FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Music of Hawaii
Music of the United States
AK - AL - AR - AS - AZ - CA - CO - CT - DC - DE - FL - GA - GU - HI - IA - ID - IL - IN - KS - KY - LA - MA - MD - ME - MI - MN - MO - MP - MS - MT - NC - ND - NE - NH - NM - NV - NJ - NY - OH - OK - OR - PA - PR - RI - SC - SD - TN - TX - UT - VA - VI - VT - WA - WI - WV - WY
Institutions
Honolulu Symphony Orchestra - Maui Academy of Performing Arts - Honolulu Chamber Music Society
Organizations
Hawaii Academy of Recording Arts - Hawaii Music Awards - Hawaiian Music Foundation - Ukulele Guild of Hawaii
Venues
Honokaa People's Theatre - Neal S. Blaisdell Center
Festivals
Big Island Slack Key Guitar Festival - Gabby Pahinui/Atta Isaacs Slack Key Festival - Hamakua Music Festival - Hawaii Performing Arts Festival - Merrie Monarch Festival
State song "Hawaii ponoi"
Other topics Hawaiian folk music - Music of Honolulu - Polynesian music

The music of Hawaiʻi includes an array of traditional and popular styles, ranging from native Hawaiian folk music to modern rock and hip hop. Hawaiʻi's musical contributions to the music of the United States are out of proportion to the state's small size. Styles like slack-key guitar are well-known worldwide, while Hawaiian-tinged music is a frequent part of Hollywood soundtracks. Hawaiʻi also made a major contribution to country music with the introduction of the steel guitar.[1] The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... Alaska is a state of the United States. ... Alabama has played a central role in the development of both blues and country music. ... Arkansas is a Southern state of the United States. ... The Samoas are a Polynesian island chain, currently divided between the independent state of Samoa (formerly Western Samoa) and an American territory called American Samoa. ... Arizonas musical history has been heavily influenced by Mexican immigrants. ... In the United States, California is commonly associated with the film, music, and arts industries; there are numerous world-famous Californian musicians. ... Colorado is a state of the United States, and has a notable reputation for music. ... Connecticut is a state of the United States in the New England region. ... The music of Washington D.C. is known for two primary scenes, hardcore and associated derivatives and a hip hop-dance music hybrid called go go. ... Delaware is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. ... Floridas ethnic diversity has led to a myriad of musical styles from punk rock to salsa and heavy metal being popular in various parts of the state. ... Georgias musical output includes Southern rap groups like Outkast and Goodie Mob, as well as a wide variety of rock, pop and country artists. ... Guam is an unincorporated territory of the United States. ... The music of Iowa includes such notable musicians as Slipknot, Stallions Versus Unicorns, Bix Beiderbecke and Greg Brown, as well as Meredith Willson, composer of The Music Man, and Alice Ettinger who was renowned enough to perform in Europe in the 1890s. ... Idaho has produced a number of musicians, including pop star Paul Revere and Doug Martsch of Built to Spill. ... Illinois, which includes Chicago, the third-largest city in the United States, has a wide musical heritage. ... The music of Indiana was strongly influenced by a large number of German and Irish immigrants who arrived in the 1830s. ... For many decades, Kansas has had a vibrant country and bluegrass scene. ... The Music of Kentucky is heavily centered on Appalachian folk music and its descendants, especially in eastern Kentucky. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... New England Conservatory of Music in Boston Massachusetts is a U.S. state in New England. ... Famous musicians from Maryland include Francis Scott Key, who wrote The Star-Spangled Banner and pop punksters Good Charlotte, from Waldorf. ... Maine is a state of the United States, located in New England. ... In Michigan, the city of Detroit has remained the capital of musical innovation for many years. ... The music of Minnesota has played a role in the historical and cultural development of Minnesota. ... St. ... The Northern Mariana Islands are an island chain dependency of the United States. ... Mississippi is best-known as the home of the blues, which developed among the freed African Americans in the latter half of the 19th century. ... Montana is a state of the United States. ... North Carolina is known particularly for its tradition of old-time music, and many recordings were made in the early 20th century by folk song collector Bascom Lamar Lunsford. ... The Music of North Dakota has followed general American trends over much of its history, beginning with ragtime and folk music, moving into big band and jazz. ... The state of Nebraska has spawned few big-name musicians, but has its own musical heritage. ... New Hampshire is a state of the United States, located in the New England region. ... New Mexico is a state of the Southwest United States. ... For most outsiders, Nevadan music is probably most closely associated with lounge singers like Wayne Newton playing in Las Vegas. ... One of the most renowned musicians from New Jersey is probably Bruce Springsteen, who became a 1980s icon with complex lyrical stories about teens growing up in Freehold and other economically depressed areas of New Jersey. ... In the United States, New York City has long been a musical hub and, in some ways, the musical capital of the country. ... The most famous musicians from Ohio are probably Marilyn Manson, Dean Martin and Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders; the 19th century composer Daniel Emmett, born in Ohio to a Virginian family, wrote many of the most popular songs in his era, including some that remain well-known. ... While the music of Oklahoma is relatively young, Oklahoma having been a state for less than a hundred years, it has a rich history and many fine musicians. ... Oregons music scene is most active in Portland and the college town of Eugene. ... The most famous musical innovaters to come out of Pennsylvania are perhaps the Philly sound in 1970s soul music, Gamble & Huff, The OJays, Teddy Pendergrass, Harold Melvin and The Delphonics, as well as jazz legends like Nina Simone and John Coltrane. ... The music of Puerto Rico has been influenced by African and European (especially Spanish) forms, and has become popular across the Caribbean and in some communities worldwide. ... Rhode Island is a state of the United States, located in the New England region. ... South Carolina is one of the Southern United States, and has produced a number of renowned performers of country, bluegrass and other styles. ... The United States state of South Dakota has an official state song, Hail! South Dakota, written by DeeCort Hammitt. ... The story of Tennessees contribution to American music is essentially the story of three cities: Nashville, Memphis, and Bristol. ... Texas has long been a center for musical innovation. ... Utah music has long been dominated culturally by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (the Mormons), although other groups have also played an important role. ... Virginias musical contribution to American culture has been diverse, and includes Piedmont blues musicians and later rock and roll bands, many centered at such college towns as Blacksburg, Charlottesville (home of Dave Matthews Band) and Richmond. ... The music of the Virgin Islands reflects long-standing cultural ties to the island nations to the south as well as to various European colonialists. ... Vermont is a state in the United States. ... The U.S. state of Washington includes several major hotbeds of musical innovation. ... Perhaps the most influential musical output of Wisconsin came from Port Washington, Ozaukee County during the 1920s, when Paramount Records released a series of blues and jazz recordings. ... West Virginias folk heritage is a part of the Appalachian folk music tradition, and includes styles of fiddling and other techniques reminiscent of Scotch-Irish music. ... The first music of Wyoming was played by various Native Americans tribes in the present-day U.S. state of Wyoming. ... The Honolulu Symphony, also known as the Honolulu Symphony Orchestra, is the official symphonic orchestra of the City & County of Honolulu in the State of Hawaii. ... -1... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... The Merrie Monarch Festival is a week-long hula festival that takes place annually in Hilo, Hawaii. ... Each state in the United States (except New Jersey) has a state song, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Omg vandalised! So, Im doing it again so it can be reverted. ... Polynesia is a group of island chains spread across much of the Pacific Ocean, and includes many countries and territories. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... Slack key guitar is a style of guitar fingerpicking that originated in Hawaii. ... ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... A Dobro style resonator guitar Steel guitar, strictly speaking, refers to a method of playing using a metal slide (or steel) on a guitar played horizontally, with the strings uppermost. ...


