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Encyclopedia > Multi User Dungeon

In computer gaming, a MUD (Multi-User Dungeon or Domain or Dimension) is a multi-player computer game that combines elements of role-playing games, hack and slash style computer games and social instant messaging chat rooms. Typically running on a bulletin board system or internet server, the game is usually text driven, where players read descriptions of rooms, objects, events, other characters, and computer-controlled creatures or non-player characters (NPCs) in a virtual world. Players usually interact with each other and the surroundings by typing commands that resemble a natural language, usually English. A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... This article is about traditional role-playing games. ... In several different types of games, hack and slash (also called hack n slash or hack-and-slash) refers to a type of game or a style of gameplay which primarily comprises defeating enemies and monsters in combat, typically with swords or other mêlée weapons, hence the name. ... A screenshot of PowWow, one of the first instant messengers with a graphical user interface Instant messaging is the act of instantly communicating between two or more people over a network such as the Internet. ... A chat room is an online site in which people can chat online (talk by broadcasting messages to people on the same site in real time). ... A bulletin board system or BBS is a computer system running software that allows users to dial into the system over a phone line and, using a terminal program, perform functions such as downloading software and data, uploading data, playing games, reading news, and exchanging messages with other users. ... A non-player character is a fictional character in a role-playing game whose role is generally created and performed by the gamemaster. ... A virtual world is a computer-simulated environment intended for its users to inhabit and interact via avatars. ... The term natural language is used to distinguish languages spoken and signed (by hand signals and facial expressions) by humans for general-purpose communication from constructs such as writing, computer-programming languages or the languages used in the study of formal logic, especially mathematical logic. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Traditional MUDs implement a fantasy world populated by elves, goblins, and other mythical or fantasy-based races with players being able to take on any number of classes, including warriors, mages, priests, thieves, druids, etc., in order to gain specific skills or powers. The object of the game is to slay monsters, explore a rich fantasy world, to complete quests, go on adventures and create a story by roleplaying. MUDs are typically fashioned around the dice rolling rules of the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) series of games . // For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... A small forest elf (älva) rescuing an egg, from Solägget (1932), by Elsa Beskow An elf is a creature of Norse mythology which survived in northern European folklore. ... A goblin is an evil or merely mischievous creature of folklore, often described as a grotesquely disfigured or elf-like phantom. ... // The word mythology (Greek: μυθολογία, from μυθος mythos, a story or legend, and λογος logos, an account or speech) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use supernatural events or characters to explain the nature of the universe and humanity. ... Many fantasy stories and worlds call their main sapient humanoid species races rather than species. ... A character class represents a characters archetype and career in many role-playing games. ... Warrior (From Middle English, from Old North French, to make war) is a character class (or job) found in many computer role-playing games, most notably in Square Enixs Final Fantasy series. ... In roleplaying games, a spellcaster is a character able to cast magic spells. ... The cleric is a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and other fantasy role-playing games. ... Zidane Tribal is a thief from Final Fantasy IX Thief, taken from the Battle for Wesnoth computer game. ... Elvish druid, taken from the Battle for Wesnoth computer game. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In role-playing, participants adopt characters, or parts, that have personalities, motivations, and backgrounds different from their own. ... For other uses, see Dungeons & Dragons (disambiguation). ...


MUDs often have a fantasy setting, while many others are set in science fiction-based universe or themed on popular books, movies, animations, history, etc. Still others, especially those which are often referred to as MOOs, are used in distance education or to allow for virtual conferences. MUDs have also attracted the interest of academic scholars from many fields, including communications, sociology, law, and synthetic economies. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... // A MOO (MUD object oriented) is a type of MUD and is a text-based online virtual reality system to which multiple users are connected at the same time. ... Distance education, or distance learning, is a field of education that focuses on the pedagogy/andragogy, technology, and instructional systems design that is effectively incorporated in delivering education to students who are not physically on site to receive their education. ... This article is in need of improvement. ... Social interactions of people and their consequences are the subject of sociology studies. ... The stela of King Hammurabi depicts the god Shamash revealing a code of laws to the king. ... ...


