FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Music of France

France has long been considered a centre for European art and music. The country boasts a wide variety of indigenous folk music, as well as styles played by immigrants from Africa, Latin America and Asia. In the field of classical music, France has produced a number of legendary composers, while modern pop music has seen the rise of popular French rock, hip hop, techno/funk, and pop performers. Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organized sounds and silence. ...

Music of France
Styles classical - folk - popular: hip hop - jazz - rock
History (Timeline and Samples)
Awards NRJ Music Awards - Victoires de la musique
Charts IFOP
Festivals Printemps de Bourges
Media
National anthem "La Marseillaise"
Regional music
Alsace - Auvergne - Aquitaine - Pays Basque - Béarn - Brittany - Burgundy - Corsica - Gascony - Languedoc - Limousin - Lorraine - Picardy - Poitou - Provence - Rousillon
Overseas music
French Guiana - French Polynesia - Martinique and Guadeloupe - Mayotte - New Caledonia - Réunion - St. Pierre and Miquelon - Tahiti - Wallis and Futuna

Contents

Of all the European countries, France has one of the longest and best-documented traditions of classical music. ... As Europe experienced a wave of roots revivals, France found its regional cultures reviving traditional music. ... French pop music is the pop music sung in the French language. ... Most French hip hop artists come from poor suburbs of Paris (including Lunatic, Mafia K1 Fry, La Brigade, Secteur Ä), Lyon, Lille, Le Havre (La Boussole), Strasbourg, Toulouse (KDD)or Marseille (IAM, Fonky Family, Psy 4 De La Rime, 3ème Oeil, and others). ... France has a long history with jazz music. ... When talking about French rock in the greater sense, it is a form of rock music produced primarily in France, but also in other European francophone countries. ... // Medieval Period Main article: Medieval music Some of the earliest manuscripts with polyphony are organum from 10th century French cities like Chartres and Tours. ... The NRJ Music Awards, created in 2000 by the radio station NRJ in partnership with the television network TF1 takes place every year in mid-January at Cannes (PACA, France) as the opening of MIDEM (Marché international de lédition musicale). ... Victoires de la musique is a French award show that recognizes the best singers of the year. ... The Institut français dopinion publique (IFOP) is an international marketing firm, whose motto is Global strenght in marketing intelligence. Its CEO is Laurence Parisot, who is also the current leader of the MEDEF French employers trade union. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as; musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... // Quick history The Printemps de Bourges is a music festival, started in 1977 by Jean Christophe Dechico (director of the Maison de la Culture at the time), Alain Meilland (actor and singer) and Daniel Colling (music booking agent). ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogizing the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a nations government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... La Marseillaise (IPA: ; in English The Song of Marseille) is the national anthem of France. ... Auvergne is a region in France. ... Aquitaine is a French region, consisting of the dèpartements of Dordogne, Gironde, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne and Pyrénées-Atlantiques. ... The Basque language is unrelated to any other language family and its origins are unknown. ... Brittany is a Celtic country rich in its cultural heritage. ... Burgundy became a major center for musical development during the Renaissance era. ... Outside of France, the island of Corsica is perhaps best known musically for its polyphonic choral tradition. ... Gascony is a region of France that has produced several well-known performers and composers of classical, folk and popular music. ... The most well-known musician from the Occitan region of Limousin is probably the piper Eric Montbel, a former member of such legendary bands as Lo Jai, Le Grand Rouge, and Ulysse; he plays the chabreta, or Limousin bagpipe. ... The former French colonies of Martinique and Guadeloupe are small islands in the Caribbean. ... Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the music of Tahiti was dominated by festivals called heiva. ...

Folk music

Main article: French folk music As Europe experienced a wave of roots revivals, France found its regional cultures reviving traditional music. ...


As Europe experienced a wave of roots revivals, France found its regional cultures reviving traditional music. Brittany, Limousin, Gascony, Corsica and Auvergne were among the regions that underwent a popularization of folk music. Traditional styles of music had survived most in remote areas like the island of Corsica and mountainous Auvergne, as well as the more nationalist lands of the Basques and Bretons. A roots revival (folk revival) is a trend which includes young performers popularizing the traditional musical styles of their ancestors. ... Brittany has an expansive coastline Flag of Brittany (Gwenn-ha-du) Historical province of Brittany région of Bretagne, see Bretagne. ... Capital Limoges Land area¹ 16,942 km² Regional President Jean-Paul Denanot (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... Map of the historical and cultural area of Gascony. ... (Territorial collectivity flag) (Territorial collectivity logo) Location Administration Capital Ajaccio President of the Executive Council Ange Santini (UMP) (since 2004) Departments Corse-du-Sud Haute-Corse Arrondissements 5 Cantons 52 Communes 360 Statistics Land area1 8,680 km² Population (Ranked 25th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Auvergne coat of arms Auvergne (Occitan: Auvèrnha) was the name of an historically independent county in the center of France, as well as later a province of France. ... Languages Basque - few monoglots Spanish - 1,525,000 monoglots French - 150,000 monoglots Basque-Spanish - 600,000 speakers Basque-French - 76,000 speakers [4] other native languages Religions Traditionally Roman Catholic The Basques (Basque: Euskaldunak) are an indigenous people who inhabit parts of both Spain and France. ...


In many cases, folk traditions were revived in relatively recent years to cater to tourists. These groupes folkloriques tend to focus on very early 20th century melodies and the use of the piano accordion. Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Piano accordion A piano accordion is a type of accordion having a right-hand keyboard similar to a piano. ...


