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Encyclopedia > Multihull

A multihull is a ship or boat with more than one hull. The additional hulls provide stability, typically to hold the vessel upright against the sideways force of the wind on the sails. This is in contrast to monohulls which typically use a keel and/or ballast for this purpose, especially on larger sailboats. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (236x645, 31 KB) kevin Murray creator realease this image to the public domain I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (236x645, 31 KB) kevin Murray creator realease this image to the public domain I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Italian ship-rigged vessel Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large, sea-going watercraft. ... A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ... A sail is any type of surface intended to generate thrust by being placed in a wind —in essence a vertically-oriented wing. ... A Monohull is a type of boat having only one hull. ... A fer is a large beam around which the hull of a ship is built. ... Look up ballast in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Traditional wooden cutter beating. ...


Multihulls include: proas, which have two differently sized hulls; catamarans, which have two similar hulls; and trimarans, which have a larger hull in the center and two smaller ones on either side. Multihull sailboats are typically much wider than the equivalent monohull, which allows them to carry no ballast, so they are typically faster than monohulls under equivalent conditions (see Nathanael Herreshoff's "Amarylis", also 1988 America's Cup). It also means that multihulls are less prone to sink than monohulls when their hulls are compromised. There are also multihull powerboats, both for racing and transportation. R. M. Munroes 1898 proa A Proa is a multihull vessel consisting of two (usually) unequal parallel hulls, superficially similar to an outrigger canoe. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... Polynesian (Hawaiian navigators) sailing trimaran, ca 1781 A trimaran is a multihull boat consisting of a main hull (vaka) and two smaller outrigger hulls (amas), attached to the main hull with lateral struts (akas). ... Nathanael Herreshoff in 1898 New York 30 Class Design, by Nathanael Herreshoff Nathanael Greene Herreshoff (1848-1938), born in Bristol, RI, was a naval architect-engineer. ... The Americas Cup trophy The Americas Cup (originally the 100 Guineas Cup, then the America Cup ) is the most famous and most prestigious competition in the sport of yachting, and the oldest active trophy in international sports, predating the FA Cup by two decades and the Modern Olympics...

Contents

Advantage of multihulls

Multihulls are substantially faster than monohulls, because the absence of ballast reduces their weight and the amount of drag through the water (see hull speed) considerably and because they rise out of the water easier which also reduces drag(see planing). The waterline to width ratio is so large allowing the thinner hulls to be driven through the water at higher speeds, as each works somewhat independently of the other(s). Look up ballast in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The hull speed is the maximum speed that a displacement hull can achieve. ... Planing has several meanings: With boats, planing or hydroplaning is a method by which a hull skims over the surface of the water, rather than plowing through it. ... Waterline refers to an imaginary line marking the level to which ship or boat submerges in the water. ...


Disadvantage of Multihulls

The width of a multihull vessel is often an issue, especially when docking. They are also more expensive to produce than a monohull of the same length.


It is a common concern that in the open ocean, multihull craft are unsafe in a heavy storm. If a storm or wave capsizes a small monohull, it may recover when the weight of the ballast in the keel rights the boat, if it does not broach and sink before it recovers. Multihulls can capsize but they rarely sink; instead they float upside-down. Many rescued crews (in races) have reported that they were unable to dismount the deck-mounted liferaft or emergency radio from the mass of broken, submerged rigging under the capsized craft. Capsizing refers to when a boat is inverted such that the bottom of the boat is on top. ... Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs), Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs) and Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs) are tracking transmitters that operate as part of the Cospas-Sarsat satellite system. ...


Another risk in a multihull is the "pitch pole"; where the bow of the boat buries itself into a wave and the stern flips over putting the boat into a forward somersault; this tends to be more common in smaller racing multihulls, which carry large sails in relation to their weight. This rarely effects monohulls because they carry more ballast which prevents the tendency to flip, and helps them power through waves.

  • Proponents argue that no careful captain ever finds himself in capsizing conditions. Most crews that have capsized in the open ocean found it an extremely traumatic event no matter what type of boat they sailed.
  • Proponents also argue that capsize is only one of many types of catastrophe that can befall yachts at sea. In other types (for example hull compromise by hitting submerged debris) multihulls are substantially safer than monohulls because they don't carry ballast and can therefore float even when severely damaged.

It has been said that, while it is true that a catamaran is ultimately stable floating upside down, a traditional keel boat is ultimately stable resting on the bottom of the ocean.


Popularity

Multihulls are quite popular for racing, especially in Europe and Australia, and are somewhat popular for cruising in the Caribbean. They're not seen very often in the United States, although they're gradually getting more popular. Until the 1980s most multihull sailboats (except for beach cats) were built either by their owners or by boatbuilders on a semi-custom basis. Since then several companies have been successful selling mass-produced (by boat industry standards) boats. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Popular multihulls

There are many types of multihulls in different categories. Among the small sailing catamarans, also called beach catamarans, the most recognized racing classes are the Hobie Cat 16, Formula 18 cats, A-cats and the Olympic multihull called Tornado. The Tornado is an olympic class sailing catamaran, with a crew of two. ...


Larger boats include Corsair Marine (mid-sized trimarans), and Privilege (large, luxurious catamarans). The largest manufacturer of large multihulls is Fountaine Pajot in France. But also the much larger French trimarans of the ORMA racing cirquit and round the world record attempts are included in this.


In the powerboat part of the multihull spectrum we find a range of boats from small single pilot Formula 1 power boat series to the large multi-engined or even gas turbined power boats that are used in the off-shore powerboat racing series and that are piloted by 2 to 4 pilots.


