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Encyclopedia > Multinational force in Iraq

The Multi-National Force - Iraq (MNF-I), is a military command, led by the United States, that is fighting the Iraq War against the multitude of Iraqi insurgents. Multi-National Force - Iraq replaced the previous force, Combined Joint Task Force 7, on May 15, 2004. A command in military organization is a collection of units or a group of personnel under the control of a single officer. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The media normally use the term U.S.-led coalition to describe this force, since nearly 92% of the troops are from the United States. However, the majority of nations that did deploy troops either confined their men to their bases due to widespread violence, or issued specific orders to avoid hostile engagement (especially true of the Spanish commanded Plus Ultra Brigade).[1] Thus, the term 'US-led coalition', when used in the context of combat operations, can be considered inaccurate, as the United Kingdom, Poland and Australia are the only nations engaged in occasional raids. Multinational troops near the ancient city of Babylon The Plus Ultra Brigade, or Brigada Hispanoamericana, was a military contingent of mixed personnel from Spain (some 1,300 troops) , the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua (about 1,200 troops between the four), which was commissioned to support coalition troops...

Contents

2003 invasion of Iraq

Four countries participated with troops during the initial invasion (termed the Major Combat Operations phase), which lasted from March 19 to May 1. These were the United States (250,000), United Kingdom (45,000), Australia (2,000), and Poland (194). is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Troop deployment in Iraq 2003-present

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Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Honduras. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Dominican_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Singapore. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tonga. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iceland. ... Sgt. ... The 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force (II MEF), one of three MEFs in the Marine Corps, is a combined arms force consisting of ground, air, and logistics forces possessing the capability of projecting offensive combat power ashore while sustaining itself in combat without external assistance for a period of 60... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ... Al Anbar (Arabic: ) is a province in the nation of Iraq. ... Asad is a Arabic name. ... This article is about the city. ... Sgt. ... The 1st Cavalry Division (1st Cav Div) is a heavy armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Fort Hood, Texas. ... Inside view of the terminal, showing an abandoned FIDS in front of empty check-in desks and passport control. ... Taji, located 30 km North of Baghdad, was the primary location for Iraqs indigenous long-range missile program. ... Iskandaria is a small Iraqi town about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of Baghdad, near the Euphrates River. ... Sgt. ... Al Diwaniyah (Arabic: ‎ ; BGN: Ad DÄ«wānÄ«yah; also spelled Diwaniya) is the capital city of Iraqs Al Qadisiyah province. ... KÅ«t (كوت; also known as Kut-Al-Imara and Kut El Amara) is a city in eastern Iraq, on the left bank of the Tigris River, about 100 miles south east of Baghdad, at 32. ... Al Hillah is a city in central Iraq on the river Euphrates, 100 km (62 miles) south of Baghdad, with an estimated population of 364,700 in 1998. ... // Karbala (Arabic: ; BGN: Al-Karbalā’; also spelled Karbala al-Muqaddasah) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... Najaf (Arabic: ‎; BGN: An Najaf) is a city in Iraq about 160 km south of Baghdad. ... Sgt. ... In American military history, the 25th Infantry Division (nicknamed Tropic Lightning) is a large military unit associated with operations in the Asia-Pacific region. ... Looking north along the Tigris towards Saddams Presidential palace in April 2003 Tikrit (تكريت, TikrÄ«t also transliterated as Takrit or Tekrit) is a town in Iraq, located 140 km northwest of Baghdad on the Tigris river (at 34. ... Baqubah (Arabic: ‎; BGN: Ba‘qÅ«bah; also spelled Baquba and Baqouba) is the capital of Iraqs Diyala Governorate. ... Mosul (Arabic: , Kurdish: موصل Mûsil, Syriac: NînÄ›wâ, Turkish: Musul) is a city in northern Iraq and the capital of the Ninawa Governorate. ... Kirkuk (also spelled Karkuk or Kerkuk; Arabic: كركوك, KirkÅ«k; Kurdish: كه‌ركووك, Kerkûk; Syriac: ܐܪܦܗܐ, Arrapha; Persian: کرکوک; Turkish: Kerkük) is a city in northern Iraq and capital of Taamim Governorate. ... Balad (Arabic: بلد) is a city 50 miles (80 kilometres) north of Baghdad in Iraq. ... Balad Air Base control tower The Sustainer Theater at Camp Anaconda. ... Multi-National Division (South-East) (MND(SE)) is a British commanded division responsible for security in the south east of Iraq. ... This article is about the city of Basra. ... NāşirÄ«yah (also transliterated as Nassiriya or Nasiriya; in Arabic الناصرية, al-Nasiriyah or an-Nasiriyah) is a city in Iraq. ... Ali Air Base (ICAO: ORTL) is an air base located near Nasiriyah, Iraq. ... Samawah or As Samawah (Arabic language:السماوة) is a city in Iraq, 280 km southeast of Baghdad. ... Amarah (sometimes written al-Amarah), is a city in southeastern Iraq, located next to the Tigris River waterway south of Baghdad, at 32°10N 46°03E. Predominately Shiite, it had a population of about 340,000 as of 2002. ... This article is about the city of Basra. ... Balad Air Base control tower The Sustainer Theater at Camp Anaconda. ... Balad Air Base control tower The Sustainer Theater at Camp Anaconda. ...

Occupation of Iraq

Occupation zones in Iraq as of September 2003
Occupation zones in Iraq as of September 2003

According to the Bush administration, its allies, and the U.S. military; the occupation ended on June 28, 2004, but Iraqis and non-Iraqis who reject the presence of foreign soldiers in Iraq staunchly believe it continued. Indeed, the expulsion of occupation forces is the main objective of Iraqi guerrilla fighters who launched a widespread and deadly guerrilla war against, primarily, American troops (specifically U.S. Marines in Al Anbar Province and the U.S. Army in and around Baghdad), the security forces of the US-influenced and Shi'ite-dominated Iraqi government, and later Shi'ite civilians perceived as supporting the occupation. Polls conducted by American companies have found that a majority of Iraqi citizens are not only against the occupation, but support attacks on foreign soldiers. Additionally, Iran and Syria are strongly opposed to the presence of U.S. troops in Iraq, and there have been widespread protests demanding the withdrawal of troops in several countries, the largest of which occurred in the United States, the UK, South Korea, Spain and Italy. President Bush has continuously rejected the rationale of the insurgents, claiming that "...what is causing violence in Iraq is the fact that Iraq is heading toward freedom."[citation needed] Map: occupation (stabilization) zones in Iraq, September 2003 Made by Kpalion File links The following pages link to this file: Post-invasion Iraq, 2003-2005 Categories: GFDL images ... Map: occupation (stabilization) zones in Iraq, September 2003 Made by Kpalion File links The following pages link to this file: Post-invasion Iraq, 2003-2005 Categories: GFDL images ... Belligerent military occupation occurs when the control and authority over a territory belonging to a state passes to a hostile army. ... The Presidency of George W. Bush, also known as the George W. Bush Administration, began on his inauguration on January 20, 2001 as the 43rd and current President of the United States of America. ... Belligerent military occupation occurs when the control and authority over a territory belonging to a state passes to a hostile army. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Iraqi insurgency denotes groups using armed resistance against the US-led Coalition occupation of Iraq. ... “Guerrilla” redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Al Anbar (Arabic: ‎ ) is an overwhelmingly Sunni Arab province of Iraq. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ...


