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Encyclopedia > Munich
München
Munich
Coat of arms Location

Details
Administration
Country Flag of Germany Germany
State Bavaria
Admin. region Upper Bavaria
District Urban district
City subdivisions 25 boroughs
Lord Mayor Christian Ude (SPD)
Governing parties SPDGreens / Rosa Liste München
Basic statistics
Area 310.43 km² (119.9 sq mi)
Elevation 519 m  (1703 ft)
Population  1,348,650  (31/10/2007)[1]
 - Density 4,344 /km² (11,252 /sq mi)
 - Urban ~2,600,000
 - Metro ~6,000,000 
Founded 1158
Other information
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Licence plate M
Postal codes 80331–81929
Area code 089
Website www.muenchen.de

Coordinates: 48°8′0″N 11°34′0″E / 48.13333, 11.56667 Munich is the capital of the German federal state of Bavaria Munich (German: München) may also mean: The Munich district Munich air disaster, an air crash at Munich-Riem airport in February 1958 that killed several players and staff of Manchester United F.C. Munich Agreement, 1938 agreement between... Munich, Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple File links The following pages link to this file: Munich ... Image File history File links Muenchen_Kleines_Stadtwappen. ... Munichs coat of arms depict a young monk dressed in black holding a red book. ... Image File history File links Karte_Deutschland. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... A Regierungsbezirk is an government region of Germany, a subdivision of certain federal states (Bundesländer). ... Oberbayern (Upper Bavaria) is one of the seven administrative regions of Bavaria, Germany, located in the south of Bavaria, around the city Munich. ... There are 439 German districts (Kreise), administrative units in Germany. ... This is a list of urban districts in Germany. ... Since the administrative reform in 1992, Munich is divided into 25 boroughs: Source: muenchen. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... Christian Ude Christian Ude (born October 26, 1947 in Munich) is the current lord mayor of Munich. ... SPD redirects here. ... A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... SPD redirects here. ... The Alliance 90/The Greens (Bündnis 90/Die Grünen), the German Green party, is a political party in Germany whose regional predecessors were founded in the late 1970s as part of the new social movements. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Events January 11 - Vladislav II becomes King of Bohemia End of the formal reign of Emperor Go-Shirakawa of Japan, also the beginning of his cloistered rule, which will last to his death in 1192. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... German car number plates (Kfz-Kennzeichen) show the place where the car carrying them is registered. ... German Postleitzahl map of the first two digits Postal codes in Germany, Postleitzahl (plural Postleitzahlen, abbreviated to PLZ), consist of five digits, which indicate the wider area (first two digits), and the postal district (last three digits). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Munich (German: München, pronounced [ˈmʏnçən] listen ; Austro-Bavarian: Minga[2]) is the capital of the German state of Bavaria and a Gamma World City. There are, in fact, three locations in Bavaria known as "München" - the one referred to as "Munich", one northeast of Nuremberg, and one north of Passau.[3] Munich is located on the River Isar north of the Bavarian Alps. Image File history File links Munich_pronunciation_in_German. ... Subdivisions Northern Austro-Bavarian Central Austro-Bavarian Southern Austro-Bavarian Austro-Bavarian or Bavarian is an Upper Germanic language. ... Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... “World city” redirects here. ... Nürnberg redirects here. ... Passau (Latin: Batavis or Batavia, also Passavium; Italian: Passavia; Czech: Pasov) is a town in Niederbayern, Eastern Bavaria, Germany, known also as the Dreiflüssestadt (City of Three Rivers), because the Danube River is joined there by the Inn River from the South, and the Ilz River coming out of... The Isar is the third largest river in Bavaria, Germany. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Munich is Germany's third largest city after Berlin and Hamburg. The city has a population of 1.35 million and the Munich Metropolitan Region is home to around 4.65 million people.[4] For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... The Munich Metropolitan Region is one of eleven metropolitan regions in Germany, consisting of the agglomeration areas of Munich, Augsburg, Ingolstadt, Landshut, Rosenheim and Landsberg am Lech. ...


The city's motto was "Die Weltstadt mit Herz" ("The world city with heart") from 1972 to 2005, when it was replaced by "München mag dich" ("Munich likes you"). Its native name, München, stems from an Old German word predating the word Mönche of today's High German, meaning "Monks". Therefore, the figure on the city's coat-of-arms is a monk, and is referred to as the Münchner Kindl, the "child of Munich". Black and gold - the colors of the Holy Roman Empire - have been the city's official colors since the time of Ludwig the Bavarian. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Old German could refer to: Old High German Old Low German (also Old Saxon) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Subdivisions Central German Upper German High German (in German, Hochdeutsch) is any of several German dialects spoken in Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein, Switzerland, and Luxembourg (as well as in neighbouring portions of Belgium, France (Alsace), Italy, Poland, and Romania (Transylvania) and in some areas of former colonial settlement, for example in... A Roman Catholic monk A monk is a person who practices monasticism, adopting a strict religious and ascetic lifestyle, usually in community with others following the same path. ... Munichs coat of arms depict a young monk dressed in black holding a red book. ... Münchner Kindl is German for Munich child, the symbol on the coat-of-arms of the city Munich. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Emperor Louis IV Louis IV of Bavaria (also known as Ludwig the Bavarian) of the House of Wittelsbach (April 1, 1282 – October 11, 1347) was duke of Bavaria from 1294/1301 together with his brother Rudolf I, also count of the Palatinate until 1329 and, German king since 1314 and...

Contents

Geography

Munich lies on the elevated plains of Upper Bavaria, about 50 km north of the northern edge of the Alps, at an altitude of about 520 m. The local rivers are Isar and Würm. Munich is situated in the Northern Alpine Foreland. The northern part of this sandy plateau includes a highly fertile flint area which is no longer affected by the folding processes found in the Alps, while the southern part is covered by morainic hills. In between there are fields of fluvio-glacial out-wash, like around Munich. Wherever these deposits get thinner, the ground water can permeate the gravel surface and flood the area, leading to marshes as in the north of Munich. Oberbayern (Upper Bavaria) is one of the seven administrative regions of Bavaria, Germany, located in the south of Bavaria, around the city Munich. ... Alp redirects here. ... The Isar is the third largest river in Bavaria, Germany. ... For the glaciaton, go here The Würm is a river in Bavaria, Germany. ... This article is about the sedimentary rock. ... Very tight folds. ... This article is about geological phenomena. ... Groundwater is any water found below the land surface. ... This article is about marsh, a type of wetland. ...


Climate

Munich has a continental climate, strongly modified by the proximity of the Alps. The city's altitude and proximity to the northern edge of the Alps mean that precipitation is rather high. Rain storms often come violently and unexpectedly. The range of temperature between day and night or summer and winter can be extreme. A warm downwind from the Alps (a föhn wind) can change the temperatures completely within a few hours, even in the winter. Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. ... Alp redirects here. ... A foehn wind occurs when a deep layer of prevailing wind is forced over a mountain range. ...


Winters last from December to March. Munich experiences rather cold winters, but heavy rainfall is rarely seen in the winter. The coldest month is January with an average temperature of −2 °C (30 °F). Snow cover is seen for at least a couple of weeks during winter. Summers in Munich city are fairly warm with average temperature of 19 °C (70 °F) in the hottest month of July. The summers last from May until September.

Weather averages for Munich, Germany
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 2 (36) 3 (38) 8 (48) 11 (53) 17 (63) 20 (68) 22 (72) 22 (73) 18 (66) 12 (55) 6 (44) 3 (38) 12 (55)
Average low °C (°F) -4 (24) -3 (25) 0 (32) 2 (36) 6 (44) 10 (50) 12 (54) 12 (54) 8 (48) 4 (40) 0 (32) -2 (27) 3 (39)
Precipitation cm (inch) 4 (1.9) 4 (1.7) 5 (2.1) 7 (2.8) 10 (4.0) 12 (4.9) 12 (5.0) 11 (4.4) 8 (3.3) 6 (2.4) 5 (2.1) 5 (2.0) 92 (36.5)
Source: Weatherbase[5] Feb 2007

Demographics

Munich: St. Lukas and River Isar.
Munich: St. Lukas and River Isar.

In July 2007, Munich had 1.34 million inhabitants, 300,129 of whom did not hold German citizenship. The city has strong Turkish and Balkan communities. The largest groups of foreign nationals were Turks (43,309), Albanians (30,385), Croats (24,866), Serbs (24,439), Greek (22,486), Austrians (21,411), and Italians (20,847). 37% of foreign nationals come from the European Union. This article contains the Population Growth of Munich via tables and graphs. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 159 KB) Evangelisch-Lutherische Pfarrkirche St. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 159 KB) Evangelisch-Lutherische Pfarrkirche St. ... German citizenship is based primarily on the principle of Jus sanguinis. ... Balkan redirects here. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in...


With only 24,000 inhabitants in 1700, the population has doubled roughly every 30 years. For example, it had 100,000 people in 1852 and then 250,000 people in 1883; by 1901, the figure had doubled again to 500,000. Since then, Munich has become Germany's third largest city. In 1933, 840,901 inhabitants were counted and in 1957, Munich's population passed the 1 million mark.


39.5% of inhabitants are Roman Catholic and 14.2% Protestant (as of December 31 2005). Catholic Church redirects here. ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ...


History

Main article: History of Munich
Munich city coat of arms.
Munich city coat of arms.

Munich city coat-of-arms. ... Image File history File links Germany_München_Monks. ... Image File history File links Germany_München_Monks. ... Munichs coat of arms depict a young monk dressed in black holding a red book. ...

Origin and Middle Ages

The year 1158 is assumed to be the foundation date, which is only the earliest date the city is mentioned in a document. By that time the Guelph Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony and Bavaria, had built a bridge over the river Isar next to a settlement of Benedictine monks - this was on the Salt Route and a toll bridge. The possessions of the Guelfs in the days of Henry the Lion The House of Welf (or House of Guelph) is a European dynasty that has included many German and British monarchs from the 11th century until the 20th century. ... Henry the Lion (statue on his tomb in Brunswick Cathedral). ... The Duchy of Saxony was a medieval Duchy covering the greater part of Northern Germany. ... The following is a list of rulers during the history of Bavaria: // Around 548 the kings of the Franks placed the border region of Bavaria under the administration of a duke -- possibly Frankish or possibly chosen from amongst the local leading families -- who was supposed to act as a regional... For the college, see Benedictine College. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ...


Almost two decades later in 1175 Munich was officially granted city status and received fortification. In 1180, with the trial of Henry the Lion, Otto I Wittelsbach became Duke of Bavaria and Munich was handed over to the Bishop of Freising. Otto's heirs, the Wittlesbach dynasty would rule Bavaria until 1918. In 1240 Munich itself was transferred to Otto II Wittelsbach and in 1255, when the Duchy of Bavaria was split in two, Munich became the ducal residence of Upper Bavaria. Duke Otto I of Bavaria (1117, Kehlheim – 11 July 1183, Pfullendorf, (German: Otto I Wittelsbach , Herzog von Bayern), since 1180 Duke of Bavaria. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Munich and Freising — known in the German language as Erzbistum München und Freising and in Latin as Archidioecesis Monacensis et Frisingensis — is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Bavaria, Germany. ... The Wittelsbach family is an European royal family and a German dynasty from Bavaria. ... Duke Otto II of Bavaria was born 7 April 1206 in Kehlheim and died 29 November 1253 in Landshut. ... Oberbayern (Upper Bavaria) is one of the seven administrative regions of Bavaria, Germany, located in the south of Bavaria, around the city Munich. ...


