large number of German and Irish immigrants who arrived in the 1830s. ... For many decades, Kansas has had a vibrant country and bluegrass scene. ... The Music of Kentucky is heavily centered on Appalachian folk music and its descendants, especially in eastern Kentucky. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... New England Conservatory of Music in Boston Massachusetts is a U.S. state in New England. ... Famous musicians from Maryland include Francis Scott Key, who wrote The Star-Spangled Banner and pop punksters Good Charlotte, from Waldorf. ... Maine is a state of the United States, located in New England. ... In Michigan, the city of Detroit has remained the capital of musical innovation for many years. ... St. ... The Northern Mariana Islands are an island chain dependency of the United States. ... Mississippi is best-known as the home of the blues, which developed among the freed African Americans in the latter half of the 19th century. ... Montana is a state of the United States. ... North Carolina is known particularly for its tradition of old-time music, and many recordings were made in the early 20th century by folk song collector Bascom Lamar Lunsford. ... The Music of North Dakota has followed general American trends over much of its history, beginning with ragtime and folk music, moving into big band and jazz. ... Music of Nebraska has included a variety of country, jazz, blues, ragtime, rock and alternative rock musicians. ... New Hampshire is a state of the United States, located in the New England region. ... New Mexico is a state of the Southwest United States. ... For most outsiders, Nevadan music is probably most closely associated with lounge singers like Wayne Newton playing in Las Vegas. ... Some of the most renowned musicians from New Jersey are Hoboken native Frank Sinatra, who was one of the most popular singers of the 20th century; and The Four Seasons (group) who had their first No. ... In the United States, New York City has long been a musical hub and, in some ways, the musical capital of the country. ... The most famous musicians from Ohio are probably Marilyn Manson, Dean Martin and Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders; the 19th century composer Daniel Emmett, born in Ohio to a Virginian family, wrote many of the most popular songs in his era, including some that remain well-known. ... While the music of Oklahoma is relatively young, Oklahoma having been a state for less than a hundred years, it has a rich history and many fine and influential musicians. ... Oregons music scene is most active in Portland and the college town of Eugene. ... The most famous musical innovaters to come out of Pennsylvania are perhaps the Philly sound in 1970s soul music, Gamble & Huff, The OJays, Teddy Pendergrass, Harold Melvin and The Delphonics, as well as jazz legends like Nina Simone and John Coltrane. ... The music of Puerto Rico has been influenced by African and European (especially Spanish) forms, and has become popular across the Caribbean and in some communities worldwide. ... Rhode Island is a state of the United States, located in the New England region. ... South Carolina is one of the Southern United States, and has produced a number of renowned performers of country, bluegrass and other styles. ... The United States state of South Dakota has an official state song, Hail! South Dakota, written by DeeCort Hammitt. ... The story of Tennessees contribution to American music is essentially the story of three cities: Nashville, Memphis, and Bristol. ... Texas has long been a center for musical innovation. ... Utah music has long been dominated culturally by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons), although other groups have also played an important role. ... Virginias musical contribution to American culture has been diverse, and includes Piedmont blues musicians and later rock and roll bands, many centered at such college towns as Blacksburg, Charlottesville (home of Dave Matthews Band) and Richmond. ... The music of the Virgin Islands reflects long-standing cultural ties to the island nations to the south as well as to various European colonialists. ... Vermont is a state in the United States. ... The U.S. state of Washington includes several major hotbeds of musical innovation. ... Perhaps the most influential musical output of Wisconsin came from Port Washington, Ozaukee County during the 1920s, when Paramount Records released a series of blues and jazz recordings. ... West Virginias folk heritage is a part of the Appalachian folk music tradition, and includes styles of fiddling and other techniques reminiscent of Scotch-Irish music. ... The first music of Wyoming was played by various Native Americans tribes in the present-day U.S. state of Wyoming. ... The Minnesota Orchestra is an American orchestra. ... The Minnesota Opera is a performance organization from Minnesota. ... The Minnesota Music Academy is a music institution in Minnesota. ... The Minnesota Orchestra is an American orchestra that was founded in 1903 by Emil Oberhoffer as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra. ... The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra is an orchestra based in St. ... The Minnesota Bluegrass and Old-Time Music Association is a music organization based out of Minnesota, founded in 1975. ... The Twin Cities Jazz Society (TCJS) is a non-profit musc organization dedicated to promoting jazz in the Minneapolis-St. ... The Pence Opera House was an opera house and later, a mission, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States. ... The Target Center The Target Center is an arena in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota sponsored by Target Corporation that is home to the National Basketball Associations Minnesota Timberwolves and Womens National Basketball Associations Minnesota Lynx. ... The Xcel Energy Center as it appeared during the 2004 NHL All-Star Weekend. ... First Avenue nightclub in Minneapolis First Avenue and 7th Street Entry are a cornerstone of the Midwest music scene, and serve as an historic landmark of downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... The 10,000 Lakes Festival (abbreviated as 10KLF) is an annual three-day music festival in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, at the Soo Pass Ranch. ... The Minnesota Bluegrass and Old-Time Music Festival is an annual music festival held in Minnesota, featuring old-time music and bluegrass music. ... The Minnesota Folk Festival is an institute dedicated to folk music in Minnesota. ... Moondance Jam is an annual classic rock festival held in mid-July in the Leech Lake/Chippewa National Forest Area near Walker, Minnesota. ... Each August the town hosts WE Fest, one of the largest country music festivals. ... Each state in the United States (except New Jersey) has a state song, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Hail! Minnesota (also simply called Minnesota in early years) is the state song of Minnesota, and a variation is used as a school song of the University of Minnesota. ... This category concerns musicians who were either born in (and strongly associated with) or based out of Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Minneapolis-Saint Paul is the most populous urban area in the state of Minnesota, United States, and is composed of 188 cities and townships. ... Music based on traditional Norwegian form usually includes minor or modal scales (sometimes mixed with major scales), making a sober and haunting sound. ...


Minneapolis has produced a number of famous performers, such as Bob Dylan, who was born in Duluth, grew up in Hibbing, and began his musical career in the Minneapolis area, and Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, who eventually formed The Time and produced for Gladys Knight and Janet Jackson. Minneapolis' most influential contributions to American popular music began in the 1970s and 1980s, when the city's music scene "expanded the state's cultural identity" and launched the careers of acclaimed performers like the multi-platinum soul singer Prince, and cult favorites The Replacements and Hüsker Dü. More recently, the Twin Cities has played a role in the national hip-hop scene with artists such as Atmosphere and P.O.S. of Doomtree.[3] This article is about the recording artist. ... James Jimmy Jam Harris III (born on June 6, 1959 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) and Terry Lewis (born November 21, 1956 in Omaha, Nebraska) are an American R&B and pop songwriting and record production team. ... The Time is a funk and dance-pop ensemble formed in 1981. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Gladys Maria Knight (born May 28, 1944 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American R&B/soul singer, actress and author. ... Janet Damita Jo Jackson (born May 16, 1966) is an American singer, actress, songwriter, record producer, dancer, activist, pop icon, and younger sister of the King of Pop, Michael Jackson. ... The first major American popular songwriter, Stephen Foster Even before the birth of recorded music, American popular music had a profound effect on music across the world. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... For other uses, see The Replacements (disambiguation). ... This article is about the rock band called Hüsker Dü. For other uses, see Husker Du. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... P.O.S. P.O.S. (born Stefon Alexander), is a rapper signed to Rhymesayers Entertainment and a founding member of Doomtree. ...