The United States deployed more than seven-eighths of the soldiers in the occupying coalition with the majority of other troops coming from the United Kingdom and the rest made up from several other allies. Although their status as Coalition Provisional Authority, or "Occupying Powers" under a United Nations resolution, changed when the new government came to power on June 28, although still heavily influenced by the massive U.S. military and diplomatic presence in the country.[2] The Seal of the CPA in Iraq The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) was established as a transitional government following the invasion of Iraq by the United States, United Kingdom and the other members of the multinational coalition which was formed to oust the government of Saddam Hussein in 2003. ... A United Nations resolution (or UN resolution) is a formal text adopted by a United Nations (UN) body. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On May 10, 2007, 144 Iraqi Parliamentary lawmakers signed onto a legislative petition calling on the United States to set a timetable for withdrawal.[3] On June 3, 2007, the Iraqi Parliament voted 85 to 59 to require the Iraqi government to consult with Parliament before requesting additional extensions of the UN Security Council Mandate for Coalition operations in Iraq.[4] The current UN mandate expires in December 2007.[5] is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Mission objectives according to the US Military

Dispositions of U.S. and allied units in the different occupation zones as of 30 April 2004
Dispositions of U.S. and allied units in the different occupation zones as of 30 April 2004

MNF-I objectives as of May 2006 [citation needed] Image File history File links Coaltion_force_in_Iraq_map_30_Apr_04. ... Image File history File links Coaltion_force_in_Iraq_map_30_Apr_04. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...

  • Iraq is at peace with its neighbors
  • Iraq is an ally in the War on Terror
  • Iraq has a representative government that respects the human rights of all Iraqis
  • Iraq has a security force that can maintain domestic order and deny Iraq as a safe haven for terrorists

The government of Iraq enjoys broad international support, including from nations of the Arab League. Jordan is assisting in training of the Iraqi Security Forces, and the United Arab Emirates have donated military equipment (bought from Switzerland), for example. Headquarters Cairo, Egypt1 Official languages Arabic Membership 22 Arab states 2 observer states Leaders  -  Secretary General Amr Moussa (since 2001)  -  Council of the Arab League Sudan  -  Speaker of the Arab Parliament Nabih Berri Establishment  -  Alexandria Protocol March 22, 1945  Area  -  Total 13,953,041 (Western Sahara Included) = 13,687,041... Iraqi army soldiers from 4th Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 5th Division stand outside an Iraqi army compound in Buhriz, Iraq, Jan. ...


Iraq is, nominally, a pluralistic democracy. The US-influenced Constitution of Iraq[6] guarantees freedoms of speech, assembly and religion, private ownership of property, privacy and equality before the law, as well as total immunity to all occupying troops in the country. The first parliamentary elections occurred in December, 2005. The current constitution of Iraq was approved by a referendum that took place on 15 October 2005. ... Iraqis in the predominantly Sunni city of Husaybah, wait in lines to vote, during the national election, December 15. ...


As of September 2006, in theory, 302,000 Iraqi security forces have been trained and equipped. However, there have frequent reports of Iraqi personnel being poorly armed, trained and motivated; suffering heavy casualties and in many instances deserting or failing to report for duty.[7] By the end of 2006, MNF-I believes that all 325,000 planned ISF members will be trained and equipped. ISF may be fully capable of maintaining domestic order sometime in 2007, perhaps with coalition help in logistics, close-air support and medical assistance, according to the US military.[citation needed]


In November 2006, the United Nations Security Council voted to extend the mandate of the multinational force in Iraq until the end of 2007. The move was requested by the Iraqi government, which said the troops were needed for another year while it built up its own security forces.[8] “Security Council” redirects here. ... The politics of Iraq takes place in a framework of a more or less federal parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the Prime Minister of Iraq is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... Iraqi army soldiers from 4th Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 5th Division stand outside an Iraqi army compound in Buhriz, Iraq, Jan. ...


List of nations in the coalition

More than 10,000 soldiers

Distinctive unit insignia of the Multi-National Force - Iraq (MNF-I)
  • Flag of the United States United States - As of October 2007, there were around 168,000[9] Army, Navy, Coast Guard, Air Force, and Marine Corps personnel deployed to the western, northern and central regions of Iraq. The latest figure includes the 28,500 troops sent to Iraq as part of the troop surge plan, which began in early 2007. An additional 30,000 troops are deployed in the Gulf region.[10] As of 8 October, 2007, a total of 3,817 American military personnel (including all branches of the military) had been killed in Iraq: 3,123 in engagements and ambushes (assault rifle and sniper fire; RPG, primitive rocket and mortar attacks; the shooting down of several helicopters and a jet; but mostly roadside bombings) as well as vehicle accidents which occurred as a result of hostile fire. A further 694 were killed in non-hostile incidents including a small number of drownings, illnesses and electrocutions, but mostly vehicle accidents, weapon accidents and suicides (at least 122 of the latter have been confirmed by the U.S. Department of Defense, as of 8/31/2007). As of 31 August 2007; at least 65,588 American military personnel have fallen ill, been wounded or injured: 36,943 of these requiring medical evacuation. Four soldiers are currently listed as captured. The Iraq war has caused considerable debate in the United States, with a majority of Senators demanding a timed withdrawal due to considerable casualties and a lack of progress. The US military itself has encountered some difficulties in sustaining such large deployments, and to this effect extended tours of duty and relaxed restrictions regarding volunteers with a criminal history under the so-called Moral Waiver. Both of these changes are expected to increase the probability of violence against Iraqi non-combatants.[11][12]

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Multi-National Force - Iraq (MNF-I) replaced Combined Joint Task Force 7 on May 15, 2004. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... USN redirects here. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... “The New Way Forward” redirects here. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... All of the branches of the United States Military have minimum standards of Education, Age, Physical Condition and Previous Criminal Convictions for recruitment. ...

More than 1,000 soldiers (currently)

  • Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom - 5,250 troops in Southern Iraq as of October 2007[13], leading the Multi-National Division (South East) which includes troops from several other countries. The deployment includes infantry, mechanized infantry and armored units as well as water-borne patrol personnel and a range of aircraft. On October 8, 2007, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown announced that the British contingent would be reduced to 4,500 by the end of the year, and cut further to 2,500 in Spring 2008. He added that 500 troops would be sent to bases in the Persian Gulf region to fulfill a supporting role.[14] On September 2, 2007, British forces withdrew from their last base in Basra, re-locating to the international airport outside the city and thus handing over nominal control to Iraqi forces[15]. The development came amid outspoken misgivings regarding the British presence from both the Bush Administration and British military leadership. After the invasion (which involved 45,000 British troops), approximately 8,500 troops were stationed in the south of the country, but 1,300 were withdrawn in early 2006.[16] On February 20, 2007, the British government declared that British soldiers would begin a timetabled withdrawal from Iraq, and 1,600 personnel had returned from Iraq by the end of February[17]. Former Prime Minister Tony Blair had considered an expansion of up to 2,000 troops during 2004 to replace those of Spain and other departing nations, however, military commanders and former diplomats criticizing U.S. military tactics put that into question and the idea was eventually shelved. The UK has lost 170 soldiers in Iraq as of October 9, 2007: 133 in ambushes, engagements, bombings or other attacks (including the shooting down of a C-130 Hercules transport plane which killed 10 soldiers). Out of the remaining 37, the cause of death included accidents, 'friendly fire' incidents, illnesses, and suicide. Between January 1 2003 and March 31 2007, 1,747 British personnel were wounded; 844 of whom required aeromedical evacuation. See Operation Telic for further information.
  • Flag of Georgia (country) Georgia - 2,000 troops deployed near the Iranian border as of October 8, 2007[18] (previously 850). Georgia's contribution to the Coalition originally consisted of 300 special forces troops under U.S. command in Baqouba, who guarded two bridges as well as American Forward Operating Bases 'Caldwell', 'Warhorse' and 'Gabe'. 550 more forces were deployed in June 2005 for UNAMI, although these were placed under U.S. command on a dangerous 'Middle Ring Security' mission in the Green Zone[19]. On March 9, 2007, Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili announced his plans to increase total Georgian troop strength in Iraq to 2000, by sending an extra 1,200 troops and moving those already in Iraq to join the new unit[20]. Several soldiers have been wounded.
  • Flag of Australia Australia - Australian involvement in Iraq (designated Operation Catalyst by the Australian military) consists of around 1,000 troops divided amongst several specialized units in and around the country, with several hundred personnel jointly supporting Australian military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan (the latter are collectively designated Operation Slipper). On 17 November 2007, an Australian opposition party spokesman said that 550 combat troops would be withdrawn from Iraq if his centre-left Australian Labor Party were to win national elections set for 24 November 2007, leaving around 500 non-combat troops in the country.[21] The largest contribution is the Overwatch Battle Group (West), based at Camp Terendak in Talil (Southern Iraq) and consisting of 515 soldiers. This unit was previously known as the Al Muthanna Task Group, which had about 450 troops and was deployed on February 22, 2005 for the purpose of replacing the withdrawn Dutch contingent. Other Army deployments include a security detachment (SECDET) composed of 110 troops protecting the Australian embassy in Baghdad, an Australian Army training team of 100 troops, 95 liaison officers distributed throughout Iraq, a small number of Australian troops as part of the Coalition Counter IED Task Force, and 110 personnel who form a 'Force Level Logistic Asset', fulfilling a support role. The Royal Australian Air Force has deployed three C-130 Hercules transport aircraft (~330 personnel). Jointly supporting operations in Iraq and Afghanistan are periodic rotations of Anzac class frigates in the Persian Gulf, currently the HMAS Anzac[22] (~170 personnel), and two Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft.[23]. There have been several injuries but no deaths of Australian troops in Iraq attributed to hostile action, however, a SASR commando was killed in a vehicle accident in Kuwait, and a soldier Jacob Kovco assigned to the Baghdad SECDET, died from an accidental discharge of his pistol.[24] (See also: Australian contribution to the 2003 invasion of Iraq)
  • Flag of South Korea South Korea - 1,200 troops in north-eastern Iraq as of October 2007. The country's contingent peaked at 3,600 during 2005, however, 1,300 troops were withdrawn in early 2006 following a December 2005 vote by the National Assembly[25] (10-3 with one abstention). Another 1,200 troops were sent home in early 2007, and it was widely assumed that a complete pullout would take place by the beginning of 2008, when the deployment mandate was set to expire[26]. However, on October 23, 2007, South Korean President Roh Moo-Hyun announced that the mandate would be extended for another year, although the size of the contingent will be halved to 600[27]. The decision to yet again renew the mandate came just several weeks away from December elections in South Korea, during which the extremely unpopular military deployment to Iraq is expected to become a significant issue. The main task of the South Korean contingent has been to provide medical services and to build and repair roads, power lines, schools and other public works. The original contingent consisted of 3,000 soldiers, mostly combat engineers of the Zaytun ("olive-peace") Division, who were deployed in late September 2004 to Irbil in the Kurdish-controlled region of northern Iraq and converged with the 600 humanitarian troops that had been operating in southern Iraq since April 2003. Although South Korea has the third-largest contingent in Iraq, it has suffered only one fatality. The AP newswire reported on 20th May 2007 that an officer had been shot dead on the South Korean base. The only other deaths attributed to their presence have been accidents involving both South Korean and Iraqi civilians.

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Multi-National Division (South-East) (MND(SE)) is a British commanded division responsible for security in the south east of Iraq. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Military tactics (Greek: Taktikē, the art of organizing an army) are the collective name for methods for engaging and defeating an enemy in battle. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is a four-engine turboprop cargo aircraft and the main tactical airlifter for many military forces worldwide. ... For other uses, see Friendly Fire (disambiguation). ... Operation (or Op) TELIC is the codename under which all British operations of the 2003 Invasion of Iraq and after are being conducted. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Georgia. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Baghdad International Airport and the Green Zone. ... Mikhail Saakashvili briefing the press at UN headquarters Mikhail Saakashvili (Georgian: მიხეილ სააკაშვილი) (born December 21, 1967, in Tbilisi) is a Georgian jurist and politician and the current President of Georgia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... An Australian SAS patrol in western Iraq. ... Operation Slipper is the Australian Defence Force (ADF)contribution to the International Coalition against Terrorism. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Australian ASLAVs en-route to OBG(W)s base at Tallil Overwatch Battle Group (West) is an Australian Army battlegroup and represents Australias largest contribution to to the Multinational force in Iraq. ... Australian soldiers supported by an ASLAV-25 patrol along a railway line near Camp Smitty during routine foot patrols in Al Muthanna Province. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... Munitions rigged for an IED discovered by Iraqi police in Baghdad, November 2005. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is a four-engine turboprop cargo aircraft and the main tactical airlifter for many military forces worldwide. ... A large military cargo aircraft: the Boeing C-17A Globemaster III A cargo aircraft is an airplane designed and used for the carriage of goods, rather than passengers. ... HMAS Anzac operating in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. ... Three ships of the Royal Australian Navy have been named HMAS Anzac after the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, which came into definite use in January, 1915: The first Anzac (G-00) was a Marksman-class destroyer commissioned in 1920 and paid off in 1931. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... The Lockheed P-3 Orion is a maritime patrol aircraft of numerous militaries around the world, used primarily for maritime patrol, reconnaissance, and anti-submarine warfare. ... The Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) is a special forces regiment modelled on the original British SAS and also drawing on the traditions of the Australian World War II Z Special Force commando unit. ... Private Kovco in Uniform Jacob (Jake) Bruce Kovco (born 25 September, 1980, Melbourne; died 21 April, 2006, Baghdad) was a private in the Australian Defence Forces who died, reportedly of a gunshot wound to the head, while on deployment in Baghdad. ... An Australian SAS patrol in western Iraq. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This is a Korean name; the family name is Roh Roh Moo-hyun (IPA: ) (born September 1, 1946 in Gimhae, South Gyeongsang, South Korea) is the President of South Korea. ... The Zaytun Division is a contingent of Republic of Korea Army troops currently operating in Northern Iraq, carrying out peace-keeping and reconstruction tasks. ...

