FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Murtis" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Murtis

Murti Worship

Different sects of Hinduism, especially devotional/bhakti and tantric ones, have their own particular monotheistic conception of supreme Godhead from whom all other deities and principles emanate (such as Vishnu or Shiva, Krishna or Devi). Most Hindus, based on belief of many as one, will often worship many Gods and Goddesses. They are seen as different aspects of the same manifested reality. This worship is largely done through the use of murtis. Murtis are statues or images used as windows or points of devotional and meditational focus. They are sometimes abstract, but more often different representations of Gods and Goddesses like Shiva or Ganesh, Ram or Krishna, Saraswati or Kali. The idea that deities are powerful conduits of faith and representations of Truth is known as ishta devata, or chosen deity. Since the mind is in turbulence (vritti) and unable to focus on the formless God, God is seen in form. Hindus (i.e., Smartas,) see these Gods as either being various manifestations of the one true formless Brahman (principle, Divine Ground) or ultimate personality of God (typically represented as either Vishnu or Shiva.). (Note other denominations don't believe entirely in such concept; see Ishta-Deva; )


Devotional (Bhakti) practices are very centered on cultivating a deep and personal bond of love with god through one of his or her forms, and often makes use of murtis.


Murti worship has been construed as idolatrous by many followers of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This view of murtis' being idols imposes many misapplied Judeo-Christian ideas onto Hindu practices; such accusations do not reflect actual Vedic philosophy and Hindu belief. The Hindu belief of murti worship is far closer to that of the icon, and consists of veneration of the image or statue as representative of a higher ideal or principle rather than objectifying divinity as the material object itself.

Topics in Hinduism
Shruti (Primary Scriptures):

Vedas | Upanishads | Bhagavad Gita | Itihasa (Ramayana & Mahabharata) | Agamas

Smriti (Other texts):

Tantras | Sutras | Puranas | Brahma Sutras | Hatha Yoga Pradipika | Smritis | Yoga Sutra | Tirukural

Concepts:

Avatar | Brahman | Dharma | Karma | Moksha | Maya | Ishta-Deva | Murti | Reincarnation | Samsara | Trimurti | Turiya

Schools & Systems:

Schools of Hinduism (Overview) | Early Hinduism | Samkhya | Nyaya | Vaisheshika | Yoga | Mimamsa | Vedanta | Tantra | Bhakti

Traditional Practices:

Jyotish | Ayurveda

Rituals:

Aarti | Bhajans | Darshan | Mantras | Puja | Satsang | Stotras | Yagnya

Gurus and Saints:

Shankara | Ramanuja |Madhvacharya | Ramakrishna | Vivekananda | Aurobindo | Ramana Maharshi | Sivananda | Chinmayananda | Sivaya Subramuniyaswami

Denominations:

Vaishnavism | Saivism | Shaktism | Madhva | Smartism | Agama Hindu Dharma | Contemporary Hindu movements | Survey of Hindu organisations


  Results from FactBites:
 
Murti - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (295 words)
Thus the murti is treated as the Deity of the Divine and regarded by Hindus and also by some Mahayana Buddhists during worship as points of devotional and meditational focus.
Murtis are made according to the prescriptions of the Silpasastra (typically of the alloy Panchaloga) and then installed by priests through the prana pratishtha ('establishing the life') ceremony.
Hindus argue that murti worship consists of veneration of the image or statue as the representative of the Divine, or as the "manifest presence" of the transcendent God, while idolatry objectifies divinity as the material object itself.
Murti Summary (1135 words)
A murti (also spelled murthi or murthy) is a deity or image used by Hindus and also by some Mahayana Buddhists during worship as points of devotional and meditational focus.
Murti are made according to the prescriptions of the Silpasastra (typically of the alloy Panchaloga) and then installed by priests through the prana pratishtha ('establishing the life') ceremony.
Murti worship is sometimes equated with idolatry; critics of this point of view argue that the Hindu concept of murti worship consists of veneration of the image or statue as representative of a higher ideal or principle, while idolatry objectifies divinity as the material object itself.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m