Contents

Institutions and venues

Music institutions in modern Minnesota include the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the only full-time professional chamber orchestra in the country, and the Minnesota Orchestra, a pioneering institution that was among the first orchestras to perform on the radio and to record. The Minnesota Orchestra was founded in 1903 as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra. The Minnesota Orchestra is widely respected in the classical music world, and has toured widely; as of 2005, the orchestra is led by music director Osmo Vänskä, a Finnish conductor, who has recently launched a program to record the complete works of Ludwig van Beethoven.[4] The Minnesota Opera is an important local music institution, and claims to be the sixteenth largest opera company in the United States. The Opera was founded in 1963, as part of the Walker Art Center, and became an independent company in 1969. The Minnesota Opera described its early reputation as "progressive (and) 'alternative'" in comparison to the more staid St. Paul Opera, which merged with the Minnesota Opera in 1975.[5] In the field of folk music, Minnesota has produced the Scandinavian Music Ensemble, a long-running group that performs in the traditional styles of Scandinavian-Americans, particularly Norwegian music.[6] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Located at Nicolet Mall and 12th Street in Minneapolis, Orchestra Hall is home to the Minnesota Orchestra. ... View of Nicollet Mall from the skyway Nicollet Mall is a portion of Nicollet Avenue in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Along with Hennepin Avenue, it forms the cultural and commercial heart of the city. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra (SPCO), based in St. ... The Minnesota Orchestra is an American orchestra that was founded in 1903 by Emil Oberhoffer as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra. ... The conductor Osmo Vänskä (* 28. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... The Minnesota Opera is a performance organization from Minnesota. ... One of the most celebrated art museums in the country, the Walker Art Center is known for commissioning and presenting innovative contemporary art; fostering the cross-pollination of the visual, performing, and media arts; and engaging diverse audiences in the excitement of the creative process. ... Music based on traditional Norwegian form usually includes minor or modal scales (sometimes mixed with major scales), making a sober and haunting sound. ...


Industry and media

The Independent Public Radio is a state-wide network of twelve independently-owned stations that play music by local artists. These stations include KFAI, KUMB, KAXE and KVSC, most of whom also operate Internet radio streams. Local music is also a part of the playlists of Minnesota's college radio stations like the University of Minnesota's Radio K and Macalaster College's WMCN. Most other radio stations in the state are owned by conglomerates like Clear Channel, and play few, if any local artists; they instead use a national radio format, mostly playing classic rock, pop, and contemporary hip hop and R&B. Minnesota Public Radio is also a major part of the Minnesota radio industry; it is one of the most successful public radio organizations in the country, and has grown from a small station associated with St. John's University in Collegeville in 1967, to a part of the American Public Media Group and is now the dominant network of radio stations in the state. Recently MPR launched a new station, KCMP 89.3, The Current, which has gained a cult following throughout the country and indeed throughout the world thanks to its Internet presence.[7] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 111 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Minneapolis-Saint Paul ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 111 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Minneapolis-Saint Paul ... Minnesota Public Radio logo Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) is a regional public radio network based in the U.S. state of Minnesota that has been broadcasting since 1967. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... Independent Public Radio (IPR) is a public radio network in Minnesota. ... KFAI (90. ... KAXE (91. ... Independent Public Radio (IPR) is a public radio network in Minnesota. ... Internet radio (aka e-Radio) is an audio broadcasting service transmitted via the Internet. ... In its most general form, a playlist is simply a list of songs. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... 770 Radio K (KUOM), Real College Radio, is a college radio station operated by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. ... Macalaster College is a four year, liberal arts college, founded in 1855 and located on 53 acres (0. ... WMCN (91. ... A clear channel, in the general sense, is a communications channel (such as a radio frequency) on which only one transmitter operates at a time. ... A radio format or programming format describes the overall content broadcast on a radio station. ... Minnesota Public Radio logo Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) is a regional public radio network based in the U.S. state of Minnesota that has been broadcasting since 1967. ... The College of Saint Benedict (CSB), for women, and Saint John’s University (SJU), for men, are partnered liberal arts colleges respectively located in St. ... Collegeville Township is a township located in Stearns County, Minnesota. ... American Public Media Group (APMG) is the non-profit organization that is the parent of non-profits Minnesota Public Radio and Southern California Public Radio (KPCC 89. ... 89. ...


The Minneapolis-St Paul area is home to a free alternative weekly that promotes local music performers and venues, called the Pulse of the Twin Cities.[8]Minnesota is also home to Earplug Radio a social music community for local artists. Minnesota is home to music festivals devoted to several styles of music, including Ironworld U.S.A.'s International Polkafest, Minnesota Bluegrass and Old-Time Music Festival and the Minnesota Folk Festival. The Detroit Lakes annual 10,000 Lakes Festival is an important part of modern Minnesota's music; it features major jam bands and indie rock bands at concerts like WE Fest and the Moondance Jam. The Bayfront Blues Festival is held on Lake Superior in Duluth; the Bayfront Festival promoters also put on the Blues on the Range Festival in Chisholm and the Apple River Blues Festival in Somerset, Wisconsin. The original Bayfront Blues Festival dates to 1989, and it has since grown to become one of the premier blues festivals in the country.[9] The Minnesota blues scene includes several other regionally important festivals, such as the Boundary Waters Blues Festival, founded by Michael Jankovec a radio host on local station WELY,[10] and the St. Paul Bluesfest. A week is a unit of time longer than a day and shorter than a month. ... The International Polkafest is an annual music festival, devoted to polka. ... The Minnesota Bluegrass and Old-Time Music Festival is an annual music festival held in Minnesota, featuring old-time music and bluegrass music. ... The Minnesota Folk Festival is an institute dedicated to folk music in Minnesota. ... Location in Minnesota Country State County Becker County Government  - Mayor Larry Buboltz Area  - City  12. ... The 10,000 Lakes Festival (abbreviated as 10KLF) is an annual three-day music festival in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, at the Soo Pass Ranch. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Each August the town hosts WE Fest, one of the largest country music festivals. ... Moondance Jam is an annual classic rock festival held in mid-July in the Leech Lake/Chippewa National Forest Area near Walker, Minnesota. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... Duluth is the county seat of St. ... Chisholm is a city located in St. ... Somerset is a village located in St. ...