Traditional Hawaiian folk music is a major part of the state's musical heritage. The Hawaiian people have inhabited the islands for centuries and have retained much of their traditional musical knowledge. Their music is largely religious in nature, and includes chanting and dance music. Hawaiian music has had an enormous impact on the music of other Polynesian islands; indeed, music author Peter Manuel called the influence of Hawaiian music a "unifying factor in the development of modern Pacific musics".[2] Native Hawaiians (in Hawaiian, kānaka ōiwi or kānaka maoli) are the Polynesian peoples of the Hawaiian Islands who trace their ancestry back to Marquesan and possibly Tahitian settlers (starting circa AD 400), before the arrival of British explorer Captain James Cook in 1778. ... A chant is the rhythmic speaking or singing of words or sounds, either on a single pitch or with a simple notes and often including a great deal of repetition or statis. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Polynesia is a group of island chains spread across much of the Pacific Ocean, and includes many countries and territories. ...

Contents

Music festivals and venues

Major music festivals in Hawaiʻi include the Merrie Monarch Hula Festival, which brings together hula groups from across the world, as well as a number of slack-key and steel guitar festivals: Big Island Slack Key Guitar Festival, Steel Guitar Association Festival and the Gabby Pahinui/Atta Isaacs Slack Key Festival. April's Aloha Week is a popular tourist attraction, as is the Moloka'i Music Festival held around Labor Day.[1] There is also a Hawaii International Jazz Festival, which was founded in 1993, and holds festivals on Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi, Maui and Kauaʻi.[3] The Merrie Monarch Festival is a week-long hula festival that takes place annually in Hilo, Hawaii. ... The Aloha Festivals is an annual series of free cultural celebrations observed in the state of Hawaii in the United States. ... Labour Day (or Labor Day) is an annual holiday that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ... The Island of Oahu. ... The Island of HawaiÊ»i (called the Big Island or HawaiÊ»i proper) is one of eight main islands that make up the U.S. state of HawaiÊ»i. ... For other uses, see Maui (disambiguation). ... Kauai (Hawaiian IPA pron. ...


Hawaiʻi is home to numerous hotels, most of which feature music in the afternoon or evening; some of the more prominent ones include the Kahala Hilton, the Sheraton Moana Hotel, Casanova's and the King Kamehameha Hotel.[1] Large music venues in Hawaii include the University Theater, which has 600 seats and is the largest venue on the Big Island.[4] The largest venue and cultural exhibition center on Kauai is the Kauai Community College Performing Arts Center.[5] The Neal S. Blaisdell Center is the largest venue in Honolulu and among the largest in the state. The historic Lanai Theatre is a cultural landmark on Lanai, dating back to the 1930s.[6]-1...


Music institutions and industry

Hawaiʻi is home to a number of renowned music institutions in several fields. The Honolulu Symphony Orchestra is an important part of the state's musical history, and is the oldest orchestra in the United States west of the Rocky Mountains, founded in 1900. The Orchestra has collaborated with other local institutions, like the Hawaiʻi Opera Theatre and the Oʻahu Choral Society's Honolulu Symphony Chorus, which operates the Hawaiʻi International Choral Festival.[7] The Honolulu Symphony, also known as the Honolulu Symphony Orchestra, is the official symphonic orchestra of the City & County of Honolulu in the State of Hawaii. ... The HawaiÊ»i Opera Theatre, or HOT is HawaiÊ»is opera theatre. ...