Duke Louis IV was elected German king in 1314 and crowned as Holy Roman Emperor in 1328. He strengthened the city's position by granting it the salt monopoly, thus assuring it of additional income. In the late 15th century Munich underwent a revival of gothic arts - the Old Town Hall was enlarged, and a new cathedral - the Frauenkirche - constructed within only twenty years, starting in 1468. Emperor Louis IV Louis IV of Bavaria (also known as Ludwig the Bavarian) of the House of Wittelsbach (April 1, 1282 – October 11, 1347) was duke of Bavaria from 1294/1301 together with his brother Rudolf I, also count of the Palatinate until 1329 and, German king since 1314 and... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... The Western (Royal) Portal at Chartres Cathedral ( 1145). ... The Frauenkirche (full name Dom zu unserer lieben Frau, Cathedral of Our Blessed Lady) is the largest church in the Bavarian capital of Munich. ...


Capital of reunited Bavaria

Marienplatz, Munich about 1650.
Marienplatz, Munich about 1650.
Banners with the colors of Bavaria (right) and Munich (left) with the Frauenkirche in the background.
Banners with the colors of Bavaria (right) and Munich (left) with the Frauenkirche in the background.

When Bavaria was reunited in 1506 Munich became capital of the whole of Bavaria. The arts and politics became increasingly influenced by the court (see Orlando di Lasso, Heinrich Schuetz and later Mozart and Richard Wagner). During the 16th century Munich was a center of the German counter reformation, and also of renaissance arts. Duke Wilhelm V commissioned the Jesuit Michaelskirche, which became a center for the counter-reformation, and also built the Hofbräuhaus for brewing brown beer in 1589. The Catholic League was founded in Munich in 1609. In 1623 during the Thirty Years' War Munich became electoral residence when Maximilian I, Duke of Bavaria was invested with the electoral dignity but in 1632 the city was occupied by Gustav II Adolph of Sweden. When the bubonic plague broke out in 1634 and 1635 about one third of the population died. Under the regency of the Bavarian electors Munich was an important center of baroque life but also had to suffer under Habsburg occupations in 1704 and 1742. Image File history File links Marcktzumuenchen. ... Image File history File links Marcktzumuenchen. ... Altes Rathaus, the old city hall. ... The Munich flag, the Bavarian flag and the Frauenkirche. ... The Munich flag, the Bavarian flag and the Frauenkirche. ... The Frauenkirche (full name Dom zu unserer lieben Frau, Cathedral of Our Blessed Lady) is the largest church in the Bavarian capital of Munich. ... Orlande de Lassus, a. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... The Counter-Reformation (also Catholic Reformation[1][2] or Catholic Revival[2]) denotes the period of Catholic revival from the pontificate of Pope Pius IV in 1560 to the close of the Thirty Years War, 1648. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... William V, Duke of Bavaria. ... The former Jesuit church of St Michael in Munich is the largest Renaissance church north of the Alps. ... Hofbräuhaus (looking south) Logo of the brewery (seen from Bräuhausstraße) The Staatliches Hofbräuhaus in München (literally state court-brew of Munich, also Hofbräu München) is a brewery in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, owned by the state government. ... The Catholic League (German: ) was a confederation of Catholic German states formed in order to counteract the Protestant Union. ... Combatants Sweden  Bohemia Denmark-Norway[1] Dutch Republic France Scotland England Saxony  Holy Roman Empire Catholic League Austria Bavaria Spain Commanders Frederick V Buckingham Leven Gustav II Adolf â€  Johan Baner Cardinal Richelieu Louis II de Bourbon Vicomte de Turenne Christian IV of Denmark Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar Johann Georg I... Not to be confused with King Maximilian I of Bavaria (1756-1825), prince-elector of Bavaria (as Maximilian IV Joseph). ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Gustav II Adolph Gustav II Adolph (December 9, 1594 - November 6, 1632) (also known as Gustav Adolph the Great, under the Latin name Gustavus Adolphus or the Swedish form Gustav II Adolf) was a King of Sweden. ... The bubonic plague or bubonic fever is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis (Pasteurella pestis). ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ...


In 1806, the city became the capital of the new Kingdom of Bavaria, with the state's parliament (the Landtag) and the new archdiocese of Munich and Freising being located in the city. Twenty years later Landshut University was moved to Munich. Many of the city's finest buildings belong to this period and were built under the first three Bavarian kings. Later Prince Regent Luitpold's years as regent were marked by tremendous artistic and cultural activity in Munich (see Franz von Stuck and Der Blaue Reiter). Anthem Königsstrophe Kingdom of Bavaria within the German Empire. ... A Landtag (Diet) is a representative assembly or parliament in German speaking countries with some legislative authority. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Munich and Freising — known in the German language as Erzbistum München und Freising and in Latin as Archidioecesis Monacensis et Frisingensis — is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Bavaria, Germany. ... Main building of the Ludwig Maximilians University Main staircase of the university, Munich The Atrium at the main building The Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München), also known as LMU or simply University of Munich, is a university in the heart of Munich. ... Prince Regent Luitpold Luitpold, Prince Regent of Bavaria (German: Prinzregent Luitpold Karl Joseph Wilhelm Ludwig von Bayern) (12 March 1821—12 December 1912), was the regent and de facto ruler of Bavaria from 1886 to 1912, due to the incapacity of his nephews, Ludwig II and Otto. ... Franz Stuck (1863 - 1928), German symbolist/expressionist painter, was born at Tettenweis, in Bavaria, and received his artistic training at the Munich Academy. ... Cover of Der Blaue Reiter almanac. ...


World War I to World War II

Following the outbreak of World War I in 1914, life in Munich became very difficult, as the Allied blockade of Germany led to food and fuel shortages. During French air raids in 1916 three bombs fell on Munich. After World War I, the city was at the center of much political unrest. In November 1918 on the eve of revolution, Ludwig III and his family fled the city. After the murder of the first republican premier of Bavaria Kurt Eisner in February 1919 by Anton Graf von Arco-Valley, the Bavarian Soviet Republic was proclaimed. When Communists had taken power, Lenin, who had lived in Munich some years before, sent a congratulatory telegram, but the Soviet Republic was put down on May 3, 1919 by the Freikorps. While the republican government had been restored, Munich subsequently became a hotbed of right-wing politics, among which Adolf Hitler and the Nazis rose to prominence. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Ludwig III (Ludwig Leopold Joseph Maria Aloys Alfred), King of Bavaria, (January 7, 1845 – October 18, 1921) was the last King of Bavaria, reigning from 1913 to 1918. ... This is a list of the men who have served in the capacity of Prime Minister or equivalent office in Bavaria from the mid-18th century to the present: Count Franz Joseph von Berchem 1745-1777 Count Matthäus von Vieregg 1777-1799 Count Maximilian Joseph von Montgelas 1799-1817... Monument to Kurt Eisner on the sidewalk where he fell when he was assassinated in Munich. ... The Bavarian Soviet Republic (Bayrische Räterepublik) — also known as the Munich Soviet Republic (Münchner Räterepublik) — was a short-lived revolutionary government in the German state of Bavaria in 1919 that sought to replace the fledgling Weimar Republic in its early days. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Vladimir Ilyich Lenin ( Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Ле́нин  listen?), original surname Ulyanov (Улья́нов) ( April 22 (April 10 ( O.S.)), 1870 – January 21, 1924), was a Russian revolutionary, the leader of the Bolshevik party, the first Premier of the Soviet Union, and the founder of the ideology of Leninism. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The designation of Freikorps (German for Free Corps) was originally applied to voluntary armies. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ...

Bombing damage to the Altstadt. Note the roofless and pockmarked Altes Rathaus looking up the Tal. The roofless Heilig-Geist-Kirche is on the right of the photo. It's spire, without the copper top, is behind the church. The Talbruck gate tower is missing completely.
Bombing damage to the Altstadt. Note the roofless and pockmarked Altes Rathaus looking up the Tal. The roofless Heilig-Geist-Kirche is on the right of the photo. It's spire, without the copper top, is behind the church. The Talbruck gate tower is missing completely.

In 1923 Hitler and his supporters, who at that time were concentrated in Munich, staged the Beer Hall Putsch, an attempt to overthrow the Weimar Republic and seize power. The revolt failed, resulting in Hitler's arrest and the temporary crippling of the Nazi Party, which was virtually unknown outside Munich. The Beer Hall Putsch was a failed coup détat that occurred between the evening of Thursday, November 8 and the early afternoon of Friday, November 9, 1923, when the Nazi partys leader Adolf Hitler, the popular World War I General Erich Ludendorff, and other leaders of the Kampfbund... Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature... The National Socialist German Workers Party, (German: , or NSDAP, commonly known as the Nazi Party), was a political party in Germany between 1919 and 1945. ...


The city would once again become a Nazi stronghold when the Nazis took power in Germany in 1933. The Nazis created the first concentration camp at Dachau, 10 miles (16 km) north west of the city. Because of its importance to the rise of Nazism, the Nazis called Munich the Hauptstadt der Bewegung ("Capital of the Movement"). The NSDAP headquarters were in Munich and many Führerbauten ("Führer-buildings") were built around the Königsplatz, some of which have survived to this day. It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... The main entrance just after the liberation Memorial at the camp in 1997 Dachau was a Nazi German concentration camp, and the first one opened in Germany, located on the grounds of an abandoned munitions factory near the medieval town of Dachau, about 16 km (10 miles) northwest of Munich... The Nazi swastika The National Socialist German Workers Party (German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei), better known as the NSDAP or the Nazi Party was a political party that was led to power in Germany by Adolf Hitler in 1933. ... Propyläen at Königsplatz (errected as memorial for the accession of Otto of Greece) The Königsplatz (Kings square) is a square in the inner city of Munich and together with the Karolinenplatz a part of the Brienner Strasse, one of four royal avenues. ...


The city is known as the site of the culmination of the policy of appeasement employed by Britain and France leading up to World War II. It was in Munich that Neville Chamberlain assented to the annexation of Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland region into Greater Germany in the hopes of sating the desires of the Nazi Party.


Munich was the base of the White Rose (German: Die Weiße Rose), a group of students that formed a resistance movement from June 1942 to February 1943. The core members were arrested and executed following a distribution of leaflets in Munich University by Hans and Sophie Scholl. This article is about the German resistance movement. ... A resistance movement is a group or collection of individual groups, dedicated to fighting an invader in an occupied country or the government of a sovereign nation through either the use of physical force, or nonviolence. ... With approximately 48,000 students, the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München or LMU) is one of the largest universities in Germany. ... This article is about the German resistance movement. ...


The city was very heavily damaged by allied bombing during World War II - the city was hit by 71 air raids over a period of six years. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Postwar Munich

After American occupation in 1945, Munich was completely rebuilt following a meticulous and - by comparison to other war-ravaged German cities - rather conservative plan which preserved its pre-war street grid. In 1957 Munich's population passed the 1 million mark.


Munich was the site of the 1972 Summer Olympics, during which Israeli athletes were assassinated by Palestinian terrorists (see Munich massacre), when terrorist gunmen from the Palestinian "Black September" group took hostage members of the Israeli Olympic team. The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were held in Munich, West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... A Black September terrorist on a balcony in the Olympic Village in September 1972, during what became known as the Munich Massacre, in which 11 Israeli athletes were kidnapped and killed. ...