Many local performers record for one of several regional labels in Minneapolis and elsewhere in the state. Some of these labels are well-known in their field, such as Red House, a prominent folk label, and the Twin/Tone indie rock label. In addition to record labels, Minneapolis has been home to several important recording studios. The first studio in the state was Kay Bank, established by studio engineer Bruce Swedien in the 1950s; the studio's first hits were from The Trashmen ("Surfin' Bird") and Dave Dudley ("Six Days on the Road"), which helped popularize a distinctive Kay Bank style based on using three-track recording and echo effects. Herb Pilhofer and Tom Jung worked at Kay Banks before founding Sound 80 in 1969. Sound 80 recorded numerous local artists over the years, ranging from part of Bob Dylan's Blood on the Tracks to works from Dave Brubeck. Though the Sound 80 building was sold in 1990, the studio is now an anechoic chamber labeled the "quietest place on Earth" by the Guinness Book of World Records. Flyte Tyme Productions, a soul and R&B studio led by Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, defined the Minneapolis sound in the 1980s with albums like Janet Jackson's Control. Other important studios in Minneapolis include the Dove studio, which released several cult classic psychedelic and garage rock recordings in the 1960s, and Blackberry Wray, founded by Paul Stark, who would later found the Twin/Tone record label. Blackberry Wray recorded many local alternative rock performers like The Replacements and Soul Asylum, while Twin/Tone was home to The Suburbs and The Fingerprints, among others.[11] Red House Records is an American independent record label specializing in folk music based in St. ... Bruce Swedien. ... The Trashmen were a rock and roll band formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1962. ... Dave Dudley (May 3, 1928 - December 22, 2003) was a Country Music singer. ... Sound 80 was a recording studio in Minneapolis, Minnesota founded by Tom Jung and Herb Pilhofer in 1969. ... Blood on the Tracks is a 1975 album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... David Warren Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California[1]), better known as Dave Brubeck, is a U.S. jazz pianist. ... A picture of an anechoic chamber An anechoic chamber is a room that is isolated from external sound or electromagnetic radiation sources, sometimes using sound proofing, and prevents the reflection of wave phenomena (reverberation). ... The Guinness Book of Records (or in recent editions Guinness World Records, and in previous US editions Guinness Book of World Records) is a book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of superlatives: both in terms of human achievement and the extrema of the natural world. ... James Jimmy Jam Harris III (born on June 6, 1959 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) and Terry Lewis (born November 21, 1956 in Omaha, Nebraska) are an American R&B and pop songwriting and record production team. ... The Minneapolis sound is a hybrid mixture of funk, rock, pop, R&B & new wave that was masterminded by Prince in the late 1970s. ... Janet Damita Jo Jackson (born May 16, 1966) is an American singer, actress, songwriter, record producer, dancer, activist, pop icon, and younger sister of the King of Pop, Michael Jackson. ... Singles from Control Control is the third studio album by American R&B/pop singer Janet Jackson. ... For other uses, see The Replacements (disambiguation). ... Soul Asylum is an alternative rock band formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1983. ... In Combo The Suburbs were an alternative rock and roll/funk/new wave band that—true to their name—came out of the western suburbs of Minneapolis. ...


Minneapolis is home to a few legendary record stores, Oar Folkjokeopus (now known as Treehouse Records) and the Electric Fetus, as well as other stores such as Cheapo. This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Oar Folkjokeopus (commonly known as Oar Folk) was a Minneapolis record store that operated on the corner of Lyndale and 26th from 1973 until 2001. ... The Electric Fetus Minneapolis storefront. ... Cheapo is a music retail franchise based in the United States, where customers can purchase new and used compact discs, DVDs, and sometimes cassettes and vinyl records. ...


Venues

First Avenue nightclub
First Avenue nightclub

Large venues frequently hosting widely popular national music acts in Minnesota include the Target Center, Xcel Energy Center, and, more rarely due to poor acoustics, the Metrodome. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,048 × 1,536 pixels, file size: 715 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,048 × 1,536 pixels, file size: 715 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... First Avenue nightclub in Minneapolis First Avenue and 7th Street Entry are a cornerstone of the Midwest music scene, and serve as an historic landmark of downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Target Center The Target Center is an arena in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota sponsored by Target Corporation that is home to the National Basketball Associations Minnesota Timberwolves and Womens National Basketball Associations Minnesota Lynx. ... The Xcel Energy Center as it appeared during the 2004 NHL All-Star Weekend. ... Acoustics is the branch of physics concerned with the study of sound (mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids). ... The Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome is a domed sports stadium in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. ...


The most influential small musical venue in the state is First Avenue, a nightclub that initially opened (as The Depot) in 1970; it was soon renamed Uncle Sam's, and became a franchise of the American Events Company, before finally becoming First Avenue in 1978. It's central location in the heart of downtown on 1st Avenue and historic value of launching renowned acts such as Prince solidifies its importance in the current local scene and in Minnesota music history.[12][13] First Avenue nightclub in Minneapolis First Avenue and 7th Street Entry are a cornerstone of the Midwest music scene, and serve as an historic landmark of downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. ...


The Twin Cities is also home to older traditional theaters of less than 2,000 capacity including The Historic Orpheum Theatre, Pantages Theatre, and [State Theatre], all in the Hennepin Theatre District. There is also a mix of modern clubs and simple bar and stage venues which generally host local acts. In Minneapolis these include the Fine Line Music Cafe, 400 Bar, the Triple Rock Social Club, Varsity Theater, Foundation, Acadia Cafe, and the Uptown Bar. In St. Paul these include Station 4 and the Turf Club. Just outside of St. Paul in Maplewood there are The Rock, and Myth Nightclub. The Historic Orpheum Theatre is a theater in downtown Minneapolis, MN. Opened on Oct 16, 1921. ... The Pantages Theatre is a historic theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Triple Rock Social Club is a bar and music venue in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, co-owned by Gretchen Funk, and Erik Funk of the punk band Dillinger Four. ... This page is about theater in Minnesota. ... The Turf Club is a bar and music venue in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... Maplewood, incorporated in 1957, is a city in Ramsey County, Minnesota, United States. ...


In 1990, Prince opened The Quest (then under a different name) in downtown's Warehouse District and the club built a reputation of booking the best local and national acts, competing directly with First Avenue. With a string of misfortunes in the early 2000s, it closed indefinitely by 2007.[14]


Venues generally exclusive to classical, choral, vocal and acoustic music or productions include Orchestra Hall, the Basilica of St. Mary, Ted Mann Concert Hall, Ordway Center and the Fitzgerald Theater, a major music and theater venue owned by Minnesota Public Radio. The Dakota Jazz Club on Nicollet Mall offers the region's best jazz. Along with collegiate music, choral and opera productions, Northrop Auditorium on the University of Minnesota campus sometimes hosts up and coming national acts to appeal to a college-aged crowd but has a limited capacity of less than 5,000. Located at Nicolett Mall and 12th Street in Minneapolis, Orchestra Hall is home to the Minnesota Orchestra. ... Basilica of St Mary in 2006 The Basilica of Saint Mary was the first basilica established in the United States of America, honored by Pope Pius XI in 1926. ... Ted Mann (April 16, 1916 – January 15, 2001) was an American businessman, film who famously changed the name of Graumans Chinese Theater to Manns Chinese Theater when he purchased the National General Theatre chain that owned it in 1973. ... Ordway Center for the Performing Arts is located in downtown Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... The Fitzgerald Theater is the oldest existing stage venue in the city of Saint Paul, Minnesota, and the home of American Public Medias A Prairie Home Companion. ... Minnesota Public Radio logo Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) is a regional public radio network based in the U.S. state of Minnesota that has been broadcasting since 1967. ... The Dakota Jazz Club and Restaurant is a well respected jazz club in Twin Cities. ... View of Nicollet Mall from the skyway Nicollet Mall is a portion of Nicollet Avenue in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Along with Hennepin Avenue, it forms the cultural and commercial heart of the city. ... Northrop Memorial Auditorium is a stage venue at the University of Minnesotas Minneapolis campus named for Cyrus Northrop, the universitys second president. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ...