Central France

Central France includes the regions of Auvergne, Limousin, Morvan, Nivernais, Bourbonnais and Berry. The lands are the home to the French bagpipe tradition, as well as the iconic hurdy gurdy and the dance bourrée. There are deep differences between the regions of Central France, with the Auvergne and Limousin retained the most vibrant folk traditions of the area. As an example of the area's diversity, the bourrée can come in either duple or triple meter; the latter is found in the south of the region, and is usually improvised with bagpipes and hurdy gurdy, while the former is found in the north and includes virtuoso players. Auvergne coat of arms Auvergne (Occitan: Auvèrnha) was the name of an historically independent county in the center of France, as well as later a province of France. ... Capital Limoges Land area¹ 16,942 km² Regional President Jean-Paul Denanot (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... The Morvan is a mountainous massif lying just to the west of the Côte dOr escarpment in Burgundy, France. ... Nevers is a commune of central France, the préfecture (capital) of the Nièvre département, in the former province of Nivernais. ... Bourbonnais was an historic province in the centre of France that corresponded to the modern département of Allier, along with part of the département of Cher. ... Berry was a province of France until the provinces were replaced by départements on March 4, 1790. ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... Drawing of a hurdy gurdy A hurdy gurdy (alternately, hurdy-gurdy) is a stringed musical instrument. ... The bourree was a dance common in Auvergne and Biscay in Spain in the 17th century, danced in quick double time, somewhat resembling the gavotte. ...


Bagpipe and hurdy gurdy

Main articles: Bagpipe and hurdy gurdy A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... Drawing of a hurdy gurdy A hurdy gurdy (alternately, hurdy-gurdy) is a stringed musical instrument. ...


The hurdy gurdy, or vielle-à-roue, is a cross between a violin and a piano accordion. It is made up of a curved, oval body, a set of keys and a curved handle, which is turn and connected to a wheel which bows the strings that are stopped by the keys. There is a moveable bridge, a variable number of drones and hidden sympathetic strings, all of which can also effect the sound. Simpler forms of the hurdy gurdy are also found in Spain, Hungary and Russia. The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... Piano accordion A piano accordion is a type of accordion having a right-hand keyboard similar to a piano. ... Sympathetic strings are strings on musical instruments which begin resonating, not due to any external influence such as picking or bowing, but due to another note (or frequency). ...


The bagpipe is found in a wide array of forms in France, which has more diversity in bagpipes than any other country. The cabrette and grande cornemuse from Auvergne and Berry are the most well-known. These forms are found at least as far back as the 17th century. Prominent bagpipers include Bernard Blanc, Frédéric Paris and Philippe Prieur, as well as bandleader Jean Blanchard of La Grande Bande de Cornemuses and Quintette de Cornemuses. Frédéric Paris is also known as a member of the Duo Chabenat-Paris, a prominent duo who use elements like mixed polyphonic ensembles and melodies based on the bourrée. Bernard Blanc and Jean Blanchard, along with Eric Montbel from Lyons, were among the musicians who formed the basis of La Bamboche and Le Grand Rouge. It was these two bands who did more than anyone to revitalize the traditions of Central France during the 1970s folk revival. The festival of St. Chartier, a music festival held annually near Chateauroux, has been a focal point for the music of Auvergne and Limousin. Auvergne coat of arms Auvergne (Occitan: Auvèrnha) was the name of an historically independent county in the center of France, as well as later a province of France. ... Berry was a province of France until the provinces were replaced by départements on March 4, 1790. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... A roots revival (folk revival) is a trend which includes young performers popularizing the traditional musical styles of their ancestors. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as; musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... For the town in the Hautes-Alpes, see Ch teauroux-les-Alpes. ...


The provinces of Morvan and Nivernais have produced some traditional stars, including Faubourg de Boignard and Les Ménétriers du Morvan, respectively. The Nivernais collector Achille Millien was also notable in the early part of the 20th century.


Southern France

Southern France includes the regions of Provence, Béarn, Rousillon, Gascony and Languedoc. The Basques, with their own unique culture, are geographically part of this area, but are culturally distinct from any of their French or Spanish neighbors. The Occitan language is in use by some musicians, including Jean-Luc Madier and Rosina de Peira. The Massilia Sound System is a well-known group, specializing in what they call trobamuffin, which is Occitan raggamuffin. Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) is a former Roman province and is now a region of southeastern France, located on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to the Italian border. ... Béarn coat of arms Béarn (Gascon: Bearn or Biarn) is a former province of France, located in the Pyrenees mountains and in the plain at their feet, in southwest France. ... Mount Canigou (2785m), a Catalan landmark Roussillon (Catalan Rosselló; Spanish Rosellón) is one of the historical Catalan Countries corresponding roughly to the present-day southern French département of Pyrénées-Orientales (Eastern Pyrenees). ... Map of the historical and cultural area of Gascony. ... Coat of arms of the province of Languedoc, now being used as an official flag by the Midi-Pyrénees region as well as by the city of Toulouse Languedoc (Lengadòc in Occitan) is a former province of France, now continued in the modern-day régions of Languedoc... Occitan, or langue doc is a Romance language characterized by its richness, variability, and by the intelligibility of its dialects. ... A reggae group formed in Marseille in the 1980s. ... Occitan, known also as Lenga dòc or Langue doc (Occitan: occitan, lenga dòc) is a Romance language spoken in Occitania (i. ... Raggamuffin (or ragga) is a kind of reggae that includes digitized backing instrumentation. ...


Bal-musette

Main article: Bal-musette Bal-musette is a style of French popular music which arose in 1880s Parisespecially the 5th, 11th and 12th districts. ...


