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Encyclopedia > Multiverse (DC Comics)
A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth.Art by Dan Jurgens and Art Thibert
A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth.
Art by Dan Jurgens and Art Thibert

The DC Multiverse is a fictional continuity construct that allows writers the creative freedom to explore alternate versions of characters and their histories without contradicting and/or permanently altering the official continuity. The number of alternate universes used by the Multiverse construct has varied over the years due to DC Comics' policy of using or abandoning the concept at various points in its publishing history. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File linksMetadata DCMultiverse. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... FicTioNaL is a Gaming Legend. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ...


After the publication of Infinite Crisis and 52, the Multiverse is again being used in print by DC Comics and consists of fifty-two alternate universes which are referred to by the numeric designations of the alternate Earths within them ("New Earth", "Earth-1", "Earth-2", "Earth-3", etc.). The numeric designation is used to distinguish the newer fictional Multiverse from the previous one, in which its alternate universes used alphabetic designations, such as "Earth-One", "Earth-Two", and "Earth-Three", instead. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... First appearance of Earth-Two Earth-Two was a fictional reality within the stories of DC Comics. ... Earth-Three is a fictional alternate universe set in the DC Comics Universe. ...

Contents

History

Although DC Comics continued publishing from the 1930s through the 1950s, the Golden Age of Comic Books had come to a close in the late 1940s or early 1950s, and most superhero comic books had ceased publication. The only superhero comic book titles to survive from the Golden Age to the present were Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman. In 1956, DC's Showcase comics provided a starting point for the new Silver Age Flash (Barry Allen). It was also firmly established in the Flash's first appearance that the Golden Age Flash was a comic-book character within the DC universe, whose fictional exploits inspired Barry Allen to take on the name. With the success of this character, more Golden Age characters' names were reused with new heroes, often having new costumes, identities or powers, such as Green Lantern, the Atom and Hawkman. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... The Atom is a DC Comics superhero, introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961). ... Katar Hol is a DC Comics superhero, the Silver Age Hawkman. ...

Wonder Woman and her multiversal counterpart realizing the existence of parallel Earths.
Wonder Woman and her multiversal counterpart realizing the existence of parallel Earths.

The first parallel universe was introduced in 1953 in Wonder Woman (vol. 1) #59, in which Wonder Woman fell through a space-time warp and encountered her double, whose name, Terra Terruna, translated as Wonder Woman. After battling the villain Duke Dazam, Wonder Woman returned home. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 427 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1436 pixel, file size: 856 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image from a panel in Wonder Woman (vol. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 427 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1436 pixel, file size: 856 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image from a panel in Wonder Woman (vol. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Duke Dazam is a fictional character who appeared in the DC Comics series Wonder Woman, in the first published DC Comics story about the multiverse. ...


The parallel universe concept was not used again until Wonder Woman #89 (April 1957), which featured an alternate Earth where crime predominated. The second was "Magic-Land", an alternate Earth where magic, instead of science, was the dominant force in the world. However, its existence has been ignored in current DC multiverse continuity. It appeared in Gardner Fox's "Secret of the Sinister Sorcerers", Justice League of America #2. December 1960- January 1961, nearly contemporary with Fox' Flash of Two Worlds. Look up magic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


The story "Flash of Two Worlds" appeared in The Flash (vol. 1) #123 and established the Multiverse concept. In the story, the Barry Allen version of the Flash uses his powers of super-speed vibration to climb a rope suspended in mid-air and vibrates from Earth-One to Earth-Two where he meets Jay Garrick, the Golden Age Flash. The much-homaged cover of The Flash #123 Flash of Two Worlds! is a landmark [1] comic book story that was published in The Flash #123 (Sept. ... The Flash. ...


Each universe's Earth has its own set of superheroes, with their own unique characteristics and life histories. In several cases, characters from other publishers acquired by DC, previously established within a fictional universe of their own, have been incorporated into the Multiverse in various alternate universes. This article is about Earth as a planet. ... A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ...


Star Hunters #7 (October 1978), by David Micheline, Bob Layton, and Rich Buckler contains one of the first anecdotal mentions of the multiverse in a DC Comics title, including the term "Multiverse", and offers a description of multiple co-existing parallel Earths. It also describes an ancient war between the forces of light and dark using agents scattered across multiple universes. David Michelinie is an American comic book writer. ... Bob Layton is a USA comic book artist. ... Cover to Daredevil #131. ...


Crisis on Infinite Earths

Star Hunters #7 (October 1978), Donovan Flint learning about the Multiverse, sequences depict Claw the Unconquered and the second Starfire. Artist Rich Buckler
Star Hunters #7 (October 1978), Donovan Flint learning about the Multiverse, sequences depict Claw the Unconquered and the second Starfire. Artist Rich Buckler

Until well into the 1970s, mass-market comic books were dominated by a generation of creators who had either been involved in the creation of the Golden Age heroes of the 1940s (e.g., Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Julius Schwartz and Joe Kubert), or been fans of Golden Age comic books and gone on to enter the industry themselves (e.g., Roy Thomas and E. Nelson Bridwell). The earliest stories of the Earth-Two heroes were written and drawn by creative personnel who had worked on those characters during the Golden Age. As time went on, however, most of the new editors and creators were less familiar with the older heroes, and had greater difficulty maintaining the overall continuity of the characters and their histories. The newer generation of creators also took comic books more seriously, and were embarrassed by the light-hearted elements of older stories, with their profusion of kid sidekicks and other spin-off characters.[original research?] Accordingly, many staffers and creators saw the need to simplify the Multiverse and eliminate elements they perceived as silly.[original research?] Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Claw the Unconquered is a sword and sorcery /fantasy comic book character created by writer David Michelinie and artist Ernie Chan (originally credited as Ernie Chua) in DC Comics Claw The Unconquered #1 (May-June 1975). ... Starfire is the name of three superheroes who have appeared in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Cover to Daredevil #131. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 – February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... Joe Kubert (born September 18, 1926, Poland) is an American comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... E. Nelson Bridwell was a writer for Mad magazine and for DC Comics. ...


To this end, the Multiverse was reduced to a single universe in the 1985 12-issue limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths. One by one, a villain known as the Anti-Monitor destroyed several alternate universes. The heroes of the last five universes (those of Earth-One, Earth-Two, Earth-Four, Earth-S, and Earth-X) along with a handful of survivors from other universes (Pariah, Lady Quark, Alexander Luthor, Jr., and the Inferior Five) held off the destruction of the last five universes long enough to defeat the Anti-Monitor. The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... The Anti-Monitor is a fictional comic book supervillain, the antagonist of the 1985 DC Comics miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Pariah is a fictional scientist published by DC Comics. ... In the DC Comics 12-issue limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths, Lady Quark was one of the rulers of her home world, Earth-Six where the Revolutionary War was won by England. ... Alexander Luthor, Jr. ... The Inferior Five (or I5) are a parodical superhero team who premiered in the DC Comics test book Showcase #62 (1966. ...


The five universes merged into a single universe with its own history that combined elements of the five, along with completely new elements. For example, there was a Flash named Jay Garrick who was a member of the Justice Society during the 1940s, and another Flash named Barry Allen was a member of the Justice League decades later, but there was only one Superman, who had a modified history, different in some respects from both the Earth-One and the Earth-Two versions.


Several pre-Crisis characters (most importantly the Kara Zor-El Supergirl and Barry Allen Flash) were killed during Crisis, and as a result were either erased from history (in Supergirl's case) or simply proclaimed dead in the new, singular universe. Other characters and concepts, such as Streaky the Supercat, Comet the Super-Horse and the Space Canine Patrol Agents, vanished without explanation. For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Streaky the Supercat is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... Comet is the name of two comic book characters owned by DC Comics, whose adventures have been published by that same company. ... The Space Canine Patrol Agents, or SCPA (not to be confused with the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals), is a group of fictional anthropomorphic extra-terrestrial canine superheroes that populated the Pre-Crisis DC Universe. ...