The region also contains youth music venues, many of which operate as youth centers by day. These include the THE GARAGE in Burnsville, [The Depot Coffee House] in Hopkins, Enigma Teen Center in Shakopee, and on some occasions the Apple Valley Teen Center. Also, a few venues catering to all ages crowds, now gone, are remembered as significant to the Twin Cities music scene. These include the Foxfire Coffee Lounge in downtown Minneapolis, the Fireball Espresso Cafe in Falcon Heights, St. Paul and the TC Underground in Uptown Minneapolis. Outside the Garage, August 2005 The Garage is a small shopping center located in Harvard Square. ... Burnsville is a city located in Dakota County, Minnesota. ... Hopkins is a city located in Hennepin County, Minnesota. ... City of Shakopee Logo Shakopee is a city in Scott County, Minnesota, United States. ... Apple Valley is a city located in northwestern Dakota County of Minnesota, and a suburb of the Twin Cities. ...


Outside of the Minneapolis-St. Paul region, important local venues include Chisholm's Ironworld U.S.A., which hosts major country stars, Ralph's Corner, which closed in 2005 but was for many years one of the premier indie rock clubs in the Fargo-Moorhead area.[15] Chisholm is a city located in St. ...


Defunct but historically important venues include the former cinema, the Pence Opera House, Perpich Center for Arts Education, NorShor Theater (Duluth) and the Prom Ballroom, which showed many prominent jazz, rock and other bands in the mid-20th century. The Pence Opera House was an opera house and later, a mission, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States. ... The Perpich Center for Arts Education (PCAE) is an agency of the State of Minnesota that is dedicated to improving 11 and 12th graders arts education for all Minnesota students and educators through innovative programs and partnerships centered in the arts. ... Duluth is the county seat of St. ... The Prom Ballroom was a dance hall in Saint Paul, Minnesota, which opened in 1941 with a performance by Glenn Miller. ...


Education

Music education is part of the curriculum at Minnesota public schools. All students take music at the elementary and middle school ages, and many choose to take it as an elective in high school, where schools often organize marching bands, choruses or other performance opportunities. The Perpich Center for Arts Education is a school of choice which draws students from all over the state and has an extensive modern and classical music education program. Higher education in music is an important part of the programs at several of Minnesota's universities, including the University of Minnesota, which offers the Bachelors of Music degree in music education, therapy or performance, and graduate degrees in education, conducting and musicology.[16] McNally Smith College of Music, a preeminent college of contemporary music based in Saint Paul, offers Bachelors of Music in music performance and music business, as well as Associates Degrees and diploma programs in recording technology. Music education is a field of study associated with the teaching and learning of music. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Perpich Center for Arts Education (PCAE) is an agency of the State of Minnesota that is dedicated to improving 11 and 12th graders arts education for all Minnesota students and educators through innovative programs and partnerships centered in the arts. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Music therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a qualified professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... For album by Prince, see Musicology (album). ... McNally Smith College of Music is a music school based in Saint Paul, Minnesota offering Bachelor and Associate degrees as well as diploma programs in music business, production, audio engineering and performance. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... Buskers perform in San Francisco A performance, in performing arts, generally comprises an event in which one group of people (the performer or performers) behave in a particular way for another group of people (the audience). ... The music industry is the industry that creates and performs music, both in the form of compositions and performances. ...


Elementary school music education introduces elements of music like melody, rhythm and harmony, and examines the music of a "variety of cultures and historical times". Students are expected to perform simply melodies and rhythms and perform songs and on instruments, and to use musical notation. Older students are exposed to more complex forms of music, and more scholarly approaches to music education. Middle school students further learn about "the connection between a work of music, its purpose, and its cultural and historical contexts" and comparisons between music and other art forms. Students also perform and listen to music, and are expected to evaluate performances using personal feelings and objective criteria. At the high school level, performance, critical and scholarly expectations are higher and more complex, and may require participation in extracurricular programs like a school band or chorus.[17] Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


History

The Apollo Club's 1889 cast of Romeo and Juliet
The Apollo Club's 1889 cast of Romeo and Juliet

Music in Minnesota extends prior to historical documentation, with the music of the Native Americans of the area. The Dakota musical traditions of what is now Minnesota are generally based around vocal, percussive and dance music; folk songs among the Dakota can be celebratory, martial or ceremonial.[18] European settlers to Minnesota brought their own tradition of folk and classical music, especially choral and Christian-themed music, opera, and various kinds of ethnic folk music, most prominently including Scandinavian styles. Traditional dance music is based mostly around schottisches, polkas and waltzes with instrumentation including fiddle, button-box, mandola, accordion and banjo.[19] Image File history File links ApolloClub. ... Image File history File links ApolloClub. ... IDNIANS SUCK BALLS American Indian music is the musics that are shared by or that distinguish American Indian tribes and First Nations. ... The Sioux are a diverse group of Native Americans generally divided into three subgroups: Lakota, Dakota and Nakota. ... The Schottische is a partnered country dance, Bohemian in origin, that is two short runs and a hop followed by four turning hop steps: step step step hop, step step step hop, step hop step hop step hop step hop. ... Street musicians in Prague playing a polka Polka is a fast, lively Central European dance, and also a genre of dance music. ... A waltz (German: , Italian: , French: , Spanish: , Catalan: ) is a ballroom and folk dance in   time, done primarily in closed position. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... mandola A mandola (US and Canada) or tenor mandola (Europe, Ireland, and UK) is a stringed musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ...


The first singing school in Minnesota was in St. Anthony (now part of Minneapolis), opened in 1851. Later in the century, the Plymouth Congregational Church of Minneapolis began a singing group in 1857, followed by the first such club for women only, the Lorelei Club (later the Ladies' Thursday Musical Chorus), in 1892.[20]

1920 image from the MacPhail Center for Music yearbook
1920 image from the MacPhail Center for Music yearbook

Thousands of Norwegians settled in Minnesota between 1825 and 1925. Subcultures formed based around village of origin (bygde), and then formed organizations to maintain their home dialect and musical traditions. These organizations held annual meetings (stevne) which featured folk dancing, singing, fiddling and poetry. In the late 1860s, male choirs with primarily Norwegian and Swedish singers formed in cities and Lutheran colleges in Minnesota. These choirs sang a variety of popular and patriotic songs, hymns and folk tunes. In the 1880s, these choirs inspired the organization of singing societies that sponsored music festivals; the largest of these singing societies is the Norwegian Singers Association of America and the Union of Scandinavian Singers.[1] Image File history File links Joy MacPhail: Free use from http://www. ... Image File history File links Joy MacPhail: Free use from http://www. ... MacPhail Center for Music is a private, non-profit music school in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ...


The end of the 19th century also saw the foundation of two long-running music groups, the Thursday Musical Chorus and the Apollo Men's Musical Group. Two of the most important Minnesota institutions were founded in the early 20th century, namely the MacPhail School of Violin (1907, later becoming the MacPhail Center for Music) and the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra (1903, later the Minnesota Orchestra).[21] MacPhail Center for Music is a private, non-profit music school in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Minnesota Orchestra is an American orchestra. ... The Minnesota Orchestra is an American orchestra that was founded in 1903 by Emil Oberhoffer as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra. ...