Folk music

Hawaiian folk music includes several varieties of chanting (mele) and music meant for highly-ritualized dance (hula). Traditional Hawaiian music and dance was functional, used to express praise, communicate genealogy and mythology and accompany games, festivals and other secular events. The Hawaiian language has no word that translates precisely as music, but a diverse vocabulary exists to describe rhythms, instruments, styles and elements of voice production. Hawaiian folk music is simple in melody and rhythm, but is "complex and rich" in the "poetry, accompanying mimetic dance (hula), and subtleties of vocal styles... even in the attenuated forms in which they survive today".[2] The Hawaiian language is an Austronesian language that takes its name from that of the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed. ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ...

Hula performance at a ceremony turning over U.S. Navy control over the island of Kahoolawe to the state

The chant (mele) is typically accompanied by an ipu heke (a double gourd drum) and/or pahu (sharkskin covered drum). Some dances require dancers to utilize hula implements such as an ipu (single gourd drum), ʻiliʻili (waterworn lava stone castanets), ʻuliʻuli (feathered gourd rattles), pu`ʻli (split bamboo sticks) or kalaʻau (rhythm sticks). The older, formal kind of hula is called kahiko, while the modern version is ʻauana. There are also religious chants called ʻoli; when accompanied by dancing and drums, it is called mele hula pahu. A ceremony at Iolani Palace where the Navy returned access control of the island of Kahoolawe to the State of Hawaii, US Navy Newsstand photo 031112-N-3228G-001 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (Nov. ... A ceremony at Iolani Palace where the Navy returned access control of the island of Kahoolawe to the State of Hawaii, US Navy Newsstand photo 031112-N-3228G-001 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (Nov. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Kaho‘olawe is the smallest of the 8 main volcanic islands in the Hawaiian Islands. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... 1: Ipu (EE-poo)is a Hawaiian percussion instrument made from a single gourd. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ...


In the pre-contact Hawaiian language, the word mele referred to any kind of poetic expression, though it now translates as song. The two kinds of Hawaiian chanting were mele oli and mele hula. The first were a cappella individual songs, while the latter were accompanied dance music performed by a group. The chanters were known as haku mele and were highly-trained composers and performers. Some kinds of chants express emotions like angst and affection, or request a favor from another person. Other chants are for specific purposes like naming, (mele inoa), prayer (mele pule), surfing (mele he'e nalu) and genealogical recitations (mele koihonua). Mele chants were governed by strict rules, and were performed in a number of styles include the rapid kepakepa and the enunciate koihonua. The Hawaiian language is an Austronesian language that takes its name from that of the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed. ... Chant is the rhythmic speaking or singing of words or sounds, often primarily on one or two pitches called reciting tones. ... A cappella music is vocal music or singing without instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Angst (disambiguation). ... For the change in vowel and consonant quality in Celtic languages, see Affection (linguistics). ... A Hawaiian name is a name in the Hawaiian language. ... Mary Magdalene in prayer. ... For other uses, see Surfing (disambiguation). ... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ...


Music history

Historical documentation of Hawaiian music does not extend prior to the late 18th century, when foreign colonizers arrived on the island. During this period, Hawaii began a period of acculturation with the introduction of numerous styles of European music, including the hymns (himeni) introduced by Protestant missionary choirs. Mexican and Spanish cowboys, or paniolos, were particularly influential immigrants in the field of music, introducing falsetto singing and the use of string instruments such as the guitar, while Portuguese sailors brought the ukulele-like braguinha.[1] Falsetto is a singing technique that produces sounds that are pitched higher than the singers normal range, in the treble range. ... A string instrument (or stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... The ukulele (Hawaiian: , IPA pronunciation: ; Anglicised pronunciation usually IPA: ), sometimes spelled ukelele (particularly in the UK) or uke, is a chordophone classified as a plucked lute; it is a subset of the guitar family of instruments, generally with four strings or four courses of strings. ... The cavaquinho (pron. ...


Elizabeth Tatar divided Hawaiian music history into seven periods, beginning with the initial arrival of Europeans and their musical cultures, spanning approximately from 1820 to 1872. The subsequent period lasted to the beginning of the 20th century, and was marked by the creation of an acculturated yet characteristically Hawaiian modern style, while European instruments spread across the islands. Tatar's third period, from 1900 to about 1915, saw the integration of Hawaiian music into the broader field of American popular music, with the invention of hapa haole songs, which use the English language and only superficial elements of Hawaiian music; the beginning of the Hawaiian recording industry was in 1906, when the Victor Talking Machine Company made the first 53 recordings in the state. By 1912, recorded Hawaiian music had found an audience on the American mainland.[8] Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ...


From 1915 to 1930, mainstream audiences outside of Hawaii became increasingly enamored of Hawaiian music, though by this time the songs marketed as Hawaiian had only tangential relations to actual Hawaiian music. Tahitian and Samoan music had an influence on Hawaiian music during this period, especially in their swifter and more intricate rhythms. The following era, from about 1930 to 1960, has been called the "Golden Age of Hawaiian music", when popular styles were adapted for orchestras and big bands, and Hawaiian performers like Lani MacIntire and Sol Hoopii became mainstream stars. In the 1960s, Hawaiian-style music declined in popularity amid an influx of rock, soul and pop acts from the American mainland. This trend reversed itself in the final period of Hawaiian music history, the modern period beginning with the Hawaiian Renaissance in the 1970s and continuing with the foundation of a variety of modern music scenes in fields like indie rock, Hawaiian hip hop and Jawaiian.[8] For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... A big band is a type of musical ensemble associated with playing jazz music and which became popular during the Swing Era from the early 1930s until the late 1940s. ... Sol Hoopii (1902 - November 16, 1953) was perhaps the most famous Hawaiian steel guitarist of the 20th century. ... This article contains information that has not been verified. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... The music of Hawaii includes an array of traditional and popular styles, ranging from native Hawaiian folk music to modern rock and hip hop. ...