Post-Crisis

Although the Multiverse concept was eliminated after the publication of Crisis, several comics published after it made several references to it. A story in Animal Man by Grant Morrison referred to the Multiverse, with its effects coming undone as comic books, along with characters who no longer or never had existed emerging from the Psycho-Pirate’s mask inside Arkham Asylum. Keith Giffen's Ambush Bug demonstrated an awareness of the events in Crisis in his various mini-series, in which it was referred to as "Crisis on the only Earth we're still allowed to use." The Books of Magic series, published under the Vertigo label but set in the DC Universe, had a storyline by Peter Gross (beginning in The Books of Magic #51) in which a Timothy Hunter from a parallel universe travelled from universe to universe, killing and absorbing the powers of his alternate selves. Animal Man (Buddy Baker) is a fictional DC Comics superhero. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... The Psycho-Pirate was the name of two DC comics supervillains. ... Ambush Bug is a fictional comic book character who has appeared in several DC Comics. ... Cover for the Italian edition of the series. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ...


Elseworlds

Although DC maintained that the other Earths no longer existed, during the 1990s they published occasional one-shots and mini-series labeled "Elseworlds", featuring alternate versions of their characters—a practice that seemed to be consistent with the concept of a Multiverse. DC officially classified these as stories that perhaps "could have" happened but had not occurred. They maintained that there was only one canonical Earth in the DC Universe. Some one-shots and limited series without the "Elseworlds" label, such as Frank Miller's reimagining of DC heroes and Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, also diverged from established continuity (or in the case of The Dark Knight Returns, have had the continuity diverge from them). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Frank Miller, the comic book writer and artist. ... The premiere issue of the series Spoiler warning: The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ...


Hypertime

Main article: Hypertime (comics)

In 1999, DC introduced Hypertime, which provided a conceptual framework to recognize both canonical and apocryphal stories, stating that all stories outside mainstream continuity happened in alternate timelines that had "branched out". Hypertime was a superset of the Multiverse, including not only all pre-Crisis stories set on alternate Earths, but any story set in any continuity. This concept was first referenced in The Kingdom, in which an image of what appeared to be the original Earth-Two Superman was shown. However, the concept has been subsequently used only a few times (most notably in story-arcs in the pages of The Flash and Superboy). According to Dan DiDio, Executive Vice President of DC Comics, Hypertime will not be featured in any future stories.(although it was recently during the climax of the 52 miniseries.) A fictional concept presented in the 1998 comic book series The Kingdom, hypertime is both a catch-all explanation for any continuity discrepancies in DC Universe stories, and a variation—in fact, a superset—of the Multiverse that existed before Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... The Kingdom is a comic book miniseries published by DC Comics, written by Mark Waid. ...


Infinite Crisis

Main article: Infinite Crisis
The Multiverse merging into "New Earth". From Infinite Crisis #6 (2006).
The Multiverse merging into "New Earth". From Infinite Crisis #6 (2006).

In 2005, DC began Infinite Crisis, a DC Universe crossover and sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths. Stories leading up to the main limited series contained scattered references the Multiverse, such as the Return of Donna Troy mini-series, in which the titular character Donna Troy returned from the dead and remembering the various origins of her alternate selves, (such as her counterpart from Earth-Seven, who became her nemesis Dark Angel) and the Captain Atom: Armageddon mini-series, which had the main character being sent to the WildStorm Universe and inadvertenly causing its destruction and recreation. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1608, 577 KB) Summary From Infinite Crisis #6. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1608, 577 KB) Summary From Infinite Crisis #6. ... Donna Troy is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... Dark Angel is a DC Comics villain who battled Wonder Woman. ... WildStorm Productions, or simply WildStorm or Wildstorm, is a publishing imprint and studio of American comic book publisher DC Comics. ...


In the Infinite Crisis series itself, the Superman and Lois Lane of Earth-Two, the Superboy of Earth-Prime, and Alexander Luthor Jr. of Earth-Three—all survivors of the destruction of the original Multiverse—reappeared, and the former existence of the Multiverse was acknowledged. Earth-Two was recreated in issue #4, and the surviving heroes who originated from Earth-Two were transported there.


In addition to this, worlds previously described only as "Imaginary Stories" or "Elseworlds" were revealed to be universes within the Multiverse, as shown by the presence of Superman Red and Superman Blue from the Silver Age imaginary story of the same name, Superman Jr. and Batman Jr. from the World's Finest stories of the 1970s, the Superman from the Elseworlds story Superman: Red Son, a world featuring Batman, Robin, and Wonder Woman in Aztec garb, and a world featuring characters from the first Wonder Woman pilot as well as from the later Wonder Woman TV show alongside the original Teen Titans in a militaristic setting.[1] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash. ... Spoiler warning: Superman: Red Son is a comic book published by DC Comics unveiled under their Elseworlds imprint in April, 2003. ... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wonder Woman is an American television series based on the DC Comics comic book character Wonder Woman (which was co-created by William Moulton Marston and Elizabeth (Sadie) Holloway Marston). ...


Eventually, Alexander's plan was circumvented when his equipment was destroyed by Superboy (Kon-El, a.k.a. Conner Kent), resulting in all Earths re-merging into "New Earth". The effects of this transformation were shown during the series 52 and in the "One Year Later" storyline. Superboy, also known by his Kryptonian name Kon-El and his human alias Conner Kent, is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... One Year Later event logo. ...


52

Main article: 52 (comic book)

In the DC Nation column printed in the back of Week 37, Dan Didio revealed "the secret of 52" in a coded message. The message was spelled out using the first letter of every third word and said: "the secret of fifty-two is that the Multiverse still exists". 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Dan DiDio is an American comic book editor and executive. ...


In 52: Week 52, it was revealed that the Multiverse was recreated at the end of Infinite Crisis with the creation of fifty-two separate Earths, separated by different vibrational frequencies and each with their own histories. These Earths were initially identical to New Earth until they were altered by the intervention of Mister Mind. Prominent members of the Monster Society Of Evil. ...


List of universes

Main article: List of DC Multiverse worlds

// Traditionally, the numbered Earths were spelled out as words rather than with numerals—e. ...

Original multiverse

Catalogued

Traditionally, the "numbered" Earths were spelled out as words rather than with numerals—e.g. "Earth-Two" not "Earth-2"—in part to avoid confusion between similar-looking numerals and letters in hand-lettered text. This convention was disregarded in Crisis on Infinite Earths, and it became common practice to refer to the various Earths with numerals instead; however, Infinite Crisis reverted to the original practice while 52 and Countdown have referred to the alternate universe with numerals. This list contains the most prominent Earths of the pre-Crisis Multiverse. For a full list, see List of DC Multiverse worlds. // Traditionally, the numbered Earths were spelled out as words rather than with numerals—e. ...