Minneapolis became a home for vaudeville, especially Scandinavian-American vaudeville. This field was known as bondkomik (Norwegian) or bondkomiker (Swedish), and featured multi-act plays, dances, songs and monologues. Vaudeville shows usually ended with social dancing. Minneapolis' most famous performers were the Olson sisters, Hjalmar Peterson and Ernest and Clarence Iverson (Slim Jim & the Vagabond Kid). After World War 1, Scandinavian musical pride diminished, a process accelerated by economic decline in the 1930s; rural and regional dance music slowly died out and became largely unknown. During this era, however, the Leikarring movement began, which celebrated national Norwegian folk dance and song through musical societies like Minnesota's Norrona Leikarring.[1] This article is about the musical variety theatre. ...


Around the time of World War II, the Andrews Sisters from Minneapolis were very popular. Today they are perhaps best known for the song "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy," which was covered by Bette Midler decades later. There was also a thriving jazz scene at the time of the war. Local radio host Leigh Kamman is linked to jazz in Minnesota, as he has now been covering it for more than sixty years. The oldest recording studio in the state, Kay Banks, was established in 1955 by Bruce Swedien, a recording engineer, using the building of the Garrick Theatre.[22] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Andrews Sisters on the cover of the reissue collection The Best of the Andrew Sisters: The Millennium Collection. ... // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Bette Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress and comedienne, also known to her fans as The Divine Miss M. She is named after the actress Bette Davis although Davis pronounced her first name in two syllables, and Midler uses one. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Leigh Kamman (born September 2, 1922, first name pronounced lay) is a longtime radio host who has focused bringing jazz music to the airwaves for his career, which spans more than six decades. ... Bruce Swedien. ... Londons Garrick Theatre was designed by Walter Emden, with CJ Phipps brought in as a consultant to help with the planning on the difficult site, which included an underground river. ...


Folk music

Ruth Adams and The World's Most Dangerous Polka Band, Nye's Polonaise
Ruth Adams and The World's Most Dangerous Polka Band, Nye's Polonaise

Minnesota is home to many ethnic groups, but the state's folk music is best known in the areas of Swedish, Finnish and Norwegian musics. These ethnic communities frequently settled near each other, in Minnesota and in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, North Dakota and South Dakota, and their musical and cultural identities grew blurred. Norwegians and Swedes very frequently lived near each other in Minnesota, for example, and their music merged into a perceived Scandinavian identity, rather than uniquely Swedish or Norwegian. Their music is perceived as old-time music, and is also influenced by the area's German, Irish, English, Polish and other Northern and Central European musics.[1] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 144 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 144 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Music based on traditional Norwegian form usually includes minor or modal scales (sometimes mixed with major scales), making a sober and haunting sound. ... West Virginia fiddler Edden Hammons, accompanied by his son James on the banjo Old-time music is a form of North American folk music, with roots in the folk musics of many countries, including England, Scotland and Ireland, as well as the continent of Africa. ...


Norwegian folk dance (bygdedanser) includes participatory social dances and performance dances like springar, springdans, pols, rull and halling. The Norwegian gammeldans tradition continues in ethnic communities in Minnesota, where two-steps, waltzes, polkas, schottisches and mazurkas are know as old-time music. Vocal music includes short poetic songs called stev, emigrant ballads which expressed nostalgia for Norway and express hope, despair and loss about life in the United States. Musical accompaniment includes the accordion, violin, guitar, bass guitar, piano, harmonica, organ, banjo and mandolin. The Norwegian Hardanger fiddle, or hardingfele, tradition has been played at weddings and taverns in Minnesota.[1] Gammaldans in Swedish or gammeldans in Norwegian (“old-time dance”) refers to a small set of dances that became broadly popular and uniformly danced in the Nordic countries, starting in the late 1800s. ... Two-step (Two Step) is the name of several dances, some related to each other and some not. ... A waltz (German: , Italian: , French: , Spanish: , Catalan: ) is a ballroom and folk dance in   time, done primarily in closed position. ... Street musicians in Prague playing a polka Polka is a fast, lively Central European dance, and also a genre of dance music. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The mazurka (Polish: mazurek, named after Polands Mazovia district; mazurka is the feminine form of mazurek) is a Polish folk dance in triple metre with a lively tempo, containing a heavy accent on the third or second beat. ... West Virginia fiddler Edden Hammons, accompanied by his son James on the banjo Old-time music is a form of North American folk music, with roots in the folk musics of many countries, including England, Scotland and Ireland, as well as the continent of Africa. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... This article or section should be merged with Pipe organ The Casavant pipe organ at Notre-Dame de Montréal Basilica, Montreal The organ is a type of keyboard musical instrument, distinctive because the sound is not produced by a percussion action, as on a piano or celesta, or by... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... A Hardanger fiddle or hardingfele (Norwegian) is a stringed instrument very similar to a violin, but different enough that a luthier accustomed to repairing violins who works on a hardangerfele is likely to ruin it. ...


Modern music

Bob Dylan and his band, 2007
Bob Dylan and his band, 2007

Minnesotan musicians from all genres have gained notoriety over the years, with the singing Andrews Sisters gaining worldwide prominence during World War II. The modern music scene includes rock, hip hop and electronic music, and is especially known for punk rock and hardcore. Prior to the evolution of punk in the 1970s, there was little rock and roll tradition from Minneapolis, which author Steven Blush attributed to a lack of anything to "rebel against", noting that it was Minneapolis' friendly atmosphere that made future hardcore punk musicians "crazy and rebellious"[23] The first rock band from Minneapolis to achieve national prominence was the surf rock group The Trashmen who formed in 1962 and had a hit two years later with "Surfin' Bird". That song, along with Dave Dudley's "Six Days on the Road", helped to establish the Kay Banks studio, which would go on to record bands like The Guess Who and would become known for a distinctive sound characterized by three-track recording and the use of echo effects. Dove Studios was another prominent studio in the 60s, known for releasing a series of psychedelic and garage rock singles that have become collector's items, including Calico Wall's "Flight Reaction" and The Litter's Distortions.[24] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 284 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 284 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... The Andrews Sisters on the cover of the reissue collection From left to right: Maxene, Patty, and LaVerne. ... Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90s. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Hardcore punk, now commonly known as hardcore, is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... The Trashmen were a rock and roll band formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1962. ... Dave Dudley (May 3, 1928 - December 22, 2003) was a Country Music singer. ... The Guess Who is a Canadian rock band from Winnipeg, Manitoba, that was one of the first to establish a major successful following in their own country while still residing there. ... The Litter was a psychedelic and garage rock band formed in 1966 in Minneapolis. ...


