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Encyclopedia > Museum of Modern Art
Museum of Modern Art
Established November 7, 1929
Location 11 West 53rd Street, Manhattan, New York, USA
Visitor figures 2.5 million/year
Director Glenn D. Lowry
Website www.moma.org

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is a preeminent art museum located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, USA, on 53rd Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. It is regarded as the leading museum of modern art in the world. Its collection includes works of architecture and design, drawings, painting, sculpture, photography, prints, illustrated books, film, and electronic media. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 402 KB) Description: Museum of Modern Art, New York City, USA File links The following pages link to this file: Museum of Modern Art ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... “NY” redirects here. ... Glenn D. Lowry, director of MOMA, while opening MOMA Queens in June 2002 Glenn D. Lowry is the current Director of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City. ... San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2004). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... View of Midtown from Empire State Building. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... This article is about building architecture. ... All Saints Chapel in the Cathedral Basilica of St. ... Drawing is one way of making an image: it is the process of making marks on a surface by applying pressure from or moving a tool on the surface. ... Painter redirects here. ... A sculpture is a three-dimensional object, which for the purposes of this article is man-made and selected for special recognition as art. ... Photography [fәtɑgrәfi:],[foʊtɑgrәfi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or electronic sensor. ... Printing is an industrial process for reproducing copies of texts and images, typically with ink on paper using a printing press. ... Illustration by Jessie Willcox Smith. ... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... A screenshot of a web page. ...


MoMA's library and archives hold over 300,000 books, artist books, and periodicals, as well as individual files on more than 70,000 artists. The archives contain primary source material related to the history of modern and contemporary art. This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


MoMA is complementary to and sometimes considered a sister museum to the nearby Metropolitan Museum of Art, although the latter is a general art museum, where modern art is only one area of specialization. Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ...

Contents

History

The idea for the Museum of Modern Art was developed in 1928 primarily by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (wife of John D. Rockefeller Jr.) and two of her friends, Lillie P. Bliss and Mrs Cornelius J. Sullivan. They became known variously as "the Ladies", "the daring ladies" and "the adamantine ladies". They rented modest quarters for the new museum and it opened to the public on November 7, 1929, nine days after the Wall Street Crash. Abby had invited A. Conger Goodyear, the former president of the board of trustees of the Albright Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, to become president of the new museum. Abby became treasurer. At the time, it was America's premier American museum devoted exclusively to modern art, and the first of its kind in Manhattan to exhibit European modernism.[1] Abby Aldrich Rockefeller was born Abby Greene Aldrich on October 26, 1874 in Providence, Rhode Island. ... John D. Rockefeller, Jr. ... Mary Quinn Sullivan was born Mary Josephine Quinn (November 24, 1877-December 5, 1939) in Indianapolis, IN to Thomas F. Quinn and Anne E. Gleason Quinn; she was a pioneer modern art collector and one of the founding trustees of the Museum of Modern Art. ... For the protest against the Communications Decency Act, see Black World Wide Web protest. ...


Goodyear enlisted Paul J. Sachs and Frank Crowninshield to join him as founding trustees. Sachs, the associate director and curator of prints and drawings at the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, was referred to in those days as a collector of curators. Goodyear asked him to recommend a director and Sachs suggested Alfred H. Barr Jr., a promising young protege. Under Barr's guidance, the museum's holdings quickly expanded from an initial gift of eight prints and one drawing. Its first successful loan exhibition was in November 1929, displaying paintings by Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, and Seurat.[2] Paul Sachs (1878 - 1965) was Harvard associate director of the Fogg Art Museum and the developer of one of the early museum studies courses in the United States. ... Francis Welch Crowninshield (1872–1947), better known as Frank or Crownie (informal), was a French-born, America-based journalist and art and theatre critic best known for developing and editing the magazine Vanity Fair. ... The Fogg Art Museum is the oldest of Harvard Universitys art museums. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Alfred H. Barr, Jr. ... van gogh is a piece of shit Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), Netherlands artist. ... Paul Gauguin (June 7, 1848 - May 9, 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... Categories: 1839 births | 1906 deaths | French painters | Post-impressionism | Artist stubs ... --68. ...