BMW Welt

Residents of Munich typically enjoy a high quality of life. Mercer HR Consulting consistently rates the city among the top 10 cities with highest quality of life worldwide - a 2007 survey ranked Munich as 8th.[6] The same company also ranks Munich as the world's 39th most expensive city to live in and the most expensive major city in Germany.[7] Munich enjoys a thriving economy, driven by the information technology, biotechnology, and publishing sectors. Environmental pollution is comparatively low, although as of 2006 the city council is concerned about levels of particulate matter (PM), especially along the city's major thoroughfares. Since the enactment of EU legislation concerning the concentration of particulate in the air, environmental groups such as Greenpeace have staged large protest rallies to urge the city council and the State government to take a harder stance on pollution.[citation needed] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... BMW Welt, October 17, 2007 The BMW Welt opened October 17, 2007. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Particulates, alternatively referred to as particulate matter (PM), aerosols or fine particles, are tiny particles of solid or liquid suspended in a gas. ... Particulates, alternatively referred to as particulate matter (PM), aerosols or fine particles, are tiny particles of solid or liquid suspended in a gas. ... Greenpeace protest against Esso / Exxon Mobil. ...


Public transport is very efficient with an extensive underground (U-Bahn) and suburban (S-Bahn) railway system. The crime rate is very low compared to other large German cities, such as Hamburg or Berlin.[8] This high quality of life and safety has caused the city to be nicknamed "Millionendorf", a mildly derogatory expression which means "village of a million people". For other uses, see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ...


Politics

Results of the elections for the city council 2008
Results of the elections for the city council 2008

Munich's current mayor is Christian Ude of the SPD (Social Democratic Party of Germany). Munich has a nearly unbroken history of SPD governments since World War II, which is remarkable because the rest of Bavaria is a conservative stronghold, with the CSU (Christian Social Union) winning absolute majorities among the Bavarian electorate in many elections at the communal, state, and federal levels. Christian Ude Christian Ude (born October 26, 1947 in Munich) is the current lord mayor of Munich. ... SPD redirects here. ... The Christian Social Union in Bavaria (CSU – ) is a conservative political party in Germany. ... Absolute majority is a supermajoritarian voting requirement which is stricter than a simple majority. ...


As capital of Bavaria, Munich is an important political centre in Germany and the seat of the Bavarian Landtag (the state parliament), the Staatskanzlei (the state chancellery) and of all state departments. The Landtag of Bavaria is Bavarias unicameral legislature. ...


Several national and international authorities are located in Munich, including the Bundesfinanzhof (the highest German tax court) and the European Patent Office. The Federal Finance Court (Bundesfinanzhof) is one of the five federal supreme courts of Germany. ... The European Patent Organisation (EPO or EPOrg in order to distinguish it from the European Patent Office, which is the main organ of the organisation) is an international organisation set up by the European Patent Convention. ...


Subdivisions

Main article: Boroughs of Munich

Munich is subdivided into 25 boroughs. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... Since the administrative reform in 1992, Munich is divided into 25 boroughs: Source: muenchen. ... Since the administrative reform in 1992, Munich is divided into 25 boroughs: Source: muenchen. ...


Architecture

New Town Hall steeple with Marian column
New Town Hall steeple with Marian column

New Town Hall steeple with Marian column Street art in Kaufingerstraße, near Marienplatz. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 373 KB) Summary Photograph taken Summer, 2005, by Benjamin Lipiecki Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 373 KB) Summary Photograph taken Summer, 2005, by Benjamin Lipiecki Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The plague Column of the Virgin Mary Immaculate in Kutná Hora, the Czech Republic, built between 1713 and 1715 Erecting religious monuments in the form of a column surmounted by a figure or a Christian symbol was a gesture of public faith that flourished in the Catholic countries of Europe...

The inner city

At the centre of the city is the Marienplatz - a large open square named after the Mariensäule (erected in gratefulness for deliveration from the plague), a Marian column in its centre - with the Old and the New Town Hall. Its tower contains the Rathaus-Glockenspiel. Three gates of the demolished medieval fortification have survived to this day - the Isartor in the east, the Sendlinger Tor in the south and the Karlstor in the west of the inner city. The Karlstor (destroyed during the Second World War and rebuilt afterwards) leads up to the Stachus, a grand square dominated by the Justizpalast (Palace of Justice) and a fountain. Altes Rathaus, the old city hall. ... The plague Column of the Virgin Mary Immaculate in Kutná Hora, the Czech Republic, built between 1713 and 1715 Erecting religious monuments in the form of a column surmounted by a figure or a Christian symbol was a gesture of public faith that flourished in the Catholic countries of Europe... The Rathaus-Glockenspiel of Munich is the most famous glockenspiel in the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

The Theatinerkirche
The Theatinerkirche

The Peterskirche close to Marienplatz is the oldest church of the inner city. It was first built during the Romanesque period, and was the focus of the early monastic settlement in Munich before the city's official foundation in 1158. Nearby St. Peter the Gothic hall-church Heiliggeistkirche (The Church of the Holy Ghost) was converted to baroque style from 1724 onwards and looks down upon the Viktualienmarkt, the most popular market of Munich. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... St Peters Church High Altar St. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... The Viktualienmarkt is a daily food market in the center of Munich The Viktualienmarkt developed from an original farmers’ market to a popular market for gourmets. ...


The Frauenkirche (Dom zu unserer Lieben Frau - Cathedral of Our Lady) is the most famous building in the city centre and serves as cathedral for the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising. The nearby Michaelskirche is the largest renaissance church north of the Alps, while the Theatinerkirche is a basilica in Italianate high baroque which had a major influence on Southern German baroque architecture. Its dome dominates the Odeonsplatz. Other baroque churches in the inner city which are worth a detour are the Bürgersaalkirche, the Dreifaltigkeitskirche, the St. Anna Damenstiftskirche and St. Anna im Lehel, the first rococo church in Bavaria. The Asamkirche was endowed and built by the Brothers Asam, pioneering artists of the rococo period. The Frauenkirche (full name Dom zu unserer lieben Frau, Cathedral of Our Blessed Lady) is the largest church in the Bavarian capital of Munich. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Munich and Freising — known in the German language as Erzbistum München und Freising and in Latin as Archidioecesis Monacensis et Frisingensis — is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Bavaria, Germany. ... The Michaelskirche in Munich The High Altar The former Jesuit church of St Michael in Munich is the largest Renaissance church north of the Alps. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... The Theatinerkirche in Munich. ... Look up basilica in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... A style of 18th century French art and interior design, Rococo style rooms were designed as total works of art with elegant and ornate furniture, small sculptures, ornamental mirrors, and tapestry complementing architecture, reliefs, and wall paintings. ... Asamkirche Munich The Asam Church St. ... Cosmas Damian Asam (September 29, 1686-May 10, 1739) was a painter and architect from Bavaria known for the Rococo style. ...


The large Residenz palace complex (begun in 1385) on the edge of Munich's Old Town ranks among Europe's most significant museums of interior decoration. Having undergone several extensions, it contains also the treasury and the splendid rococo Cuvilliés Theatre. Next door to the Residenz the neo-classical opera, the Nationaltheater was erected. The Residenz (German word for residence) in the city center of Munich, Bavaria is the former royal residence of the Bavarian Dukes, Electors and Kings. ... Schatzkammer in German translates as Treasury (Chamber/Vault). ... Cuvilliés-Theatre The Cuvilliés Theatre or Old Residence Theatre of the Residence in Munich was built from 1751 to 1753 by François de Cuvilles in rococo style. ... Munich, National Theatre The National Theatre or Nationaltheater München on Max-Joseph-Platz in Munich is an opera house and the home base of The Bayerische Staatsoper or Bavarian State Opera. ...


The royal avenues and squares

Munich, Ludwigstraße
Munich, Ludwigstraße

Four grand royal avenues of the 19th century with magnificent official buildings connect Munich's inner city with the suburbs: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 659 KB) Description: Ludwigstraße, München. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 659 KB) Description: Ludwigstraße, München. ...


The neoclassical Brienner Straße, starting at Odeonsplatz on the northern fringe of the Old Town close to the Residenz, runs from east to west and opens into the impressive Königsplatz, designed with the "Doric" Propyläen, the "Ionic" Glyptothek and the "Corinthian" State Museum of Classical Art, on its back side St. Boniface's Abbey was erected. The area around Königsplatz is home to the Kunstareal, Munich's gallery and museum quarter (as described below). Brienner Strasse The neoclassical Brienner Strasse in Munich is one of four royal avenues and was constructd in line with a draft from Karl von Fischer under the reign of Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria from 1812 onwards. ... Propyläen at Königsplatz (errected as memorial for the accession of Otto of Greece) The Königsplatz (Kings square) is a square in the inner city of Munich and together with the Karolinenplatz a part of the Brienner Strasse, one of four royal avenues. ... The Doric order was one of the three orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ... Architects first real look at the Greek Ionic order: Julien David LeRoy, Les ruines plus beaux des monuments de la Grèce Paris, 1758 (Plate XX) Ionic order: 1 - entablature, 2 - column, 3 - cornice, 4 - frieze, 5 - architrave or epistyle, 6 - capital (composed of abacus and volutes), 7 - shaft, 8... The Glyptothek is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures (hence Glypto-, from the Greek root glyphein, to carve). ... The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. ... Bavarian State Collection of Antiques The Staatliche Antikensammlung (State Collection of Antiques) in Munich is a museum for the Bavarian states antique collections for Greek, Etruscan and Roman art. ... St. ... The Kunstareal (art area) is a museum quarter in the city centre of Munich, Germany. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ...


Ludwigstraße also begins at Odeonsplatz and runs from south to north, skirting the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, the St. Louis church, the Bavarian State Library and numerous state ministries and palaces. The southern part of the avenue was constructed in Italian renaissance style while the north is strongly influenced by Italian Romanesque architecture. Ludwigstraße, Munich The Ludwigstrasse in Munich is one of the citys four royal avenues. ... Main building at the Geschwister-Scholl-Platz With approximately 48,000 students, the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München or LMU) is the second largest university in Germany (surpassed only by the University of Cologne). ... The Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (right) on Ludwigstraße, Munich The Bavarian State Library (German: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek), located in Munich, is the central library of the German state of Bavaria and one of the largest libraries in the German-speaking world. ...

Maximilianeum.
Maximilianeum.

The neo-Gothic Maximilianstraße starts at Max-Joseph-Platz, where the Residenz and the National Theatre are situated, and runs from west to east. The avenue is framed by neo-Gothic buildings which house, among others, the Schauspielhaus and the building of the district government of Upper Bavaria and the Museum of Ethnology. After crossing the river Isar, the avenue circles the Maximilianeum, home of the state parliament. The western portion of Maximilianstrasse is known for its designer shops, luxury boutiques, jewellery stores, and one of Munich's foremost five-star hotels, the Hotel Vier Jahreszeiten. Image File history File links Maximilianeum. ... Image File history File links Maximilianeum. ... Maximilianeum. ... The Munich Kammerspiele (German: Münchner Kammerspiele) is a successful German language theatre in Munich. ... The State Museum of Ethnology (Staatliches Museum für Völkerkunde) in Munich was founded in 1868, but its history started much earlier. ... The Landtag of Bavaria is Bavarias unicameral legislature. ...


Prinzregentenstraße runs parallel to Maximilianstraße and begins at Prinz-Carl-Palais. Many museums can be found along the avenue, such as the Haus der Kunst, the Bavarian National Museum and the Schackgalerie. The avenue crosses the Isar and circles the Friedensengel monument passing the Villa Stuck and Hitler's old apartment. The Prinzregententheater is at Prinzregentenplatz further to the east. Friedensengel in Prinzregentenstrasse The Prinzregentenstrasse in Munich is one of four royal avenues and runs parallel to Maximilianstrasse and begins at Prinz-Carl-Palais, in the northeastern part of the Old Town. ... The Prinz Carl Palais in Munich is a mansion built in the style of early Neoclassicism in 1804-1806. ... The Haus der Kunst (literally House of Art) is an art museum in Munich, Germany. ... The Bavarian National Museum in Munich is one of the most important cultural history museums in Europe. ... The Schackgalerie is a museum in Munich. ... Prinzregententheater The Prinzregententheater is a theatre and opera house in Munich. ...