Bob Dylan, a Hibbing native, became the first major mainstream solo star from Minnesota in the 1960s, known for his unique lyricism and folk-rock style. He spent a brief period in Minneapolis, attending the University of Minnesota, where he played free shows on the West Bank of the University of Minnesota Minneapolis campus. He was associated with Dinkytown, the local center for young fans of folk music, where he listened to a wide variety of folk and blues. The city's local folk scene produced a few well-known performers in the 1960s, besides Dylan, who spent much of his early career based out New York; these include the guitarist Leo Kottke and the trio Koerner, Ray & Glover. Folk music continues to be a major part of the Minnesota music scene, and is broadcast by the Prairie Home Companion, a radio show hosted by author Garrison Keillor; the Red House record label is the most influential local label, and releases records by Peter Ostroushko and Greg Brown, among others.[25] Hibbing is a city in St. ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Dinkytown, USA (also known just as Dinkytown) is an unofficial neighborhood in the city of Phillips City, Minnesota. ... Leo Kottke (born on 11 September 1945 in Athens, Georgia, USA, North America) is an acoustic guitarist. ... A Prairie Home Companion is a live radio variety show created and hosted by Garrison Keillor. ... Garrison Keillor (born Gary Edward Keillor on August 7, 1942 in Anoka, Minnesota) is an American author, storyteller, humorist, columnist, musician, satirist, and radio personality. ... Red House Records is an American independent record label specializing in folk music based in St. ... Peter Ostroushko (b. ... Greg Brown at the Falcon Ridge Folk Festival in 2004 For other people by this name, see Greg Brown. ...


These influences contributed to the rise of punk rockers Hüsker Dü, Soul Asylum, the Replacements, and the rhythm and blues stylings of Morris Day and the Time and Prince in the 1980s.[26] R&B mega-producing team Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis have origins in the Twin Cities, and jazz musician Lester Young lived there for a time in his youth. Punk Rock is an anti-establishment music movement that began about 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified by The Ramones,the Misfits, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... This article is about the rock band called Hüsker Dü. For other uses, see Husker Du. ... Soul Asylum is an alternative rock band formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1983. ... For other uses, see The Replacements (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... The Time is a funk and dance-pop ensemble formed in 1981. ... For another person sometimes known as The Artist, see Michael Haynes III. Prince Rogers Nelson (born June 7, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American funk musician. ... Jimmy Jam (born James Harris III in Minneapolis, Minnesota on June 6, 1959) and Terry Lewis (born November 21, 1956 in Omaha, Nebraska) are an R&B and pop songwriting and record production team. ... Lester Young Lester Willis Young (August 27, 1909 – March 15, 1959), nicknamed Prez, was an American jazz tenor saxophonist and clarinetist. ...


These later sources brought the Minneapolis music scene to national attention; the period from about 1977 to 1987 was a period of incredible dynamism in the Minneapolis music scene, with offshoots in the punk scene including Soul Asylum, Babes in Toyland, the Clams and many other seminal favorites, while Prince's immense power in the industry (which peaked during this period) created a rhythm and blues mini-empire at his Paisley Park Studios, based in suburban Chanhassen. Babes in Toyland were an all-women band formed in Minneapolis in 1988. ... Paisley Park Studios is a studio and multimedia company run by rock/rhythm and Blues artist Prince. ... Chanhassen is a city located in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ...


Contemporary local artists continue to enjoy critical acclaim such as hip-hop duo Atmosphere and frontman Slug's label Rhymesayers Entertainment, the smaller Doomtree, and commercially successful pop-rockers Semisonic. While things have slowed considerably, the Twin Cities are still the region's musical hotbed. More recently, the music scene has showed signs of revival with the success of the Minneapolis-based rock bands Motion City Soundtrack, Tapes 'n Tapes, and Quietdrive. The area has also shown an unusual affinity for certain artists. For instance, while largely unnoticed on their home turf in New York City, the Twin Cities accounted for the majority of national sales for Soul Coughing's second album Irresistible Bliss during its first eight weeks of release; this followed from the fledgling fan base that Soul Coughing found here while touring for their first effort, Ruby Vroom. [citation needed] Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Slugs latest release. ... Official Logo Rhymesayers Entertainment is an underground hip-hop music label based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, co-founded in 1995 by Slug, a member of the group Atmosphere. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Semisonic is an alternative rock band formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1995 (see 1995 in music). ... Motion City Soundtrack is an American pop punk band from Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Tapes n Tapes is an indie rock band from Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Quietdrive is a pop punk band from Minneapolis, Minnesota formed at Saint Johns University in 2002. ... Soul Coughing (1992–2000) was a New York-based alternative rock band comprised of Mike Doughty (vocals, lyrics, guitar), Mark De Gli Antoni (samples, keyboards), Sebastian Steinberg (string bass) and Yuval Gabay (drums). ... Irresistible Bliss was Soul Coughings 1996 (see 1996 in music) second album. ... Ruby Vroom was Soul Coughings 1994 (see 1994 in music) debut album. ...


R&B

Main article: Minneapolis sound

Minneapolis became noted as a center for R&B in the 1980s, when the singing star Prince rose to fame. The city had little history in African American popular music, like R&B, until Prince debuted in 1978. He became the first architect of the Minneapolis sound, a funk and disco-influenced style of R&B, and inspired a legion of subsequent performers, including The Time, Wendy & Lisa and Vanity Six.[27] The Minneapolis sound is a hybrid mixture of funk, rock, pop, R&B & new wave that was masterminded by Prince in the late 1970s. ... Prince changed his stage name into an unpronounceable symbol in 1993, but took up the name Prince again in 1999. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... This article is about the music genre. ... The Time may refer to: The Time, a funk band of the 80s associated with Prince Or may be a typo for: The Times of London The New York Times This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Wendy and Lisa are a musical duo comprised of musicians Lisa Coleman and Wendy Melvoin that formed in the mid 1980s. ... Vanity 6 was a female vocal trio assembled by Prince in the early 1980s. ...


In 1980, a group of session musicians, recording as Lipps Inc., recorded the song "Funkytown" at Sound 80 Studios. The song launched the record production careers of Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, whose Flyte Tyme Productions helped define the Minneapolis sound. The pair's first big break was Janet Jackson's Control in 1986, which launched her career and spawned numerous projects between Jam and Lewis with artists as varied as Mint Condition, Michael Jackson, Sounds of Blackness, New Edition, Alexander O'Neal, Cherrelle, The S.O.S. Band, Boyz II Men Patti LaBelle, and many others.[28] Lipps Inc was a studio band that achieved one significant hit, Funkytown in 1980. ... Sound 80 was a recording studio in Minneapolis, Minnesota founded by Tom Jung and Herb Pilhofer in 1969. ... In the music industry, record producer designates a person responsible for completing a master recording so that it is fit for release. ... James Jimmy Jam Harris III (born on June 6, 1959 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) and Terry Lewis (born November 21, 1956 in Omaha, Nebraska) are an American R&B and pop songwriting and record production team. ... Janet Damita Jo Jackson (born May 16, 1966) is an American singer, actress, songwriter, record producer, dancer, activist, pop icon, and younger sister of the King of Pop, Michael Jackson. ... Singles from Control Control is the third studio album by American R&B/pop singer Janet Jackson. ... Mint Condition is a six-person R&B band from the Twin Cities. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Sounds Of Blackness is a gospel music ensemble from Minneapolis Minnesota who scored several big hits on the Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart in the nineties. ... New Edition is an American R&B/Pop group formed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1980, that was most popular during the 1980s. ... Alexander ONeal (born November 14, 1953 in Natchez, Mississippi) is an American singer. ... Cherrelle, as pictured in 1988 on her third album, Affair Cherrelle (born Cheryl Newton in Los Angeles, California in 1958) is a soul singer who rose to fame as one of the premier R&B female divas of the mid-to-late 1980s. ... The SOS Band is an American musical ensemble, founded in Atlanta, Georgia in 1977. ... Boyz II Men is an American R&B/soul singing group from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Patti LaBelle (born Patricia Louise Holt on May 24, 1944 in West-Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an multi-grammy winning American R&B and soul singer and songwriter who fronted two groups, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles and Labelle, which changed and birthed a new era of womens music and...