Most MUDs are run as hobbies and are free to players; some may accept donations or allow players to "purchase" in-game items. There are also many professionally developed MUDs which charge a monthly subscription fee. A hobby is a spare-time recreational pursuit. ...

Contents


History

A MUD logon screen.
Enlarge
A MUD logon screen.

Prehistory

The first games which were recognisably MUDs appeared in 1977 on the PLATO system. In Europe at around the same time, MUD development was centered around academic networks, particularly at the University of Essex where they were played by many people, both internal and external to the University. In this context, it has been said that MUD stands for "Multi-Undergrad Destroyer" or "Multiple Undergraduate Destroyer" due to their popularity among college students and the amount of time devoted to the MUD by the student. The popularity of MUDs of the Essex University tradition escalated in the USA during the 1980s, when - relatively speaking - cheap, home personal computers with 300 to 2400 baud modems enabled role players to log into multi-line BBSes and online service providers such as Compuserve. For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... The University of Essex is a British university, one of the plate glass universities (like Warwick or York). ... In telecommunications and electronics, baud (pronounced , unit symbol Bd) is a measure of the symbol rate, that is the number of distinct symbolic changes (signalling event) made to the transmission medium per second in a digitally modulated signal. ... A modem (a portmanteau constructed from modulate and demodulate) is a device that modulates an analog carrier signal to encode digital information, and also demodulates such a carrier signal to decode the transmitted information. ... An online service provider is an entity which provides a service online. ... CompuServe, (in full, CompuServe Information Services, or CIS), was the first major commercial online service in the United States, dominating the field during the 1980s and remaining a major player through the mid-1990s when it was sidelined by the rise of GUI-based services such as America Online (AOL). ...


MUD the game

The first known MUD was created in 1978 by Roy Trubshaw and Richard Bartle at Essex University on a DEC PDP-10 in the UK, using initially MACRO-10 (an assembly language) and, later, rewritten in BCPL; also used was a database description language, MUDDL [1]. They chose the acronym MUD to stand for Multi-User Dungeon[2], in reference to another PDP-10 game called Dungeon (or DUNGEN due to the six character filename limit), which was later commercially released by Infocom under the original development code name Zork[citation needed]. Zork in turn was inspired by an older text-adventure game known as Colossal Cave Adventure or ADVENT. The classic game MIST (also part of Essex University MUD) which could be played from any computer connected to JANET (a European academic network predating the internet), became one of the first of its kind to attain broad popularity[3]. Roy Trubshaw was a programmer at Essex University who coauthored, with Richard Bartle, the first known MUD on a DEC PDP-10. ... Richard Allan Bartle (born January 10, 1960, in England) is a British writer and game researcher, best known for being the co-author of MUD, the first multi-user dungeon. ... DEC, dec or Dec may refer to: December - a month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar Digital Equipment Corporation - a computer and technology company, now part of HP Declination - a term from astronomy Diethylcarbamazine - a drug commonly used to treat infections by filarial parasites Disasters Emergency Committee -- a group... The PDP-10 was a computer manufactured by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) from the late 1960s on; the name stands for Programmed Data Processor model 10. It was the machine that made time-sharing common; it looms large in hacker folklore because of its adoption in the 1970s by many... It has been suggested that Assembler be merged into this article or section. ... BCPL (Basic Combined Programming Language) is a computer programming language that was designed by Martin Richards of the University of Cambridge in 1966; it was originally intended for use in writing compilers for other languages. ... The PDP-10 was a computer manufactured by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) from the late 1960s on; the name stands for Programmed Data Processor model 10. It was the machine that made time-sharing common; it looms large in hacker folklore because of its adoption in the 1970s by many... Zork universe Zork games Zork Anthology Zork trilogy Zork I   Zork II   Zork III Beyond Zork   Zork Zero   Planetfall Enchanter trilogy Enchanter   Sorcerer   Spellbreaker Other games Wishbringer   Return to Zork Zork: Nemesis   Zork Grand Inquisitor Zork: The Undiscovered Underground Topics in Zork Encyclopedia Frobozzica Characters   Kings   Creatures Timeline   Magic   Calendar... Zork universe Zork games Zork Anthology Zork trilogy Zork I   Zork II   Zork III Beyond Zork   Zork Zero   Planetfall Enchanter trilogy Enchanter   Sorcerer   Spellbreaker Other games Wishbringer   Return to Zork Zork: Nemesis   Zork Grand Inquisitor Zork: The Undiscovered Underground Topics in Zork Encyclopedia Frobozzica Characters   Kings   Creatures Timeline   Magic   Calendar... Colossal Cave Adventure (also known as ADVENT or Colossal Cave) (Crowther & Woods, 1976) was the first computer adventure game. ... MIST was one of the first public access MUDs (Multi-user Dungeon) games in the world. ... Janet is a female name. ...