The hurdy gurdy became the basis for bal-musette music, which arrived in Paris by 1880 as a result of Auvergnat migration. The influence of Antoine Bouscatel led to bal-musette incorporating the Italian accordion, which soon came to dominate the music. The popularity of musette began to recede in the 1960s and this style is now largely considered out-of-fashion. Bal-musette is a style of French popular music which arose in 1880s Parisespecially the 5th, 11th and 12th districts. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the instrument as a whole. ...


Basque

Main article: Basque music The Basque language is unrelated to any other language family and its origins are unknown. ...


The Basques are a unique ethnic group, unrelated to any other in France and with uncertain connections abroad. The main form of Basque folk music is called trikitixa, which is based on the accordion and includes popular performers like Benat Achiary and Oldarra. The Spanish Basques have had a much more active music scene, especially in the field of traditional music. The trikitixa or eskusoinu (hand sound) is a two-row Basque diatonic button accordion, with right-hand rows keyed a fifth apart and twelve unisonoric bass buttons. ... This article is about the instrument as a whole. ... Benat Achiary, basque vocal improviser who lives in southern france, has released three songs from lucas heros-limite on his cd seven circles for peter, released by german label FMP in 2004. ...


Corsica

Main article: Music of Corsica Outside of France, the island of Corsica is perhaps best known musically for its polyphonic choral tradition. ...


Corsican polyphonic singing is perhaps the most unique of the French regional music varieties. Sung by male trios, it is strongly harmonic and occasionally dissonant. Works can be either spiritual or secular. Modern groups include Canta u Populu Corsu, I Muvrini, Tavagna and Chjami Aghjalesi; some groups have been associated with Corsican nationalism. I Muvrini is a Corsican folk music group who sing traditional Corsican music in their native Corsican language. ... Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution. ...


Corsican musical instruments include the bagpipe (caramusa), 16-stringed lute (cetera), mandolin, fife (pifana) and the diatonic accordion (urganettu). A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... The lute is a plucked string instrument with a fretted neck and a deep round back. ... Carved (electric) and round backed mandolins (front) A mandolin is a small, stringed musical instrument which is plucked, strummed or a combination of both. ... Fife from the American Civil War A fife is a small, high-pitched, transverse flute that is similar to the piccolo, but louder and shriller due to its narrower bore. ... This article is about the instrument as a whole. ...


Brittany

Main article: Music of Brittany Brittany is a Celtic country rich in its cultural heritage. ...


Uniquely Celtic in character, Breton folk music has had perhaps the most successful revival of its traditions, partly thanks to the city of Lorient, which hosts France's most popular music festival. Celtic music is a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic peoples of Western Europe. ... This article is about The place Lorient in France. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as; musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ...


The documented history of Breton music begins with the publication of Barzaz-Breizh in 1839. A collection of folk songs compiled by Hersart de la Villemarqué, Barzaz-Breizh helped keep Breton traditions alive. The Barzaz Breiz ( The Plaints of Brittany, Barz refers to barde and Breiz means Brittany) is the collection of Breton folk tales, legends and music collected by Théodore Hersart de la Villemarqué and published in 1839. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Couple de sonneurs, consisting of a bombarde and biniou, is usually played at festoù-noz celebrations (some are famous, like Printemps de Chateauneuf). It is swift dance music and has an older vocal counterpart called kan ha diskan. Unaccompanied call and response singing was interspersed with gwerz, a form of ballad. It has been suggested that Electronic dance music be merged into this article or section. ... Kan ha discan is likely the most common type of traditional music of Brittany. ... In music, a call and response is a succession of two distinct phrases usually played by different musicians, where the second phrase is heard as a direct commentary on or response to the first. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ...


Probably the most popular form of Breton folk is the bagad pipe band, which features native instruments like biniou and bombarde alongside drums and, in more modern groups, biniou braz pipes. Modern revivalists include Kevrenn Alre Bagad and Bagad Kemper. Kevrenn an Arvorig here with dancer Bro ar Ster Goz A bagad is a Breton band, composed of biniou (Breton bagpipes), bombardes and snare drums. ... The Biniou is a mouth blown bagpipe from the Brittany region of France. ... Bombardes from Kevrenn an Arvorig The bombarde is a French folk instrument from Brittany. ... Biniou means bagpipe in the Breton language. ...


Alan Stivell is perhaps the most influential folk-rock performer of continental Europe. After 1971's Renaissance of the Celtic Harp, Breton and other Celtic traditional music achieved mainstream success internationally. With Dan Ar Bras, he then released Chemins de Terre (1974), which launched Breton folk-rock. This set the stage for stars like Malicorne in the ensuing decades. Alan Stivell at Lorient Alan Stivell (born Alan Cochevelou January 6, 1944) is a Breton musician from the town of Gourin. ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... Dan ar Braz at Lorient Dan Ar Braz, born Daniel Le Bras (1949, Quimper, Brittany), is a Breton guitarist and the founder of Héritage des Celtes. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Malicorne was a French folk-rock group the traditional years Malicorne was founded by Gabriel Yacoub and Marie Yacoub in 1974. ...


Pure folk of modern Brettany includes harpists like Anne-Marie Jan, Anne Auffret and Myrdhin, while singers Kristen Nikolas, Andrea Ar Gouilh and Yann-Fanch Kemener have become mainstream stars. Instrumental bands, however, have been the most successful, including Gwerz, Bleizi Ruz, Strobinell, Sonerien Du and Tud.


Music history

Main article: Music history of France // Medieval Period Main article: Medieval music Some of the earliest manuscripts with polyphony are organum from 10th century French cities like Chartres and Tours. ...