First housed in six rooms of galleries and offices on the twelfth floor of Manhattan's Heckscher Building, on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 57th Street, the museum moved into three more temporary locations within the next ten years. Abby's husband was adamantly opposed to the museum (as well as to modern art itself) and refused to release funds for the venture, which had to be obtained from other sources and resulted in the frequent shifts of location. Nevertheless, he eventually donated the land for the current site of the Museum, plus other gifts over time, and thus became in effect one of its greatest benefactors.[3]


During that time it initiated many more exhibitions of noted artists, such as the lone Vincent van Gogh exhibition on November 4, 1935. Containing an unprecedented sixty-six oils and fifty drawings from the Netherlands, and poignant excerpts from the artist's letters, it was a major public success and became "a precursor to the hold van Gogh has to this day on the contemporary imagination".[4] “van Gogh” redirects here. ...


The museum also gained international prominence with the hugely successful and now famous Picasso retrospective of 1939-40, held in conjunction with the Art Institute of Chicago. In its range of presented works, it represented a significant reinterpretation of Picasso for future art scholars and historians. This was wholly masterminded by Barr, a Picasso enthusiast, and lionized the greatest artist of the time, setting the model for all the museum's retrospectives that were to follow.[5] A young Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso, formally Pablo Ruiz Picasso, (October 25, 1881 - April 8, 1973) was one of the recognized masters of 20th century art. ... The Art Institute of Chicago is a fine art museum located in Chicago, Illinois. ...


When Abby Rockefeller's son Nelson was selected by the board of trustees to become its flamboyant president in 1939, at the age of thirty, he became the prime instigator and funder of its publicity, acquisitions and subsequent expansion into new headquarters on 53rd Street. His brother, David Rockefeller, also joined the Museum's board of trustees, in 1948, and took over the presidency when Nelson took up position as Governor of New York in 1958. Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... David Rockefeller, Sr. ...


David subsequently employed the noted architect Philip Johnson to redesign the Museum garden and name it in honor of his mother, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden. He and the Rockefeller family in general have retained a close association with the Museum throughout its history, with the Rockefeller Brothers Fund funding the institution since 1947. Both David Rockefeller, Jr. and Sharon Percy Rockefeller (wife of Senator Jay Rockefeller) currently sit on the board of trustees. 1933 Portrait of Philip Johnson by Carl Van Vechten Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) was an influential American architect. ... The Rockefeller family, founded by John D. Rockefeller (1839-1937) (Senior) and his brother William Rockefeller (1841-1922), is an American industrial, banking, and philanthropic family of German American origin that made the worlds largest private fortune in the oil business during the late 19th and early 20th century... The Rockefeller Brothers Fund (RBF), (Philanthropy for an Interdependent World), is the principal philanthropic organisation created and run by members of the Rockefeller family. ... David Rockefeller Jr. ... John Davison Rockefeller IV (born June 18, 1937), generally known as Jay Rockefeller, has served as a Democratic U.S. Senator from West Virginia since 1985. ...


In 1937, MoMA had shifted to offices and basement galleries in the Time & Life Building in Rockefeller Center. Its permanent and current home, now renovated, designed in the International Style by the modernist architects Philip C. Johnson and Edward Durell Stone, opened to the public on May 10, 1939, attended by an illustrious company of 6,000 people, and with an opening address via radio from the White House by President Franklin Roosevelt.[6] The Time-Life Building, located at 1271 Avenue of the Americas in Rockefeller Center in New York is an historically important building opened in 1958 and designed by Wallace Harrison of Harrison, Abramovitz, and Harris. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International style was a major architectural trend of the 1920s and 1930s. ... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... Philip Cortalyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 (Cleveland, Ohio) – January 25, 2005 (New Canaan, Connecticut)) was a distinguished American architect. ... Edward Durell Stone (1902 Fayetteville, Arkansas - 1978 New York City) was an American modernist twentieth century architect. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States (1933-1945), is best known for leading the U.S. through the Great Depression with his New Deal programs, building a powerful political coalition -- the New Deal Coalition -- that dominated American politics for decades, a...