Designation Era Inhabitants Notes First Appearance
Earth-One Pre-Crisis DC's Silver Age heroes, including the original Justice League of America: police scientist Barry Allen as the Flash; Hal Jordan as Green Lantern; Thanagarian Katar Hol as Hawkman; and scientist Ray Palmer as the Atom.
  • The default Earth for most of DC's comics during the prolific Multiverse era, Earth-One was by far the most "populous" and widely explored, and it retained dominance over the other four worlds which merged with it during the Crisis on Infinite Earths storyline. The DC Universe's "official" continuity post-Crisis took place on a "merged" Earth-One, as the Crisis revealed that this universe had been the core reality until rogue Guardian Krona fractured reality at the dawn of creation, creating both the multiverse and the Antimatter universe.
  • First described as a distinct Earth in Flash #123 (1961), first named in Justice League of America #21 (1963)
More Fun Comics #101 (1945)
Earth-Two Pre-Crisis DC's Golden Age heroes, including the Justice Society of America, whose careers began at the dawn of World War II (concurrently with their first appearances in comics): chemistry student Jay Garrick as the Flash; engineer Alan Scott as Green Lantern; archaeologist Carter Hall as Hawkman; and pint-sized powerhouse Al Pratt as the Atom.
  • Politically, Earth-Two was distinctly different from the Earth-One template modelled after Earth-Prime. For example, Quebec was an independent nation autonomous from Canada, South Africa had abolished apartheid sooner, and the Atlantean countries of Poseidonis and Tritonis were ruled by a queen, not a king, their inhabitants displaying surface-dweller features and no capacity for underwater survival, as the Atlantis continent had been raised to the surface.
  • First described as a distinct Earth in Flash #123 (1961), first named in Justice League of America #21 (1963)
New Fun Comics #1 (1935)
Earth-Three Pre-Crisis Crime Syndicate of America, evil versions of the Earth-One heroes: Ultraman; Superwoman; Owlman; Power Ring; Johnny Quick; Alexander Luthor; and briefly, Alexander Luthor, Jr.
  • History was "backwards": American Christopher Columbus discovered Europe; Britain won its freedom from the United States; President John Wilkes Booth was assassinated by actor Abraham Lincoln; and the United States flag's colours were reversed: black stars on a red field, with alternating blue and black stripes.
Justice League of America #29 (1964)
Earth-Four Crisis on Infinite Earths The former Charlton Comics heroes: Captain Atom, Blue Beetle, Nightshade, Peacemaker, The Question, Thunderbolt (Peter Cannon), and Judomaster.
  • This Earth was introduced at the beginning of Crisis, and disappeared less than a year later.
  • Named in Crisis on Infinite Earths #1 (Apr. 1985)
Yellowjacket #1 (1944)
Earth-Six Crisis on Infinite Earths Lady Quark, Lord Volt, and their daughter Princess Fern.
  • Earth-Six is apparently ruled by a royal family of superheroes (Lord Volt is referred to as the king, and he mentions his family's reign over Earth). On this Earth, America lost the Revolutionary War, and technology appears to have advanced more rapidly than on Earth-One. Earth-Six was destroyed in the "Crisis", with only Lady Quark surviving.
Crisis on Infinite Earths #4 (June 1985)
Earth-Twelve Pre-Crisis The Inferior Five: Awkwardman, Blimp, Dumb Bunny, Merryman and White Feather.
  • This Earth may have been home to other comedic superheroes published by DC. Additionally, references within the series pointed to versions of Justice League members having existed in that universe.
  • Named in Oz-Wonderland War #3 (1985)
Showcase Comics #62 (1966)
Post-Kirby Earth-Seventeen Pre-Crisis New Gods
  • Also the world where all pre-Crisis non-Kirby Fourth World tales took place according to Mark Evanier's speculation in the text page of New Gods (reprint series) #1.
First Issue Special #13
Earth-A Pre-Crisis The Lawless League: alternate, evil versions of Superman, Batman, the Flash, Green Lantern and the Martian Manhunter.
  • Johnny Thunder's evil Earth-One counterpart created Earth-A when he used Johnny’s Thunderbolt to alter the origins of the Justice League, replacing them with his own henchman, whom he granted powers and skills identical to the Justice League's. "A" stood for "alternate", since it was an alternate timeline of Earth-One.
Justice League of America #37 (Aug. 1965)
Earth-B Pre-Crisis Versions of various Earth-One & Earth-Two characters.
  • This Earth was never specifically depicted, but was suggested to exist in a letters column by DC editor/writer Bob Rozakis as a possible explanation for certain non-continuity stories or character traits (for example, stories that showed Catwoman committing murder with no qualms, despite being established that she did not engage in that kind of activity).
Debatable.
Earth-C Pre-Crisis Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew: Captain Carrot, Alley-Kat-Abra, Fastback, Little Cheese, Pig-Iron, Rubberduck, and Yankee Poodle.
  • This world is populated with anthropomorphic animals, who appear as comic book characters on Earth-One.
New Teen Titans #16 (Feb. 1982)
Earth-C-Minus Pre-Crisis Just'a Lotta Animals: Super-Squirrel, Wonder Wabbit, the Batmouse, Green Lambkin, Aquaduck, and the Crash.
  • This Earth (like Earth-C) is populated by anthropomorphic animals. Events and characters on this world paralleled those of Earth-One; additionally, events and characters on Earth-C-Minus were considered fictional on Earth-C (with Captain Carrot's alter-ego employed as the cartoonist of the Just'a Lotta Animals comic book series), in the vein of Earth-Two heroes’ only appearing as comic book characters on Earths-One and Prime.
Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew #14 (1983)
Earth-Prime Pre-Crisis Ultraa, Superboy-Prime, and DC editor Julius Schwartz.
  • Supposedly our world, Earth-Prime had few or no superheroes. The superheroes of Earths-One, -Two, -S, etc. existed only in fiction.
  • In Infinite Crisis #6, Alexander Luthor searches for Earth Prime. His discovery of it is shown when he looks at the reader and tries to reach out of the page, implying that Earth Prime is actually the real world.
Flash #179 (1968)
Earth-S Pre-Crisis Shazam, Captain Marvel, Mary Marvel, Captain Marvel, Jr., Bulletman and Bulletgirl, Mister Scarlet and Pinky, Minute-Man, Ibis the Invincible, Spy Smasher, Commando Yank, Isis.
  • Fawcett Comics publications of the 1940s and 1950s took place on this planet, with its predominant heroic teams being the Marvel Family, the Crime Crusader Club and the Squadron of Justice, while the main team of supervillains were the Monster Society of Evil.
  • Named in Shazam! #1 (1973)
Whiz Comics #2 (Feb. 1940)
Earth-X Pre-Crisis Freedom Fighters (retconned to have migrated from Earth-Two): Uncle Sam, the Human Bomb, Miss America, The Ray, Black Condor, Doll Man, Phantom Lady, Firebrand.
  • On this world, Nazi Germany won World War II, and the Freedom Fighters, originally from Earth-Two, fought to defeat them. Most Quality Comics publications chronicled adventures from this Earth.
  • Named in Justice League of America #107 (1973)
The Comics Magazine #1 (1936)
Antimatter Universe Pre-Crisis Anti-Monitor, Weaponers of Qward, the Thunderers.
  • Qward's universe has been described as a "universe of evil". Qwardian society seems to be dominated by a philosophy of selfishness and greed. This could be the effects of millennia of inescapable rule by the Weaponers.
  • The antimatter universe held a special place in the Multiverse: there was an infinite number of "positive-matter universes" separated from each other by vibrational planes, and there was a single Antimatter universe.
Green Lantern #2 (1960)