Other boroughs

Nymphenburg.
Nymphenburg.

Two large baroque palaces in Nymphenburg and Oberschleißheim are reminders of Bavaria's royal past. Schloss Nymphenburg (Nymphenburg Palace), some 6 km north west of the city centre, is surrounded by an impressive park and is considered to be one of Europe's most beautiful royal residences. 2 km north west of Nymphenburg Palace is Schloss Blutenburg (Blutenburg Castle), an old ducal country seat with a late-Gothic palace church. Schloss Fürstenried (Fürstenried Palace), a baroque palace of similar structure to Nymphenburg but of much smaller size, was contemporaneously erected in the south west of Munich. The second large baroque residence is Schloss Schleißheim (Schleissheim Palace), located in the suburb of Oberschleissheim, a palace complex encompassing three separate residences: Altes Schloss Schleißheim (the old palace), Neues Schloss Schleißheim (the new palace) and Schloss Lustheim (Lustheim Palace). Most parts of the palace complex serve as museums and art galleries. Deutsches Museum's Flugwerft Schleißheim flight exhibition centre is located nearby, on the Schleißheim Special Landing Field. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1522x993, 166 KB) Description: Schloss Nymphenburg, München. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1522x993, 166 KB) Description: Schloss Nymphenburg, München. ... View from the Park The Nymphenburg Palace (German: Schloss Nymphenburg) is a Baroque palace in Munich, Bavaria, Germany. ... Blutenburg Castle. ... Fürstenried Palace is a baroque palace in the southwest of Munich, Germany. ... The Schleissheim Palace (German: Schloss Schleißheim) comprises actually three palaces in a grand baroque park in the village of Oberschleißheim near Munich, Bavaria, Germany. ... Oberschleißheim is a municipality in the district of Munich, in Bavaria, Germany. ... Deutsches Museum The Deutsches Museum (German Museum) in Munich, Germany, is the worlds largest museum of technology and science, with approximately 1. ...


St Michael in Berg am Laim might be the most remarkable church out of the inner city. Most of the boroughs have parish churches which originate from the Middle Ages like the most famous church of pilgrimage in Munich St Mary in Ramersdorf. The oldest church within the city borders is Heilig Kreuz in Fröttmaning next to the Allianz-Arena, known for its Romanesque fresco. St. ...

Highlight Towers
Highlight Towers

Especially in its suburbs Munich features a wide and diverse array of modern architecture, although strict height limitations for buildings have limited the construction of skyscrapers. Most high-rise buildings are clustered at the northern edge of Munich in the skyline, like the Hypo-Haus, the Arabella High-Rise Building, the Highlight Towers, Uptown Munich, Münchner Tor and the BMW Headquarters next to the Olympic Park. Several other high-rise buildings are located near the city center and on the Siemens campus in southern Munich. A landmark of modern Munich is also the architecture of the sport stadiums (as described below). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 449 KB) de: Beschreibung: Highlight Tower 1 + 2 in München Quelle: private Fotografie Fotograf/Zeichner: sMike Datum der Aufnahme: 23. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 449 KB) de: Beschreibung: Highlight Tower 1 + 2 in München Quelle: private Fotografie Fotograf/Zeichner: sMike Datum der Aufnahme: 23. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... The Arabella High-Rise Building is a high-rise residential building with 23 floors, built from 1966 to 1969, in Munich, Germany. ... BMW headquarters in Munich, Germany is one of the few buildings built from top to bottom. ... Siemens redirects here. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ...

Hofgarten with the dome of the state chancellery near the Residenz.
Hofgarten with the dome of the state chancellery near the Residenz.

In Giesing is the former McGraw Kaserne, a former U.S. army base, near Stadelheim Prison. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2514x1885, 2040 KB) en: Hofgartentempel in Munich, Germany. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2514x1885, 2040 KB) en: Hofgartentempel in Munich, Germany. ... The Residenz (German word for residence) in the city center of Munich, Bavaria is the former royal residence of the Bavarian Dukes, Electors and Kings. ... Stadelheim Prison in Munich is one of the largest jails in Germany. ...


The parks

Munich is a green city with numerous parks. The Englischer Garten, close to the city centre and covering an area of 3.7 km², is one of the world's largest urban public parks, and contains a nudist area, jogging tracks and bridle-paths. It was devised and laid out by Benjamin Thompson, Count of Rumford, an American, for both pleasure and as work area for the city's vargants and homeless. Nowadays it is entirely a park with a Biergarten at the Chinese Pagoda. The Monopteros at dusk The Englischer Garten or English Garden is a large urban public park that stretches from the city center to the northeastern city limits of Munich, Germany. ... A nudist sunning herself on a beach in Formentera. ... For other persons named Benjamin Thompson, see Benjamin Thompson (disambiguation). ... A beer garden (or in the German language, Biergarten) is an open-air drinking establishment that originated in Bavaria, where beer gardens in general are distinguished from traditional beer gardens today. ...


Other large green spaces are the modern Olympiapark and Westpark as well as the parks of Nymphenburg Palace (with the Botanical Garden to the north), and Schleissheim Palace. The city's oldest park is the Hofgarten, near the Residenz, and dating back to the 16th century. Most known for the largest beergarden in the town is the former royal Hirschgarten, founded in 1780 for deer which still live there. Partial view of The Olympiapark (a view down of the Olympiaturm to the Olympic Stadium, on the right: Olympia Halle, left: Schwimmhalle ) The Olympiapark in Munich, Germany, is an Olympic Park which was constructed for the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... Westpark in Munich The Westpark is a large urban public park in Munich, Germany. ... View from the Park The Nymphenburg Palace (German: Schloss Nymphenburg) is a Baroque palace in Munich, Bavaria, Germany. ... The Schleissheim Palace (German: Schloss Schleißheim) comprises actually three palaces in a grand baroque park in the village of Oberschleißheim near Munich, Bavaria, Germany. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The city's zoo is the Tierpark Hellabrunn near the Flaucher Island in the Isar in the south of the city. Another notable park is Ostpark, located in Perlach-Ramersdorf area which houses the swimming area, Michaelibad, one of the largest in Munich. A zoo. ... Tierpark Hellabrunn is the name of the zoological garden in the Bavarian capital Munich. ...


Sports

Olympiasee in Olympiapark, Munich
Olympiasee in Olympiapark, Munich
Allianz Arena
Allianz Arena

Munich is home to several professional football (soccer) teams, including Germany's most popular club, FC Bayern Munich and 1860 Munich. The Munich area currently has two teams in the Bundesliga system, which comprises the two top divisions of German football. The city's hockey club is EHC Munich. // Main article: Football in Munich Munich is the most successful city in Bundesliga history. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 1280 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Olympia Park - Munich, September 2007 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 1280 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Olympia Park - Munich, September 2007 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Partial view of The Olympiapark (a view down of the Olympiaturm to the Olympic Stadium, on the right: Olympia Halle, left: Schwimmhalle ) The Olympiapark in Munich, Germany, is an Olympic Park which was constructed for the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... Download high resolution version (1508x781, 465 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1508x781, 465 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Wikinews has related news: 2007/08 Bundesliga: Bayern Munich vs. ... TSV München von 1860, commonly known as 1860 Munich is a German sports club based in Munich, Bavaria. ... The Bundesliga is the highest level of Germanys football league system. ... Football is a popular sport in Germany. ... Eishockeyclub München aka EHC München is the professional ice hockey team in Munich, Germany. ...


Munich has also hosted the Munich Summer Olympics in 1972 and was one of the host cities for the 2006 World Cup which was not held in Munich's Olympic Stadium but in a new soccer specific stadium, the Allianz Arena. The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were held in Munich, West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... 2006 World Cup redirects here. ... At the heart of the Olympiapark München in northern Munich, the Olympiastadion was the main venue for the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... Columbus Crew Stadium opened in 1999 as the first of a growing number of North American stadiums built for soccer Soccer-specific stadium (SSS) is a term used mainly in the United States and Canada. ... Allianz Arena The Allianz Arena is a football stadium located in the north-Munich district of Fröttmaning. ...


Culture

Museums

The Deutsches Museum, located on an island in the Isar, is one of the oldest and largest science museums in the world. Three redundant exhibition buildings which are under a protection order were converted to house the Verkehrsmuseum, which houses the land transport collections of the Deutsches Museum. Deutsches Museum's Flugwerft Schleißheim flight exhibition centre is located nearby, on the Schleißheim Special Landing Field. Several non-centralised museums (many of those are public collections at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität) show the expanded state collections of palaeontology, geology, mineralogy,[9] zoology, botany and anthropology. Deutsches Museum The Deutsches Museum (German Museum) in Munich, Germany, is the worlds largest museum of technology and science, with approximately 1. ... The Paläontologische Museum München (Palaeontological Museum Munich) is a German national natural history museum situated in Munich, Bavaria. ...

The city has several important art galleries, most of which can be found in the Kunstareal, including the Alte Pinakothek, the Neue Pinakothek, and the Pinakothek der Moderne. Alte Pinakothek's rather monolithic structure contains a treasure trove of the works of European masters between the 14th and 18th centuries. The collection reflects the eclectic tastes of the Wittelsbachs over four centuries, and is sorted by schools over two sprawling floors. Major displays include Albrecht Dürer's Christ-like Self-Portrait, his Four Apostles, Raphael's paintings The Canigiani Holy Family and Madonna Tempi as well as Peter Paul Rubens two-storey-high Judgment Day. The gallery houses one of the world's most comprehensive Rubens collections. Before World War I, the Blaue Reiter group of artists worked in Munich. Many of their works can now be seen at the Lenbachhaus. An important collection of Greek and Roman art is held in the Glyptothek and the Staatliche Antikensammlung (State Antiquities Collection). King Ludwig I managed to acquire such famous pieces as the Medusa Rondanini, the Barberini Faun and the figures from the Temple of Aphaea on Aegina for the Glyptothek. The Kunstareal will be further augmented by the completion of the Egyptian Museum. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 475 KB) The Glyptothek is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures (hence Glypto-, from the Greek root glyphein, to carve). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 475 KB) The Glyptothek is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures (hence Glypto-, from the Greek root glyphein, to carve). ... The Glyptothek is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures (hence Glypto-, from the Greek root glyphein, to carve). ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... The Kunstareal (art area) is a museum quarter in the city centre of Munich, Germany. ... The Alte Pinakothek (Old Pinakothek) is an art museum situated in the Kunstareal in Munich, Germany. ... The Neue Pinakothek (New Pinakothek) is an art museum in Munich, Germany. ... The Pinakothek der Moderne is a modern art museum, situated in the city centre of Munich, Germany. ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced /al. ... This article is about the Renaissance artist. ... The Canigiani Holy Family or Canigiani Madonna is a painting by the Italian High Renaissance artist Raphael. ... The Tempi Madonna is an oil painting by the Italian [[High Renaissance painter Raphael. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Cover of Der Blaue Reiter almanac. ... The Lenbachhaus was errected as villa for the painter Franz von Lenbach and is an art museum of the city of Munich, Germany. ... The Glyptothek is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures (hence Glypto-, from the Greek root glyphein, to carve). ... Bavarian State Collection of Antiques The Staatliche Antikensammlung (State Collection of Antiques) in Munich is a museum for the Bavarian states antique collections for Greek, Etruscan and Roman art. ... For other uses, see Medusa (disambiguation). ... The statue known as the Barberini Faun or Sleeping Satyr is 215 cm long and made from marble. ... The Temple of Aphaia (or Aphaea) is located within a sanctuary complex dedicated to the goddess Aphaia on the Greek island of Aigina, which lies in the Saronic Gulf. ... Aegina (Greek: Αίγινα (Egina)) is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 31 miles (50 km) from Athens. ... The Kunstareal (art area) is a museum quarter in the city centre of Munich, Germany. ... An obelisk at the museum. ...