Artworks

Inside the MoMA building.

Considered by many to have the best collection of modern Western masterpieces in the world, MoMA's holdings include more than 150,000 individual pieces in addition to approximately 22,000 films and 4 million film stills. The collection houses such important and familiar works as the following: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2898 KB) Inside the Museum of Modern Art in New York. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2898 KB) Inside the Museum of Modern Art in New York. ...

It also holds works by a wide range of influential American artists including Cindy Sherman, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jasper Johns, Edward Hopper, Chuck Close, Georgia O'Keefe, and Ralph Bakshi. For other uses, see Starry Night (disambiguation). ... “van Gogh” redirects here. ... Les Demoiselles dAvignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon in English) is a celebrated painting by Pablo Picasso that depicts five prostitutes in a brothel, in the Avignon Street of Barcelona. ... “Picasso” redirects here. ... La persistencia de la memoria (1931) or The Persistence of Memory is quite possibly the most famous painting by artist Salvador Dalí. The painting has also been popularly known as Soft Watches, Droopy Watches, or Melting Clocks. ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí y Domènech, Marquis of Pubol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish (Catalan) surrealist painter. ... The rectilinear pattern of Broadway Boogie_Woogie evokes the streets of New York City Broadway Boogie_Woogie is a painting by Piet Mondrian completed in 1943, shortly after he moved to New York in 1940. ... Piet Mondrian in his studio in 1941 photographed by Arnold Newman Pieter Cornelis (Piet) Mondriaan, after 1912 Mondrian, (pronounced: Pete Mon-dree-on, IPA: ) (b. ... The Sleeping Gypsy or La Bohémienne endormie is an oil painting by French Naive artist Henri Rousseau. ... The Dream, 1910 MoMA. Henri Julien Félix Rousseau (May 21, 1844 – September 2, 1910) was a French Post-Impressionist painter in the Naive or Primitive manner. ... For other uses, see Campbells Soup Cans (disambiguation). ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who became a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... The Raising of the Cross, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp A triptych (from the Greek tri- three + ptychÄ“ fold) is a work of art (usually a panel painting) which is divided into three sections, or three carved panels which are hinged together. ... Claude Monet also known as Oscar-Claude Monet or Claude Oscar Monet (November 14, 1840 – December 5, 1926)[1] was a founder of French impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movements philosophy of expressing ones perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein... La Danse is a painting by Henri Matisse from 1909. ... Henri Matisse, Self-Portrait in a Striped T-shirt 1906, Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, Denmark Henri Matisse (December 31, 1869 – November 3, 1954) was a French artist, noted for his use of color and his fluid, brilliant and original draughtsmanship. ... “Cezanne” redirects here. ... Marc Chagall as photographed in 1941 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Frida Kahlo (July 6, 1907 – July 13, 1954) was a Mexican painter who depicted the indigenous culture of her country in a style combining Realism, Symbolism and Surrealism. ... Controversy swirls over the alleged sale of No. ... Painting (1946) is a 1946 painting by the Irish born artist Francis Bacon. ... Francis Bacon (28 October 1909 – 28 April 1992) was an Irish figurative painter. ... Cindy Sherman (born January 19, 1954 in Glen Ridge, New Jersey) is an American photographer and film director known for her conceptual self-portraits. ... Image:Jean1. ... Jasper Johnss Map, 1961 Jasper Johnss Flag, Encaustic, oil and collage on fabric mounted on plywood,1954-55 Detail of Flag (1954-55). ... Nighthawks. ... Chuck Close (born Charles Thomas Close July 5, 1940, Monroe, Wisconsin) is an American photorealistic painter and photographer. ... Georgia O’Keeffe in Abiquiu, New Mexico, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1950 Georgia OKeeffe (November 15, 1887 – March 6, 1986) was an American artist born in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ...