Showcase #4 (Oct. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... First appearance of Earth-Two Earth-Two was a fictional reality within the stories of DC Comics. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Earth-Three is a fictional alternate universe set in the DC Comics Universe. ... The Crime Syndicate of America, also known as CSA and Crime Syndicate of Amerika, is a fictional team of supervillains from one of DC Comics parallel universes, and are the evil counterparts of the Justice League of America. ... Ultraman is the evil criminal counterpart of Superman. ... Superwoman is the name given to several fictional characters published over the years by DC Comics, most of them being, much like the more popular Supergirl, a woman with powers alike to those of Superman. ... Owlman is a fictional supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Power Ring is the name of several DC Comics supervillains and the counterparts of Green Lanterns Hal Jordan, Kyle Rayner and John Stewart. ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ... Lex Luthor (Alexander Luthor) is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and is the primary antagonist of the Superman franchise. ... Alexander Luthor, Jr. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) assassinated Abraham Lincoln the 16th President of the United States at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Big C logo, used from Sept. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... Nightshade (Eve Eden) is a fictional character, a superheroine who was owned and published by Charlton Comics and was later acquired by DC Comics. ... The Peacemaker is the name of a series of superheroes originally owned by Charlton Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ... Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt is a fictional character originally owned by Charlton Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... A Charlton Comics super hero created in 1965 by writer Joe Gill & artist Frank McLaughlin in Special War Series #4 Cover. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the DC Comics 12-issue limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths, Lady Quark was one of the rulers of her home world, Earth-Six where the Revolutionary War was won by England. ... This article is about the year. ... The Inferior Five (or I5) are a parodical superhero team who premiered in the DC Comics test book Showcase #62 (1966. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... The New Gods are a fictional race published by DC Comics, as well as the title for four series of comics about those characters. ... Fourth World may mean: Fourth World, a term most commonly used to collectively describe notably marginalised or oppressed groups, in particular indigenous peoples, living in Third or First World countries. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew is a DC Comics comic book about a team of funny animal superheroes called the Zoo Crew. ... Captain Carrot is a comic book superhero who appeared in a series published by DC Comics. ... Alley-Kat-Abra is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Fastback (real name Timmy Joe Terrapin) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Little Cheese (real name Chester Cheese) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Peter Porkchops is the name of a fictional funny animal pig who appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... Rubberduck (real name Byrd Rentals) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Yankee Poodle (real name Rova Barkitt) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... An anthropomorphic character; a cat ascribed human characteristics. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Justa Lotta Animals is a fictional superhero team that appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Earth Prime (or Earth-Prime) is a term sometimes used in works of speculative fiction involving parallel universes or a multiverse, and refers either to the universe containing our Earth, or to a parallel world with a bare minimum of divergence points from Earth as we know it. ... Ultraa is the name of a DC Comics character, originally the first superhuman on Earth Prime. ... Superboy-Prime is a fictional character, a superhero turned supervillain in the DC Universe. ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 – February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... The fourth wall is the imaginary invisible wall at the front of the stage in a proscenium theater, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shazam is a comic book character created by Bill Parker and C. C. Beck for Fawcett Comics. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Mary Marvel is a fictional character, a superhero derived from the DC Comics (formerly Fawcett Comics) character Captain Marvel. ... CM3 redirects here. ... Bulletman was a Fawcett Comics superhero created by Bill Parker and Jon Smalle for Nickel Comics #1 in May, 1940. ... Mr. ... The word Minuteman usually has one of the following meanings, depending on context: the Minutemen of the American Revolutionary War (the origin of the term) the LGM-30 Minuteman intercontinental ballistic missile the Minuteman pocket calculator by Commodore Business Machines the Minuteman Project (volunteer American citizens patrolling the US/Mexican... Ibis the Invincible is a fictional character, a comic book superhero originally published by Fawcett Comics in the 1940s and then by DC Comics beginning in the 1970s. ... Spy Smasher (real name Alan Armstrong) is a DC Comics superhero, formerly owned by Fawcett Comics. ... Isis is a DC Comics superhero, as well as a separate goddess also living in the DC Universe. ... The Marvel Family is a group of fictional characters, a team of superheroes in the Fawcett Comics and DC Comics universes. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The Monster Society of Evil is a fictional team of supervillains published first by Fawcett Comics, then by DC Comics. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Freedom Fighters is the name of a DC Comics comic book superhero team made up of characters acquired from the defunct company Quality Comics. ... In the Golden Age of Comic Books of the 1940s, Will Eisner created a superhero version of Uncle Sam for Quality Comics. ... The Human Bomb is a fictional superhero from the Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Miss America is a DC Comics superhero. ... Occupation: Freelance computer programmer/software designer Known Relatives: Happy Terrill (a. ... Black Condor is the name of three DC Comics superheroes who have all been members of the Freedom Fighters. ... Doll Man is a fictional superhero from the Golden Age of Comics, originally published by Quality Comics and currently part of the DC Comics universe of characters. ... For other uses, see Phantom Lady (disambiguation). ... Firebrand is a name that has been used by multiple heroes by DC Comics. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Crack Comics #1 (May, 1940), featuring the Clock, previously introduced as the first masked comic book superhero. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Anti-Monitor is a fictional comic book supervillain, the antagonist of the 1985 DC Comics miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Qward is a fictional world existing within an antimatter universe that is part of the DC Comics universe. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Unclassified

Various other Earths were arguably depicted in DC's substantial publishing output during the period in which the Multiverse was in effect. Some Earths have been posited to explain (for example) the Super Friends (based on the TV series). On yet another conjectured Earth-Crossover, the Silver Age DC Comics heroes lived side-by-side with the Silver Age Marvel Comics heroes, and it is on this alternate Earth where various team-ups and battles between the two publishers' heroes have occurred over the years. Some of these could instead be categorized using the "imaginary story" identifier which DC occasionally applied to stories they didn't wish to be considered part of continuity, especially before the invention of the Multiverse. This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ... This article is about the comic book company. ...


After the first Crisis, several new universes appeared despite DC's intentions to the contrary. In addition, DC ran a number of crossovers with other companies that involved travel between different realities. Technically, none of these worlds were ever part of the Multiverse.


This was until Infinite Crisis retroactively labeled the Tangent Comics universe and many Elseworlds as Earths of the Multiverse, even though they had been published long after the Multiverse was destroyed. Infinite Crisis did the same with many Pre-Crisis Imaginary Tales.


In the "With A Vengeance!" storyline in Superman/Batman, the Multiverse is visited by Bizarro and Batzarro. The Joker and Mr. Mxyzptlk summon Batmen and Supermen from various realities, both previously established worlds as well as unexplored ones.

Designation Era Inhabitants Notes First Appearance
Post-Crisis Earth (unnamed) Post-Crisis All residents of the reconstituted Earth formed following Crisis on Infinite Earths.
  • This universe has various derivations explained as manifestations of Hypertime and influenced by the actions of Superboy-Prime. This world blends elements of the last five universes existing prior to the Crisis.
  • This world was divided and rebuilt during Infinite Crisis as "New Earth."
  • This world is dubbed "Earth 2" by the Antimatter Lex Luthor who dubs his own world "Earth 1".
Crisis on Infinite Earths #11 (1986)
(unnamed) Elseworlds Soviet versions of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman, along with an alternate version of the Green Lantern Corps.
  • A world where Superman landed in a Soviet commune instead of Smallville.
  • Bizarro visited this Earth during the Superman/Batman "Vengeance" storyarc.
  • Although debuted on Superman: Red Son #1, an early cameo appearance of this Earth's Superman is seen in 1999's The Kingdom #2.
Superman: Red Son #1 (2001)
Pocket Universe (unnamed) Post-Crisis The first post-Crisis versions of Superboy, the Phantom Zone residents General Zod, Quex-Ul, Faora Hu-Ul and Supergirl (Matrix). This Earth also had versions of Bruce Wayne, Oliver Queen, Lex Luthor, Lana Lang and Jonathan and Mary Kent.
  • First alternate Earth following Crisis on Infinite Earths.
  • It was an artificial world created by the Time Trapper, a long-time foe of the Legion of Super-Heroes, to act as the source of the legendary (but now fictitious) Superboy whose legends inspired the Legion. This Earth was rendered lifeless by three super powered villains. It was not seen again until the last Legion story arc prior to Zero Hour.
Superman #8 (1987)
Anti-Matter Universe Post-Crisis Crime Syndicate of America: Ultraman, Superwoman, Owlman, Power Ring, and Johnny Quick. Justice Underground: Alexander Luthor, Sir Solomon Grundy, General Grodd, Q-Ranger, Lady Sonar, Star Sapphire, and the Quizmaster.
  • A post-Crisis Antimatter Earth with a Crime Syndicate whose motto is "Cui Bono?" ("Who profits?"), inspired by the pre-Crisis Earth-Three. Originally, the Luthor of the CSA Earth, upon discovering the positive-matter Earth, named his world, "Earth 1", and the positive-matter Earth, "Earth 2" (no hyphens). Subsequent appearances revised the naming convention and simply referred to it as the Antimatter universe's Earth, and also established that the CSA Earth existed in the same Antimatter universe as Qward.
JLA: Earth 2 (2001)
The Fourth World Pre- & Post-Crisis Darkseid, Orion, Mister Miracle, Big Barda.
  • The Fourth World is a continuum inhabited by the New Gods. Its two main worlds, New Genesis and Apokolips, are mirror reflections of each other: New Genesis, the bright, glorious home ruled by Highfather, and Apokolips, the fiery, horrific home of the evil warlord Darkseid and his minions. Inhabitants of these worlds have been frequent visitors to Earth-One and Post-Crisis Earth, but it has been shown that they could venture into any number of alternate worlds. The Fourth World was not affected by the Crisis on Infinite Earths. It has not been established whether it is a separate universe, or whether it is a kind of dimension linked to each Earth in the same way as the homes of the Old Gods, such as Olympus and Asgard. In the latter case each Earth would have its own set of New Gods so that there would, for example, be parallel Darkseids of the various parallel universes.
Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen #133
Earth-Dakota Post-Zero Hour Icon, Static, Hardware and Blood Syndicate
  • In 1993, word of a Big Bang gang war on Paris Island resulted in Mayor Jefferson ordering enforcement officials to spray every gang member present with an experimental tear gas laced with a radioactive marker that would allow the police to track the participants down later. Survivors then became known as "bang babies" given mutagenic abilities.
Icon #1 (1993)
Earth-616 Post-Zero Hour All main-continuity Marvel Comics characters. Motion Picture Funnies Weekly (1939)
Earth-9602 Post-Crisis Amalgamated DC/Marvel Comics characters including Super-Soldier (Superman/Captain America), Dark Claw (Batman/Wolverine) and JLX (Justice League/X-Men).
  • A head to head battle with DC and Marvel Characters for the survival of their universe ended in a draw, both universes were combined.
  • For the comics that were published, an entire history existed for each of the combined characters.
DC vs Marvel (1996)