The famous gothic Morris dancers of Erasmus Grasser are exhibited in the Munich City Museum in the old gothic arsenal building in the inner city. Cotswold morris with handkerchiefs A morris dance is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied with music. ... One of 16 (now 10) Morris Dancers by Erasmus Grasser, Munich, 1480. ...


Another area for the arts next to the Kunstareal is the Lehel quarter between the old town and the river Isar: The State Museum of Ethnology in Maximilianstrasse is the second largest collection in Germany of artifacts and objects from outside Europe, while the Bavarian National Museum and the adjoining State Archeological Collections in Prinzregentenstrasse rank among Europe's major art and cultural history museums. The nearby Schackgalerie is an important gallery of German 19th century paintings. Altstadt and Lehel are districts of the German city of Munich. ... The State Museum of Ethnology (Staatliches Museum für Völkerkunde) in Munich was founded in 1868, but its history started much earlier. ... The Bavarian National Museum in Munich is one of the most important cultural history museums in Europe. ... The Schackgalerie is a museum in Munich. ...


The Dachau concentration camp is just a few kilometers outside the city. The main entrance just after the liberation Memorial at the camp in 1997 Dachau was a Nazi German concentration camp, and the first one opened in Germany, located on the grounds of an abandoned munitions factory near the medieval town of Dachau, about 16 km (10 miles) northwest of Munich...


Arts and literature

Munich is a major European cultural centre and the domain of many prominent composers including Orlando di Lasso, W.A. Mozart, Carl Maria von Weber, Richard Wagner, Gustav Mahler, Richard Strauss, Max Reger and Carl Orff. With the Biennale, founded by Hans Werner Henze the city still contributes to modern music theatre. Orlande de Lassus, a. ... W. A. Mozart, 1790 portrait by Johann Georg Edlinger Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) is among the most popular, significant and influential composers of European classical music. ... Carl Maria von Weber Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst, Freiherr von Weber (November 18, 1786 in Eutin, Holstein – June 5, 1826 in London, England) was a German composer, conductor, pianist and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romantic school. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Johann Baptist Joseph Maximilian Reger (March 19, 1873 – May 11, 1916) was a German composer, organist, pianist and teacher. ... Carl Orff Carl Orff (July 10, 1895) – March 29, 1982) was a 20th-century German composer, most famous for Carmina Burana (1937). ... Hans Werner Henze (born July 1, 1926 in Gütersloh, Westphalia, Germany) is a composer well known for his left-wing political beliefs. ...

Nationaltheater
Nationaltheater

The Nationaltheater where several of Richard Wagner's operas had their premieres under the patronage of Ludwig II of Bavaria is the home of the Bavarian State Opera and the Bavarian State Orchestra. Next door the modern Residenz Theatre was erected in the building that had housed the Cuvilliés Theatre before World War II. Many operas were staged there, including the premiere of Mozart's "Idomeneo" in 1781. The Gärtnerplatz Theatre is a ballet and musical state theatre while another opera house the Prinzregententheater has become the home of the Bavarian Theatre Academy. The modern Gasteig center houses the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra. The third orchestra in Munich with international importance is the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. Its primary concert venue is the Herkulesaal in the Residenz. A stage for shows, big events and musicals is the Deutsche Theater. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 578 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 722 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) München, Germany: Nationaltheater (home to the Bavarian State Opera), Max-Joseph-Platz Auditorium with Royal Box Photo: Andreas Praefcke, 2003 File historyClick on a date... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 578 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 722 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) München, Germany: Nationaltheater (home to the Bavarian State Opera), Max-Joseph-Platz Auditorium with Royal Box Photo: Andreas Praefcke, 2003 File historyClick on a date... Munich, National Theatre The National Theatre or Nationaltheater München on Max-Joseph-Platz in Munich is an opera house and the home base of The Bayerische Staatsoper or Bavarian State Opera. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm II, King of Bavaria (August 25, 1845 – June 13, 1886) was king of Bavaria from 1864 until shortly before his death. ... Munich, National Theatre The Bayerische Staatsoper or Bavarian State Opera is an opera company in Munich and is one of the leading opera companies in Germany and the world and has existed since 1653. ... Munich, National Theatre The Bayerische Staatsoper or Bavarian State Opera is an opera company in Munich and is one of the leading opera companies in Germany and the world and has existed since 1653. ... Residenztheater The Residence Theatre (German: Residenztheater) or New Residence Theatre ( Neues Residenztheater) of the Residence in Munich was built from 1950 to 1951 by Karl Hocheder. ... Cuvilliés-Theatre The Cuvilliés Theatre or Old Residence Theatre of the Residence in Munich was built from 1751 to 1753 by François de Cuvilles in rococo style. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... Staatstheater am Gärtnerplatz (The State Theatre on the Gärtnerplatz) is an opera house and opera company in Munich. ... Prinzregententheater The Prinzregententheater is a theatre and opera house in Munich. ... Main entrance of the Gasteig Gasteig is a cultural center in Munich, which hosts the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra. ... The Munich Philharmonic Orchestra (German: Münchner Philharmoniker) is one of three orchestras located in the city of Munich, along with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and the Bavarian State Orchestra. ... The Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra in Munich was founded in 1949 by Eugen Jochum, he was also principal conductor until 1960. ...


Next to the Bavarian Staatsschauspiel in the Residenz Theatre (Residenztheater), the Munich Kammerspiele in the Schauspielhaus is one of the most important German language theatres in the world. Since Gotthold Ephraim Lessing's premieres in 1775 many important writers have staged their plays in Munich such as Christian Friedrich Hebbel, Henrik Ibsen and Hugo von Hofmannsthal. The Munich Kammerspiele (German: Münchner Kammerspiele) is a successful German language theatre in Munich. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Gotthold Ephraim Lessing (22 January 1729 – 15 February 1781), writer, philosopher, publicist, and art critic, was one of the most outstanding German representatives of the Enlightenment era. ... Christian Friedrich Hebbel ( March 18, 1813 – December 13, 1863), was a German poet and dramatist. ... Ibsen redirects here. ... Hugo von Hofmannsthal Hugo von Hofmannsthal (February 1, 1874 – July 15, 1929), was an Austrian novelist, librettist, poet, dramatist, narrator, and essayist. ...


Prominent literary figures worked in Munich especially during the final centuries of the Kingdom of Bavaria such as Paul Heyse, Rainer Maria Rilke and Frank Wedekind. The period immediately before World War I saw particular economic and cultural prominence for the city. Munich, and especially its suburb of Schwabing, became the domicile of many artists and writers. Thomas Mann who also lived there wrote in his novella Gladius Dei about this period "Munich shone". Munich remained a center of cultural life also during the Weimar period, as figures such as Lion Feuchtwanger, Bertolt Brecht and Oskar Maria Graf were active. In 1919 the Bavaria Film Studios were founded. Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse (March 15, 1830 - April 2, 1914) was a German author. ... Rainer Maria Rilke (4 December 1875 – 29 December 1926) is considered one of the German languages greatest 20th century poets. ... Benjamin Franklin Wedekind (July 24, 1864 - March 9, 1918) was a German playwright. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Schwabing is a neighborhood in the northern part of Munich, the capital of the German state of Bavaria. ... For other persons named Thomas Mann, see Thomas Mann (disambiguation). ... Lion Feuchtwanger (pseudonym: J.L. Wetcheek) (7 July 1884 - 21 December 1958) was a German-Jewish novelist who was imprisoned in a French internment camp in Les Milles and later escaped to Los Angeles with the help of his wife, Marta. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... Oskar Maria Graf (born July 22, 1894 in Berg, Bavaria ; died June 28, 1967 in New York) was a German author. ... The Bavaria Film Studios in Geiselgasteig, a district of Munichs suburb Grünwald, Bavaria belongs to Europes biggest and most famous movie production studios. ...


Munich had already become an important place for painters like Carl Rottmann, Lovis Corinth, Wilhelm von Kaulbach, Carl Spitzweg, Franz von Lenbach, Franz von Stuck and Wilhelm Leibl when Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), a group of expressionist artists, was established in Munich in 1911. The city was a home the Blue Rider's painters Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Alexej von Jawlensky, Gabriele Münter, Franz Marc, August Macke and Alfred Kubin. Inntal bei Neubeuern, 1823. ... Self-portrait with skeleton, 1896. ... Wilhelm von Kaulbach (October 15, 1805 - April 7, 1874) was a German painter. ... The Poor Poet, 1839. ... Franz von Lenbach, Portrait of his daughter Marion. ... Franz Stuck (1863 - 1928), German symbolist/expressionist painter, was born at Tettenweis, in Bavaria, and received his artistic training at the Munich Academy. ... Wilhelm Leibl and Sperl on the hunt, 1890-1895. ... Cover of Der Blaue Reiter almanac. ... “Klee” redirects here. ... Wassily Kandinsky (Russian: Василий Кандинский, first name pronounced as [vassi:li]) (December 16 [O.S. December 4] 1866 – December 13, 1944) was a Russian painter, printmaker and art theorist. ... Artists in Munich 1914: (from left) Alexej von Jawlensky, Clotilde von Derp, Marianne von Werefkin, Alexander Sacharoff Alexej Georgewitsch von Jawlensky (?March 13, 1864 – March 15, 1941) was a Russian expressionist painter active in Germany. ... Gabrielle Münter (1877 - 1962) was a German expressionist painter who was at the forefront of the Munich avant-garde in the early 20th century. ... Franz Marc (February 8, 1880 – March 4, 1916) was one of the principal painters and printmakers of the German Expressionist movement. ... August Macke. ... Alfred Leopold Isidor Kubin (April 10, 1877 - August 20, 1959) was an Austrian expressionist illustrator and occasional writer of Czech ancestry. ...


Hofbräuhaus and Oktoberfest

Main article: Oktoberfest For the beer, see Pale lager#Oktoberfestbier. ...

Oktoberfest (2003).
Oktoberfest (2003).

The Hofbräuhaus am Platzl, arguably the most famous beer hall worldwide, is located in the city centre. It also operates the second largest tent at the Oktoberfest, one of Munich's most famous attractions. For two weeks, the Oktoberfest, attracts millions of people visiting its beer tents ("Bierzelte") and fairground attractions. The Oktoberfest was first held on October 12, 1810 in honor of the marriage of crown prince Ludwig to Princess Therese von Sachsen-Hildburghausen. The festivities were closed with a horse race and in the following years the horse races were continued and later developed into what is now known as the Oktoberfest. Despite its name, most of Oktoberfest occurs in September. It always finishes on the first Sunday in October unless the German national holiday on 3 October ("Tag der deutschen Einheit" - Day of German Unity) is a Monday or Tuesday - then the Oktoberfest remains open for these days. Image File history File links BeergartenenMunich. ... Image File history File links BeergartenenMunich. ... Hofbräuhaus (looking south) Logo of the brewery (seen from Bräuhausstraße) The Staatliches Hofbräuhaus in München (literally state court-brew of Munich, also Hofbräu München) is a brewery in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, owned by the state government. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Oktoberfest1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Oktoberfest1. ... For the beer, see Pale lager#Oktoberfestbier. ... The Hofbräuhaus am Platzl is a beer hall in the city center of Munich, Germany. ... For the beer, see Pale lager#Oktoberfestbier. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Ludwig I (or Louis I, which is the French form of his name, his godfather was Louis XVI of France) (Strasbourg, August 25, 1786 – February 29, 1868 in Nice) was king of Bavaria from 1825 until the 1848 revolutions in the German states. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Culinary specialities

Weißwürste with sweet mustard and a Breze (pretzel).
Weißwürste with sweet mustard and a Breze (pretzel).