French music history dates back to organum in the 10th century, followed by the Notre Dame School, an organum composition style. By the end of the 12th century, a kind of music called the motet arose, accompanied by the spread of traveling musicians called troubadours. In the 14th century, France produced two notable styles of music, Ars Nova and Ars Subtilior. During the Renaissance, Burgundy became a major center for musical development. This was followed by the rise of chansons and the Burgundian School A History of Western Music Seventh Edition by J. Peter Burkholder, Donald J. Grout, and Claude V. Palisca (affectioned called Grout) is one of several popular books used to teach Music History in North America. ... Organum (pronounced , though the stress is now sometimes incorrectly put on the second syllable) is a technique of singing developed in the Middle Ages, and is an early form of polyphonic music. ... The group of composers working at or near the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris from about 1170 to 1250, along with the music they produced, is referred to as the Notre Dame school, or the Notre Dame School of Polyphony. ... In Western music, motet is a word that is applied to a number of highly varied choral musical compositions. ... A troubadour composing lyrics, Germany c. ... Ars nova was a stylistic period in music of the Late Middle Ages, centered in France, which encompassed the period from the publication of the Roman de Fauvel (1310 and 1314) until the death of Machaut (1377). ... Ars subtilior (more subtle art) is a musical style characterized by rhythmic and notational complexity, centered around Avignon in southern France, at the end of the fourteenth century (Hoppin 1978, p. ... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ... région of Bourgogne, see Bourgogne. ... Chanson is a French word for song, and in English-language contexts is often applied to any song with French words, particularly a cabaret song. ... Composer Guillaume Dufay (left) and Gilles Binchois (right), Martin le Franc, Champion des Dames The Burgundian School is a term used to denote a group of composers active in the 15th century in what is now eastern France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, centered on the court of the Dukes of...


Classical music

Main article: French classical music Of all the European countries, France has one of the longest and best-documented traditions of classical music. ...


Opera

Main article: French opera In rivalry with imported Italian opera productions, a separate French tradition, sung in the French, was founded by Italian Jean-Baptiste Lully. ...


The first French opera may be Akébar roi du Mogol, first performed in Carpentras in 1646. It was followed by the team of Pierre Perrin and Cambert, whose Pastoral in Music, performed in Issy, was a success, and the pair moved to Paris to produce Pomone (1671) and Les Peines et les Plaisirs de l'Amour (1672). The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Carpentras is a city and commune in the département of Vaucluse in the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Issy-les-Moulineaux, is a city in the département of Hauts-des-Seine in the southwestern suburban Paris, France. ... Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ... Events England, France, Munster and Cologne invade the United Provinces, therefore this name is know as ´het rampjaar´ (the disaster year) in the Netherlands. ...


Jean-Baptiste Lully, who had become well-known for composing ballets for Louis XIV, began creating a French version of the Italian opera seria, a kind of tragic opera known as tragédie lyrique or tragédie en musique - see (French lyric tragedy). His first was Cadmus from 1673. Lully's forays into operatic tragedy were accompanied by the pinnacle of French theatrical tragedy, led by Corneille and Racine. Jean-Baptiste de Lully, originally Giovanni Battista di Lulli (November 28, 1632 – March 22, 1687), was an Italian-born French composer, who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. ... Painting of ballet dancers by Edgar Degas, 1872. ... Sun King redirects here. ... Opera seria is an Italian musical term which refers to the noble and serious style of Italian opera that predominated in Europe from the 1720s to ca 1770. ... The French lyric tragedy (french : tragédie lyrique or tragédie en musique) is a specific french form of opera introduced by Jean-Baptiste Lully and used by his followers during the first half of XVIII century until Jean-Philippe Rameau. ... 1673 (MDCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Corneille is the name or pseudonym of several artists: Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French dramatist Thomas Corneille (1625-1709), French dramatist Guillaume Cornelis van Beverloo (born 1922), Dutch painter Corneille Nyungura, German-born Québécois rhythm and blues singer Corneille is a French word for raven. ... Jean Racine. ...


Lully also developed the common beat patterns used by conductors to this day, and was the first to take the role of leading the orchestra from the position of the first violin.


Romanticism

Main article: Classical music era

One of the major French composers of the time, and one of the most innovative composers of the early Romantic era, was Hector Berlioz. The Classical period in Western music occurred from about 1730 through 1820, despite considerable overlap at both ends with preceding and following periods, as is true for all musical eras. ... Hector Louis Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer best known for the Symphonie fantastique, first performed in 1830, and for his Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem) of 1837, with its tremendous resources that include four antiphonal brass choirs. ...


In the late 19th century, pioneers like Georges Bizet, Jules Massenet, Gabriel Fauré, Maurice Ravel and Claude Debussy revitalized French music. The last two had an enormous impact on 20th century music - both in France and abroad - and influenced many major composers like Béla Bartók and Igor Stravinsky. Erik Satie was also a very significant composer from that era. His music is difficult to classify but sounds surprisingly ahead of its time. Georges Bizet. ... Jules (Émile Frédéric) Massenet (May 12, 1842 – August 13, 1912) was a French composer. ... Gabriel Urbain Fauré (May 12, 1845 – November 4, 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist, and teacher. ... Maurice Ravel in 1912. ... Achille-Claude Debussy (IPA ) (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918) was a French composer. ... Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ... Selfportrait of Erik Satie. ...