More than 100 soldiers

  • Flag of Poland Poland - Around 900 troops are currently based at Camp Echo in Diwaniyah and are primarily involved in training local security forces. Poland leads the Multi-National Division (Central South) which consists of forces from several other countries. New Prime Minister Donald Tusk, who had promised to withdraw Poland's troops as soon as possible throughout his election campaign hopes to complete the withdrawal by mid-2008, but conservative President Lech Kaczynski, a staunch supporter of the Polish mission in Iraq, could veto the decision if he deems it too hasty[28]. Nevertheless, P.M. Tusk has insisted that the Polish mission will definitely end by the end of the year[29]. In accordance with the decision of the former Polish Minister of Defense Jerzy Szmajdziński, the number of troops was reduced from 2,500 to 1,500 during the second half of 2005. Poland's former leftist government, which lost September 25, 2005 elections, had planned to withdraw the remaining 1,500 troops in January. However, the new defense minister, Radosław Sikorski, visited Washington on December 3 for talks on Poland's coalition plans, and Prime Minister Kazimierz Marcinkiewicz declared that he would decide after the Iraqi elections on December 15, whether to extend its troops' mandate beyond December 31.[30] On Tuesday 22 December, Prime Minister Marcinkiewicz announced that he had asked President Lech Kaczyński to keep Polish troops in Iraq for another year, calling it "a very difficult decision."[31] On January 5, 2006, Polish troops handed over control of the central Babil province to U.S. troops and decided to remain on bases in Kut and Diwaniyah for the remainder of their mandate,[32] cutting their contingent from 1,500 troops to 900 troops two months later,[33] and switching their main objective from patrolling their Den sector to the training of Iraqi security forces. Poland has lost 20 soldiers in Iraq: 14 in bombings or ambushes and 6 in various accidents. In addition, a Polish Government Protection Bureau agent was killed in an October 2007 ambush while escorting the Polish ambassador (and former commander of Polish forces in Iraq) Edward Pietrzyk through a Baghdad district. In July 2004, Al Zarqawi released a statement threatening Japan, Poland and Bulgaria over their troop deployments. He demanded of the Polish government 'Pull your troops out of Iraq or you will hear the sounds of explosions that will hit your country.' Hours later Prime Minister Marek Belka denied, and deputy Defence Minister Janusz Zemke said pulling out would be a 'terrible mistake.'
  • Flag of Romania Romania - 405[34] troops divided intro three different command zones (South-East, South Central, and Baghdad). They conduct a wide range of missions including prisoner interrogation at Camp Cropper and Camp Bucca; reconnaissance and surveillance missions (including the use of UAVs) in the Polish Sector; and training, patrolling and base security missions in the British Sector. The previous contingent numbered approximately 730 personnel, including 400 infantry, 100 military police, 150 de-miners, 30 medics, plus 50 intelligence officers stationed north of Baghdad.[35] Romanian President Traian Basescu announced on August 30, 2006 that, within two months, Romania would withdraw its troops from Iraq. However, on November 8, 2006, Romanian Defense Minister Sorin Frunzaverde stated that there was to be no scheduled withdrawal.[36] The troops' presence in Iraq has become a contentious issue in domestic politics, with Prime Minister Calin Popescu Tariceanu calling for their return home, while President Traian Basescu, who is commander in chief, decided they should stay.[37] One Romanian soldier died in a Kuwaiti hospital, ten days after shooting himself in the head, and another was killed in a roadside bombing (along with three Italians). Four were seriously injured on 14 April 2007 when their vehicle toppled over.[37] On 21 September 2007, one soldier was killed and five more were wounded by an IED.[38] 130 more troops were temporarily deployed for UNAMI.
  • Flag of El Salvador El Salvador - 300 troops from the 'Cuscatlan Battalion' under Polish command (Central South Iraq), based at Camp Delta in Kut. Their mandate has been extended to December 2007. The original contingent of 380 was reduced in August 2007, and further withdrawals are expected[39]. Salvadoran troops provide perimeter security for their base and also guard supply convoys. El Salvador has lost five soldiers in Iraq, four in hostile incidents and one in an accident.[40]
  • Flag of Azerbaijan Azerbaijan - 250 troops under U.S. command. There are conflicting reports as to their duties and whereabouts. It was initially reported that these troops were located in the city of Hadid, in the far north of Iraq. 100 soldiers were apparently sent on December 29, 2004, to reinforce the 150 soldiers already in the country. Their role had supposedly been providing security for the local Turkmen population and guard important sites. However, on April 30, 2007, MNF-I declared that they were located in the vicinity of Haditha Dam in western Iraq, providing security for a nearby US Marine camp, patrolling the dam complex, and escorting and searching Iraqi workers.
  • Flag of Bulgaria Bulgaria - There are currently 155 Bulgarian troops (including 35 support staff) guarding the headquarters of the MEK at Camp Ashraf, 100km west of the Iranian border. This facility is home to 4,000 MEK militants and their massive munitions stocks.[41] This deployment was approved by the Bulgarian parliament on January 17, 2006, with the contingent being deployed on 29 March. The contingent was expected to remain for about a year.[42] Bulgaria withdrew its original contribution of about 485 soldiers in 2005, their objective had been guarding the city center of Diwaniyah, 13 of whom died: 7 in hostile circumstances, 5 in accidents, while one was shot dead by a U.S. soldier. In addition, two Bulgarian truck drivers working for companies serving coalition troops have been captured and killed in Iraq, with another ambushed and killed. Three Bulgarian pilots were killed when their Mi-17 transport helicopter (transporting a team of private military contractors) was shot down in April 2005.

Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Donald Franciszek Tusk (IPA: [], born 22 April 1957, GdaÅ„sk) is a conservative-liberal Polish politician, co-founder and chairman of the Civic Platform (Platforma Obywatelska), and the Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland. ... Jerzy SzmajdziÅ„ski Jerzy SzmajdziÅ„ski (born April 9, 1952) is a Polish minister of defence. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... RadosÅ‚aw Sikorski, Warsaw, 2006 RadosÅ‚aw Radek Sikorski (born February 23, 1963 in Bydgoszcz) is a conservative Polish politician and journalist. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kazimierz Marcinkiewicz ( ) (born December 20, 1959 in Gorzów Wielkopolski) is a Polish politician who served as Prime Minister of Poland from October 2005 to July 2006. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...  , IPA: [] (born June 18, 1949) is the President of the Republic of Poland and a politician of the conservative party Prawo i Sprawiedliwość (Law and Justice, PiS.) KaczyÅ„ski served as President of Warsaw from 2002 until December 22, 2005, the day before his presidential inauguration. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gen. ... Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in one of eight photos from Rewards for Justice, all undated. ... Marek Belka (pronounce: [marεk bεlka]) (b. ... Janusz Zemke (born February 24, 1949 in Kowalewo) is a Polish politician. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_El_Salvador. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Azerbaijan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... MKO Logo The Peoples Mujahedin of Iran (PMOI, also MEK, MKO) (Persian: سازمان مجاهدين خلق ايران sazmaan-e mujahedin-e khalq-e Iran) is a militant political party that advocates overthrowing the government in the Islamic Republic of Iran and replacing it with its own leadership. ...