Oubliette, written by Jim Schwaiger, and published on the PLATO system predated MUD1 by about a year. It was so difficult that one could not play it alone: in order for players to survive, they had to run in groups. Whilst Oubliette was a multi-player game there was no persistence to the game world. Following it, also on PLATO, was a game called Moria written in 1977, copyright 1978. Again, players could run in parties but in this game and it was also possible to effectively play while only running one character. They were graphical in nature and very advanced for their time, but were proprietary programs that were unable to spread beyond PLATO. Textual worlds, which typically ran on Unix, VMS, or DOS, were now far more accessible to the public. Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... OpenVMS (Open Virtual Memory System or just VMS) is the name of a high-end computer server operating system that runs on the VAX and Alpha family of computers developed by Digital Equipment Corporation of Maynard, Massachusetts (now owned by Hewlett-Packard), and more recently on Hewlett-Packard systems built... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...


Another early MUD was Avatar, written in 1979 by Bruce Maggs and Andrew Shapira, both high school students using the PLATO system at the University of Illinois. This MUD was 2.5-D game running on 512x512 plasma panels of the PLATO system, and groups of up to 15 players could enter the dungeon simultaneously and fight monsters as a team. Avatar is a text-based & graphics-based multi-user highly interactive role-playing computer game, created on the Control Data Corporation PLATO computer system. ... The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, also known as UIUC and the U of I (the officially preferred abbreviation), is the flagship campus in the University of Illinois system. ... (Redirected from 2. ... A plasma display (a. ...


Commercialisation and spread

In the early 1980s Alan E. Klietz wrote a game called Milieu using Multi-Pascal on a CDC Cyber, which was used by high school students in Minnesota for educational purposes. Klietz ported Milieu to an IBM XT in 1983, naming the new port Scepter of Goth (also spelled Sceptre of Goth). Scepter supported 10 to 16 simultaneous users, typically connecting in by modem. It was one of the first commercial MUDs, as franchises were sold to a number of locations. Scepter (as well as unfinished advanced MUD by Klietz called ScreenPlay) was first owned and run by GamBit (of Minneapolis, Minnesota), founded by Bob Alberti. GamBit's assets, including Scepter and ScreenPlay, were then sold to InterPlay (of Fairfax, Virginia). InterPlay eventually went bankrupt, making Scepter no longer available. In 1984, Mark Peterson wrote The Realm of Angmar, beginning as a clone of Sceptre of Goth. The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI unit of pressure. ... The Cyber range of mainframe computers were Control Data Corporations primary products during the 1970s and 1980s. ... Official language(s) None Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... Scepter of Goth, also spelled Sceptre of Goth, was an early multi-user text-based adventure game, a genre now typically called a multi-user dungeon or MUD. Originally written by Alan E. Klietz, Scepter of Goth was one of the first commercial MUDs, usually implementing a fantasy setting in... Commerce is the trading of something of value between two entities. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Lakes Motto: En Avant Location Location in Hennepin County and the state of Minnesota. ... Map Political Statistics Founded 1805 County Independent City Mayor Robert Lederer Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 16. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the computer and video game industry, a clone is a game which is very similar to a previous popular game. ...


