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Encyclopedia > Murderer's Row

Murderers' Row is also the title of a 1960s motion picture starring Dean Martin as secret agent Matt Helm. Matt Helm, a fictional character created by author Donald Hamilton, is a U.S. government counteragent—a man whose primary job is to kill or nullify enemy agents—not a spy or secret agent in the ordinary sense of the term as used in spy thrillers. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... Dean Martin in 1965 at a St. ... Spy and secret agent redirect here; for alternate use, see Spy (disambiguation) and Secret agent (disambiguation). ... Matt Helm, a fictional character created by author Donald Hamilton, is a U.S. government counteragent—a man whose primary job is to kill or nullify enemy agents—not a spy or secret agent in the ordinary sense of the term as used in spy thrillers. ...



Murderer's Row was the nickname given to the New York Yankees baseball team of the late 1920s, in particular the 1927 team. The term was actually coined in 1919 by a sportwriter to desribe the 1919 pre-Babe Ruth Yankee lineup, a team with quality hitters such as Frank Baker and Wally Pipp, and led the A.L. in home runs with 45. The term became revived for the Ruth, Lou Gehrig Yankee teams beginning in the mid-1920's, and was much more an appropriate term for this Yankee lineup (that produced some astounding offensive numbers) than for the earlier 1919 squad. The 1927 Yankees are recognized as one of the best teams in baseball history, alongside the Big Red Machine of the Cincinnati Reds. The New York Yankees are a Major League baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City. ... Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a defensive player called a pitcher and hit by an offensive player called a batter with a round, smooth stick called a bat. ... Sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or primarily in North America as the Roaring Twenties. // Events and trends Technology John T. Thompson invents Thompson submachine gun, also known as Tommy gun John Logie Baird invents the first working television system (1925) Charles Lindbergh becomes the first person to fly... 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George Herman Ruth, (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), better known as Babe Ruth and also commonly known by the nicknames The Bambino and The Sultan of Swat, was an American baseball player and United States national icon. ... Frank Home Run Baker (March 13, 1886 - June 28, 1963) was an American baseball player who played Major League Baseball from 1908 to 1922. ... Walter Clement Pipp (February 17, 1893 - January 11, 1965) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball, now best remembered as the man who lost his starting role to Lou Gehrig at the beginning of Gehrigs streak of 2,130 consecutive games. ... Henry Louis Gehrig, born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the New York Yankees and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939. ... The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


Owner Jacob Ruppert is the man most often credited for building the line-up of the team, although general manager Ed Barrow may have had as much to do with it. In a July series against the Washington Senators, the Yankees blasted their opponents 21-1 in one game and prompted Senators' first baseman Joe Judge to say, "Those fellows not only beat you but they tear your heart out. I wish the season was over." Jacob Ruppert (August 5, 1867-January 13, 1939), sometimes referred to as Jake Ruppert, was a National Guard colonel and brewery owner who went on to own the New York Yankees, building what has arguably been one of the best teams in baseball history. ... Edward Grant Barrow (May 10, 1868 - December 15, 1953) was an American manager and executive in Major League Baseball who guided the Boston Red Sox to the 1918 World Series title, then built the New York Yankees into baseballs premier franchise as their top executive from 1921 to 1945. ... The Washington Senators can refer to: The Washington Senators (officially named the Washington Nationals during the 1905–1956 seasons), an American League baseball team based in Washington, D.C. from 1901 to 1960. ...


The 1927 season was particularly spectacular by baseball standards for the Yankees. After losing in the 1926 World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals, the 1927 Yankee Stadium residents posted a record of 110 wins and 44 losses, one of the best records in baseball history. The team was nicknamed Murderer's Row because of their offense, including Babe Ruth's 60 home runs, 158 runs batted in (RBI), and .356 batting average; Lou Gehrig's 47 home runs, 175 RBI, and .373 batting average; and Earle Combs's 231 base hits. 1926 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... In baseball, the World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in North America, played in October after the end of the regular season between the pennant winner of the American League and the pennant winner of the National League. ... The St. ... Yankee Stadium is the home stadium of the New York Yankees, a major league baseball team. ... George Herman Ruth, (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), better known as Babe Ruth and also commonly known by the nicknames The Bambino and The Sultan of Swat, was an American baseball player and United States national icon. ... For other uses of the phrase see Home run (disambiguation) In baseball, a home run is a base hit in which the batter is able to circle all the bases, ending at home plate and scoring a run himself (along with a run for each runner who was already on... Henry Louis Gehrig, born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the New York Yankees and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939. ... Earle Bryan Combs (May 14, 1899 - July 12, 1976) was a Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and early 1930s. ...


Their pitching was also good, ranking first in the major leagues in lowest earned run average (ERA) that season. Waite Hoyt tied for the league lead in wins with 22, and Wilcy Moore somehow won 19 as a reliever. Three other Yankees pitchers had ERAs under 3.0 that season. Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... Waite Hoyt (September 9, 1899–August 25, 1984) was a baseball player and one of the dominant pitchers of the 1920s. ...


The 1927 Yankees won the American League pennant by one of the largest margins ever, 19 games. Then, they swept the Pittsburgh Pirates to win the World Series, and they repeated as World Series champion in 1928. The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The Pittsburgh Pirates are a Major League Baseball team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ...


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Fight the Death Penalty in USA (3591 words)
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Murderers' Row is the fifth book in the series, second in the series of films, and as with The Silencers, the book and the film share some common plot points even if the tone of the two works is light years apart.
Hamilton keeps Murderers' Row close enough to that same edge so that we never know if he's going to give Matt that final push or allow him to be snatched away from the brink at the last second.
Murderers' Row is not as good as The Silencers, but it's still a fun movie and fairly polished compared to the two films that would follow it.
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