Superboy-Prime is a fictional character, a superhero turned supervillain in the DC Universe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional prison dimension featured in the Superman comic books and related media. ... General Zod is a fictional comic book supervillain who is an enemy of Superman. ... For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ... The Time Trapper is a fictional character, a supervillain in the DC Universe who often fought the Legion of Super-Heroes. ... LSH redirects here. ... Superboy is the name of several fictional characters in the DC Universe, most of them youthful incarnations of Superman. ... Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ... The Crime Syndicate of America, also known as CSA and Crime Syndicate of Amerika, is a fictional team of supervillains from one of DC Comics parallel universes, and are the evil counterparts of the Justice League of America. ... Ultraman is the evil criminal counterpart of Superman. ... Superwoman is the name given to several fictional characters published over the years by DC Comics, most of them being, much like the more popular Supergirl, a woman with powers alike to those of Superman. ... Owlman is a fictional supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Power Ring is the name of several DC Comics supervillains and the counterparts of Green Lanterns Hal Jordan, Kyle Rayner and John Stewart. ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ... The Justice Underground was comprised of heroes of the Anti-Matter Universe in the DC Universe. ... Lex Luthor (Alexander Luthor) is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and is the primary antagonist of the Superman franchise. ... Solomon Grundy is a DC Comics character, a large, strong zombie supervillain. ... Gorilla Grodd is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an opponent of The Flash. ... Major Force (Clifford Zmeck) is a fictional character, a comic book supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Sonar is the name of a DC Comics supervillain. ... Star Sapphire is the name of several female supervillains in DC Comics, all connected in origin. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... The New Gods #1 (February-March 1971) featuring Orion. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Orion is a fictional deity published by DC Comics. ... Mister Miracle is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Big Barda is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Milestone Media is a company best known for creating the Milestone comics imprint (that was published through DC Comics) and the Static Shock cartoon series. ... Icon is a fictional superhero created by Milestone Comics and published by DC Comics. ... Static is a fictional superhero created by Milestone Comics and published by DC Comics. ... Hardware (real name Curt Metcalf) is a Milestone Comics superhero. ... In Milestone Comics fictional city of Dakota, the Blood Syndicate is a loose affiliation of super-powered individuals brought together by circumstance; 35 issues of their eponymous comic book, written largely by Ivan Velez, Jr. ... The Big Bang is a significant event in the fictional history of Milestone Comics, in which many of the superheroes and supervillains of Dakota - including Static and the Blood Syndicate - got their powers. ... In the fictional Marvel Universe, Earth-616 or Earth 616 is the name used to identify the primary continuity in which most Marvel Comics titles take place. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... JLA/Avengers was a 4-issue comic book mini-series jointly published by Marvel Comics and DC Comics in late 2003 through early 2004. ... This article is about the shared universe setting used by many Marvel Comics titles. ... Within Marvel Comics, most tales take place within the fictional Marvel Universe, this in turn is part of a larger multiverse. ... Amalgam Comics was a metafictional American comic book publisher, and part of a collaboration between Marvel Comics and DC Comics, in which the two comic book publishers merged their characters to create new ones (e. ... This article is about the superhero. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ...

The 52

A new Multiverse was revealed at the end of the 52 weekly limited series.[2] Unlike the original Multiverse, which was composed of an infinite number of alternate universes, this Multiverse is composed of only fifty-two alternate universes, which are referred to as New Earth and Earths 1 through 51. The alternate universes were originally identical to New Earth and contained the same history and people until Mister Mind "devoured" portions of each Earth’s history, creating new, distinct Earths with their own histories and people, such as the Nazi-themed version of the Justice League that exists in Earth-10.[3] Each of the alternate universes have their own parallel dimensions, divergent timelines, microverses, etc, branching off them.[4] 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ...


The Guardians of the Universe serve as protectors of the new Multiverse.[5] Each universe within the Multiverse is separated by the Source Wall, behind which Anti-Life keeps the universes apart.[6] The Bleed permeates the Anti-Life in unpredictable places[6] behind the Source Wall,[5] allowing for transport between the universes. The destruction of New Earth would set off a chain reaction that would destroy the other fifty-one alternate universes at the same time, leaving only the Antimatter Universe in existence.[5] As a consequence of Alexander Luthor's attempts to recreate the Multiverse,[7] fifty-two new Monitors were created to oversee the fifty-two universes created afterwards.[8] The Monitors seek to protect the Multiverse from people who crossover from one alternate universe to another, through the Bleed or through innate ability, who the Monitors have labeled "anomalies".[9] The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... The Source Wall is a fictional structure in the DC Comics universe. ... The Anti-Life Equation is the equation that the DC Comics villain Darkseid is lusting for in the Jack Kirbys Fourth World setting. ... Kyle Rayner discovers himself in The Bleed in Ion #10 (2007). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Alexander Luthor, Jr. ... The Monitors are a group of fictional characters, owned by DC Comics who exist in that companys DC Universe. ...