100 or fewer soldiers

  • Flag of Mongolia Mongolia - 100 infantrymen (previously 160) in a company known as the 'Peacekeeping Operations Battalion' under Polish command. The role of the Mongolian contingent is to provide security at the main Polish base, Camp Echo, by manning guard towers and guarding entry points. Mongolia’s mandate was scheduled to expire in April 2007.
  • Flag of the Czech Republic Czech Republic - 99 troops under British command (South-East Iraq) as of September 3, 2007[43] (reduced from about 300 troops and 3 civilians running a field hospital, first deployed in late 2003). After 2006, the goal changed from training Iraqi police to guarding Shaibah logistics base, internally and externally by means of vehicle checkpoints. On 5 December 2006, the Czech Parliament voted to extend military mission in Iraq until the end of December 2007. One Czech soldier died in May 2003 from injuries sustained in a vehicle accident in Iraq.
  • Flag of Denmark Denmark - As of 1st September 2007, Denmark has 55 troops remaining in Iraq, whose task is to operate a unit of four helicopters in support of British and Iraqi forces until December[44]. A separate unit of 35 troops temporarily served under UNAMI. The original contingent of 430 troops operated under UK command (South-East Iraq), and included military police involved in the training of local security forces as well as infantry. They were based north of Basra at "Camp Danevang". On February 21, 2007, Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen had announced that the withdrawal of Danish troops in Iraq would be completed by August 2007[45], however, on July 26, 2007, it was reported that 250 of the Danish troops had already withdrawn, at least two weeks ahead of schedule[46]. The Danish government repeatedly guaranteed that its forces would remain as long as the Iraqi government requested. On April 28, 2007, the Danish military reported that it was in the process of temporarily deploying an unspecified number of special forces to 'resolve a special problem.'[47] Denmark has lost seven soldiers in Iraq; one to friendly fire, one in a vehicle accident, and five to hostile incidents, while several more have been wounded. In early 2006, the Iraqi insurgency released a statement calling for more attacks on the Danish army in the retaliation to the Danish cartoon controversy.[48] (See also: Dancon/Irak)
  • Flag of Albania Albania - Currently, 70 troops[49] (previously 120) under U.S. command, stationed at Mosul airport, where they man guard towers and conduct internal and external patrols. In December 2006, Albanian Defence Minister Fatmir Mediu said that Albanian troops would stay in Iraq as long as United States forces remain there.[50]
  • Flag of the Republic of Macedonia Macedonia - 40 special forces soldiers under U.S. command in Baghdad, conducting a wide range of missions including patrols, raids, training, and manning checkpoints.[51] In December 2006 Macedonia extended its mandate through June 2007.
  • Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina deployed a unit of 37 men to destroy munitions and clear mines, in addition to 6 command personnel. The unit was first deployed to Fallujah, then Talil Air Base, and is now located at Camp Echo. In December 2006, the Bosnian government formally extended its mandate through June 2007.
  • Flag of Estonia Estonia - 35 special forces troops known as the 'EstPla-11' unit under U.S. command in Baghdad. Their task is to conduct raids and combat patrols. Two soldiers were killed in Iraq in separate insurgent attacks. In December 2006, Estonia officially extended its mandate through December 2007.
  • Flag of Kazakhstan Kazakhstan - 29 ordnance disposal engineers under Polish command. One was killed (09/01/2005) along with eight Ukrainians when a pile of booby-trapped munitions was detonated by insurgents.
  • Flag of Moldova Moldova - 12 de-mining and ordnance disposal specialists under U.S. Command. On July 15, 2004, it was reported that Moldova had quietly halved its contingent from 24 to 12. It was widely believed that Moldova withdrew these remaining troops in February 2005, but they were replaced by a fresh contingent. A third rotation took place in February 2006.

Image File history File links Flag_of_Mongolia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Anders Fogh Rasmussen , also: (born January 26, 1953) is the current Prime Minister of Denmark (in Danish Statsminister, meaning Minister of State). ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The controversial cartoons of Muhammad, as they were first published in Jyllands-Posten in September 2005. ... Official insignia of Dancon/Irak since August 2003 Dancon/Irak, also called Dancon/Iraq, short for Danish Contingent / Irak is the hierarchically top formation, to which all Danish military forces currently in Iraq belong. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Albania. ... Mosul (Arabic: , Kurdish: موصل Mûsil, Syriac: Nîněwâ, Turkish: Musul) is a city in northern Iraq and the capital of the Ninawa Governorate. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Macedonia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kazakhstan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Moldova. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

United Nations Assistance Mission in Iraq (UNAMI)

See United Nations Assistance Mission in Iraq for a list of guards and military observers deployed to Iraq under the United Nations. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Multinational Force Iraq. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


NATO-Sponsored Training of the Iraqi Police Force (NTM-I)

  • Flag of the United States United States - The US provided 60 instructors and a protection company in addition to airlift support and logistics.[52]
  • Flag of Poland Poland - Poland has sent 10 instructors and a transport platoon of 30 soldiers to serve under NTM-I.[52]
  • Flag of Denmark Denmark - Denmark offered 10 instructors and 7 guards to NTM-I.[52]
  • Flag of the Netherlands Netherlands - There are 15 Dutch soldiers in Iraq, training police as part of a NATO mission.[53]
  • Flag of Hungary Hungary - There are 15 Hungarian personnel supporting the NTM-I mission.[54]
  • Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom - The UK has deployed 11 soldiers to NTM-I.[52]
  • Flag of Portugal Portugal - Portugal sent 10 soldiers to Iraq as part of NTM-I.[52]
  • Flag of Norway Norway - 10 Norwegian instructors are deployed in Iraq.[52]
  • Flag of Italy Italy - As of February 2005, 8 Italian officers had been deployed, while the deployment of 16 more was under consideration.[52] Additionally, the Italian Navy began providing advice to its Iraqi counterpart in November 2006; while until February 2007 a 'Military Advisement and Liaison Team (MALT)' had provided training programs for Iraqi troops tasked with the defense of NTM-I's Ar-Rustamiyah complex.[55]
  • Flag of the Czech Republic Czech Republic - Pledged to send 5 instructors as of February 2005.[52]
  • Flag of Slovenia Slovenia - In March 2006, Slovenia deployed 4 officers and an unspecified number of subordinate troops to a fortified compound in Rustamiyah, Baghdad to assist in the training of Iraqi police. The troops will ostensibly stay for six months, and are the first Slovenian soldiers that have been sent to the country.[56]
  • Flag of Bulgaria Bulgaria - In October 2006, the Bulgarian government sent 4 officers.[57]
  • Flag of Turkey Turkey - As of February 2005, 2 Turkish soldiers were serving in Baghdad.[52]
  • Flag of Romania Romania - As of February 2005, there were 2 instructors in Iraq, while the deployment of 5 more was a possibility.[52]
  • Flag of Lithuania Lithuania - As of August 2007, there were 9 Lithuanian trainers in Iraq.[58]
  • Flag of Iceland Iceland - A 'public information officer' was expected to serve with NTM-I as of February 2005.[52]
  • Flag of Estonia Estonia - One officer as of February 2005.[52]

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iceland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ...