20th Century

The early 20th century saw neo-classical music flourish in France, especially composers like Albert Roussel and Les Six, a group of musicians who gathered around Satie. Later in the century, Olivier Messiaen, Henri Dutilleux and Pierre Boulez proved influential. The latter was a leading figure of Serialism while Messiaen incorporated asian (particularly indian) influences and bird song and Dutilleux translated the innovations of Debussy, Bartók and Stravinsky into his own, very personal, musical idiom. Albert Roussel was a French composer. ... Le Groupe des Six, 1922, by Jacques-Emile Blanche. ... Olivier Messiaen It has been suggested that List of students of Olivier Messiaen be merged into this article or section. ... Henri Dutilleux (born January 22, 1916 in Angers, France) is one of the most important French composers of the second half of the 20th century, producing work in the tradition of Maurice Ravel, Claude Debussy, and Albert Roussel, but in a style distinctly his own. ... Pierre Boulez Pierre Boulez (IPA: /pjɛʁ.buˈlÉ›z/) (born March 26, 1925) is a conductor and composer of classical music. ... Serialism is a technique for composing music that uses sets to describe musical elements, and allows the composer manipulations of those sets to create music. ... Bird songs are certain vocal sounds that birds make—in non-technical use, those sounds that are melodious to the human ear. ...


The most important French contribution to musical innovation of the past 35 years is a form a computer-assisted composition called "spectral music." The astonishing technical advances of the spectralist composers in the 1970s are only recently beginning to achieve wide recognition in the United States, though European composers long ago absorbed them. Computer assisted composition (or computer-assisted composition) is the technique or practice of using a computer to aid in the composition of music, though the music itself may be performed either electronically or on traditional, non-electronic instruments without the use of a computer or electronic device of any kind. ... Spectral music (or spectralism) is a musical genre or movement originating in France in the 1970s and characterized by the use of computer analysis of sound wave components as the basis for composition. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ...


Popular music

Main article: French popular music

The late 1800s saw the dawn of the music hall when Yvette Guilbert was a major star. The era lasted through to the 1930s and saw the likes of Félix Mayol, Lucienne Boyer, Marie-Louise Damien, Marie Dubas, Fréhel, Georges Guibourg, Tino Rossi, Jean Sablon, Charles Trenet and Maurice Chevalier. Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ... Yvette Guilbert, born January 20, 1867 in Paris, France – died February 4, 1944 in Aix-en-Provence, was a music-hall singer and actress. ... Félix Mayol (November 18, 1872 - November 1, 1941) was a French singer and entertainer. ... Lucienne Boyer, born August 18, 1903 in the Montparnasse Quarter of Paris, France - died on December 6, 1983 in Paris, was a singer. ... Marie-Louise Damien (December 5, 1889 – January, 1978) was a French singer and actress best known under the stage name Damia. ... Marie Dubas, born September 3, 1894 – died February 21, 1972, was a music-hall singer and comedienne. ... Fréhel, born Marguerite Boulch on July 14, 1891 – died February 3, 1951, was a French singer and actress. ... Georges Guibourg (June 3, 1891 - January 8, 1970) was a French singer, author, writer, playwright, and actor, George Guibourg, alias Georgius, alias Theodore Crapulet, was one of the most popular and versatile performers in Paris for more than 50 years. ... Tino Rossi (April 29, 1907 — September 26, 1983) was a singer and film actor. ... Jean Sablon (Nogent-sur-Marne March 25, 1906 – February 24, 1994 at Cannes-La-Bocca was a popular French singer. ... Charles Trenet (May 18, 1913, Narbonne, France – February 19, 2001, Créteil, France) was a French singer and songwriter, most famous for his recordings from the late 1930s through the mid-1950s, though his career continued through the 1990s. ... French singer Maurice Chevalier with stars of Hellzapoppin at Expo 67, in Montreal, Quebec. ...


French popular music in the 20th century included singers like superstar Édith Piaf as well as Monique Serf (Barbara) and Georges Brassens plus the more art-house musicians like Brigitte Fontaine. Many present-day stars released their first albums in the mid-1970s and early 1980s including Francis Cabrel, Alain Souchon, Laurent Voulzy, and Jean-Jacques Goldman. More recently, the success of the Star Academy television show has spawned a new generation of young pop music stars including Jenifer Bartoli and Nolwenn Leroy; and the superstar status of diva Mylene Farmer inspired pop rock performers like Zazie, Lorie and Alizée, and R&B-influenced singers like Nadiya and Ophelie Winter. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Édith Piaf (December 19, 1915 – October 11, 1963)[1] was one of Frances most loved singers, who became a national icon. ... Barbara was a popular French female singer born as Monique Andrée Serf (June 9, 1930 - November 25, 1997) best known under her stage name . ... Georges Brassens (French IPA: ) (October 22, 1921 - October 29, 1981) was a French acoustic singer and songwriter. ... Brigitte Fontaine, born in 1939 in Morlaix, Finistère, in the Brittany region of France, is a singer of avant-garde music. ... Francis Cabrel (born 23 November 1953 in Agen, France) is a French singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Alain Souchon (born Alain Kienast on May 27, 1944, Casablanca, Morocco) is a French singer, songwriter and actor. ... Laurent Voulzy (born Lucien Voulzy on December 18, 1948 in Paris, France) is a French singer and composer. ... Jean-Jacques Goldman (born October 11, 1951) is a French singer and songwriter. ... Location of different versions of Star Academy Star Academy is a highly successful television show format produced by Endemol, that has been broadcasted in over 50 countries. ... For popular music (music produced commercially rather than art or folk music), see Popular music. ... Jenifers third single, Donne-Moi Le Temps, peaked at #18 in May of 2003 Jenifer Yaël Dadouche-Bartoli (born on 15 November 1982 in Nice), better known as simply Jenifer, is a pop singer who has, since 2002, had a number of hit singles in the French and... Nolwenn Leroy (born September 28, 1982 in Saint-Renan, Brittany, France) is a French singer, revealed by Star Academy, a popular French TV show, in 2002. ... A diva is a female opera singer, but now the term also refers to a popular female performer of non-operatic works. ... Mylène Farmer (September 12, 1961), born Mylène Jeanne Gautier [1], is a Canadian-born French singer and songwriter. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Zazie (born Evi Moechel in Homburg, Germany), is a German cyberartist based in Austria. ... Lorie performs live. ... Alizée Jacotey (IPA: ) (born August 21, 1984) is a French singer. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Nâdiya (born Nâdiya or Nadia Zighem on June 19, 1973) is a French Pop/R&B singer. ... Ophelie Kleerekoper-Winter (born February 20, 1974 in Boulogne, France) is a French singer and actress. ...