Queen Lili'uokalani and Henry Berger

Queen Lili'uokalani
Queen Lili'uokalani

Queen Lili'uokalani was the last Queen of Hawaii before the Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown. She was also a musician and composer, known for the unofficial Hawaiian anthem "Aloha 'Oe". Though she arranged the music for "Aloha 'Oe", and wrote the lyrics, she appropriated the tune from a Croatian folk song called "Sidi Mara na kamen studencu". Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Her Majesty Lili‘uokalani, Queen of Hawai‘i Queen Lili‘uokalani of Hawai‘i (September 2, 1838 - November 11, 1917), given the Christian name Lydia Lili‘uokalani and later named Lydia K. Dominis, was the last monarch of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i. ... Princess Victoria Ka‘iulani, a member of the Kalakaua Dynasty, was in line to become Queen of Hawai‘i when her kingdom was overthrown by local American businessmen with the aid of the United States Marine Corps The Kingdom of Hawai‘i was established in 1810 upon... now. ... The music of Croatia, like the country itself, has three major influences: the influence of the Mediterranean especially present in the coastal areas, of the Balkans especially in the mountainous, continental parts, and of central Europe in the central and northern parts of the country. ...


Lili'uokalani was one of many members of the Hawaiian royal family with musical inclinations. They studied under a Prussian military bandleader, Henry Berger, who was sent by the Kaiser at the request of Kamehameha V. Berger became fascinated by Hawaiian folk music, and wrote much documentation on it. However, he also brought his own musical background in German music, and heavily guided the Hawaiian musicians and composers he worked with. As a result, the traditional Hawaiian music that he documented was a hybrid of native and German styles, brought both by Berger and Lutheran missionaries. For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... Henri Berger, standing in front, is the Father of the Royal Hawaiian Band, the oldest municipal band in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kamehameha V was the last monarch of the House of Kamehameha. ... Forms of German-language music include Neue Deutsche Welle (NDW), Krautrock, Hamburger Schule, Volksmusik, German hip hop, Schlager and multiple varieties of folk music. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Two Mormon missionaries A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ...


Guitar innovations

Guitars could have come to Hawaii from several sources: sailors, missionaries, or travelers to and from California. The most frequently-told story is that it accompanied the Mexican cowboys (vaqueros) brought by King Kamehameha III in 1832 in order to teach the natives how to control an overpopulation of cattle. The Hawaiian cowboys (paniolo) used guitars in their traditional folk music. The Portuguese introduced an instrument called the braguinha, a small, four-stringed Madeira variant of the cavaquinho; this instrument was a precursor to the `ukulele.[1] Kamehameha III, King of Hawaii (born Kauikeaouli) (August 11, 1813?–December 15, 1854) was the king of the Kingdom of Hawaii from 1824 to 1854. ... For other uses, see Madeira (disambiguation). ... The cavaquinho is a small string instrument (like the ukulele) of the European guitar family with four wires or gut strings. ... Ukulele The ukulele (pronounced , or the Anglicised ), or uke, is a fretted string instrument which is, in its construction, essentially a smaller, four-stringed version of the guitar. ...


Steel-string guitars also arrived with the Portuguese in the 1860s and slack-key had spread across the chain by the late 1880s. A ship called the Ravenscrag arrived in Honolulu on August 23, 1879, bringing Portuguese field workers from Madeira. Legend has it that one of the men, João Fernandes, later a popular musician, tried to impress the Hawaiians by playing folk music with a friend's braguinha; it is also said that the Hawaiians called the instrument `ukulele (jumping flea) in reference to the man's swift fingers. Others have claimed the word means gift that came here or a corruption of ukeke lele (dancing ukeke, a three-string bow).[1] For other uses, see Madeira (disambiguation). ... The cavaquinho (pron. ...


Late 19th and early 20th century

1913 sheet music cover
1913 sheet music cover

In the 1880s and 90s, King David Kalakaua promoted Hawaiian culture and also encouraged the addition of new instruments, such as the ukulele and steel guitar. Kalakaua's successor, his sister Lili'uokalani, composed music herself, and wrote several songs, like "Aloha 'Oe", which remain popular. During this period, Hawaiian music evolved into a "new distinctive" style, using the derivatives of European instruments; aside from the widespread string instruments, brass bands like the Royal Hawaiian Band performed Hawaiian songs as well as popular marches and ragtimes.[1] Aloha Oe, 1913 sheet music cover This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Aloha Oe, 1913 sheet music cover This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... David Kalākaua was elected by the legislature to assume the throne of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i upon the death of William Charles Lunalilo. ... Her Majesty Lili‘uokalani, Queen of Hawai‘i Queen Lili‘uokalani of Hawai‘i (September 2, 1838 - November 11, 1917), given the Christian name Lydia Lili‘uokalani and later named Lydia K. Dominis, was the last monarch of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ... The Royal Hawaiian Band is the oldest and only full-time municipal band in the United States. ...