The Weißwürste ('white sausages'), traditionally eaten only before 12 p.m. (when there were no refrigerators they used to be best until that time), often served with sweet mustard and freshly baked Brezen (pretzels) are a Munich speciality, as is Leberkäs, Bavarian baked sausage loaf often served with potato salad. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1400x1200, 205 KB) en Description: Weisswurst with sweet mustard (Second breakfast in Bavaria) Source: self-made Author: Thomas S. de Beschreibung: Weißwurst Quelle: selbst fotografiert Fotograf: Thomas S. 00:08, 14. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1400x1200, 205 KB) en Description: Weisswurst with sweet mustard (Second breakfast in Bavaria) Source: self-made Author: Thomas S. de Beschreibung: Weißwurst Quelle: selbst fotografiert Fotograf: Thomas S. 00:08, 14. ... Weißwurst (literally white sausage) is a traditional Bavarian sausage made from very finely minced veal and fresh pork bacon. ... This article is about the baked snack. ...


The most famous soup might be the Leberknödel Soup. Leberknödel is a bread dumpling seasoned with liver and onions.


Schweinebraten (pot roasted pork) with Knödel (dumplings made from potatoes and/or white bread) and Kraut (cabbage) or a Schweinshaxe (pork knuckle) are served as lunch or dinner. Beuscherl, a plate of lung, heart and spleen is also served with dumplings.


Popular as dessert is the Apfelstrudel apple strudel with vanilla sauce, the Millirahmstrudel a cream cheese strudel, Dampfnudeln (yeast dumplings served with custard) or Auszogene, a fried pastry shaped like a large donut but without a hole. Not forgetting the famous Prinzregententorte created in honour of the prince regent Luitpold. Apfelstrudel A strudel is a type of pastry that originated in Germany and Austria and is most often associated with Austrian and German cuisine. ... Luitpold (1821 - 1912) was a German Bavarian administrator. ...


Some specialities are typical cold dishes served in beergardens: Obatzda is a Bavarian cheese delicacy, a savoury blend of smashed mellow camembert prepared with cream cheese, cut onions and spicy paprika (and sometimes some butter). It's often served in the beergardens as well as Radi (radish), white radish cut in thin slices and salted, and Münchner Wurstsalat, Munich's famous sausage salad with thinly sliced Knackwurst marinated in vinegar and oil with onions on a bed of lettuce. Popular grilled meals include Steckerlfisch is a local fish, such as trout or whitefish, speared on a wooden stick, grilled and smoked on charcoal - the typical feature is the crispy skin. Another classic is A hoibs Hendl (half a grilled chicken). A Maß (die Maß) is a litre of beer, a Radler consists of half beer and half lemonade. A beer garden (or in the German language, Biergarten) is an open-air drinking establishment that originated in Bavaria, where beer gardens in general are distinguished from traditional beer gardens today. ... Obatzda is a Bavarian cheese delicacy. ... This article is about the vegetable. ... Hendl is German, or rather, Bavarian for chicken, mainly in its roasted form. ...


Local beers brewed in Munich

Munich is famous for its breweries and the Weißbier (or Weizenbier, wheat beer) is a speciality from Bavaria. Helles with its translucent gold colour is the most popular Munich beer today, although it’s not very old (only introduced in 1895). Helles and Pils have almost ousted the Munich Dark Beer (Dunkles), which gets its dark colour from burnt malt, the most popular beer in Munich within the 19th century. Starkbier is the strongest Munich beer, containing 6–9 percent alcohol. It is dark amber and has a heavy malty taste. It is available and popular during the Lenten Starkbierzeit (strong beer season), which begins on or before St. Joseph’s Day (March 19th). There are around 20 major beer gardens, with four of the most famous and popular being located in the Englischer Garten and the largest one in the Hirschgarten. It has been suggested that Kristall Weissbier be merged into this article or section. ... Helles is a Bavarian style beer, a type of lager, and the most popular beer in Munich. ... Pilsener or pilsner is a type of lager beer. ... Dunkel (or dunkles) is a style of dark German lager beer. ... A beer garden (or in the German language, Biergarten) is an open-air drinking establishment that originated in Bavaria, where beer gardens in general are distinguished from traditional beer gardens today. ... The Monopteros at dusk The Englischer Garten or English Garden is a large urban public park that stretches from the city center to the northeastern city limits of Munich, Germany. ...

Augustiner Bräu is a brewery located in Munich, Germany. ... Hacker-Pschorr Brewery was founded in Munich, Germany in 1417, 99 years before the enactment of the Reinheitsgebot Purity Law of 1516. ... Hofbräuhaus (looking south) Logo of the brewery (seen from Bräuhausstraße) The Staatliches Hofbräuhaus in München (literally state court-brew of Munich, also Hofbräu München) is a brewery in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, owned by the state government. ... Löwenbräu can Löwenbräu is a brewery in Munich that produces a traditional Munich-style beer. ... Paulaner is a German brewery, one of the six official breweries of Munich. ... Spaten Brewery is a Munich brewery now owned by Spaten-Löwenbräu-Gruppe. ...

Markets

The Viktualienmarkt is Munich's most popular market for fresh food and delicatessen. A very old feature of Munich's Fasching (carnival) is the dance of the Marktfrauen (market women) of the Viktualienmarkt in comical costumes. The Viktualienmarkt is a daily food market in the center of Munich The Viktualienmarkt developed from an original farmers’ market to a popular market for gourmets. ...


The Auer Dult is held three times a year on the square around Mariahilf church and is one of Munich's oldest markets, well known for its jumble sale and antiques. Mariahilf Church The Auer Dult is a traditional annual market in Munich, Germany, taking place three times per year on the Mariahilfplatz in the Munich district of Au. ...


Three weeks before Christmas the Christkindlmarkt opens at Marienplatz and other squares in the city, selling Christmas goods. In many towns in southern Germany, Advent is usually ushered in with the opening of the town Christmas Markets, often also called Christkindlmarkt or Christkindlesmarkt (Ger. ...


Nightlife in Munich

Nightlife in Munich is thriving with over 6,000 licensed establishments in the city, especially in Schwabing, which is still the main quarter for students and artists. Some notable establishments are: the touristy Hofbräuhaus, one of the oldest breweries in Munich, located in the city center near Tal; Kultfabrik and Optimolwerke, former industrial areas converted to host many different discos and pubs; Munich's gay quarter is in Isarvorstadt, surrounding the Staatstheater am Gärtnerplatz, also known as the Glockenbachviertel. Nightlife is the collective term for any entertainment that is available and more popular from the late evening into the early hours of the morning. ... Schwabing is a neighborhood in the northern part of Munich, the capital of the German state of Bavaria. ...


Colleges and universities

Munich is a leading location for science and research with a long list of Nobel Prize laureates from Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen in 1901 to Theodor Hänsch in 2005. Munich has become a spiritual centre already since the times of Emperor Louis IV when philosophers like Michael of Cesena, Marsilius of Padua and William of Ockham were protected at the emperor's court. Both the universities of the Bavarian metropolis, the Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU) and the Technical University (TU or TUM), were found to be worthy of the title of elite university by the selection committee, which consisted of academics and members of the Ministries of Education and Research of the Federation and the German states (Länder). Only Munich's two universities and the Technical University of Karlsruhe have been awarded already in 2006 the title of elite university of Germany and millions of euro in funding. Wilhelm Röntgen Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (* March 27, 1845; † February 10, 1923) was a German physicist, of the University of Würzburg, who, on November 8, 1895, produced wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation that are now known as x-rays. ... Theodor Wolfgang Hänsch (b. ... Michael of Cesena (Michele di Cesena or Michele Fuschi) (c. ... Marsilius of Padua (Italian Marsilio or Marsiglio da Padova; c. ... William of Ockham (also Occam or any of several other spellings, IPA: ) (c. ...

Main building of the Ludwig Maximilians University

Image File history File links Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität_München_04-05-22. ... Image File history File links Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität_München_04-05-22. ... With approximately 48,000 students, the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München or LMU) is one of the largest universities in Germany. ... Ingolstadt (Austro-Bavarian: InglstÃ¥dt) is a city in the Free State of Bavaria, Germany. ... Munich University of Technology, or Technical University of Munich (TUM) (in German: Technische Universität München, TUM), is a major German university located in Munich (and the towns of Garching and Freising outside of Munich). ... The Munich University of Applied Sciences, (in German: Fachhochschule München (FHM)) was founded in 1971 and is the largest University of Applied Sciences in Bavaria with about 12,000 students. ... The University of the German Federal Armed Forces, Munich (in German: Universität der Bundeswehr München) is one of the two Universities of the German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) that both were founded in 1973. ... The Munich College for Music and Theatre (in German, Hochschule für Musik und Theater München) is one of the most respected traditional universities in Germany specialising in the performing arts. ... Akademie der Bildenden Künste München New Building Panoramic view of the Academy The Academy of Fine Arts, Munich (German: Akademie der Bildenden Künste München, also known as Munich Academy) was founded 1808 by Maximilian I of Bavaria in Munich as the Royal Academy of Fine Arts... The University of Television and Film Munich (German: Hochschule für Fernsehen und Film München, HFF Munich) is a publicly funded film school in Munich, Germany. ... Pullach is a town in the district of Munich in Bavaria in Germany. ... Image:Munich Business School 020. ... To date more than 43 International Max Planck Research Schools (IMPRS) [1] have been established in Germany, representing joint cooperatives of Max Planck Institutes and German universities respectively. ... ESMT European School of Management and Technology is a private business school located in Berlin, Germany. ...

Scientific research institutions

Max Planck Society

The Max Planck Society, an independent German non-profit research organization, has its administrative headquarters in Munich. The following institutes are located in the Munich metropolitan area: The Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. ...

The Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics is a Max Planck Institute, located in Garching, near Munich, Bavaria, Germany. ... Garching bei München or Garching is a town in Bavaria, Germany near Munich. ... A research institute of the Max Planck Society located in Martinsried, a suburb of Munich. ... A suburb of Munich, Germany, about 15 km south-west from the city center. ... The Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics is a Max Planck Institute, located in Garching, near Munich, Germany. ... Garching bei München or Garching is a town in Bavaria, Germany near Munich. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German Bundesland of Bavaria. ... The Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition and Tax Law (German: Max-Planck-Institut für Geistiges Eigentum, Wettbewerbs- und Steuerrecht) is a Munich, Germany, -based institute, part of the research institutions of the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, which manages more than 90 institutes and... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German Bundesland of Bavaria. ... The Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology [1] is a research institute of the Max Planck Society located in Martinsried, a suburb of Munich. ... A suburb of Munich, Germany, about 15 km south-west from the city center. ... The Benedictine abbey of Andechs is a former place of pilgrimage on a hill east of the Ammersee in the Landkreis of Starnberg (Oberbayern) in Germany. ... Radolfzell am Bodensee is a town in Germany at the western end of Lake Constance approximately 18 km northwest of Konstanz. ... A physics institute in Munich, Germany which specialises in High Energy Physics and Astrophysics. ... A physics institute in Munich, Germany which specialises in High Energy Physics and Astrophysics. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German Bundesland of Bavaria. ... The Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) is a physics institute for the investigation of plasma physics, with the aim of working towards fusion power. ... Garching bei München or Garching is a town in Bavaria, Germany near Munich. ... Greifswald (from German Greif, griffin, and Wald, forest) is a town in northeastern Germany. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German Bundesland of Bavaria. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German Bundesland of Bavaria. ... Garching bei München or Garching is a town in Bavaria, Germany near Munich. ...