These text-adventure games (both single and multi-player) drew inspiration from the paper-and-pencil based role-playing games (RPGs) such as Dungeons & Dragons which were approaching their peak popularity at this time, especially with the release of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D) in 1977. A role-playing game (RPG) is a type of game in which players assume the roles of characters and collaboratively create narratives. ... For other uses, see Dungeons & Dragons (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dungeons & Dragons (disambiguation). ...


This strong bond between RPGs and MUDs continued through the years with the release of dozens of AD&D modules and series of related books and stories (e.g., Forgotten Realms and Dragonlance). Influences also came from the gamebooks such as Fighting Fantasy, Choose Your Own Adventure, and Lone Wolf; and also other RPGs such as Vampire: The Masquerade and Middle-Earth Role Playing. The Forgotten Realms third edition logo. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Dragonlance Dragonlance Logo Dragonlance is a large series of fantasy books, and a Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting. ... A gamebook is a book with a branching storyline that serves as a medium for gameplay. ... Fighting Fantasy is a series of single-player role-playing gamebooks created by Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone, originally published by Puffin and now by Wizard Books. ... The Cave of Time, the first Choose Your Own Adventure book. ... Lone Wolf is the protagonist in a collection of 28 gamebooks, created by Joe Dever and initially illustrated by Gary Chalk. ... Vampire: The Masquerade (Revised Edition) cover. ...


Other MUDs that appeared around 1985 included Mirrorworld, run by Pip Cordre and developed and written by Tim Rogers, Lorenzo Wood and Nathaniel Billington; and SHADES. SHADES was a commercial MUD accessible in the UK via the Prestel system. Mirrorworld was the first MUD to feature rolling resets. Prestel, the brand name for the British General Post Offices Viewdata technology, was an interactive videotex system developed during the late 1970s and commercially launched in 1979. ...


Another popular MUD was AberMUD written in 1988 by Alan Cox, also known as Anarchy, named after the University of Wales Aberystwyth. Avalon, the Legend Lives, started in 1989, was the first MUD to combine a consistent fantasy story-line with a commercial venture. AberMUD was the first popular internet-based MUD. The first version was written in B by Alan Cox for an old Honeywell mainframe and opened in 1987. ... Alan Cox (born 1968) is a programmer heavily involved in the development of the Linux kernel since its early days (1991). ... The University of Wales, Aberystwyth, a Member Institution of the federal University of Wales, was the first university institution to be established in Wales. ... Avalon, the Legend Lives, was the first fully commercial MUD in existence. ...


Monster was a multi-user adventure game created by Richard Skrenta for the VAX and written in VMS Pascal. It was publicly released in November 1988[4]. Monster was disk-based and modifications to the game were immediate. Monster pioneered the approach of allowing players to build the game world, setting new puzzles or creating dungeons for other players to explore[5]. Monster was the inspiration for TinyMUD[6]. Rich Skrenta is a computer programmer. ... VAX is a 32-bit computing architecture that supports an orthogonal instruction set (machine language) and virtual addressing (i. ... The letters OLC can be an abbreviation for many different topics, including the following: online creation Office of Legal Council This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... TinyMUD is the name both of a certain implementation of a Multi-User Dungeon server, and the first MUD run using that implementation. ...