American and British rock and roll was also popular in the 1950s and 60s, and indigenous rock achieved some domestic success. Punk rock, heavy metal found some listeners. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... // Recovering from World War II and its aftermath, the economic miracle emerged in West Germany and Italy. ... The 1960s Ashley Rocks! decadeHI refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... “Heavy metal” redirects here. ...


In particular, electronic music, as exemplified by Jean Michel Jarre, achieved a wide French audience. The French electro-pop bands Air and Daft Punk and techno artists Laurent Garnier and David Guetta found a wide audience in the late 1990s and early 2000s, both locally and internationally. Electronica groups such as Télépopmusik continue to enjoy success. Electronic music is a term for music created using electronic devices. ... Jean-Michel André Jarre (born August 24, 1948 in Lyon, France) is a French composer, performer and music producer. ... Air is a French music duo, consisting of Nicolas Godin and Jean-Benoît Dunckel. ... Daft Punk is the collective name of Paris musicians Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo (born February 8, 1974) and Thomas Bangalter (born January 3, 1975). ... Techno is a form of electronic dance music that became prominent in Detroit, Michigan during the mid-1980s with influences from electro, New Wave, Funk and futuristic fiction themes that were prevalent and relative to modern culture during the end of the Cold War in industrial America at that time. ... Laurent Garnier (born February 1, 1966) is a French techno music producer and DJ. As a DJ at the Hacienda club in Manchester he was a significant player in the Madchester scene in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... David Guetta (born 7 November 1967 in Paris) is a French DJ. At age 13, he began mixing his first vinyls. ... This article is very long Some browsers may have difficulty rendering this article. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Electronica is a term that covers a wide range of electronic or electronic-influenced music. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Algerian rai also found a large French audience, especially Khaled. Moroccan chaabi and gnawa is also popular. Raï (Arabic: راي) is a form of folk music, originated in Oran, Algeria from Bedouin shepherds, mixed with Spanish, French, African-American and Arabic musical forms, which dates back to the 1930s and has been primarily evolved by women in the culture. ... Khaled [خالد], born Khaled Hadj Brahim, is an Algerian raï singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist from Oran. ... Chaabi is the popular music of North Africa. ... Gnawas around 1920s Gnawa or Gnaoua (in Arabic چنّاوة) is a group of musicians who might be descendants of former slaves originating from Sub-Saharan Africa or came freely to Morocco with Caravans during the Trans-Saharan trade trade, or both. ...


American hip hop music was exported to France in the 1980s, and French rappers and DJs, like MC Solaar, also had some success. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... The 1980s refers to the years of 1980 to 1989. ... very gay West Coast rapper Snoop Dogg performing for the US Navy For information on rap music, see hip hop music. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... MC Solaar is the stage name of francophone hip hop artist Claude MBarali (born March 5, 1969). ...


Rock

Main article: French rock

At the end of World War ll, French musicians were becoming wildly experimental and diverse. Popular musicians from the era included romantics like Édith Piaf, politicized singers like Leo Ferre, morbid sex symbols like Juliette Greco, elegant stars like Charles Aznavour and experimental, often humorous, performers like Georges Brassens and the Belgian Jacques Brel widely renowned as one of the best French popular composers of all time. Their works known as "chanson française" refer to French popular music from the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s performed by the singers and songwriters mentioned above and others such as Georges Moustaki and Yves Montand. Sometimes unjustly associated with the past, such as is the music from American golden age musicals, Spanish Zarzuelas and Italian operettas, the French popular songs are nevertheless today still part of a dynamic French social movement which has for centuries – since the French revolution – moved audiences with elegant and often poetic lyrics combined with realism around social themes, spirituality and love. The most widely recognized songs such as “Non, Je ne regrette rien"; "Ne me quitte pas" or "Les feuilles mortes" have dignified successors today in diverse genres such as rap, jazz, electronic music or pop. When talking about French rock in the greater sense, it is a form of rock music produced primarily in France, but also in other European francophone countries. ... Édith Piaf (December 19, 1915 – October 11, 1963)[1] was one of Frances most loved singers, who became a national icon. ... Léo Ferré (August 24, 1916 - July 14, 1993) was a poet and a musician. ... Juliette Gréco was born in Montpellier, France, on the 7th of February 1927. ... Charles Aznavour (born May 22, 1924) is an Armenian-French singer, songwriter and actor. ... Georges Brassens (French IPA: ) (October 22, 1921 - October 29, 1981) was a French acoustic singer and songwriter. ... Brel on a cover of Les Adieux à lOlympia concert album (1966) Jacques Brel (April 8, 1929 – October 9, 1978) was a respected Belgian French-speaking singer-songwriter, considered by many as a poet as well, given the power of his lyrics. ...