Other research institutes

The Fraunhofer Society (German Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft) is a German research organization named after the German physicist Joseph von Fraunhofer, with 58 institutes spread over Germany each focusing on different fields of applied science, as opposed to the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, which works mostly on basic science. ...

Economy

BMW Headquarters building (one of the few buildings that have been built from the top to the bottom) and the bowl shaped BMW museum
BMW Headquarters building (one of the few buildings that have been built from the top to the bottom) and the bowl shaped BMW museum

Munich has the strongest economy of any German city,[10] as well as the lowest unemployment rate (5.6 %) of any German city with more than a million people (the other ones being Berlin and Hamburg).[11] The city is also the economic centre of southern Germany. The initiative “Neue Soziale Marktwirtschaft (INSM)” (New Social Market Economy) and the “WirtschaftsWoche” (Business Weekly) magazine have awarded Munich the top score in their comparative survey for the third time in June 2006. Munich topped the ranking of the magazine “Capital” in February 2005 for the economic prospects between 2002 and 2011 in sixty German cities. Munich is considered a global city and holds the headquarters of Siemens AG (electronics), BMW (car), MAN AG (truck manufacturer, engineering), Linde (gases), Allianz (insurance) and Munich Re (re-insurance). Among German cities with more than 500,000 inhabitants purchasing power is highest in Munich (26.648 Euros per inhabitant) as of 2007.[12] Download high resolution version (1182x852, 92 KB)BMW building in Munich, image taken by User:Fantasy on 28. ... Download high resolution version (1182x852, 92 KB)BMW building in Munich, image taken by User:Fantasy on 28. ... BMW headquarters in Munich, Germany is one of the few buildings built from top to bottom. ... CIA figures for world unemployment rates, 2006 Unemployment is the state in which a person is without work, available to work, and is currently seeking work. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... Southern Germany is the term used to desribe the southern states of Germany: namely Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria. ... Wirtschaftswoche is a German weekly business news magazine. ... “World city” redirects here. ... Siemens redirects here. ... For other uses, see BMW (disambiguation). ... MAN AG (German: Maschinenfabrik Augsburg-Nürnberg AG, ISIN: DE0005937007) is a German transportation company. ... Linde AG is an international company with three principle activity areas: industrial gases, plant engineering, and materials handling, headquartered in Wiesbaden, Germany. ...   SE[1], (ISIN: DE0008404005; IPA pronunciation: [alliˈanʦ], and formerly AG) is a large financial service provider headquartered in Munich, Germany. ... Headquarters in Munich Munich Re AG, in German Münchener Rück AG, is one of the worlds largest reinsurance companies with over 5000 customers in 160 countries and has its headquarters in Munich, Germany. ... Reinsurance refers to the situations where insurance companies insure against losses they may incur. ...


Munich is also a centre for biotechnology, software and other service industries. Munich is also the home of the headquarters of many other large companies like the aircraft engine manufacturer MTU Aero Engines, the space and defence contractor EADS (headquartered in the suburban town of Ottobrunn), the injection molding machine manufacturer Krauss-Maffei, the camera and lighting manufacturer Arri, the semiconductor firm Infineon Technologies (headquartered in the suburban town of Neubiberg), the DRAM company Qimonda, as well as the German or European headquarters of many foreign companies like Precision Plus, McDonald’s and Microsoft. The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... MTU Aero Engines, Germanys leading aircraft engine manufacturer, develops, manufactures and provides service support for aircraft engines, military and civil alike. ... The European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company EADS N.V. (EADS) is a large European aerospace corporation, formed by the merger on July 10, 2000 of Aérospatiale-Matra of France, Construcciones Aeronáuticas SA (CASA) of Spain, and DaimlerChrysler Aerospace AG (DASA) of Germany. ... Ottobrunn is a small suburban community south-east of Munich, Bavaria, Germany, founded in 1955. ... Paper clip mold opened in molding machine; the nozzle is visible at right Injection molding machine (also known as injection press) - a machine for making plastic parts. ... Krauss-Maffei is an injection molding machine manufacturer based in Germany. ... The ARRI Group has been the largest world wide supplier of high quality motion picture film equipment since 1917. ... For the raceway, see Infineon Raceway. ... Neubiberg is a small suburban municipality south-east of Munich, Germany, founded in 1912. ... Qimonda AG (NYSE: QI), (pronounced key-MON-duh) is the new memory company split out of Infineon Technologies AG on May 1, 2006, to form the third largest DRAM company worldwide, according to the industry research firm Gartner Dataquest. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants[1]. Although McDonalds did not invent the hamburger or fast food, its name has become nearly synonymous with both. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ...


Munich has significance as a financial centre (secondary to Frankfurt), being home of HypoVereinsbank and the Bayerische Landesbank. It outranks Frankfurt though as home of insurance companies like Allianz and Munich Re.   (German: , English: American English: ) is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany, with a mid-2007 population of 663,567. ... Image:Hypo-Haus 03-10-28-012. ...   (German: , English: American English: ) is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany, with a mid-2007 population of 663,567. ...   SE[1], (ISIN: DE0008404005; IPA pronunciation: [alliˈanʦ], and formerly AG) is a large financial service provider headquartered in Munich, Germany. ... Headquarters in Munich Munich Re AG, in German Münchener Rück AG, is one of the worlds largest reinsurance companies with over 5000 customers in 160 countries and has its headquarters in Munich, Germany. ...


Munich is the largest publishing city in Europe[13] and home to the Süddeutsche Zeitung, one of Germany's largest daily newspapers. Munich is also home to Germany's largest public broadcasting network, ARD, and its largest commercial network, Pro7-Sat1 Media AG, and is also host to the Burda publishing group. The Süddeutsche Zeitung is one of the largest German newspapers. ... ARD (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der öffentlich-rechtlichen Rundfunkanstalten der Bundesrepublik Deutschland – the Consortium of public-law broadcasting institutions of the Federal Republic of Germany), is a joint organization of Germanys regional public broadcasting agencies. ... ProSieben is a commercial television station in Germany distributed to a large extent via cable and satellite along with DVB-T (Digital Video Broadcasting - Terrestrial) in larger population centres. ... Hubert Burda Media is a privately held, family owned global media company with its origins in printing and magazine publishing, dating back to more than a hundred years. ...


The Bavaria Film Studios are located in the suburb of Grünwald. They are one of Europe's biggest and most famous movie production studios.[14] The Bavaria Film Studios in Geiselgasteig, a district of Munichs suburb Grünwald, Bavaria belongs to Europes biggest and most famous movie production studios. ... Grünwald is a municipality in the district of Munich, in Bavaria, Germany. ...


Lufthansa has opened a second hub at Munich's Franz Josef Strauss International Airport, the second-largest airport in Germany, after Frankfurt International Airport. Deutsche Lufthansa AG (ISIN: DE0008232125) (pronounced ) is the second largest airline in Europe in terms of overall passengers carried (after Air France - KLM). ... Munich International Airport Munich International Airport, named Franz Josef Strauß International Airport (Strauß is often spelled Strauss in English) (German Franz-Josef-Strauß-Flughafen) is the airport located 28 km northeast of Munich, Germany, and is a hub for Lufthansa and Star Alliance partner airlines. ... Frankfurt Airport Frankfurt Airport (IATA: FRA, ICAO: EDDF), known in German as Rhein-Main-Flughafen or Flughafen Frankfurt am Main, is located near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ...


Linux migration

Main article: LiMux

LiMux project in municipal administration of Bavarian capital Munich (1. ...

Transportation

Public transport network
Public transport network

Munich International Airport

Franz Josef Strauss International Airport (IATA: MUC, ICAO: EDDM) is with about 34 Mio. pax/year Germany's second largest airport after Frankfurt, some 30 km to the north east of the city centre. The airport can be reached by suburban train lines S1 from the east and S8 from the west part of the city. However, from the Hauptbahnhof (main railway station), the journey takes 40–45 minutes. A magnetic levitation train (called Transrapid) which will run at speeds of up to 400 km/h from the central station to the airport has been approved.[15] It will reduce the travel time from the central station to only 10 minutes. As of January 2008 the transrapid project has been put on hold pending the outcome of a local referendum in April. The transrapid project has also lost some of the much needed funding. Given the anti-transrapid sentiment of the taxpayers and the lack of sufficient funding for the project. Others supporting the transrapid project in Munich have founded the organization Bayern pro Rapid in 2007. Munich International Airport (IATA: MUC, ICAO: EDDM), officially named Franz Josef Strauss International Airport (German: Flughafen München Franz Josef Strauß) is located 17. ... The International Air Transport Association is an international trade organization of airlines headquarted in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), an agency of the United Nations, develops the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt Airport (disambiguation). ... Transrapid at the Emsland test facility Transrapid maglev in Shanghai Magnetic levitation transport, or maglev, is a radically new form of transportation that suspends, guides and propels vehicles via electro-magnetic energy. ... Transrapid at the Emsland test facility Transrapid is a German monorail system using magnetic levitation. ...


The airport began operations in 1992, replacing the former main airport, the Munich-Riem airport (active 1939–1992). Terminal and main entrance hall in 1992 Main entrance hall Road leading to the airport and control tower in 1992 Control tower The Munich-Riem airport was the main airport of Munich until it was closed in 1992. ...


Also, the Bavarian state government has announced plans to expand the Oberpfaffenhofen Air Station, located west of Munich, for commercial use. These plans are opposed by many residents of the Oberpfaffenhofen area.


Public transportation

For its population, Munich has one of the most comprehensive systems in the world, incorporating the Munich U-Bahn (underground railway), the Munich S-Bahn (suburban trains), trams and buses. The system is supervised by the Munich Transport and Tariff Association (Münchner Verkehrs- und Tarifverbund GmbH). Georg-Brauchle-Ring station (U1) The Munich U-Bahn system is an electric railway public transport network (a metro or subway system) in Munich. ... S-Bahn trains in Munich are operated by S-Bahn München, a subsidiary of Deutsche Bahn Regio Bavaria. ... The Munich Transport and Tariff Association (Münchner Verkehrs- und Tarifverbund) is the transportation authority of the city of Munich, Germany. ...


The main railway station is Munich Hauptbahnhof (Central Station), in the city centre, and there are two smaller main line stations at Pasing (Pasing Station), in the west of the city, and Munich Ostbahnhof (East Station) in the east. All three are connected to the public transport system and serve as transportation hubs. Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... München-Pasing is a railway station with nine platforms situated in the in the west of Munich. ... The Station from above München Ost (German for Munich East, colloquially also called Ostbahnhof) is a railway station in Munich. ...


ICE highspeed trains stop at Munich-Pasing and Munich-Hauptbahnhof only. InterCity and EuroCity trains with destinations East of Munich also stop at Munich East. Since 28 May 2006 Munich is connected to Nuremberg via Ingolstadt by a 300 km/h ICE high speed railway line. ICE 3 trainset near Ingolstadt The InterCityExpress or ICE (German pronunciation: ) is a system of high-speed trains predominantly running in Germany and its neighbouring countries. ... A Romanian InterCity train, run by Romanian Railways, at Arad station in May 2003 InterCity is a name for the inter-city rail services in Europe. ... German Class 101 locomotive pulling an EuroCity train consisting of Swiss and German coaches EuroCity, abbreviated EC, denotes an international train service within the European inter-city rail network. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nürnberg redirects here. ... Ingolstadt (Austro-Bavarian: Inglstådt) is a city in the Free State of Bavaria, Germany. ...