TinyMUD and diversification

In 1989, TinyMUD began to allow players to easily participate in creating the online environment, as well as playing in it. The TinyMUD code spawned a number of descendants, including TinyMUCK and TinyMUSH, which added more sophisticated programmability. (TinyMUCK versions 2 and higher contain a full programming language named MUF, or Multi-User Forth, while MUSH greatly expanded the variety of commands and functions available and allowed them to apply to all objects.) Some use the term MU* to refer to TinyMUD, MUCK, MUSH, MUSE, MUX, and their kin; others simply allow the term MUD to apply universally. MUVE is a recent coinage, intended to stand for Multi-User Virtual Environment. UberMUD, UnterMUD, and MOO are some other MUD servers that were at least partially inspired by TinyMUD but are not direct descendants. TinyMUD is the name both of a certain implementation of a Multi-User Dungeon server, and the first MUD run using that implementation. ... TinyMUCK is a MUD server written by Stephen White which was released sometime before Feb 1990 and was derived from TinyMUD 1. ... The login screen from M*U*S*H, the centre of development for PennMUSH. A MUSH (sometimes said to be an abbreviation for Multi-User Shared Hack, Habitat, Holodeck, or Hallucination, though these are backronyms) is a text-based online social medium to which multiple users are connected at the... MUF (short for Muckers Forth or Multi-User Forth) is a Forth-based programming language used on TinyMUCK MUCK servers and their descendants, including Fuzzball MUCK, ProtoMUCK and GlowMUCK. MUF is the systems-programming language for TinyMUCK systems. ... Forth is a procedural, stack-oriented, reflective programming language and programming environment. ... // A MOO (MUD object oriented) is a type of MUD and is a text-based online virtual reality system to which multiple users are connected at the same time. ...


Also in 1989, and inspired by TinyMUD and AberMUD, LPMud was developed as a more game-oriented MUD that allowed participants to program the behavior of its "monsters". LPMud (sometimes shortened to simply LP) is a MUD variant developed in 1989 by Lars Pensjö that separates the mud game functionality between a virtual machine (known as the driver) and world-building components in the LPC programming language (known as the mudlib). ...


In 1991, the release of DikuMUD, which was inspired by AberMUD, lead to a virtual explosion of hack-n-slash MUDs based upon its code. DikuMUD inspired several derivative codebases as well, including CircleMUD, Merc, ROM, NiMUD and SMAUG. 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... DikuMUD is a multiplayer text-based adventure game (a type of MUD) written in 1990 and 1991 by Sebastian Hammer, Tom Madsen, Katja Nyboe, Michael Seifert, and Hans Henrik Staerfeldt at DIKU (Datalogisk Institut Københavns Universitet), the department of computer science at the University of Copenhagen in Copenhagen, Denmark. ... In several different types of games, hack and slash refers to a type of game or a style of gameplay which is primarially comprised of defeating enemies and monsters in combat, typically with swords or other melée weapons, hence the name. ... Codebase is a term used in software development to refer to the aggregate of all source code used to build a particular application or component. ... CircleMUD is a MUD codebase written by Jeremy Elson first released on July 16, 1993. ... Merc is a MUD engine derived from DikuMUD (through Copper MUD) in the early 1990s that has served as the basis for many later MUDs. ... ROM is a MUD codebase derived from Merc, which is based on DikuMUD. Russ Taylor (Alander) released Rom 2. ... NiMUD is a periodically updated package of open source MUD software. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Smaug, also known as Smaug The Golden, was a greedy, reddish-gold dragon of Middle-earth, who laid waste to Dale and captured the Lonely Mountain (Erebor) with all its treasure, which he gathered in a central hall and slept upon. ...


In 1994, Mark Peterson rewrote The Realm of Angmar, adapting it to MS-DOS (the basis for many dial-in BBS systems), and renamed it Swords of Chaos. For a few years this was a very popular form of MUD, hosted on a number of BBS systems, until widespread Internet access eliminated most BBSs. 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal. // Events January Bill Clinton January 1 : North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) goes into effect. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... A bulletin board system or BBS is a computer system running software that allows users to dial into the system over a phone line and, using a terminal program, perform functions such as downloading software and data, uploading data, playing games, reading news, and exchanging messages with other users. ... Swords of Chaos is a computer game by Mark Peterson of the type called a MUD (Multi-User Dungeon). ...