In the 1950s, Elvis Presley and rock and roll made inroads in the French music scene. It produced stars like Johnny Hallyday, Richard Anthony, and Claude François, the popular yé-yé girls like Sylvie Vartan and some various music genre like Dalida, who can do anything like Italian style music in 50s; twist, pop and rock in the 60s (and later pop, disco, new wave and rock in the 70s and 80s). These were popular female teen idols, and included Françoise Hardy, who was the first to write her own songs. Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Johnny Hallyday Johnny Hallyday (born June 15, 1943 in Paris, France) is a French singer and actor. ... Claude François Claude François (born February 1, 1939 in Ismaïlia, Egypt; died March 11, 1978 in Paris, France) was a French pop singer. ... Yé-yé is a style of pop music, popular in France in the 1960s. ... Sylvie Vartan Sylvie Vartan (born 1944) is a French pop singer and music hall impressario of Hungarian and Armenian origin. ... Dalida as shown on a French stamp issued in 2001 Dalida (January 17, 1933 - May 3, 1987) was an Egyptian-born singer, of Italian origin, making her career in France. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... One of many compilations Françoise Hardy (born January 17, 1944 in Paris) is a French singer and actress. ...


Singer-songwriter Serge Gainsbourg began as a jazz musician in the 1950s and spanned several eras of French popular music including pop, rock, reggae, new wave, disco and even hip hop filtered through his unique sense of black humor, heavily laden with sex and scatology. Serge Gainsbourg (April 2, 1928 – March 2, 1991) was a French poet, singer-songwriter, actor and director. ... // Recovering from World War II and its aftermath, the economic miracle emerged in West Germany and Italy. ... Black comedy, also known as black humor, is a subgenre of comedy and satire that deals with serious subjects – death, divorce, drug abuse, et cetera in a humorous manner. ...


Though rock was not extremely popular until the 70s, there were innovative musicians in France as the psychedelic rock trend was peaking worldwide. Jean-Pierre Massiera's Les Maledictus Sound (1968) and Aphrodite's Child's 666 were the most influential. Later came bands such as Magma, Martin Circus, Au Bonheur des Dames, Trust, Téléphone, Indochine, Noir Désir, and musicians Marcel Dadi, Paul Personne, Jean Pierre Danel, Bireli Lagrene, etc. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Aphrodites Child was a Greek rock band formed around the time of the student riots in 1968, by Vangelis Papathanassiou (keyboards and vocals); Demis Roussos (bass guitar and vocals); and Loukas Sideras (drums and vocals). ... 666 (The Apocalypse of John, 13/18) is a double album by psychedelic/progressive art rock group Aphrodites Child. ... Magma is molten rock located beneath the surface of the Earth (or any other rocky planet), and which often collects in a magma chamber. ... Au Bonheur des Dames book cover Au Bonheur des Dames (The Ladies Delight) or (The Ladies Paradise) is a 1883 novel by Émile Zola, the eleventh in his Les Rougon-Macquart series, about Denise who moves to Paris with her two brothers when her father dies. ... Bernie Bonvoisin (left) and Norbert Krief (right) Trust was a famous hard rock band seen by many in its early years as the French AC/DC. // Band history Trust was founded in 1977 by: Bernard Bernie Bonvoisin (vocals, lyricist) Norbert Nono Krief (guitar, composer) Raymond Ray Manna (bass guitar) Jean... Téléphone was a French rock band formed in 1976. ... Indochine has several meanings: Indochine is the French name for Indochina, or sometimes more specifically, the old colony of French Indochina. ... Noir Désir is a French rock band, currently on hiatus. ... Marcel Dadi (1951-July 17, 1996) was a French guitarist known for his country & western music. ... Paul Personne is a French blues singer and guitar player. ... Born in 1968, self-taught guitarist, record producer and composer, Jean-Pierre Danel started his career as a professional guitarist in July 1982, at the age of 14. ...


In the early 70s, Breton musician Alan Stivell (Rennaissance de l'Harpe Celtique) launched the field of French folk-rock by combining psychedelic and progressive rock sounds with Breton and Celtic folk styles. Alan Stivell at Lorient Alan Stivell (born Alan Cochevelou January 6, 1944) is a Breton musician from the town of Gourin. ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ...


Progressive rock

Main article: Progressive rock

France became one of the leading producers of prog rock in the 1970s. Aficionados worldwide were enamoured by recordings like Ange's Le Cimetiere des Arlequins, Pulsar's Halloween, Shylock's Ile de Fievre, Atoll's L'Araignee-Mal and Eskaton's Ardeur. Most well-known, however, may be the band Magma, whose 1970 debut, Magma, used free jazz and lyrical references to science fiction. The band later used Indian and electronic styles. For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Ange is a French progressive rock band formed in 1970 by the Décamps brothers, Francis (keyboards) and Christian (vocals). ... Halloween is a live album by Frank Zappa, released in DVD-Audio CD format by Vaulternative Records in 2003. ... Atoll is a French progressive rock band. ... Eskaton is a defunct vanity record label created by Coil, exclusively for albums put out by the group and their friends. ... Magma is a French progressive rock band founded in 1969 by classically-trained drummer Christian Vander, who claimed as his inspiration a vision of humanitys spiritual and ecological future that profoundly disturbed him. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... Free jazz is a movement of jazz music developed in the 1950s and 1960s by artists such as Ornette Coleman, Eric Dolphy, Cecil Taylor, Albert Ayler, Joe Harriott, Archie Shepp, Bill Dixon and Paul Bley. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Electronic music is a term for music created using electronic devices. ...


1980s

In the 1980s, French rock spawned a myriad of styles, many closely-connected with other Francophone musical scenes in Switzerland, Canada and especially Belgium. Pub rock (Telephone), psychobilly (La Muerte), pop punk (Les Thugs), synth pop and punk rock (Bérurier Noir, Bijou) were among the styles represented in this era. Revival of the Pub Rock Scene made popular by Dire Straits and Elvis Costello. ... Téléphone was a French rock band formed in 1976. ... Psychobilly is a genre of music generally described as a mix between the punk rock of the 1970s and the American rockabilly of the 1950s. ... Pop punk is used for two separate subgenres of punk rock music: the kind typically found on Lookout! Records, which stray very little from the three-chord formula that The Ramones pioneered, as well as a newer subgenre of melodic, more emotional punk, which includes by bands like NOFX and... Synth pop is a style of popular music in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Bérurier noir is a French punk band formed in 1983 by Loran (guitar), François(vocals) and Dédé (drum machine). ... Bijou Phillips, born on 1 April 1980 in Greenwich, Connecticut, is the daughter of John Phillips, of The Mamas and the Papas, and Genevieve Waite, a South African model. ...