MoMA developed a world-renowned art photography collection, first under Edward Steichen and then John Szarkowski, as well as an important film collection under the Museum of Modern Art Department of Film and Video. The film collection owns prints of many familiar feature-length movies, including Citizen Kane and Vertigo, but the department's holdings also contains many less-traditional pieces, including Andy Warhol's eight-hour Empire and Chris Cunningham's music video for Björk's All Is Full of Love. MoMA also has an important design collection, which includes works from such legendary designers as Paul László, the Eameses, Isamu Noguchi, and George Nelson. The design collection also contains many industrial and manufactured pieces, ranging from a self-aligning ball bearing to an entire Bell 47D1 helicopter. Fine art photography, or simply art photography, refers to high-quality archival photographic prints of pictures that are created to fulfill the creative vision of an individual professional. ... Edward Steichen (March 27, 1879-March 25, 1973) was an American photographer, painter, and art gallery and museum curator, born in Luxembourg. ... John Szarkowski (December 18, 1925 – July 7, 2007) was an influential photographer, curator, historian, and critic. ... The Museum of Modern Art Department of Film and Video, founded in 1935, contains works of international cinema, focusing on the art and history of the film medium. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... For other uses of the word, see Vertigo. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who became a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Empire was a silent, black and white film made in 1964 by Andy Warhol. ... Cary Cunningham is an acclaimed English music video film director. ... This article is about the musician. ... All is Full of Love was the fifth and final single by Icelandic singer, Björk to be taken from Homogenic. ... Paul László Paul Laszlo or Paul László (the latter spelling is correct, but the name is often anglicized to the former) (6 February 1900–27 March 1993) was a famous modern architect and interior designer and is considered a giant amongst the furniture designers, interior designers, and architects... Perhaps the most notable couple in the history of the field of industrial design. ... Isamu Noguchi , November 17, 1904 - December 30, 1988) was a prominent Japanese -American artist and landscape architect whose artistic career spanned six decades, from the 1920s onward. ... George Nelson (1908-1986) was, together with Charles & Ray Eames, one of the founding fathers of American modernism. ... A 4 point angular contact ball bearing A ball bearing is a common type of rolling-element bearing, a kind of bearing. ... The Bell 47 was the first helicopter to be certified for civil use on 8 March 1946. ...


Renovation

MoMA's midtown location underwent extensive renovations in the 2000s, closing on May 21, 2002 and reopening to the public in a building redesigned by the Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi, on November 20, 2004. From June 29, 2002 until September 27, 2004, a portion of its collection was on display in what was dubbed MoMA QNS, a former Swingline staple factory in the Long Island City section of Queens. An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... MoMA, New York. ... Swingline is a brand of the American Clip Company (ACCO) that specializes in manufacturing staplers and hole punchers and is headquartered in Lincolnshire, Illinois. ... Long Island City, New York, often abbreviated L.I.C., is an area in the borough of Queens in New York City. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ...


The renovation project nearly doubled the space for MoMA's exhibitions and programs and features 630,000 square feet of new and redesigned space. The Peggy and David Rockefeller Building on the western portion of the site houses the main exhibition galleries, and The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building on the eastern portion provides over five times more space for classrooms, auditoriums, teacher training workshops, and the Museum's expanded Library and Archives. These two buildings frame the enlarged Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden, home to two works by Richard Serra. Fulcrum 1987, 55 ft high free standing sculpture of Cor-ten steel near Liverpool Street station, London Richard Serra (born 2 November 1939) is an American minimalist sculptor and video artist known for working with large scale assemblies of sheet metal. ...


MoMA's reopening brought controversy as its admission cost increased from US$12 to US$20, making it one of the most expensive museums in the city; however it has free entry on Fridays after 4pm, thanks to sponsorship from Target Stores. The architecture of the renovation is controversial. At its opening, some critics thought that Taniguchi's design was a fine example of contemporary architecture, while many others were extremely displeased with certain aspects of the design, such as the flow of the space.[7][8][9] Target Stores is a division of Target Corporation. ...