Designation Era Inhabitants Notes First Appearance
New Earth Infinite Crisis All currently published superheroes and villains.
  • After the destruction of Alexander Luthor's Multiverse Tower in Infinite Crisis, the parallel Earths that had been created were merged into a new single world dubbed "New Earth". New Earth is currently the core existence of the DC Universe.
Infinite Crisis #6 (2006)
Earth-1 Post-52 Unknown.
  • In 52 Week 52 (2007), Rip Hunter mentioned that New Earth and Earth-1 are separate alternate universes.
Pending publication.
Earth-2 Post-52 An alternate version of the Justice Society of America.
  • Resembles the pre-Crisis Earth-Two.
  • This Earth's Power Girl and Superman are missing.
52 Week 52 (2007)
Earth-3 Post-52 The Crime Society of America, the Jokester,[10] Talon, and the Joker's Daughter.
  • Resembles the pre-Crisis Earth-Three and the Antimatter Earth.[11] This Earth is home to the Crime Society of America which has been described as a "world full of evil doppelgangers of Earth-2."[12]
  • Originally, this Earth was to be the home of a revamped Crime Syndicate, as shown in early solicitations,[10][13][14][15] but was later changed to be the home of the Crime Society, who coexist with the Antimatter Earth's Crime Syndicate.[11][16]
52 Week 52 (2007) (cameo) Countdown #32 (2007) (full)
Earth-4 Post-52 Alternate versions of the characters purchased from Charlton Comics such as Captain Atom, Blue Beetle, Nightshade, Peacemaker, The Question and Judomaster.
  • Resembles the pre-Crisis Earth-Four.
  • Described as a film noir world populated by alternate versions of the Charlton Comics characters that uses story elements from the Watchmen limited series.
52 Week 52 (2007)
Earth-5 Post-52 Alternate versions of the Marvel Family and an alternate Green Lantern.[3]
  • Resembles the pre-Crisis Earth-S.
52 Week 52 (2007)
Earth-8 Post-52 Lord Havok and the Extremists.
  • The existence of this reality was revealed in early solicitation information released through comics news websites[17] and DC's site.[18]
Countdown #29 (2007)
Earth-10 Post-52 Alternate versions of the characters purchased from Quality Comics, such as Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters, and an alternate Nazi version of the Justice League known as the JL-Axis.
  • Resembles a more apocalyptic version of the pre-Crisis Earth-X.
  • On this Earth, Adolf Hitler is still alive and controls the entire world through the Nazi Party. People are separated by genetics and those with the strongest genes are taken away and made to breed with others while those with the weakest genes are killed.
52 Week 52 (2007) (cameo), Countdown To Adventure #2 (2007) (full)
Earth-12 Post-52 Characters shown in the Batman Beyond television series.
  • Existence of this reality is based on information from an interview with Keith Champagne. Champagne claimed to have a vague recollection of Dan Didio's list of alternate worlds.[3] Asked "what is Earth-8?", Champagne responded "Batman Beyond... maybe? I'd have look them up to be sure." The Countdown: Arena website later revealed the official designation to be Earth-12.
  • Batman Beyond is part of the DC animated universe, a cohesive universe of several animated series based on DC Comics properties, such as Batman: The Animated Series, Superman: The Animated Series, Justice League Unlimited and others.
Pending publication.
Earth-13 Post-52 Alternate versions of characters shown in some Vertigo Comics titles.
  • Existence of this reality is based on information from an interview with Keith Champagne. Champagne claimed to have a vague recollection of Dan Didio's list of alternate worlds and said that Earth-13 was "Vertigo, sort of".[3]
  • Notable is that some Vertigo stories and characters take place in standalone continuity (such as V for Vendetta) and others are part of the main DC Universe (such as Swamp Thing, Hellblazer and Black Orchid) but rarely appear in mainstream publications.
Pending publication.
Earth-15 Post-52 Highly evolved heroes, including Superman (Zod), Wonder Woman (Donna Troy), Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner), Batman (Jason Todd), and the Atom (Jessica Palmer).
  • The Countdown: Arena website refers to Earth-15 as a place where heroes "have evolved to become nearly perfect beings." The Superman from this Earth will appear in Countdown: Arena.
  • This Earth's Superman is semi-retired as he is no longer needed but is still active everyday.
  • This Earth's Lex Luthor appeared in Countdown #26.
Countdown #30 (2007)
Earth-17 Post-52 The Atomic Knights.
  • Resembles the Earth of the pre-Crisis Atomic Knights stories.
52 Week 52 (2007)
Earth-18 Post-52 Characters shown in the Justice Riders one-shot.[19]
  • This world's Justice League is composed of marshals operating in the Wild West.
Pending publication.
Earth-19 Post-52 Characters shown in the Batman: Gotham by Gaslight collection.
  • In Countdown #40, a Monitor identifies his universe as being "in the throes of the Industrial Revolution." A figure resembling the Batman from Batman: Gotham by Gaslight is shown in the background.
Countdown #40 (2007)
Earth-21 Post-52 Characters shown in the DC: The New Frontier mini-series.
  • Referred to by Dan Didio in DC Nation #77.[19]
Pending publication.
Earth-22 Post-52 Characters featured in the Kingdom Come mini-series.
  • Resembles the Earth of the Kingdom Come mini-series.
52 Week 52 (2007)
Earth-26 Post-52 Captain Carrot and the Zoo Crew.
  • Confirmed as Earth-26 at Wizard World 2007.[20]
Captain Carrot And The Final Ark #1 (2007)
Earth-30 Post-52 Characters shown in the Superman: Red Son mini-series.
  • In Countdown #40, a Monitor identifies his universe as one where "the last Kryptonian became a representative of the Soviet empire." A figure resembling the Superman from Superman: Red Son is shown in the background. Designated as Earth-30 in Countdown #31.
Countdown #31 (2007)
Earth-31 Post-52 "Darker" versions of the DC heroes.
  • The Countdown: Arena website describes this world as a darker version of the future seen in the "Absolute Power" storyarc of the Superman/Batman series.
Pending publication.
Earth-32 Post-52 Characters shown in the Batman: In Darkest Knight one-shot.[19]
  • Bruce Wayne becomes Earth's Green Lantern instead of Hal Jordan.
Pending publication.
Earth-33 Post-52 Characters based upon the Conjurors graphic novel.
  • A magical version of the DC Universe, Earth-33 is home to characters such as "Batmage, master of the Dark Arts, Kal-El, wielder of Kryptonian magics, and Lady Flash, keeper of the Speed Force,"[21] Hawkgirl analogue "Black Bird", Starman and superheroic versions of Weather Wizard and Shade. The world's ruler is the mystical Oracle who can percieve and foresee all across the Multiverse.
Countdown to Adventure #3.
Earth-34 Post-52 Solicited as both the world of the Wonder Woman: Amazonia one-shot in some instances,[19] but is also referred to as the Forerunner homeworld in several comics.
  • Native home of the Forerunners, creatures bred by the Monitors from all the alien races of the solar system after the destruction of all human life on Earth in a war against other planets.[22] Forerunners are matriarchal, telepathic through their eldest living female, living in a society that kills off the weakest of its kind, and unaware of what happens outside of their solar system.[23]
  • This reality's version of J'onn J'onzz is a general in the Martian army.
  • Referred to as "Earth-34" in Countdown, a Monitor refers to it as the "forty-eighth Earth" in Countdown to Adventure #1 but again as Earth-34 in #2 and #3. The exact numbering of this Earth remains uncertain.
Countdown to Adventure #1 (2007)
Earth-40 Post-52 Characters shown in the JSA: The Liberty Files collection.
  • The existence of this reality is based on comments made by Dan Didio about the Countdown Arena mini-series at Wizard World 2007.[3]
Pending publication.
Earth-43 Post-52 Characters shown in the Tales of the Multiverse: Batman - Vampire collection.
  • In Countdown #40, a Monitor identifies his universe as being "a world of vampires and the supernatural." A figure resembling the Batman from Tales of the Multiverse: Batman - Vampire is shown in the background.
Countdown #40 (2007) (Cameo) Countdown Presents: The Search for Ray Palmer: Red Rain #1 (2007) (Full)
Earth-50 Post-52 Characters from the Wildstorm Universe, including Mr. Majestic, Gen13, WildC.A.T.s and the Authority. Wildcats (vol. 4) #1 (Sept. 2006)
Earth-51 Post-52 Unknown.
  • The existence of this Earth was revealed in an interview with Mike Carlin and will appear in a future issue of Countdown.[24]
Pending publication.
(unknown) Post-52 Characters created for the Tangent Comics imprint.
  • In Countdown #41, a picture showing characters from various alternate universes show the Tangent Universe's Atom and Green Lantern.
  • In Countdown #40, a female Monitor is shown to be the Monitor for this "tangential" Earth.
Pending publication.
(unknown) Post-52 Characters shown in the JLA: The Nail mini-series.
  • The Countdown: Arena website mentions the world of JLA: The Nail as one of the alternate universes within the current Multiverse.
Pending publication.
(unknown) Post-52 Characters shown in the Batman: Thrillkiller collection.
  • Existence of this reality based solely on solicitation information from an issue of Previews.[issue # needed]
  • A world where Bruce Wayne's parents were murdered by their servants and his inheritance is denied by debts, Barbara Gordon is a wealthy heiress following the death of her mother and partners with Richard "Dick Grayson" Gruastark to fight crime in Gotham City.
Pending publication.
(unknown) Post-52 Gender reversed world featuring Superwoman and Batwoman.
  • Existence of this reality based solely on solicitation information from DC Comics.[25]
Pending publication.
Antimatter Universe Pre-Crisis on Infinite Earths Anti-Monitor, the Crime Syndicate of Amerika,[11] the Sinestro Corps, and the Weaponers of Qward.
  • The Antimatter universe is a "universe of evil". It survived the events of Crisis on Infinite Earths and Infinite Crisis and exists alongside the fifty-two positive-matter alternate universes.
  • Referred to as "Sector -1" by the Green Lantern Corps.[citation needed]
Green Lantern #2 (1960)