Rock

In the mid-1970s, the local music scene in the Minneapolis area began producing popular and innovative acts. Many signed to major record labels, and by the mid 1980s, had achieved national prominence. The first may have been Lipps Inc, who gained some popularity in the late 1970s during the disco era with the global hit "Funkytown" (though the song itself was not in the rock genre). The Suburbs also formed around the same time. They were the first group to be released under the local Twin/Tone Records label in 1978. Largely only known locally, the group developed a New Wave sound in the 1980s and opened for national acts such as Iggy Pop and The B-52's. Lipps Inc was a studio band that achieved one significant hit, Funkytown in 1980. ... This article is about the music genre. ... Funkytown is a 1979 song by the disco band Lipps Inc. ... In Combo The Suburbs were an alternative rock and roll/funk/new wave band that—true to their name—came out of the western suburbs of Minneapolis. ... Twin/Tone Records was a record label based out of Minneapolis, Minnesota that operated from 1977 until 1994 and helped several local groups receive national attention. ... New Wave was a pop and rock music genre that existed during the late 1970s and the early-to-mid 1980s. ... James Newell Osterberg, Jr. ... The B-52s are a New Wave rock band formed in Athens, Georgia, an important center of alternative rock. ...

Audio samples of Minnesota music

Originally based out of Jay's Longhorn Bar, the Minneapolis hardcore punk scene grew slowly. The Suicide Commandos were perhaps first, and they were quickly followed by Hüsker Dü and The Replacements, who started as hardcore punk bands and became pivotal in the development of alternative rock. The Replacements eventually achieved some limited mainstream success, while Hüsker Dü became the first hardcore outfit to sign to a major label. Soul Asylum was originally a Minneapolis hardcore band called Loud Fast Rules, which played with bands like Man Sized Action, Rifle Sport and Breaking Circus who mixed funk, thrash metal and other influences.[29] The Twin Cities rock scene had fully come to national prominence by 1984, when the Village Voice's renowned critics poll, Pazz and Jop, named three Minneapolis recordings among the top ten of the year: Prince's Purple Rain, The Replacements' Let It Be, and Hüsker Dü's Zen Arcade.[30] Image File history File links Subterranean_Homesick_Blues. ... Image File history File links Prince-How_Come_U_Don't_Call_Me_Anymore. ... For another person sometimes known as The Artist, see Michael Haynes III. Prince Rogers Nelson (born June 7, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American funk musician. ... Prince (UK) singles chronology Lets Work (1982) 1999 (1982) Little Red Corvette (1983) Prince (UK) singles chronology The Holy River (1997) 1999 (1998) The Greatest Romance Ever Sold (1999) 1999 is one of Princes most well-known songs and a defining point in his rise to superstar status. ... The Hits/The B-Sides is a 1993 (and the first) greatest hits compilation album by Prince. ... Image File history File links The_ReplacementsUnsatisfied. ... Image File history File links HuskerDuImNeverTalkingtoYou. ... The Longhorn is often considered the nexus of the punk scene in Minneapolis. ... // The Minneapolis area has been a fertile ground for the hardcore punk scene for many years. ... The Suicide Commandos were an American punk rock trio from Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... This article is about the rock band called Hüsker Dü. For other uses, see Husker Du. ... For other uses, see The Replacements (disambiguation). ... Hardcore punk, now commonly known as hardcore, is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Soul Asylum is an alternative rock band formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1983. ... Man sized action were a post punk group from Minneapolis. ... Breaking Circus was postpunk band from the 1980s, based in Chicago and later Minneapolis, led by guitarist and vocalist Steve Björklund. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music, one of the extreme metal subgenres that is characterised by the high speed and aggression. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... There are multiple meanings for Purple Rain, all related to Prince: His album Purple Rain The song Purple Rain from the same album The film Purple Rain in which he starred All three were released in 1984. ... Let It Be is the title of a 1984 album released by The Replacements. ... Zen Arcade is the third full-length album from the American rock band Hüsker Dü, released in July 1984 on SST Records. ...


The late 1980s saw new sounds coming out of the state, when Information Society came to the attention of nightclubs and record labels in New York City. The group had formed in 1982 at Macalester College in St. Paul and made an initial release on the local Wide Angle Records label two years later. "What's on Your Mind (Pure Energy)" became a huge hit in 1988, and they continued to make music through most of the 1990s. Beginning in 1986, The Jayhawks began recording, achieving critical acclaim with a modern folk-rock sound.[31] For other uses, see Information society (disambiguation). ... Laser lights illuminate the dance floor at a Gatecrasher dance music event in Sheffield, England A nightclub (or night club or club) is a drinking, dancing, and entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Macalester College is a privately supported, coeducational liberal arts college in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... Hailing from Minneapolis, the Jayhawks are a band playing a style of alt-country and roots rock with elements of folk. ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ...


Another group to form around the same time was Babes in Toyland, an early riot grrl band that saw moderate popularity through the 1990s as well. They toured with Lollapalooza in 1993. Many groups of the 1980s and 1990s eventually split up, and a number of other bands formed from the remnants. Bob Mould left Hüsker Dü to head Sugar and do solo projects. Trip Shakespeare eventually transformed into Semisonic, who gained popularity in the late 1990s. A former member of Semisonic met up with another from Trip Shakespeare to form The Flops. Babes in Toyland were an all-women band formed in Minneapolis in 1988. ... Riot grrl (also frequently spelled riot grrrl) is a form of hardcore punk rock music, known for its militant feminist stance. ... Lollapalooza is an American music festival featuring rock, alternative rock, hip hop, and punk rock bands, dance and comedy performances, and craft booths. ... Bob Mould (born October 16, 1960, in Malone, New York) is an American musician, principally known for his work as guitarist, vocalist and songwriter for influential rock bands Hüsker Dü in the 1980s and Sugar in the 1990s. ... Sugar was an indie rock band of the early 1990s led by former Hüsker Dü vocalist/guitarist Bob Mould. ... Trip Shakespeare was a Minneapolis-based alternative rock of the late 1980s/early 1990s. ... Semisonic is an alternative rock band formed in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1995 (see 1995 in music). ... The Flops were a collaboration of John Munson (of Semisonic and Trip Shakespeare) and Matt Wilson (frontman of Trip Shakespeare). ...