MoMA has seen its average number of visitors rise to 2.5 million from about 1.5 million a year before its new granite and glass renovation. The museum's director, Glenn D. Lowry, expects average visitor numbers eventually to settle in at around 2.1 million.[10] Glenn D. Lowry, director of MOMA, while opening MOMA Queens in June 2002 Glenn D. Lowry is the current Director of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City. ...


Officers and Board of Trustees

  • Honorary Chairman - David Rockefeller
  • Chairman Emeritus - Ronald S. Lauder
  • President Emerita - Agnes Gund
  • Chairman - Robert B. Menschel
  • President - Marie-Josée Kravis (wife of Henry Kravis)

Vice Chairmen: David Rockefeller, Sr. ... Ronald Steven Lauder (born February 26, 1944 in New York) is an American businessman, civic leader, philanthropist, and art collector. ... Henry R. Kravis (born January 6, 1944 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States) is an American business financier and investor, notable for co-founding and heading the leading private equity firm, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. ...

Notable Trustees: Sid Bass (1943-). His father, Perry Bass, built on oil fortune inherited from uncle Sid Richardson (d. ... Jerry Speyer Jerry I. Speyer (born 23 June 1940 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is one of two founding partners of the real estate company Tishman Speyer. ...

Life Trustees Vartan Gregorian is a distinguished Iranian-American academic. ... The Carnegie Corporation was founded by the will of Andrew Carnegie in 1911 to promote the advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding. ... The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is the worlds largest charitable foundation. ... Ronald Steven Lauder (born February 26, 1944 in New York) is an American businessman, civic leader, philanthropist, and art collector. ... Michael Ovitz (born December 14, 1946), talent agent and Hollywood powerhouse, served as the head of the Creative Artists Agency from 1975 to 1995. ... Richard D. Parsons is the present CEO and Chairman of the Board of the largest media company in the world, Time Warner, Inc. ... David Rockefeller Jr. ... John Davison Rockefeller IV (born June 18, 1937) is a member of the prominent United States Rockefeller family who has served as a Democratic U.S. Senator from West Virginia since 1985. ... Gary Winnick was a founder of Global Crossing Limited, a telecommunications company providing worldwide computer networking services. ...

  • Celeste Bartos
  • Thomas S. Carroll
  • Gianluigi Gabetti
  • Werner H. Kramarsky
  • June Noble Larkin
  • Peter G. Peterson
  • Gifford Phillips
  • David Rockefeller
  • Joanne M. Stern
  • Mrs. Donald B. Straus
  • Jeanne C. Thayer
  • Joan Tisch
  • Richard S. Zeisler.

Notable Honorary Trustee: This article is about the Pete Peterson who was a U.S. government official during the Nixon administration; there is also a Pete Peterson who was a former Florida Congressman and ambassador to Vietnam. ... David Rockefeller, Sr. ...

Notable Ex-Officio Trustee: Maurice R. Hank Greenberg (born May 4, 1925 in New York City) is an American businessman and former chairman and CEO of American International Group (AIG), the worlds largest insurance and financial services corporation. ...

Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ...

Gallery of some works on display

Further reading

  • Fitzgerald, Michael C. Making Modernism: Picasso and the Creation of the Market for Twentieth-Century Art. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1995.
  • Harr, John Ensor and Peter J. Johnson. The Rockefeller Century: Three Generations of America's Greatest Family. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1988.
  • Kert, Bernice. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller: The Woman in the Family. New York: Random House, 1993.
  • Lynes, Russell, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art, New York: Athenaeum, 1973.
  • Reich, Cary. The Life of Nelson A. Rockefeller: Worlds to Conquer 1908-1958. New York: Doubleday, 1996.
  • Rockefeller, David. Memoirs. New York: Random House, 2002.
  • Schulze, Franz. Philip Johnson: Life and Work. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press, 1996.