The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, also known as Karen Starr) is a DC Comics superhero, making her first appearance in All Star Comics #58 (January/February 1976). ... Not to be confused with Kal-El, the mainstream Superman. ... The Crime Syndicate of America, also known as CSA and Crime Syndicate of Amerika, is a fictional team of supervillains from one of DC Comics parallel universes, and are the evil counterparts of the Justice League of America. ... Talon is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics universe who was first mentioned in Teen Titans #38. ... Duela Dent is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Big C logo, used from Sept. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... Nightshade (Eve Eden) is a fictional character, a superheroine who was owned and published by Charlton Comics and was later acquired by DC Comics. ... The Peacemaker is the name of a series of superheroes originally owned by Charlton Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ... A Charlton Comics super hero created in 1965 by writer Joe Gill & artist Frank McLaughlin in Special War Series #4 Cover. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... The Marvel Family is a group of fictional characters, a team of superheroes in the Fawcett Comics and DC Comics universes. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Lord Havok is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain, part of the evil gang called Extremists. ... The Extremists are a team of supervillains in DC Comics Justice League titles. ... Crack Comics #1 (May, 1940), featuring the Clock, previously introduced as the first masked comic book superhero. ... In the Golden Age of Comic Books of the 1940s, Will Eisner created a superhero version of Uncle Sam for Quality Comics. ... Freedom Fighters is the name of a DC Comics comic book superhero team made up of characters acquired from the defunct company Quality Comics. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... JL-Axis (Justice League-Axis) is the counterpart of the Justice League of America on Earth-10, a Nazi-dominated alternate world in DC Comics newly re-established Multiverse. ... The National Socialist German Workers Party (German: , or NSDAP, commonly known as the Nazi Party), was a political party in Germany between 1919 and 1945. ... Batman Beyond (known as Batman of the Future in Europe, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand and India) is an American animated television series created by The WB Television Network in collaboration with DC Comics as a continuation of the Batman legacy. ... An image of many of the DCAU heroes. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... This article is about the comic book series. ... For other uses, see Swamp Thing (disambiguation). ... Hellblazer is a contemporary horror comic book series published by the Vertigo imprint of DC Comics. ... Lets us talks some realities here before we get into the fictional works here. ... Atomic Knight is a DC Comics superhero and was briefly a member of the Outsiders team. ... ... Kingdom Come was a four-issue comic book limited series published in 1996 by DC Comics. ... Captain Carrot is a comic book superhero who appeared in a series published by DC Comics. ... Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew is a DC Comics comic book about a team of funny animal superheroes called the Zoo Crew. ... Spoiler warning: Superman: Red Son is a comic book published by DC Comics unveiled under their Elseworlds imprint in April, 2003. ... Spoiler warning: Superman: Red Son is a comic book published by DC Comics unveiled under their Elseworlds imprint in April, 2003. ... Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... Star Boy is the name of several comic book characters owned by DC Comics. ... Weather Wizard is the name of a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ... The Shade is quite distinct from Shade, the Changing Man, who was a separate character entirely. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... Forerunner is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wildstorm Wildstorm Productions, or simply WildStorm, is an American publisher of comic books. ... Mr. ... Gen13 is a comic book originally written by Jim Lee and Brandon Choi and illustrated by J. Scott Campbell. ... It has been suggested that Wildcats v2 be merged into this article or section. ... For The Authority in the trilogy His Dark Materials, see The Authority (His Dark Materials). ... WildStorm Productions, or simply WildStorm or Wildstorm, is a publishing imprint and studio of American comic book publisher DC Comics. ... Tangent Comics was a DC Comics imprint created in 1997-1998, developed from ideas created by Dan Jurgens. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... The Anti-Monitor is a fictional comic book supervillain, the antagonist of the 1985 DC Comics miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... The Crime Syndicate of America, also known as CSA and Crime Syndicate of Amerika, is a fictional team of supervillains from one of DC Comics parallel universes, and are the evil counterparts of the Justice League of America. ... The Sinestro Corps is a group of fictional characters, a villainous analogue to the Green Lantern Corps in the DC Universe led by the supervillain Sinestro. ... Qward is a fictional world existing within an antimatter universe that is part of the DC Comics universe. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contact between universes

Most inhabitants of the Multiverse are completely unaware of the other universes. The first character recorded to cross the gap between them (chronologically in continuity, not publishing order as this tale was revealed in the series All-Star Squadron in the 1980s) was Uncle Sam of Earth-Two, who accidentally crossed over into Earth-X. (The first published story was Wonder Woman's crossing into an unnamed parallel earth, in Wonder Woman (vol. 1) #59 (1953).) Barry Allen, the Flash of Earth-One became the first recorded individual during the Silver Age to visit another Earth, accidentally vibrating at just the right speed to appear on Earth-Two, where he met Jay Garrick, his Earth-Two counterpart. The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981-1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by DC Comics about the adventures of a large team of superheroes which comprised of most of the feature characters owned by the company that appeared in the Golden Age of Comic Books... In the Golden Age of Comic Books of the 1940s, Will Eisner created a superhero version of Uncle Sam for Quality Comics. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ...


Other characters with super-speed powers have been able to duplicate the trick, but it has not been done routinely. Magic and technological devices have done the job as well. The Justice League of America's "transmatter" device (ordinarily used to transport between their satellite headquarters and the ground), was pressed into service for annual events in which the League and some of their counterparts on other Earths faced a universe-crossing "crisis" of one sort or another. Wonder Woman's invisible jet was also shown to be able to vibrate her across the multiversal barrier (Wonder Woman (vol. 1) #300), and she also crossed over when her magic lasso was struck by lightning (Wonder Woman (vol. 1) #59). Superman could travel to other Earths at will while Captain Marvel used the magical Rock of Eternity that granted him access to any of the Earths. This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


Writers have occasionally put characters from different Earths together in the same story without explanation, a continuity error often cited as a reason for eliminating the Multiverse in Crisis on Infinite Earths or as an extension of "Earth-B" (cited by DC staff[citation needed] as the setting for team-up stories told in The Brave and the Bold which did not always conform to established continuity for Earth-One, or any other established Earth). For instance, one such story featured Catwoman committing murder, which neither the Earth-One nor Earth-Two versions would ever do as it was strictly against either character's moral code. In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ...


Earth-616, Marvel's main universe, is typically acknowledged as being part of a different multiverse entirely; in the JLA/Avengers crossover, even after the barriers between Earth-616 and the post-Crisis DC Earth had been deliberately weakened, it was incredibly hard to make the voyage. In the fictional Marvel Universe, Earth-616 or Earth 616 is the name used to identify the primary continuity in which most Marvel Comics titles take place. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Within Marvel Comics, most tales take place within the fictional Marvel Universe, this in turn is part of a larger multiverse. ... JLA/Avengers was a 4-issue comic book mini-series jointly published by Marvel Comics and DC Comics in late 2003 through early 2004. ...


