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Encyclopedia > Murti
A large clay Ganesha murti at Ganesh Chaturthi festival in Mumbai, 2004

In Hinduism, a murti (Devanagari: मूर्ति) typically refers to an image in which the Divine Spirit is 'murta', or expressed. Hindus consider a murti worthy of worship after the divine is invoked in it for the purpose of offering worship. Thus the murti is regarded by Hindus and also by some Mahayana Buddhists during worship as a point of devotional and meditational focus.it is the statue of the dieties. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 278 KB) Photograph of Ganesh deity at a festival in 2004 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 278 KB) Photograph of Ganesh deity at a festival in 2004 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... For other uses, see Ganesha (disambiguation). ... , Bombay redirects here. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Rigveda manuscript in Devanagari (early 19th century) DevanāgarÄ« (देवनागरी — in English pronounced ) (ISCII – IS13194:1991) [1] is an abugida alphabet used to write several Indian languages, including Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Bihari, Bhili, Konkani, Bhojpuri and Nepali from Nepal. ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Kuan Yin from Mt. ...

Contents

Role of murtis in worship

Modern murtis representing Balarama (left) and Krishna at the Krishna-Balarama mandir in Vrindavan, India.

Murtis are sometimes abstract, but are almost always representations of God in anthropomorphic or zoomorphic forms like Shiva, Ganesha, Rama, Kali etc. Murtis are made according to the prescriptions of the Śilpa Śāstras.[1] The alloy Panchaloga is sometimes used.[citation needed] They are installed by priests through the Prana pratishta ('establishing the life') ceremony. Krishna Balarama deities from Krishna-Balarama Mandir, Vrindavan, India File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Krishna Balarama deities from Krishna-Balarama Mandir, Vrindavan, India File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Balarama, next to the river Yamuna. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with colourful icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ... , Vrindavan   (alternate spellings Vrindaban or Brindavan), or Vraj in Mathura district, Uttar Pradesh, India is a town on the site of an ancient forest which is believed to have been the region where the famous cowherd boy, Krishna, from Hindu scriptures spent his childhood days. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... Categories: Animal stubs ... For other uses, see Siva (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ganesha (disambiguation). ... Rama ( in IAST, in DevanāgarÄ«) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Shilpa Shastras (Sanskrit: ) are ancient artistic texts in India that describe the standards for Hindu religious iconography. ... Panchaloha (also called Panchaloham or Panchaloha - literally, five metals) is a term for traditional five-metal alloys of sacred significance used for making Hindu temple icons (Murti). ... Prana pratistha is the Hindu theological term for a rite or ceremony (Samskara in Sanskrit) by which the spirit or being of a deity is infused or brought to inhabit a murti or idol of that deity. ...


Devotional (Bhakti) practices centered on cultivating a deep and personal bond of love with God often include veneration of murtis. Some Hindu denominations like Arya Samaj, however, reject image worship. Arya Samaj (Aryan Society or Society of Nobles) is a Hindu reform movement in India that was founded by Swami Dayananda in 1875. ...


Some say that the presence of murtis in Hindu temples and shrines provide a mystical form of communication with Devas. According to Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami, “This is similar to our ability to communicate with others through the telephone. One does not talk to the telephone; rather the telephone is a way to interact with another person. Without the telephone, one could not have a conversation across long distances; and without the sanctified image in the temple, one cannot easily talk with the Deity.” [2] Bhavna says there are 300 million gods in Hinduism. ... The word temple has different meanings in the fields of architecture, religion, geography, anatomy, and education. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Telephone (disambiguation). ...


See also

Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ishta-Deva, or Ishta Devata is a term from Hinduism that means chosen Deity or revered aspect of God by a devotee and is a widely held concept in Smartism. ...

Notes

  1. ^ For Śilpa Śāstras as basis for iconographic standards, see: Hopkins, p. 113.
  2. ^ Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami, "Ten Questions people ask About Hinduism …and ten terrific answers!" (p. 7) [1]

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  • Hopkins, Thomas J. (1971). The Hindu Religious Tradition. Belmont, California: Dickenson Publishing Company. 

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Murti - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (295 words)
Thus the murti is treated as the Deity of the Divine and regarded by Hindus and also by some Mahayana Buddhists during worship as points of devotional and meditational focus.
Murtis are made according to the prescriptions of the Silpasastra (typically of the alloy Panchaloga) and then installed by priests through the prana pratishtha ('establishing the life') ceremony.
Hindus argue that murti worship consists of veneration of the image or statue as the representative of the Divine, or as the "manifest presence" of the transcendent God, while idolatry objectifies divinity as the material object itself.
Murti Summary (1135 words)
A murti (also spelled murthi or murthy) is a deity or image used by Hindus and also by some Mahayana Buddhists during worship as points of devotional and meditational focus.
Murti are made according to the prescriptions of the Silpasastra (typically of the alloy Panchaloga) and then installed by priests through the prana pratishtha ('establishing the life') ceremony.
Murti worship is sometimes equated with idolatry; critics of this point of view argue that the Hindu concept of murti worship consists of veneration of the image or statue as representative of a higher ideal or principle, while idolatry objectifies divinity as the material object itself.
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