See also

Rene dHarnoncourt is best known as the Director of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, a position he held from 1949 to 1967. ... John D. Rockefeller Jr. ... Abby Aldrich Rockefeller was born Abby Greene Aldrich on October 26, 1874 in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... David Rockefeller, Sr. ... David Rockefeller Jr. ... The Rockefeller family, founded by John D. Rockefeller (1839-1937) (Senior) and his brother William Rockefeller (1841-1922), is an American industrial, banking, and philanthropic family of German American origin that made the worlds largest private fortune in the oil business during the late 19th and early 20th century... Mary Quinn Sullivan was born Mary Josephine Quinn (November 24, 1877-December 5, 1939) in Indianapolis, IN to Thomas F. Quinn and Anne E. Gleason Quinn; she was a pioneer modern art collector and one of the founding trustees of the Museum of Modern Art. ...

References

  1. ^ First modern art museum featuring European works in Manhattan - Michael FitzGerald, Making Modernism: Picasso and the Creation of the Market for Twentieth-Century Art. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1995. (p. 120)
  2. ^ Origins of MoMA and first successful loan exhibition - see John Ensor Harr and Peter J. Johnson, The Rockefeller Century: Three Generations of America's Greatest Family, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1988. (pp.217-18)
  3. ^ John D. Rockefeller, Jr. one of MoMA's greatest benefactors - see Bernice Kert, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller: The Woman in the Family. New York: Random House, 1993. (pp.376,386)
  4. ^ Precursor to the current hold of van Gogh in public imagination - Ibid., (p.376)
  5. ^ MoMA's international prominence through the Picasso retrospective of 1939-40 - see FitzGerald, op.cit. (pp.243-62)
  6. ^ Time Magazine. 1939: The formal opening of MoMA
  7. ^ Updike, John (2004-11-15). Invisible Cathedral. The New Yorker. Retrieved on 2007-02-27. “Nothing in the new building is obtrusive, nothing is cheap. It feels breathless with unspared expense. It has the enchantment of a bank after hours, of a honeycomb emptied of honey and flooded with a soft glow.”
  8. ^ Smith, Roberta (2006-11-01). Tate Modern's Rightness Versus MoMA's Wrongs. New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-02-27. “The museum’s big, bleak, irrevocably formal lobby atrium ... is space that the Modern could ill afford to waste, and such frivolousness continues in its visitor amenities: the hard-to-find escalators and elevators, the too-narrow glass-sided bridges, the two-star restaurant on prime garden real estate where there should be an affordable cafeteria ...Yoshio Taniguchi’s MoMA is a beautiful building that plainly doesn’t work.”
  9. ^ Rybczynski, Witold (2005-03-30). Street Cred: Another Way of Looking at the New MOMA. Slate.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  10. ^ "Build Your Dream, Hold Your Breath." 6 August 2006 The New York Times.

For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Museum of Modern Art official site
  • Abby Aldrich Rockefeller: Patron of the modern
  • New York Times, 2007: Donors Sweetened Director's Pay At MoMA, Prompting Questions Controversy over the compensation package of MoMA's Director, Glenn D. Lowry.
  • Taniguchi and the New MOMA
  • Museum Conservation Lab Renovation

Coordinates: 40.761484° N 73.977664° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Museum of Modern Art - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (571 words)
It is one of the leading museums of modern art in the world.
The Museum of Modern Art was founded in 1929 by a triumvirate of patrons: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, Mary Sullivan, and Lillie P. Bliss.
MoMA's Midtown location underwent extensive renovations in the 2000s, closing on May 21, 2002 and reopening to the public in a building redesigned by the Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi on November 20, 2004.
Modern Art Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (276 words)
Modern Art Oxford is an art gallery established in 1969 at the University of Oxford.
From 1969 to 2002 the gallery was known as The Museum of Modern Art, Oxford.
The gallery's original founders—a small group of Oxford dons— aspired to build it into a museum with a permanent collection by way of an endowment from the University; Oxford declined, leaving the gallery with a misnomer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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