Trade paperback

Contact between the universes (or stories set on the other Earths) have been reprinted in the following graphic novels:

Title Material collected
Crisis On Multiple Earths: The Team Ups
Volume 1 The Flash #123, 129, 137, 151
Showcase #55-56
Green Lantern #40
The Brave and the Bold #61
The Spectre #7
Volume 2 The Atom #29, 36
The Brave and the Bold #62
The Flash #170, 173
Green Lantern #45, 52
The Spectre #3
(Scheduled for March 2007)[1]
Crisis On Multiple Earths
Volume 1 Justice League of America #21-22, 29-30, 37-38, 46-47
Volume 2 Justice League of America #55-56, 64-65, 73-74, 82-82
Volume 3 Justice League of America #91-92, 100-102, 107-108, 113
Volume 4 Justice League of America #123-124, 135-137, 147-148
Justice Society
Volume 1 All Star Comics #58-67
DC Special #29
Volume 2 All Star Comics #68-74
Adventure Comics #461-466
Miniseries
Crisis on Infinite Earths #1-12
Infinite Crisis #1-7
One Shots
Power Girl Showcase #97-99
Secret Origins #11
JSA Classified #1-4
(Contains a few plot related pages from JSA #32 and 39)
Showcase Presents: Shazam Shazam (1973-1978) #1-20, 26-33
(Stories are set on Earth-S)
Huntress: Dark Knight Daughter DC Comics Super Stars #11
Batman Family
Wonder Woman #271-287, 289-290, 294-295

The Flash. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... Adventure Comics #296 Adventure Comics is a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, also known as Karen Starr) is a DC Comics superhero, making her first appearance in All Star Comics #58 (January/February 1976). ... Brian Bollands cover to the 1989 Secret Origins collection. ... Showcase Presents is a line of black & white paperback books published by DC Comics. ... The Huntress is a superheroine from DC Comics. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ...

Representations in other media

The Super Friends have had crossovers with other universes; in the episode "Universe of Evil", a freak accident causes Superman to switch places with his evil counterpart. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The DC animated universe (DCAU) has depicted the Multiverse. Several characters from the main DCAU have visited parallel universes that were similar to the DCAU: An image of many of the DCAU heroes. ...

  • In the Superman: The Animated Series episode "Brave New Metropolis", Lois Lane fell into a parallel Earth where Superman and Lex Luthor had taken over Metropolis, turning it into a fascist police-state.
  • In the Justice League episode "Legends", several members of the League were accidentally sent to a parallel universe where John Stewart's comic-book idols, a pastiche of the Justice Society of America named the Justice Guild of America, live. One member of the Justice Guild hypothesized that there are an infinite number of parallel dimensions.
  • In the Justice League episode "A Better World", the Justice League were held captive by their authoritarian counterparts from another universe, the "Justice Lords". In this universe, Lex Luthor had risen to the U.S. Presidency, and had started a war which had killed the Flash, sparking the Lords' takeover of the world. (Later in the series, the regular Lex Luthor ran for President solely to enrage Superman.)
  • In the Justice League Unlimited episode "Question Authority", the Question is surfing through Cadmus's files on a computer, one of the files is titled "Multiverse".

In an interview, Teen Titans producer Glen Murakami stated, possibly as a joke, that the show did not exist in the DCAU continuity, but instead took place on "Earth-T."[citation needed] Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Justice Guild as shown in the Justice League series The Justice Guild of America is a superhero team featured in the Justice League animated series two-part episode Legends, a homage to the Golden Age Justice Society of America, and to a degree the Silver Age Justice League of America. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... The Justice Lords. ... Lex Luthor (Alexander Luthor) is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and is the primary antagonist of the Superman franchise. ... The Flash. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Teen Titans is an American animated television series created by Sam Register and Glen Murakami and produced by Warner Bros. ... Glen Murakami has worked on several television programs, most notably for the DC Animated Universe, especially the animated series of the Teen Titans. ...


Other Version

Teen Titans Go #48 introduces it's own Multiverse. Each version pays references to various incarnation of the Teen Titans. The worlds shown: Teen Titans Go! is a 2000s comic book published by DC Comics. ...

  • The majority of the story is set on a world which is menaced by the Teen Tyrants (Evil Teen Titans), and is defended by The Brotherhood of Justice (Heroic versions of the Brotherhood of Evil).
  • Malchior's (from the Teen Titan episode Spellbound) homeworld.
  • A world containing the Teen Lobo.
  • A world consisting of the Animalistic Teen Titans (from the Teen Titans episode Bunny Raven).
  • Another future timeline with Nightwing (from the Teen Titans episode How Long Is Forever).
  • A world consisting of the Chibi Titans.
  • A world in which the Teen Titans (As depicted in the Silver Age comics) consist of Robin, Speedy, Wonder Girl, Aqualad and Kid Flash.
  • The home of Larry The Titan.
  • A futuristic world where the Teen Titans consist of Nightwing (a vampirish version), Battalion (who resembles Cyborg), Mirage (who resembles Raven) and Killowat

The Brotherhood of Evil is a group of DC Comics supervillains, arch-enemies of the original Doom Patrol and the Teen Titans. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Battalion is a DC Comics Team Titan member who appeared in Team Titans #2 dubbed the Drill Sargent from Hell. ... Character history Killowat Killowats story began 10 years in the future; Or, rather, the false future where Lord Chaos reigned and a force known as the Team Titans struggled to overthrow his tyranny. ...

Parodies

In the Futurama episode "The Farnsworth Parabox", the characters meet versions of themselves from an alternate reality. They argue over which universe should be named "Universe A" until one group decides to be "Universe 1." Futurama is an animated American cartoon series created by Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons) and David X. Cohen (also a writer for The Simpsons). ... “The Farnsworth Parabox” is the fifteenth episode of the fourth production season of Futurama. ...


Bongo Comics published a comic book series featuring characters from Simpsons and Futurama titled Futurama/Simpsons Infinitely Secret Crossover Crisis. One of the conventions of DC's multiverse that the series parodies is the existence of one universe's characters as fictional comic book characters in another. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... The Futurama/Simpsons Infinitely Secret Crossover Crisis is a two part crossover between the animated series Futurama and The Simpsons. ...


References

  1. ^ Infinite Crisis #6
  2. ^ Wizard Entertainment: ‘52’ ROUNDUP Week 52
  3. ^ a b c d e Newsarama.com: WW: CHICAGO '07: DAN DIDIO ON COUNTDOWN: ARENA
  4. ^ Newsarama.com: BALTIMORE COMIC-CON 07: DC NATION PANEL REPORT
  5. ^ a b c Green Lantern Sinestro Corps Special #1 (2007)
  6. ^ a b Countdown #39
  7. ^ Infinite Crisis #1-7
  8. ^ Countdown #40
  9. ^ Countdown #51
  10. ^ a b DC Comics' solicitation for Countdown Presents: The Search for Ray Palmer: The Crime Syndicate
  11. ^ a b c Comic Book Resources: CCI: DC NEW WORLD ORDER
  12. ^ Wizard Entertainment: KEEPING COUNT
  13. ^ Newsarama.com: SEAN MCKEEVER ON THE SEARCH FOR RAY AND THE JOKESTER
  14. ^ Sean McKeever Store: Countdown Presents the Search for Ray Palmer: Crime Society
  15. ^ Jamal Igle.com: The Next Project
  16. ^ Newsarama.com: A QUICK CHECK-IN WITH JAMAL IGLE
  17. ^ DC Comics Solicitations for October 2007. Newsarama (2007-07-14). Retrieved on 2007-07-15.
  18. ^ Solicitation information for: Countdown Presents: Lord Havok and the Extremists #1. Retrieved on 2007-08-04.
  19. ^ a b c d DiDio, Dan (2007-09-05). "DC Nation 77". [All comics published in the week.]. 
  20. ^ Newsarama.com: WW CHICAGO: THE DC NATION PANEL
  21. ^ DC Comics' solicitation for Countdown to Adventure #3
  22. ^ Countdown to Adventure #1
  23. ^ COUNTING DOWN WITH MIKE MARTS: COUNTDOWN #45
  24. ^ COUNTING DOWN: MIKE CARLIN ON COUNTDOWN #30
  25. ^ Newsarama.com: DC COMICS SOLICITATIONS FOR DECEMBER 2007

Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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