In about 1900, Joseph Kekuku began sliding a piece of steel across the strings of a guitar whose strings had been tuned down (slacked) to an open chord tuning, thus inventing steel guitar (kila kila); at about the same time, traditional Hawaiian music with English lyrics became popular — this was called hapa haole. Vocals predominated in Hawaiian music until the 20th century, when instrumentation took a lead role. Much of modern slack-key guitar has become entirely instrumental.[1] Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Joseph Kekuku (1874-1932) is regarded as the inventor of the steel guitar. ... A Dobro style resonator guitar Steel guitar, strictly speaking, refers to a method of playing using a metal slide (or steel) on a guitar played horizontally, with the strings uppermost. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... In the Hawaiian language, hapa is strictly defined as: portion, fragment, part, fraction, installment; to be partial, less. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


From about 1895 to 1915, Hawaiian music dance bands became in demand more and more. These were typically string quintets. Ragtime music influenced the music, and English words were commonly used in the lyrics. This type of Hawaiian music, influenced by popular music and with lyrics being a combination of English and Hawaiian (or wholly English), is called hapa haole (literally: half white) music. In 1903, Albert "Sonny" Cunha composed My Waikiki Mermaid, arguably the first hapa haole song. Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Look up ragtime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Albert Sonny Cunha (1879 - 1933) was a Hawaiian composer, bandleader, pianist, singer, politician and entrepreneur. ...


In 1927, Rose Moe (1908 - 1999), a Hawaiian singer, with her husband Tau Moe (1908 - 2004), a Samoan guitarist, began touring with Madame Riviere's Hawaiians. In 1929 they recorded eight songs in Tokyo, one of the first recordings of traditional Hawaiian music. Rose and Tau continued touring for over fifty years, living in countries such as Germany, Lebanon and India. With their children, the Tau Moe family did much to spread the sound of Hawaiian folk music and hapa haole music throughout the world. In 1988, the Tau Moe family re-recorded the 1929 sessions with the help of musician and ethnomusicologist Bob Brozman. Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tau Moe (Papa Tau) (1908 - 2004) was an influential pioneer of the Hawaiian steel guitar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


The 1920s also saw the development of a uniquely Hawaiian style of jazz, innovated by performers at the Moana and Royal Hawaiian Hotels.[9] For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ...


Slack key guitar

Main article: Slack-key guitar Slack key guitar is a style of guitar fingerpicking that originated in Hawaii. ...


Slack-key guitar (kī ho`alu in Hawaiian) is a fingerpicked playing style, named for the fact that the strings are most often "slacked" or loosened to create an open (unfingered) chord, either a major chord (G or C, sometimes D) or a major 7th. (The latter are called "wahine" tunings.) A tuning might be invented to play a particular song or facilitate a particular effect, and as late as the 1960s they were often treated as family secrets and passed from generation to generation. By the time of the Hawaiian Renaissance, though, the example of players such as Auntie Alice Namakelua, Leonard Kwan, Raymond Kane, and Keola Beamer had encouraged the sharing of the tunings and techniques and probably saved the style from extinction. Playing techniques include "hammering-on", "pulling-off", "chimes" (harmonics), and "slides," and these effects frequently mimic the falsettos and vocal breaks common in Hawaiian singing. This article contains information that has not been verified. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia on one of the following topics: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... Keola Beamer (born Keolamaikalani Breckenridge Beamer) is a Hawaiian slack-key guitar player, best known as the composer of Honolulu City Lights and an innovative musician who fused Hawaiian roots and contemporary music. ...


The guitar entered Hawaiian culture from a number of directions—sailors, settlers, contract workers. One important source of the style was Mexican cowboys hired to work on the Big Island of Hawai'i in the first half of the 19th century. These paniolo brought their guitars and their music, and when they left, the Hawaiians developed their own style of playing the instrument.


Slack key guitar evolved to accompany the rhythms of Hawaiian dancing and the melodies of Hawaiian chant. Hawaiian music in general, which was promoted under the reign of King David Kalakaua as a matter of national pride, drew rhythms from traditional Hawaiian beats and military marches, and drew its melodies from Christian hymns and the cosmopolitan peoples of the islands (although principally American).


Popularization

In the early 20th century Hawaiians began touring the United States, often in small bands. A Broadway show called Bird of Paradise introduced Hawaiian music to many Americans in 1912 and the Panama Pacific Exhibition in San Francisco followed in 1915; one year later, Hawaiian music sold more recordings than any other style in the country. The increasing popularization of Hawaiian music influenced blues and country musicians; this connection can still be heard in modern country. In reverse, musicians like Bennie Nawahi began incorporating jazz into his steel guitar, ukulele and mandolin music, while the Kalama Quartet introduced a style of group falsetto singing. The musician Sol Ho'opii arose during this time, playing both Hawaiian music and jazz, Western swing and country, and developing the pedal steel guitar; his recordings helped establish the Nashville sound of popular country music.[1] Lani McIntyre was another musician who infused a Hawaiian guitar sound into mainstream American popular music through his recordings with Jimmie Rodgers and Bing Crosby. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Categories: Stub | Worlds Fairs | California history | San Francisco history ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... “Blues music” redirects here. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... King Bennie Nawahi (Benjamin Keakahiawa Nawahi) was an American slack_key guitar master from Hawaii, well-known throughout the country in the 1920s and 30s. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... A Dobro style resonator guitar Steel guitar, strictly speaking, refers to a method of playing using a metal slide (or steel) on a guitar played horizontally, with the strings uppermost. ... The ukulele (Hawaiian: , IPA pronunciation: ; Anglicised pronunciation usually IPA: ), sometimes spelled ukelele (particularly in the UK) or uke, is a chordophone classified as a plucked lute; it is a subset of the guitar family of instruments, generally with four strings or four courses of strings. ... A mandolin is a small, stringed musical instrument which is plucked, strummed or a combination of both. ... Sol Hoopii (1902 - November 16, 1953) was perhaps the most famous Hawaiian steel guitarist of the 20th century. ... The Nashville Sound (often known as Countrypolitan) arose during the late 1950s as a sub-genre of American country music, replacing the chart dominance of the Honky Tonk sound which was most popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Lani McIntyre (sometimes spelled Lani McIntire, 15 December 1904 - 17 June 1951) was a Hawaiian guitar and steel guitar player who helped to popularize the instrument, which eventually became a mainstay in American country and western music. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ...