Nations no longer participating in ground operations

2007 withdrawals

  • Flag of Slovakia Slovakia - On January 27, 2007, Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico announced that all but 11 of the 110 Slovak troops (primarily engaged in destroying ordnance) operating under the US-led Coalition had been transferred from Diwaniya in Iraq to Kuwait. They arrived home the following month. The remaining troops were sent to perform liaison duties at the Multinational Forces HQ in Baghdad: nine were withdrawn in stages, while the last two were withdrawn at the end of October 2007[59]. 4 Slovak soldiers were killed by mortars and roadside bombs during their deployment in Iraq.
  • Flag of Latvia Latvia - On June 18, 2007, all but 7 of Latvia's 125 troops left Iraq. 2 soldiers remained in Iraq, presumably serving as instructors under NTM-I or fulfilling a liaison role with other members of the Coalition. These soldiers have now left Iraq permanently and returned home to Latvia .[60] Latvian troops were initially deployed to Kirkuk (under U.S. command) for a year, then transferred to Camp Charlie in Al Hillah, followed by Camp Delta in Al Kut. Finally, the Latvians were stationed at Camp Echo in Ad Diwaniyah where they conducted external security patrols. During their final posting, three Latvian soldiers were killed in action.
  • Flag of Armenia Armenia deployed a total of 46 personnel divided into three units: a logistics platoon providing vehicles and drivers for supply convoys which run from Kuwait into the Polish sector of Iraq, an ordnance disposal engineer team attached to the Salvadoran contingent, and a medical unit at Camp Echo. On December 5, 2005, the Armenian government declared its intention to stay in Iraq for another year,[61], and did the same on December 6, 2006[62] Armenia announced on October 3, 2007 it would not be renewing it mandate in Iraq and that all troops would be home by the end of the year. 26 troops left by October 24 and the remaining 20 were withdrawn on November 4[63]
  • Flag of Lithuania Lithuania - The remaining 50 members of the Lithuanian contingent arrived home on August 9, 2007[64]. Lithuania originally deployed 120 troops to Iraq, approximately 50 under Polish command near Hillah where they guarded Camp Echo; and an equal number under Danish command near Basra, where they conducted joint patrols with the Danish troops. The remainder served at various command centers throughout the country. The unit in the Polish sector was withdrawn during the course of 2006. Nine Lithuanian soldiers remain in Iraq under NTM-I.

Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Robert Fico (15 September 1964 in Topoľčany) is the current Prime Minister of Slovakia (since July 4, 2006). ... Al Diwaniyah (sometimes called Ad Diwaniyah) (Arabic: ألديوانيه ) is the capital city of Iraqs Al Qadisyah province. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Latvia. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Armenia. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Al Hillah is a city in central Iraq on the river Euphrates, 100 km (62 miles) south of Baghdad, with an estimated population of 364,700 in 1998. ... This article is about the city of Basra. ...

2006 withdrawals

  • Flag of Italy Italy - On September 21, 2006, Italian forces handed over Dhi Qar province in southern Iraq to newly-trained Iraqi security forces, thus ending their military mission: "The Italian contingent is going back. The mission is accomplished — the security of the province is in your hands", Minister of Defence Arturo Parisi said to Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.[65] About a month earlier, on August 23, the Italian contingent stood at 1,600 troops. The 'Garibaldi Brigade' served its final four month tour of duty between May and September 2006, and included mechanized infantry, helicopters and Carabinieri in South Central Iraq, based around Nasiriyah. The original contingent consisted of about 3,200 troops, but on July 9, 2005, former PM Berlusconi announced that Italian soldiers would gradually be withdrawn in groups of 300. New Prime Minister Romano Prodi had pledged to withdraw the troops in his first speech to the senate and called the war "a grave mistake that has complicated rather than solved the problem of security".[66][67] Shortly after, on May 26, 2006, Italian foreign minister Massimo D'Alema announced that the Italian forces would be reduced from 1,800 to 1,600 by June. On June 8, he said Italy's military presence in Iraq would end before 2007.[68] The Military of Italy have lost 33 soldiers in Iraq. 25 were hostile deaths: two in separate engagements, six in various roadside bombings, 17 in a late 2003 suicide bombing on the Italian HQ in Nasiriyah (which also killed at least two Italian civilians), eight were accidents and one, a ranking major general, was a controversial friendly fire incident.
  • Flag of Japan Japan - The last 280 of the original 600 medics and engineers based in Samawah (Southern Iraq) had been withdrawn by July 25, 2006, arriving home in Tokyo in the early morning.[69] The reconstruction mission in Samawa had limited the troops' activities to "non-combat zones". Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's Cabinet decided on December 8, 2005 to allow its 600 troops to stay for another year,[70] despite a poll by the Asahi newspaper which found that 69% of respondents were against renewing the mandate, up from 55% in January. Despite the apparent year-long extension of the mandate, PM Koizumi announced on June 20, 2006 that the Japanese contingent would be withdrawn within 'several dozen days',[71] citing the completion of the Japanese mission in Samawah. However, he suggested expanding airborne logistical support from southern parts of the country to Baghdad in place of the ground force. Three Japanese hostages were captured in Iraq in early 2004 but were released unharmed a week later. Later, in a statement released in July 2004, Al Zarqawi released a statement threatening Japan, Poland and Bulgaria over their troop deployments. He demanded the Japanese government to 'do what the Philippines have done' and withdraw its troops, and said that 'lines of cars laden with explosives are awaiting you' if his demands were not met. Mortars and rockets have been lobbed at the Japanese camp several times, causing no damage or injuries.
  • Flag of Norway Norway - 140 of 150 troops (engineers and mine clearers) withdrawn on June 30, 2004 citing growing domestic opposition and the need for the troops elsewhere; the 10 remaining liaison officers had been withdrawn by August 2006. The Bondevik II government insists the troops were never part of the invasion force, citing a UN humanitarian mandate. This does not seem to have come to the attention of the international community, as Al-Qaeda has included Norway in videotaped threats on at least two occasions, and U.S. organizations have included Norway on their lists of participating nations. The actual status of Norwegian engineering and administrative personnel past and present is still a matter of domestic controversy, in part because troops serving in a war zone are entitled to better pay.
  • Flag of Singapore Singapore - 161 Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) personnel onboard RSS Endurance returned on 31 January 2004 after a two-month deployment.[72] The amphibious transport dock conducted logistical tasks, such as replenishing supplies for other naval vessels in the Persian Gulf, and conducted patrols to enforce maritime presence. It also served as a platform for helicopter missions and maritime boarding operations missions by teams from other coalition countries when they inspected ships leaving Iraq.[73] A Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) C-130 transport aircraft carrying a crew of 31 returned on 4 April 2004 after a two-month deployment. During its deployment, the C-130 detachment conducted air support missions, including providing airlift and transportation of logistics supply to coalition forces.[74] A RSAF KC-135 tanker aircraft with a crew of 33 returned on 11 September 2004 after a three-month deployment. During its deployment, the KC-135 provided air-to-air refueling for coalition forces.[75] Another RSN amphibious transport dock, RSS Resolution, returned on 19 March 2005 with 180 personnel after a three-month deployment,[76] while another RSAF KC-135 returned on 17 September 2005 with 35 personnel after a three-month deployment.[77] In the RSN's latest deployment, a total of 180 personnel onboard the amphibious transport dock RSS Resolution returned on 27 May 2006 after a three-month deployment.[78] This deployment saw the ship taking on the expanded role of taking charge of coalition and Iraqi Navy ships to defend Iraq's oil platforms.[79] Currently, there are no Singapore Armed Forces personnel in or around Iraq.

Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Carabinieri are the military police of Italy. ... Nāşirīyah (also transliterated as Nassiriya or Nasiriya; in Arabic الناصرية, al-Nasiriyah or an-Nasiriyah) is a city in Iraq. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Prodi redirects here. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Military branches Esercito Italiano (Army) Marina Militare (Navy) Aeronautica Militare (Air Force) Carabinieri (Military police) The Guardia di Finanza is a specialized police and fight against financial crimes, illegal drugs trafficking, customs and borders control. ... Nicola Calipari Nicola Calipari (June 23, 1953, Reggio Calabria - March 4, 2005, Iraq) was an Italian SISMI military intelligence officer with the rank of Major General. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Samawah or As Samawah (Arabic language:السماوة) is a city in Iraq, 280 km southeast of Baghdad. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In 2004, the Japanese government ordered the deployment and eventual formation of the Japanese Iraq Reconstruction and Support Group at the request of the United States: A contingent of the Japan Self-Defense Forces was sent in order to assist the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq, sending 600 soldiers... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kjell Magne Bondevik [IPA: çɛl mɑgne bʊnevik](born September 3, 1947) is a Norwegian Lutheran minister and politician. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Singapore. ... The Republic of Singapore Navy (Abbreviation: RSN; Chinese: 新加坡共和国海军部队; Malay: Angkatan Laut Republik Singapura) is the navy of the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF), responsible for the defence of Singapore against sea-borne threats and protection of its sea lines of communications. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Endurance class landing platform dock ships are the biggest class of ships in the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN). ... The Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF, Chinese: 新加坡空军部队; Malay Angkatan Udara Republik Singapura) is the air force branch of the Singapore Armed Forces, established in 1968 as the Singapore Air Defence Command (SADC). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

2005 withdrawals

  • Flag of Portugal Portugal - had 128 military policemen under Italian command (South East Iraq). Troops were withdrawn on February 10, 2005, two days ahead of schedule.
  • Flag of the Netherlands Netherlands - An independent contingent of 1,345 troops (including 650 Dutch Marines, three or four Chinook helicopters, a military police unit, a logistics team, a commando squad, a field hospital and Royal Netherlands Air Force AH-64 attack helicopters) was deployed to Iraq in 2003, based in Samawah (Southern Iraq). On June 1, 2004, the Dutch government renewed their stay through 2005. The Algemeen Dagblad reported on October 21, 2004, that the Netherlands would pull its troops out of Iraq in March 2005, which it did, leaving half a dozen liaison officers until late 2005. The Dutch Government reportedly turned down an Iraqi Government request to extend the Dutch contingent for another year. The Netherlands lost 2 soldiers in separate attacks.
  • Flag of Ukraine Ukraine - As of December 22, 2005, all remaining Ukrainian troops crossed the Iraqi border into Kuwait and arrived home in Ukraine by December 30. This fulfills a long-planned withdrawal pledged by President Viktor Yushchenko who was sworn in on the January 23, 2005, and executes a ruling by the Ukrainian legislative body, the Verkhovna Rada, which passed a motion for the withdrawal of all troops. An independent contingent originally consisting of 1,650 mechanized infantry troops in Kut (South Central Iraq), the 5th Mechanized Brigade, had been slashed to around 900 between March 15 and May 15, 2004.[80] This number was then reduced continuously until the 44 remaining troops were pulled out along with the last of the vehicles within the final days of 2005.[81] Defense Minister Anatoliy Hrytsenko announced that 30 Army officers, ten specialists from the border service and ten representatives from the Interior Ministry would stay in Iraq, and that they would work at headquarter and command facilities, they have since been withdrawn. Ukraine lost a total of 18 soldiers in Iraq: 12 in attacks, 3 in accidents, 2 in suicides and 1 as a result of a heart attack, while 32 were wounded or injured. Early in 2004, three Ukrainian engineers were taken hostage in Iraq but were freed shortly after. Total wounded/inured: 32

Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... The Korps Mariniers is the marine corps of the Netherlands, and is part of the Royal Netherlands Navy. ... Roundel of the Royal Netherlands Air Force. ... Samawah or As Samawah (Arabic language:السماوة) is a city in Iraq, 280 km southeast of Baghdad. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Algemeen Dagblad is a Dutch newspaper. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian:  ) (born February 23, 1954) is the current President of Ukraine. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Verkhovna Rada. ... KÅ«t (كوت; also known as Kut-Al-Imara and Kut El Amara) is a city in eastern Iraq, on the left bank of the Tigris River, about 100 miles south east of Baghdad, at 32. ... The 5th Separate Mechanized Brigade was a formation of the Ukrainian Ground Forces sent to Iraq in august of 2003. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anatoliy Hrytsenko (Ukrainian: ; Russian: ), (born October 25, 1957) is the current Minister of Defence of Ukraine. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

2004 withdrawals

  • Flag of Nicaragua Nicaragua - 230 troops left in February 2004, no replacement, attributed to financial reasons. While in Iraq, the troops were under Spanish command.
  • Flag of Honduras Honduras - 368 troops withdrawn by the end of May 2004 along with Spain's contingent, citing that the troops were sent there for reconstruction, not combat. While in Iraq, the troops were under Spanish command (South East Iraq).
  • Flag of the Dominican Republic Dominican Republic - 302 troops withdrawn by the end of May 2004, shortly after Spain and Honduras withdrew their contingents, citing growing domestic opposition and the fall from power of PRD candidate Hipolito Mejia and the election of center-left PLD candidate Leonel Fernandez to the presidency in 2004. Dominican troops were under constant mortar attacks but suffered no casualties. While in Iraq, the troops were under Spanish command (South East Iraq).
  • Flag of the Philippines Philippines - 51 medics, engineers and other troops withdrawn July 14, 2004 in response to kidnapping of a truck driver. When the hostage takers' demands were met (Filipino troops out of Iraq), the hostage was released. While in Iraq, the troops were under Polish command (Central South Iraq) and during that time several Filipino soldiers were wounded in an insurgent attack but none died.
  • Flag of Thailand Thailand - Withdrawal of last 100 troops from Thailand's 423-strong humanitarian contingent completed on September 10, 2004, in accordance with Thailand's mandate in Iraq which expired in September. Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra had previously announced early withdrawal if the situation became too dangerous. Thailand lost 2 soldiers in Iraq in an insurgent attack.
  • Flag of Hungary Hungary - Hungary's contingent of 300 transportation troops had begun arriving home in Budapest from Iraq on December 22, 2004, reported AFP. All of Hungary's troops were reported by the Defence Ministry to have left Iraq by the end of that day. While in Iraq 1 Hungarian soldier was killed in an insurgent attack.
  • Flag of Tonga Tonga - 45 Royal Marines. Arrived in Iraq at the beginning of July 2004 to augment the I Marine Expeditionary Force in the Al Anbar Province. Withdrew all forces in mid-December 2004.
  • Flag of Iceland Iceland - Iceland had 2 Explosive Ordnance Disposal experts, a medical advisor, and some transport experts assigned to the Danish unit immediately after the occupation began; they have since been withdrawn.

Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Najaf (Arabic: ‎; BGN: An Najaf) is a city in Iraq about 160 km south of Baghdad. ... The President of the Government of Spain (Spanish: Presidente del Gobierno), sometimes known in English as the Prime Minister of Spain, is the Spanish head of government. ...   (IPA: ) (born 4 August 1960), better known under his second surname Zapatero, is the Prime Minister of Spain. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Honduras. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Dominican_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Thaksin” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Security Council, Recalling all its previous relevant resolutions, Reaffirming the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq, Reaffirming also the importance of the disarmament of Iraqi weapons of mass destruction and of eventual confirmation of the disarmament of Iraq, Stressing the right of the Iraqi people freely to determine their... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tonga. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iceland. ... Bomb disposal is the process by which hazardous devices are rendered safe. ...

YouTube channel

In early March 2007, MNF-I announced [84] that the coalition had launched an official YouTube channel.[85] The channel's videos have over a million views.[86] YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ...


The stated purpose of the YouTube channel is to "document action as it appeared to personnel on the ground and in the air as it was shot." The clips posted to the site are edited for "time, security reasons, and/or overly disturbing or offensive images."


Private security companies

In addition to regular troops there are 35,000-120,000[87][not in citation given] private military contractors in Iraq. One such example is Blackwater USA, which has been discussed often in recent news. These contractors also differ from military troops as they are outside a Uniform Code of Military Justice, and follow a separate system of legal accountability through registration with the Iraqi Ministry of Interior. PSCs are regulated under CPA Memorandum 17, which has been endorsed with the Government of Iraq. A private military company (PMC) provides specialised expertise or services of a military nature, sometimes called or classified as mercenary (soldiers for hire).[1] Such companies are equally known as Private Security Contractors (PSCs), Private Military Corporations, Private Military Firms, Military Service Providers, and generally as the Private Military Industry. ... Blackwater USA is an international security contractor founded in 1997 by Erik Prince and Al Clark. ... The Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) is the foundation of military law in the United States. ...


Contractor Casualties


As of 3 April 2007, at least 390 contractors have been killed in Iraq: the vast majority of them security personnel killed in ambushes or bombings. These include at least 120 Americans, 40 Britons, 21 South Africans, 17 Fijians, 5 Canadians as well as smaller numbers of fatalities from various other nations. Significant numbers of translators, engineers, truck-drivers and other workers have been killed including around 40 Americans, 34 Turks, 12 Nepalis, 9 Filipinos, 6 Bulgarians and 5 Jordanians; amongst others.


Incentives given by the U.S. to coalition members

Many nations received monetary and other incentives from the United States in return for sending troops to or otherwise supporting the Iraq war.[88] Critics of the Bush Administration such as Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Democrat of Massachusetts, has said this approach smacks of "bribery"[89] Below is a partial list of some of the incentives offered to coalition members: Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ...

  • Turkey - Turkey was offered approximately $8.5 billion in loans in exchange for sending 10,000 peacekeeping troops in 2003. Even though the US did say the loans and the sending of troops to Iraq were not directly linked, it also said the loans are contingent upon "cooperation" on Iraq.[90]
  • Singapore - In May 2003 the Bush Administration signed a free trade agreement with Singapore, the first with an Asian country. In announcing the deal, President Bush hailed Singapore as "a strong partner in the war on terrorism and a member of the coalition on Iraq." Asia Times columnist Jeffrey Robertson argued was a reward for Singapore's support of the Iraq invasion.[91][92][93]
  • Australia: In 2004 the Bush Administration "fast tracked" a free trade agreement with Australia. The Sydney Morning Herald called the deal a "reward" for Australia's contribution of troops to the Iraq invasion.[94][95]
  • Great Britain: As of 2006, the Independent reported that British companies have received at least £1.1bn contracts for reconstruction work in postwar Iraq.[96]

In addition to direct incentives, critics of the war have argued that the involvement of other members of the coalition was in response for indirect benefits, such as support for NATO membership or other military and financial aid. Indeed, almost all of the Eastern European nations involved in the Coalition have either recently joined or are in the process of joining the US-led NATO alliance (namely Bulgaria, Georgia, Albania, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Poland, Romania and Slovakia).[97] Estonian Foreign Minister Urmas Paet, for example, said on April 21 that Estonian troops had to remain in Iraq due to his country's “important partnership” with the United States.[98] Asia Times Online is an Internet-only publication that reports and examines geopolitical, political, economic and business issues, looking at these from an Asian perspective. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... Urmas Paet (born April 20, 1974) is an Estonian politician and currently the Foreign Minister of Estonia. ...


At least one country, Georgia, is believed to have sent soldiers to Iraq as an act of repayment for the American training of security forces that could potentially be deployed to the break-away regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.[99] Indeed, Georgian troops that were sent to Iraq have all undergone these training programs.[100] Anthem unknown Capital Tskhinvali Official languages Ossetian1 Government  -  President Eduard Kokoity  -  Prime Minister Yury Morozov De facto independence from Georgia  -  Declared November 28, 1991   -  Recognition none  Currency Russian ruble (RUB) Russian in widespread use by government and other institutions. ... Capital Sokhumi Official languages Abkhaz, Georgian Government  -  Chairman, Cabinet of Ministers  -  Chairman, Supreme Council Temur Mzhavia Autonomous republic of Georgia  -  Georgian independence Declared Recognised 9 April 1991 25 December 1991  Currency Georgian lari (GEL) Anthem Aiaaira Capital Sukhumi Official languages Abkhaz, Russian1 Government  -  President Sergei Bagapsh  -  Prime Minister Alexander Ankvab...


El Salvador's President Antonio Saca has been accused of deploying troops in return for membership in the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA),[101] and as a member of the right-wing ARENA party that was supported heavily by the United States during the El Salvador Civil War, is certainly influenced by the United States. Elías Antonio (Tony) Saca González (born in Usulutan, 9 March 1965) is a Salvadoran politician and the current President of El Salvador. ... For other uses, see Arena (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Conversely, Greece's non involvement (a poll indicated 90% against the Iraq Invasion), may have led to the US recognizing FYROM as 'Macedonia'.[102]


See also

For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...

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  101. ^ http://www.coha.org/2006/08/21/el-salvador-dispatches-additional-contingent-to-iraq/
  102. ^ Tamara Causidis. Balkan Crisis Report: Macedonia Looks to US to Lean on Greece. Institute for war & Peace Reporting, citing"(BCR No 581, 28-Oct-05)". Retrieved on 2007-05-16. “At a time of deep divisions within the EU, Macedonia backed the US-led invasion of Iraq and also sent troops there. It also supported the US position in the controversy within the EU over the International Criminal Court, ICC. As a reward, in November 2004 the US abandoned its former neutrality over the name dispute and recognized Macedonia under its constitutional name, the Republic of Macedonia.”

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UK and Denmark announce troop withdrawals from Iraq
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  • British Casualty Monitor: Tracking the war in Iraq

  Results from FactBites:
 
Iraq Needs Multinational Force, Foreign Minister Says (835 words)
A premature departure of the multinational troops "would cause a humanitarian crisis and provide a foothold for terrorists to launch their evil campaign in our country and beyond our borders," he said.
He flew to New York to discuss the council's draft resolution, presented by the United States and United Kingdom, which would endorse the restoration of Iraq's sovereignty and define the relationship between the United Nations, the coalition forces and Iraq after the end of the month.
But with the relationship between the multinational force and the interim government, Zebari said, "we should use our imagination" to define the coordination of Iraqi forces and leadership and the multinational force "so they can work as partners in facing the security threats we are challenged with."
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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