Individual transportation

Munich is an integral part of the Autobahn network of southern Germany. Freeways from Stuttgart, Berlin, Frankfurt, Lindau, Garmisch Partenkirchen and Salzburg terminate at Munich, making it easy to access the different parts of Germany, Austria and Italy. However, traffic in and around Munich is often heavy (especially on the beltway, a 3-5 lane freeway and on the inner-city freeways). Traffic jams are commonplace during rush hour and at the beginning and end of major vacations in Germany. This article is about the German, Austrian and Swiss road system. ... For other uses, see Stuttgart (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ...   (German: , English: American English: ) is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany, with a mid-2007 population of 663,567. ... famous harbor entrance of Lindau reverse side of the old town hall of Lindau Lindau is a German city and an island in the eastern part of the Lake Constance, the Bodensee. ... Garmisch-Partenkirchen (29,875 inhabitants; 01-01-2004) is a market town, and the administrative centre of the district of Garmisch-Partenkirchen, in the Oberbayern region of Bavaria, Germany, near the border with Austria. ... This article is about the capital of the Austrian state of Salzburg. ...


Cycling is recognised as a good alternative to motorised transport and the growing number of bicycle lanes are widely used throughout the year. A modern bike hire system is available in the central area of Munich that is surrounded by the beltway. Cycleway, Bicycle street and Pedestrian/Cyclist bridge in Nuremberg, Germany Segregated cycle facilities may consist of separate roads, tracks, paths or lanes designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is generally excluded. ... Call a Bike is a bike hire system run by Deutsche Bahn in several German cities, which uses a system of authentication codes to automatically lock and unlock bikes. ...


Around Munich

The Munich agglomeration sprawls across the plain of the Alpine foothills. Several smaller traditional Bavarian towns like Freising, Erding and Moosburg are today part of the Munich region formed by Munich and the surrounding districts. In the study of human settlements, an agglomeration is an extended city or town area comprising the built-up area of a central place (usually a municipality) and any suburbs or adjacent satellite towns. ... The Alpine foothills, Alpenvorland, or Prealps (German: ; Italian: ; French: ) can refer generally to any area of foothills in the Alps of Europe. ... Freising is a city in Bavaria, Germany, capital of the district Freising. ... Erding is a town in Bavaria, Germany, and capital of the district Erding. ... Moosburg-an-der-Isar in Bavaria is the oldest town between south of the Danube river and north of Italy, with a population of 18,000 inhabitants. ...

Twin cities

Plaques in the Neues Rathaus (New City Hall) showing Munich's sister cities.
Plaques in the Neues Rathaus (New City Hall) showing Munich's sister cities.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1312x1520, 239 KB) Photo of Sister City plaques in Munichs Neuesrathaus (in the main entry corridor from the Marienplatz) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1312x1520, 239 KB) Photo of Sister City plaques in Munichs Neuesrathaus (in the main entry corridor from the Marienplatz) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed... Neues Rathaus (2006). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... Map of Zimbabwe showing the location of Harare. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ohio. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Map of Ukraine with Kiev highlighted Coordinates: , Country Ukraine Oblast Kiev City Municipality Raion Municipality Government  - Mayor Leonid Chernovetskyi Elevation 179 m (587 ft) Population (2006)  - City 4,450,968  - Density 3,299/km² (8,544. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Sapporo redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Bordeaux (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... This page is about the city in Italy; for other uses, see Verona (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ...

Famous people born in Munich

Franz Anton Beckenbauer (born September 11, 1945) is a German football coach, manager, and former player, nicknamed der Kaiser (the emperor) because of his elegant style, his leadership qualities, his first name Franz (reminiscent of the Austrian emperors), and his dominance on the football pitch. ... Thomas Hitzlsperger (born 5 April 1982 in Munich, Germany) is a midfielder for VfB Stuttgart. ... VfB Stuttgart is a German sports club based in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg. ... Philipp Lahm (born November 11, 1983 in Munich, Bavaria) is a German footballer who currently plays as a defender for Bayern Munich and Germany at Euro 2004 and the 2006 FIFA World Cup. ... FC Bayern Munich (German: FC Bayern München) is a German football club based in Munich, the capital of the state of Bavaria. ... Josef Sepp Maier (born February 28, 1944, Metten, Germany) is a former professional football goalkeeper. ... Andreas Ottl (born March 1, 1985 in Munich, Bavaria, Germany) is a German footballer who currently plays as a defensive midfielder for Bayern Munich. ... Frank Shorter (born October 31, 1947) is an American distance runner and winner of the marathon race at the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... Markus Babbel (born September 8, 1972 in Munich) is a former German international footballer who played as a defender. ... VfB Stuttgart is a German sports club based in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg. ... Carl Amery (Munich, 9 April 1922 - 24 May 2005), the pen name of Christian Anton Mayer, was a German writer and environmental activist. ... Himmler redirects here. ... Dr h. ... Percy Adlon, German Filmaker Percy Adlon (born June 1, 1935 in Munich, Germany) is a German Film - Television Director, Author and Producer. ... Harold Faltermeyer (born October 5, 1952 in Munich) is a German musician and moreover composer. ... Moritz Bleibtreu (born August 13, 1971 in Munich) is a German actor. ... Werner Herzog (born Werner Stipetić on September 5, 1942) is a critically and internationally acclaimed German film director, screenwriter, actor, and opera director. ... Jürgens in a scene from Der Kommissar (1973) Peer Schmidt, Klaus Kinski and Jürgens (right) in the German movie Bankraub in der Rue Latour (1961) Curd Jürgens playing Sigmund Freud on the stage at Viennas Theater in der Josefstadt (1979) Curd Gustav Andreas Gottlieb Franz J... Briana Banks (born Briana Bany[3] on May 21, 1978[1] in Munich, Germany) is a German-born American pornographic actress and model. ... A pornographic actor or a porn star is somebody who appears in pornographic movies, live sex shows or peep shows. ... Wolfgang Sawallisch (born August 26, 1923) is a German conductor and pianist. ... Brent Mydland (October 21, 1952 – July 26, 1990) was the fourth keyboardist to play for the United States rock band the Grateful Dead. ... This article is about the band. ... Carl Orff Carl Orff (July 10, 1895) – March 29, 1982) was a 20th-century German composer, most famous for Carmina Burana (1937). ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Karl Valentin (* 4th June, 1882 in Munich; + 9th February, 1948 in Planegg near Munich); actually Valentin Ludwig Fey, was a Bavarian comedian, author and film producer, who had great influence on German culture. ... Fritz Wepper Fritz Wepper, born in Munich, Germany on August 17, 1941, is a German actor who is most famous for playing Harry Klein in the television drama Derrick. ... David Lubega (aka Lou Bega) (born April 13, 1975 in Munich, Germany) is a Latin-pop musician famous for his song Mambo No. ... Alfred Hellmuth Andersch (February 4, 1914 — February 21, 1980) was a German writer, publisher and radio editor. ... Lion Feuchtwanger (pseudonym: J.L. Wetcheek) (7 July 1884 - 21 December 1958) was a German-Jewish novelist who was imprisoned in a French internment camp in Les Milles and later escaped to Los Angeles with the help of his wife, Marta. ... Klaus Mann at 12 years old. ... Eugen Roth (1895–1976) was a German language poet and philosopher. ... Ernst Otto Fischer is a German chemist who won the Nobel Prize for pioneering work in the area of organometallic chemistry. ... Feodor Felix Konrad Lynen (6 April 1911 – 6 August 1979) was a German biochemist. ... Rudolf Ludwig Mößbauer (born January 31, 1929) is a German physicist who studied gamma rays from nuclear transitions. ... Willy Bogner, Jr. ... Rudolph Moshammer (September 27, 1940 – January 14, 2005) was a German fashion designer. ... Isabeau de Bavière (also Isabella of Bavaria-Ingolstadt) (about 1369 – September 24, 1435) was a Queen Consort of France (1385 - 1422) after marrying Charles VI of France, a member of the Valois Dynasty, on July 17, 1385. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Elisabeth in a riding habit, from Vanity Fair, 1884. ... Ludwig (Louis) II, King of Bavaria, Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm, also known as Ludwig the Mad, and Mad King Ludwig (August 25, 1845 - June 13, 1886) was king of Bavaria from 1864 until his death. ... View from the Park The Nymphenburg Palace (German: Schloss Nymphenburg) is a Baroque palace in Munich, Bavaria, Germany. ... Franz Marc (February 8, 1880 – March 4, 1916) was one of the principal painters and printmakers of the German Expressionist movement. ... Andreas Baader Andreas Baader (May 6, 1943 - October 18, 1977) was the first leader of the German revolutionary organization Red Army Faction, commonly known as the Baader-Meinhof gang. ... Red Army Faction Insignia - a Red Star and a Heckler & Koch MP5 The Red Army Faction or RAF (German Rote Armee Fraktion) (in its early stages commonly known as Baader-Meinhof Group [or Gang]), was one of postwar West Germanys most active and prominent militant left-wing groups. ... Adolf Abraham Halevi Fraenkel (February 17, 1891 - October 15, 1965), known as Abraham Fraenkel, was a German / Israeli mathematician. ... Franz Xaver Gabelsberger (February 9, 1789 - January 4, 1849, both in Munich) was German inventor of shorthand writing system, named Gabelsberger shorthand after him. ... Charlotte Knobloch Charlotte Knobloch (born October 29, 1932 in Munich) was elected President of Zentralrat der Juden in Deutschland in June, 2006. ...

Famous Residents

Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara; 5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991) was a British musician, best known as the lead singer of the rock band Queen (inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001). ... Johann Baptist Joseph Maximilian Reger (March 19, 1873 – May 11, 1916) was a German composer, organist, pianist and teacher. ... For other persons named Thomas Mann, see Thomas Mann (disambiguation). ... Lenin redirects here. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Franz Stuck (1863 - 1928), German symbolist/expressionist painter, was born at Tettenweis, in Bavaria, and received his artistic training at the Munich Academy. ... Brigitte Horney who was born 29 March 1911 in Berlin and died 27 July 1988 in Hamburg was a well loved German Theatre and Film Actress. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Elizabeth Rosanna Gilbert [1] (February 17, 1821 – January 17, 1861), better known by the stage name Lola Montez, was an Irish-born dancer and actress who became famous as an exotic dancer, courtesan and the mistress of King Ludwig I of Bavaria. ... Ludwig I (or Louis I, which is the French form of his name) (August 25, 1786 – February 29, 1868) was king of Bavaria from 1825 until 1848. ...

References

  1. ^ Landeshauptstadt München. Monthly population figures (German). Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  2. ^ Names of European cities in different languages#M
  3. ^ http://www.multimap.com/maps/?hloc=DE%7cMünchen
  4. ^ http://www.region-muenchen.com/themen/info_en/info_en.htm Region Munich
  5. ^ Weatherbase: Historical Weather for Munich, Germany (English). Weatherbase (2007). Retrieved on 2007-02-04.
  6. ^ 2007 survey Mercer Human Resource Consulting
  7. ^ 2007 Cost of Living Report Munich Mercer Human Resource Consulting
  8. ^ Report in Stern magazine (German)
  9. ^ Museum Reich der Kristalle München
  10. ^ [1] Study conducted by INSM (New Social Market Economy Initiative) and WirtschaftsWoche magazine
  11. ^ [2] Bundesagentur für Arbeit (Federal agency for work)
  12. ^ [3] Germany, statistics, studies, consumers
  13. ^ Munich Literature House: About Us. Retrieved on February 17, 2008.
  14. ^ Bavaria Film GmbH. Retrieved on February 17, 2008.
  15. ^ BBC NEWS | Business | Germany to build maglev railway

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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