In the 1920s and 30s, Hawaiian music became an integral part of local tourism, with most hotels and attractions incorporating music in one form or another. Among the earliest and most popular musical attractions was the Kodak Hula Show, sponsored by Kodak, in which a tourist purchased Kodak film and took photographs of dancers and musicians.[1] The show ran from 1937 through 2002. In the first half of the 20th century, the mostly-young men who hung around the Honolulu beaches, swimming and surfing, came to be known as the Waikiki Beachboys and their parties became famous across Hawaii and abroad; most of them played the ukulele all day long, sitting on the beach and eventually began working for hotels to entertain tourists. Also see the destination guide on Wikitravel:Hawaii. ... Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) is a large multinational public company producing photographic equipment. ...


Popular Hawaiian music with English verse (hapa haole) can be described in a narrow sense. Generally, songs are sung to the ukulele or steel guitar. A steel string guitar sometimes accompanies. Melodies often feature an intervallic leap, such as a perfect fourth or octave. Falsetto vocals are suited for such leaps and are common in Hawaiian singing, as is the use of microtones. Rhythm is mostly in duple meter. A musical scale that is unique to Hawaiian music imbues it with its distinct feel, and so is aptly named the Hawaiian scale.


Modern music

In recent decades, traditional Hawaiian music has undergone a renaissance, with renewed interest from both ethnic Hawaiians and others. The islands have also produced a number of well-regarded rock, pop, hip hop, soul and reggae performers, and many local musicians in the clubs of Waikiki and Honolulu play outside the various "Hawaiian" genres. Hawaii has its own regional music industry, with several distinctive styles of recorded popular music. Hawaiian popular music is largely based on American popular music, but does have distinctive retentions from traditional Hawaiian music.[2] Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... For popular forms of music in general, see Popular music. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... The first major American popular songwriter, Stephen Foster Even before the birth of recorded music, American popular music had a profound effect on music across the world. ...


Hawaiian Renaissance

Main article: Hawaiian Renaissance This article contains information that has not been verified. ...


The Hawaiian Renaissance was a resurgence in interest in Hawaiian music, especially slack-key, among ethnic Hawaiians. Long-standing performers like Gabby Pahinui found their careers revitalized; Pahinui, who had begun recording in 1947, finally reached mainstream audiences across the United States when sessions on which Ry Cooder played with him and his family were released as The Gabby Pahinui Hawaiian Band, Vol. 1 on a major mainland label. Pahinui inspired a legion of followers who played a mix of slack-key, reggae, country, rock and other styles. The more traditional players included Leland "Atta" Isaacs, Sr., Sonny Chillingworth, Ray Kane, Leonard Kwan, Ledward Ka`apana, Dennis Pavao, while Keola Beamer and Peter Moon have been more eclectic in their approach. George Kanahele's Hawaiian Music Foundation did much to spread slack-key and other forms of Hawaiian music, especially after a major 1972 concert.[1] Charles Philip Gabby or Pops Pahinui (April 22, 1921 - October 13, 1980) was a slack-key guitarist. ... Ryland Ry Peter Cooder (born 15 March 1947, in Los Angeles, California) is an American guitarist, singer and composer, known for his slide guitar work, his interest in the American roots music and, more recently, for his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries. ... Leland Atta Isaacs, Sr. ... Edwin Bradfield Liloa Sonny Chillingworth was a slack-key guitar player from Hawaii and is widely regarded as one of the most influential slack key guitarists in history. ... Ray Kane (born on October 2, 1925), is one of Hawaiis acknowledged Masters of the Slack Key Guitar. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia on one of the following topics: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... Ledward Kaapana is a Hawaiian musician, best known for playing in the slack key guitar style. ... Dennis Pavao (1951 - January 19, 2002), was one of several Hawaiian musicians who during the 1970s led a Hawaiian music renaissance, reviving Hawaiian music. ... Keola Beamer (born Keolamaikalani Breckenridge Beamer) is a Hawaiian slack-key guitar player, best known as the composer of Honolulu City Lights and an innovative musician who fused Hawaiian roots and contemporary music. ... Peter Moon (August 25, 1944 - Present) is a ʻukulele and (slack-key) guitar master. ... George Hueu Sanford Kanahele (1930 - 15 September 2000) was a Hawaiian activist and historian and founder of the Native Hawaiian Tourism and Hospitality Association. ...


Don Ho from the small Honolulu neighborhood of Kaka'ako figures among the more widely known Hawaiian musicians. Although he perhaps does not produce completely "traditional" Hawaiian music, Ho has become an unofficial ambassador of Hawaiian culture throughout the world as well as on the American mainland. Ho's style often appears to combine traditional Hawaiian elements and older 1950s and 1960s-style crooner music with an easy listening touch. Donald Tai Loy Don Ho (in Chinese characters, 何大來, Hé Dàlái) (August 13, 1930 – April 14, 2007) was a Hawaiian musician and entertainer. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


A female version of Ho, Loyal Garner also embraced Hawaiian elements in her lounge act and albums. Loyal Garner was a Hawaiian musician and de factor leader of the Hawaiian singing group Local Divas. ...


Jawaiian

Main article: Jawaiian The music of Hawaii includes an array of traditional and popular styles, ranging from native Hawaiian folk music to modern rock and hip hop. ...