Hip hop

Slug of underground hip hop group Atmosphere
Slug of underground hip hop group Atmosphere
Main article: Twin Cities Hip Hop

The Twin Cities region is home to a thriving underground hip hop scene due largely to the presence of Rhymesayers Entertainment. Rhymesayers artists including, among others, Eyedea & Abilities, Brother Ali, Los Nativos, Musab, and, most notably, Atmosphere, began to receive national attention in recent years. Heiruspecs is another notable group. Also recently, the Twin Cities hip hop scene owes some of its success to the annual Twin Cities Celebration of Hip Hop founded by Larry Lucio, Jr. & Toki Wright and sponsored by YO! The Movement, as well as D.U. Nation's website. The next most respectable hip-hop crew of the Twin Cities is Doomtree. The Twin Cities scene is unique as most crews have a friendly relationship and perform many shows together. Doomtree includes such artists as; P.O.S., Sims, Turbo Nemesis, and Lazerbeak. There are many other hip hop crews in the Twin Cities. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 105 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 105 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Slugs latest release. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Twin Cities hip hop is hip-hop or rap music that originates from the Twin Cities metropolitan area in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Underground hip hop, underground rap, or undie (to draw comparison to indie or independent rock) is an umbrella term for hip-hop and rap music outside the general commercial cannon. ... Official Logo Rhymesayers Entertainment is an underground hip-hop music label based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, co-founded in 1995 by Slug, a member of the group Atmosphere. ... Eyedea and DJ Abilities Eyedea & Abilities are an American rap duo. ... Brother Ali (born Jason Newman, now Ali Newman) is an American hip hop artist. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Heiruspecs (pronounced high-roo-spex) is a live rap/hip hop band based in St. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... P.O.S. P.O.S. (born Stefon Alexander), is a rapper signed to Rhymesayers Entertainment and a founding member of Doomtree. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Techno/Dance

Minnesota is home to a burgeoning electronic music scene in the area, though the genre tends to get little radio airplay in the state. Dance music in Minnesota is often played on local pirate radio outlets. The most famous of these was Beat Radio 97.7, started by area programmer and DJ Alan Freed (not to be confused with the Alan Freed who was an early promoter of rock and roll). After his transmitter was shut down by the Federal Communications Commission, Freed brought the music to special programs on several local stations, including during most of 1998 with night-long broadcasts on the former Radio Aahs network, which reached 10 cities around the country. He now programs dance stations of XM Satellite Radio. For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... The term Pirate Radio usually refers to illegal or unregulated radio transmission. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... FCC redirects here. ... // Radio AAHS (sometimes misspelled as Radio Oz) was a radio network managed by the Childrens Broadcasting Corporation. ... “XM” redirects here. ...


References

is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e Garland, pp. 866 - 881
  2. ^ Music Scene.org An incomplete listing of local bands at MusicScene.org has 2,241 entries as of February 2005, while a concert calendar compiled by the University of Minnesota's radio station usually lists dozens of performances each week in the Twin Cities
  3. ^ Minneapolis Music Collection In the mid-1970s and early 1980s, the creative explosion in Minnesota's thriving black and white rock music scenes expanded the state's cultural identity far beyond the shores of Lake Wobegon.
  4. ^ About the MOA The first disc was released on the BIS label in 2005, covering the 4th and 5th symphonies.
  5. ^ Minnesota Opera
  6. ^ Leroy Larson and the Scandinavian Music Ensemble
  7. ^ Pitchfork
  8. ^ Pulse of the Twin Cities
  9. ^ Minnesota Blues
  10. ^ Ely Blues
  11. ^ City Pages
  12. ^ Scholtes, Peter. "First Love." City Pages. September 3, 2003. http://www.citypages.com/databank/24/1187/article11480.asp
  13. ^ First Avenue (homepage); Minneapolis Music and Nightlife
  14. ^ Anderson Jr., G.R. "RIP: The Quest club." City Pages. January 12, 2007. http://blogs.citypages.com/blotter/2007/01/rip_the_quest_nightclub.php
  15. ^ Byron, pg. 111 Byron calls Ironworld a "theme park of iron-ore mining and European immigrant cultures"
  16. ^ University of Minnesota: School of Music
  17. ^ Arts standards in 2003
  18. ^ A History of Minneapolis: Music
  19. ^ Leroy Larson and the Scandinavian Music Ensemble
  20. ^ A History of Minneapolis: Music
  21. ^ A History of Minneapolis: Music
  22. ^ City Pages
  23. ^ Blush, pg. 224 Prior to Punk, Minneapolis provided little fodder for the music industry. No Rock & Roll tradition existed. Maybe there was nothing to rebel against. Life in friendly places tends to make kids crazy and rebellious. Thus, Mpls cultivated its own brand of alienation and self-loathing. (sic)
  24. ^ City Pages
  25. ^ Unterberger, pg. 326
  26. ^ Breining, Greg (December 2005). Compass American Guides: Minnesota, 3rd Edition, 3rd, Compass American Guides. ISBN 1-4000-1484-0. 
  27. ^ Unterberger, pgs. 323–325
  28. ^ Unterberger, pgs. 325–326
  29. ^ Blush, pg. 224
  30. ^ Minnesota Historical Society Purple Rain was at #2, Let It Be was at #4 and Zen Arcade at #8.
  31. ^ Allmusic.com: Jayhawks

University of Minnesota Twin Cities This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... BIS is an acronym standing for: Bank for International Settlements Barratt Impulsivity Scale, a self administered test to measure impulsivity Benevolent Irish Society Bispectral index Bislama language (ISO 639 alpha-3, bis) Bohemia Interactive Studio Bezpecnostni informacni sluzba, the Czech intelligence agency Best in Show, the highest placing in a... Fodors (pronounced ) is the worlds largest publisher of English language travel and tourism information, and the first relatively professional producer of travel guidebooks. ...

See also

Minnesota Portal

Category:Minnesota musicians Image File history File links Portal. ...


External links

  • Platial Map of 18+ and all-ages venues in the Twin Cities
  • scheduletwo.com – features live video of local and touring bands performing in the Twin Cities.
  • MusicScene.org – covering Minnesota and western Wisconsin
  • Radio stations - a list of stations and formats in Minnesota
  • Minnewiki: The Minnesota Music Encyclopedia – Wiki operated by Minnesota Public Radio
  • Fargo Band Family Tree – wiki covering the Minnesota and North Dakota indie music scenes
  • McNally Smith College of Music – Twin Cities-based college of popular music performance, production, recording, and business
  • Minnesota Public Radio – see also KCMP
  • MINNIE INDIE – weekly mailing list of music events in the Minneapolis/St.Paul area.
  • Twin Cities Hardingfelelag – Twin Cities group dedicated to the performance of traditional Norwegian hardanger fiddle (hardingfele) music
  • The Weekly Musician - The online source for the Northern & Central Minnesota area nightclub, band & musician info

  Results from FactBites:
 
Music of Minnesota - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3351 words)
Music institutions in modern Minnesota include the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the only full-time professional chamber orchestra in the country, and the Minnesota Orchestra, a pioneering institution that was among the first orchestras to perform on the radio and to record.
Minnesota Public Radio is also a major part of the Minnesota radio industry; it is one of the most successful public radio organizations in the country, and has grown from a small station associated with St.
Music in Minnesota extends prior to historical documentation, with the music of the Native Americans of the area.
River of Song: Music Along the River (738 words)
Music was one of the last areas of American Indian culture to receive serious attention from scholars.
Trained in classical Western art music, they applied their skills at transcription and analysis, but from their European cultural bias they invariably arrived at conclusions that today are generally recognized as ethnocentric and dated.
Minnesota Ojibway were among the first American Indians to have their music recorded in any depth, due mostly to the efforts of Frances Densmore, born in Red Wing, Minnesota, in 1867.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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