Trivia

The catamaran is also known as a multihull and also comes in a 'power' flavor with no sailing apparatus. In fact, pure power catamarans are now becoming a common sight in international charter fleets in the Caribbean and Mediterranean. Further, a new breed of catamarans has now started to take shape in the form of the mega or super catamaran. This definition is reserved for those catamarans over 60 feet in length. It usually takes one year to build these huge vessels and often a large amount of customization takes place at the request of the owner who commissions the vessel.


See also

It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... Polynesian (Hawaiian navigators) sailing trimaran, ca 1781 A trimaran is a multihull boat consisting of a main hull (vaka) and two smaller outrigger hulls (amas), attached to the main hull with lateral struts (akas). ... Sailing at sunset Wooden sailing boat Sailing is the skillful art of controlling the motion of a sailing ship or sailboat, across a body of water. ... Round Texel is the biggest catamaran race in the world with an annual average of 600 participants. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

External links

Commons logo
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Multihulls
  • MYCQ - Multihull Yacht Club Queensland - Australia's leading Multihull club
  • MYCV - Multihull Yacht Club Victoria - Australia's premier Multihull Yacht Club
  • http://www.catsailor.com/forums/ubbthreads.php - the most active forum page for all small sailing catamarans (beach cats).
  • http://www.cruisincats.com Cruisincats.com - 101 reasons why catamarans are better, faster and sexier than...
  • http://www.multihull-maven.com/ Articles and news on multihulls, profiles of boats, designers, yards, etc.
  • http://www.catamaran.co.uk/main.htm
  • http://www.sailing.org/ International Sailing Federation
  • http://wingo.com/proa/
  • http://www.multihull.com


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Classes and types of catamarans, trimarans and multihulls (worldwide list)

A-Catamaran | ARC 17 | ARC 21 | ARC 22 | Astus 16.1 | Astus 20.1 | Beachcat | Sprint 15 | Dart 16 | Dart 18 | Dragonfly 800 | Formula 16 | Formula 18 | Hobie | Mystere | Proa | RC 27 | RC 30 | Taipan 4.9 | Tornado | Open Ocean Performance Sixties | Unicorn The A-Class Catamaran, often abbreviated to A-Class, is a developmental class sailing catamaran for singlehanded racing. ... The Astus 16. ... The Astus 20. ... Beachcat is a word used to describe an off the beach type of catamaran sailboat. ... Jon Cook (ISAF Youth World Youth Catamaran Champion) putting the Sprint 15 through its paces up wind off Falmouth!! Sprint 15s on the Beach at Pentewan Sands UK The Sprint 15 is a one-design 15 foot long glassfibre sailing catamaran, principly sailed in the UK. It is designed to... [1] Dragonfly 800 The Dragonfly 800 is an 8 metre trimaran manufactured in Denmark by Quorning Boats. ... sports catamaran or beach catamaran sailing The Formula 16 (F16) sport catamaran is a 5 mtr long beach catamaran with a asymmetric spinnaker setup. ... Sports catamaran or beach catamaran sailing The Formula 18 class, with its F18 abbreviation, is one of the success stories in the sport catamarans scene. ... Hobie Cats are small racing catamarans that are mainly used for racing and personal use. ... Mystère is a Canadian manufacturer of off-the-beach Catamarans also known as multihulls. ... R. M. Munroes 1898 proa A Proa is a multihull vessel consisting of two (usually) unequal parallel hulls, superficially similar to an outrigger canoe. ... Taipan 4. ... The Tornado is an olympic class sailing catamaran, with a crew of two. ... The Open Ocean Performance Sixty, or simply Open 60, is a class of trimaran racing yacht defined by the Ocean Racing Multihull Association. ...

Types of sailing vessels and rigs
Barque | Barquentine | Bermuda rig | Bilander | Brig | Brigantine | Caravel | Carrack | Catamaran | Catboat | Clipper | Dutch Clipper | Cog | Corvette | Cutter | Dhow | Fifie | Fluyt | Fore & Aft Rig | Frigate | Full Rigged Ship | Gaff Rig | Galleon | Gunter Rig | Hermaphrodite Brig | Junk | Ketch | Longship | Mersey Flat | Multihull | Nao | Norfolk Wherry | Pink | Pocket Cruiser | Polacca | Pram | Proa | Sailing hydrofoil | Schooner | Ship of the Line | Sloop | Smack | Snow | Square Rig | Tall Ship | Thames Sailing Barge | Trimaran | Wherry | Windjammer | Windsurfer | Xebec | Yacht | Yawl

  Results from FactBites:
 
Multihull - definition of Multihull in Encyclopedia (517 words)
Multihulls are typically either catamarans, which have two similar hulls, or trimarans, which have a larger hull in the center and two smaller ones on either side.
Multihulls are substantially faster than monohulls, because the absence of ballast reduces their weight considerably without reducing the amount of sail that they can carry, and because the waterline to width ratio is so large.
Until the 1980s most multihull sailboats (except for beach cats) were built either by their owners or by boatbuilders on a semi-custom basis.
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Multihull (534 words)
Multihulls include: proas, which have two differently sized hulls; catamarans, which have two similar hulls; and trimarans, which have a larger hull in the center and two smaller ones on either side.
Multihull sailboats are typically much wider than the equivalent monohull, which allows them to carry no ballast, so they are typically faster than monohulls under equivalent conditions (see Nathaniel Herreshoff's "Amarylis", also 1988 America's Cup).
Multihulls are substantially faster than monohulls, because the absence of ballast reduces their weight and the amount of drag through the water considerably, without reducing the amount of sail that they can carry, and because the waterline to width ratio is so large.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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