Jawaiian is a Hawaiian style of reggae music, a genre that evolved in the late 1960s and early 70s in Jamaica. Reggae has become popular across the world, especially among ethnic groups and races that have been historically oppressed, such as Native Americans, Pacific Islanders and New Zealand Maori, and Australian Aborigines. In Hawaii, ethnic Hawaiians and others in the state began playing a mixture of reggae and local music in the early 1990s. By the end of that decade, it had come to dominate the local music scene, as well as spawned a backlash that the Honolulu Star-Bulletin compared to the "disco sucks" movement of the late 1970s.[10] Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Australian Aborigines are the main indigenous people of Australia. ... Native Hawaiians (in Hawaiian, kānaka ōiwi or kānaka maoli) are the Polynesian peoples of the Hawaiian Islands who trace their ancestry back to Marquesan and possibly Tahitian settlers (starting circa AD 400), before the arrival of British explorer Captain James Cook in 1778. ... The Honolulu Star-Bulletin, based in Honolulu, Hawaii, is the second largest daily newspaper in the state of Hawaii (the largest being the Honolulu Advertiser. ... This article is about the music genre. ...


Hip Hop

Main article: Hawaii Hip Hop


Hawaii Hip Hop can be dated back to its first inception in the early 1980s (though the birth of Hip Hop can be dated as far back as the late 1960s, originating in New York City). A lot of credit goes to breakthrough A.M. radio station KISA for playing Hip Hop in the prime time hours. Radio personalities for KISA included Auntie Loki, Johnny Jay Jam and Mother Goose. KIKI (FM) also played a big role in bringing Hip Hop to mainstream radio. In regards to alternative Hawaii Hip Hop on the airwaves, first came DJ Minh One then Kavet the Catalyst of the LightSleepers camp, and both hosted radio shows on the University of Hawaii's KTUH. Some of the Hawaii Hip Hop crews & solo emcees include 808 Natives (formerly "Def Squad" in the 80s), P.O.P. (Princes of Percussion), Club Rox Rock, Rhythm & Rhyme, C.O.D. (Concept's of Desire), Skream Team, Aiga, Nomasterbacks, Direct Descendants, HI State, Audible Lab Rats, Big Mox, Omega Cix, Earth Movers, Amphibieus Tungs and many more. One of the first ever solo artists noted to do Hawaiian Hip Hop was a Hawaiian female emcee by the name of, Charlotte Kaluna, better known as Frumpy. One of the first Hawaiian Hip Hop groups, Sudden Rush, received notice for their integration of Hawaiian language into their rhymes, and came up with the term na mele paleoleo (literally "music of fast repetitive poetry") to describe their music. Also, a Hawaii Hip Hop veteran who has been a longtime contributor to the scene is music producer and Hawaii's 1st Hip Hop DJ Champion, Joseph Netherland, better known as, DJ ELITE of Elite Empire Entertainment, LLC. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... A page from a late 17th century handwritten and illustrated version of Charles Perraults Contes de ma mère lOye (Mother Goose Tales) depicting Puss in Boots. ... KIKI(FM), also known as Hot 93. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... KTUH is a non-commercial, student-run, listener-supported station in Honolulu, Hawaii. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... C.O.D. is a Three-letter abbreviation, which can refer to: Cash on delivery, a type of delivery payment. ... The aiga is, in traditional Samoan culture, or Faasamoa, the extended family. ...


Jazz

Musicians

Some notable current jazz musicians in Hawaii include Gabe Baltazar (saxophone), Ryan Kunimura (saxophone), Robert Shinoda, Tim Tsukiyama, DeShannon Higa (trumpet), Danny Del Negro, Abe Weistein (saxophone), David Choy (saxophone), Rich Crandall (piano), Abe Lagrimas Jr. (drums/ukulele/vibes), John Kolivas (bass), and Adam Baron (drums). There are frequent performances by the two University of Hawaii jazz bands.

Locales This article is about the University of Hawaii system. ...

Regular venues to hear jazz in Honolulu include:
  • Ward Rafters [1], a residential home in Kaimuki (3810 Maunaloa Ave.) converted into an indoor stage with performances every Sunday afternoon
  • The Honolulu Club [2]: Robert Shinoda's rotating group is featured here. In the 1990's this group played regularly at the Music Union building.
  • Jazz Minds [3]: DeShannon Higa's gr00ve.imProV.arTiSts plays here, as well as other groups. Higa also formerly appeared regularly at the Music Union building in the late 1990s.
  • 39 Hotel [4]: Regular location of the Newjass Quartet.

Links

  • Hawaii International Jazz Festival
  • University of Hawaii Jazz Ensembles

Ukulele

Main article: Ukulele The ukulele (Hawaiian: , IPA pronunciation: ; Anglicised pronunciation usually IPA: ), sometimes spelled ukelele (particularly in the UK) or uke, is a chordophone classified as a plucked lute; it is a subset of the guitar family of instruments, generally with four strings or four courses of strings. ...


Some well known ukulele recording artists include Eddie Kamae, Jake Shimabukuro, Abe Lagrimas Jr., Herb Ohta Jr., Brittni Paiva, Daniel Ho, Benny Chong, Ululwehi Guerrero and Israel Kamakawiwo'ole. Eddie Kamae was born in Honolulu in 1927. ... Jake Shimabukuro (born November 3, 1976 in Honolulu, Hawaii) is a ukulele virtuoso known for his lightning-fast fingers. ... Israel Braddah IZ Kamakawiwoole (May 20, 1959 – June 26, 1997) (pronounced IPA ) was a musician who lived in Hawaii until his death at the age of thirty-eight. ...