Punk rock had arisen in the 1970s and continued into the next decade, perhaps best represented by Oberkampf and Metal Urbain. 80s progressive rock peaked early in the decade, with Dun's Eros, Emeraude's Geoffroy and Terpandre's Terpandre, all from 1981, representing the genre's pinnacle. Oberkampf can refer to: Christohpe-Philippe Oberkampf, French industrialist of German descent a street in Paris (rue Oberkampf) and its surrounding area, the scene quarter Oberkampf (Paris) a Paris metro station, see Oberkampf (Paris Metro) a French rock band, see Oberkampf (band) This is a disambiguation page, a list of... Metal Urbain is a French punk group from the late 70s and early 80s who idolized the Sex Pistols and had a drum machine instead of a drummer. ... Dun comes from the Brythonic Din and Gaelic Dun, meaning fort, and is now used as a general term for small stone built strongholds, enclosures or roundhouses in Scotland, as a sub-group of hill forts. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Hip hop

Main article: French hip hop

Hip hop music came from New York City, invented in the 1970s by African Americans. By 1983, the genre had spread to much of the world, including France. Almost immediately, French performers (musicians and breakdancers) began their career, including Thony Maskot, Frank II Louise, Max-Laure Bourjolly, Farid Berki, Traction Avant and Black Blanc Beur. Popularity was brief, however, and hip hop quickly receded to the French underground. Most French hip hop artists come from poor suburbs of Paris (including Lunatic, Mafia K1 Fry, La Brigade, Secteur Ä), Lyon, Lille, Le Havre (La Boussole), Strasbourg, Toulouse (KDD)or Marseille (IAM, Fonky Family, Psy 4 De La Rime, 3ème Oeil, and others). ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A breakdancer performing a one-handed freeze (also known as a pike) in the streets of Paris. ...


Paname City Rappin (1984, by Dee Nasty) was the first album released, and the first major stars were Suprême NTM, IAM and MC Solaar, whose 1991 Qui Sème le Vent Récolte le Tempo, was a major hit. Dee Nasty is a DJ, producer, and Hip-Hop pioneer in Paris, France. ... Suprême NTM is a controversial French rap group, comprised of rappers Joey Starr and Kool Shen. ... IAM is a French rap band from Marseille, created in 1989. ... MC Solaar is the stage name of francophone hip hop artist Claude MBarali (born March 5, 1969). ... Qui sème le vent récolte le tempo is French rapper MC Solaars first album. ...


Raï

Main article: Raï

France has long had a large Algerian minority, a legacy of long-time colonial domination of that country. Algerian immigrants brought their own music to France, most especially including raï. Originating in the lower-class slums of the city of Oran, raï shot to the top of the French charts in 1992 with the release of Khaled's self-titled album Khaled. Later performers added influences from funk, hip hop, rock and other styles, creating most notably a pop genre called lover's raï. Performers include Rachid Taha and Faudel. Raï (Arabic: راي) is a form of folk music, originated in Oran, Algeria from Bedouin shepherds, mixed with Spanish, French, African-American and Arabic musical forms, which dates back to the 1930s and has been primarily evolved by women in the culture. ... View of Oran Oran (Population: 897,700) (Arabic: ‎, pronounced Wahran) is a city in northwestern Algeria, situated on the Mediterranean coast. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Khaled [خالد], born Khaled Hadj Brahim, is an Algerian raï singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist from Oran. ... Khaled, released in 1992, is Khaleds self titled album, which established his reputation as a superstar in France and around the world. ... Funk is an African American musical style. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Rachid Taha (born 1958 in Oran, Algeria) is a French-Algerian musician. ... Faudel (born Faudel Belloua on June 6, 1978 in Mantes-la-Jolie) is a French singer of Algerian descent, considered the Prince of Raï. He grew up in the suburbs of Paris, where he picked up his musical talents from his grandmother who taught him traditional Algerian music. ...


References

  • Krümm, Philippe and Jean-Pierre Rasle. "Music of the Regions". 2000. In Broughton, Simon and Ellingham, Mark with McConnachie, James and Duane, Orla (Ed.), World Music, Vol. 1: Africa, Europe and the Middle East, pp 103-113. Rough Guides Ltd, Penguin Books. ISBN 1-85828-636-0

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Music of France (8912 words)
The most important French contribution to musical innovation of the past 35 years is a form a computer-assisted composition called "spectral music." The astonishing technical advances of the spectralist composers in the 1970s are only recently beginning to achieve wide recognition in the United States, though European composers long ago absorbed them.
Spectral music (or spectralism) is a musical genre or movement originating in France in the 1970s and characterized by the use of computer analysis of sound wave components as the basis for composition.
Brigitte Fontaine, born in 1939 in Morlaix, Finistère, in the Brittany region of France, is a singer of avant-garde music.
The Arts in France - French Music (1795 words)
The chief musical forms of this period were the motet--now little resembling its medieval ancestor--and the cyclic mass.
The arias were simple and songlike, in contrast to the long, florid arias of Italian music, and the influence of Italian recitative is slight.
Music by French composers consisted mostly of inferior operas or empty, virtuosic salon pieces.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m