Other

The music that is considered popular or "underground" in Hawaii does not necessarily correspond to similar genres in mainland areas of the U.S.A. This is partly a result of Hawaiian music, which appeals to many generations over. Whereas music like heavy metal or punk rock appeals primarily to a more youthful generation, and is not considered as commercially attractive to tourism.


It is difficult to promote popular acts from the mainland due to its geographical isolation, and the smaller group of people interested in the music. And as a result Hawaii has become a mixing plate for many cultures (and subcultures), and is home to many bands that incorporate world influence in a unique fusion of sound. Quadrophonix (India). Mabanzi (Zimbabwe), and Gamelan (Hawaii) just to name a few.


Still a subculture, amazingly, continues to thrive with music from bands such as Technical Difficulties, Moemoea, PIMPBOT, Living in Question, and Missing Dave. And the incredible efforts of 808 Shows, and Unity Crayons (a non profit organization that promotes all ages shows in Hawaii).


Links

  • University of Hawaii Ethnomusicology Ensembles
  • Hawaii Underground: Island Music and Entertainment

See also

Hawaii Calls was a radio program that ran from 1935 through 1975 that featured live Hawaiian music. ... Andy Iona (1902 - 1966) was an American musician and one of Hawaiis most influential musicians. ...

References

  • Big Island: Entertainment. Alternative Hawaii. Retrieved on February 2, 2006.
  • Kuaui: Entertainment. Alternative Hawaii. Retrieved on February 2, 2006.
  • History of the Hawaii International Jazz Festival (pdf). Hawaii International Jazz Festival. Retrieved on February 2, 2006.
  • Cooper, Mike (2000). "Steel Slide Hula Baloos", in Broughton, Simon and Ellingham, Mark with McConnachie, James and Duane, Orla (Ed.): World Music, Vol. 2: Africa, Europe and the Middle East. London: Rough Guides, 56-57. ISBN 1-85828-636-0. 
  • History of the Honolulu Symphony. Honolulu Symphony. Retrieved on January 10, 2006.
  • Lanai: Entertainment. Alternative Hawaii. Retrieved on February 2, 2006.
  • Manuel, Peter (1988). Popular Musics of the Non-Western World, 236 - 241. ISBN 0-19-506334-1. 
  • in Kanahele, George S., ed.: Hawaiian Music and Musicians, xxv - xxvii. 
  • Unterberger, Richie (1999). Music USA: The Rough Guide. London: Rough Guides, 465 - 473. ISBN 1-85828-421-X. 
  • ’02 not the year Jawaiian dies, but look out. Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Retrieved on January 12, 2006.
  • Waikiki hula show ends run. Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  • Tatar, Elizabeth (1979). "Slack Key Guitar,", in Kanahele, George S., ed.: Hawaiian Music and Musicians. University Press of Hawaii, 350 - 360. ISBN 0-8248-0578-X. 

is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Unterberger, pgs. 465 - 473
  2. ^ a b c Manuel, pgs. 236 - 241
  3. ^ History of the Hawaiʻi International Jazz Festival (pdf)
  4. ^ Alternative Hawai`i: Big Island
  5. ^ Alternative Hawai`i: Kuaui
  6. ^ Alternative Hawaii: Lanai
  7. ^ Honolulu Symphony
  8. ^ a b Tatar, Elizabeth, in George Kanahele's Hawaiian Music and Musicians
  9. ^ History of the Hawaii International Jazz Festival (pdf)
  10. ^ Honolulu Star-Bulletin

External links

  • Live Ukulele: A collection of contemporary and traditional hawaiian songs and tabs.
  • Hapa Haole Songs, Island songs written in English
  • Hawaii Academy of Recording Arts (HARA) home of the Na Hoku Awards.
  • Territorial Airwaves - Your Source For The History of Hawaiian Music
  • Hawaii Music Awards The "People's Choice" awards.
  • Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame
  • Huapala, Hawaiian Music and Hula Archives
  • Taro Patch, An internet and international Slack Key community
Polynesian music
Easter Island - Fiji - Hawaii - Samoa - Tonga - Tuvalu - Wallis and Futuna

French Polynesia: Austral - Marquesas and Tahiti - Tuamotus
New Zealand: Chatham Islands - Cook Islands - Maori - Niue - Tokelau Polynesia is a group of island chains spread across much of the Pacific Ocean, and includes many countries and territories. ... Easter Island is located in the Pacific Ocean. ... The Austral Islands are part of the territory of French Polynesia. ... Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the music of Tahiti was dominated by festivals called heiva. ... The Maori are the native peoples of New Zealand. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Music of Hawaii - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (3630 words)
Hawaii's musical contributions to the music of the United States are out of proportion to the state's small size.
Hawaiian music in general, which was promoted under the reign of King David Kalakaua as a matter of national pride, drew rhythms from traditional Hawaiian beats and military marches, and drew its melodies from Christian hymns and the cosmopolitan peoples of the islands (although principally American).
Hawaii Hip Hop can be dated back to its first inception back in the early 1980s (though the birth of Hip Hop can be dated as far back as the early 1970s, originating in New York City).
Hawaiian Music Store - Hawaii Economy (1070 words)
Hawaii is economically vigorous, with diversified agriculture and manufacturing; strategically important to the global defense system of the United States; a Pacific Basin transportation and cultural centre, often called the Crossroads of the Pacific; and a major tourist mecca.
Hawaii has no important mineral deposits; its only natural resources are its climate, water supply, soil, vegetation, and surrounding ocean and rock, gravel, sand, and earth quarried for use in construction and landscaping.
Hawaii's dominance of the world pineapple market is challenged by the lower labour costs in pineapple-producing countries such as the Philippines.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m