Though seeing some decline in the past few years due to the advent of graphical MUDs (MMORPGs)and other networked games, the MUD scene is still very much alive on the Internet, and can be accessed via standard telnet clients, or specialized MUD clients (which give a more pleasant user experience). These games are still listed at various web portals (see external links). Players interacting in Ultima Online. ... TELNET is a network protocol used on the Internet or local area network LAN connections. ... A mud client is a software used to connect to a MUD. Generally a mud client is a very basic telnet client that lacks VT100 terminal emulation and the capability to perform telnet negotiations. ...


Some consider the lack of graphics not to be detrimental, as it allows every player to envision a unique and therefore more immersive environment.


Variations on MUDs

Graphical MUDs

Main article: MMORPG Players interacting in Ultima Online. ...


A graphical MUD is a MUD that uses computer graphics to represent parts of the virtual world and its visitors. A prominent early graphical MUD was Habitat, written by Randy Farmer and Chip Morningstar for Lucasfilm in 1985. Graphical MUDs require players to download a special client and the game's artwork. They range from simply enhancing the user interface to simulating 3D worlds with visual spatial relationships and customized avatar appearances. Computer graphics (CG) is the field of visual computing, where one utilizes computers both to generate visual images synthetically and to integrate or alter visual and spatial information sampled from the real world. ... Habitat was an early and technologically influentual online role-playing game developed by Lucasfilm Games and made available as a beta test in 1987 by Quantum Link, an online service for the Commodore 64 computer and the corporate progenitor to America Online. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: #REDIRECT Life preserver If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Lucasfilm Ltd. ... The user interface is the part of a system exposed to users. ... Look up avatar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


After the increase in computing power and Internet connectivity during the late nineties graphical MUDs became better known as MMORPGs (massively multiplayer online role-playing games). Unlike earlier MUDs, most MMORPGs are commercial ventures. See list of MMORPGs for examples of this type of game. Players interacting in Ultima Online. ... It has been suggested that List of free MMORPGs be merged into this article or section. ...


Talkers and spods

Main article: Talker The talker is a kind of chat system that was originally based on MUDs. ...


A lesser known variant is the talker, typically based on ew-too or NUTS, with plenty of derived codebases. The early talkers were essentially MUDs, with most of the complex game machinery stripped away, leaving just the communication level commands - hence the name "talker". The talker is a kind of chat system that was originally based on MUDs. ... ewtoo, short for Elsewhere Too, was the first publicly available code base for Internet talkers and was written by Simon Burble Marsh in 1992, and was based on the code used for the first Internet talker Chat Chat that was written by Chris Cat Thompson in 1990. ... NUTS is a talker base written in C programming language by Neil Robertson, and got the status as the most well-known talker base. ... Codebase is a term used in software development to refer to the aggregate of all source code used to build a particular application or component. ...


They also use very little network traffic, and use simple protocols, making them ideal for setting up quietly at work. Talker applications predate MUDs by many years, although some of the early ones were used to play Dungeons & Dragons over computer networks. Talkers and some other MUDs use InterMUD to chat with users on completely separate MUDs. For other uses, see Dungeons & Dragons (disambiguation). ... InterMUD or interMU* communications is the commonly accepted termonology for different methods of allowing MUDs to communicate with each other. ...


People who use these tend to be called spods, and have earned a place in the Jargon File here. Spod is used to refer to a person who uses ew-too-style talkers (it is unheard of with NUTS-style talkers, which make up 1/2 of all talkers). ... The Jargon File is a glossary of hacker slang. ...


Role-play intensive MUDs

A lesser known type of MUDs are Role-Play Intensive MUD (RPIMUD). RPIMUDs gear toward realistic enforced roleplay which is often blended in with fantasy themes. In general, the objective of the game is not goal based hack-and-slash, but to collaborate with fellow players to create complex and multi-layered storylines in a cohesive gameworld. In role-playing, participants adopt characters, or parts, that have personalities, motivations, and backgrounds different from their own. ... In several different types of games, hack and slash (also called hack n slash or hack-and-slash) refers to a type of game or a style of gameplay which primarily comprises defeating enemies and monsters in combat, typically with swords or other mêlée weapons, hence the name. ...


The majority of RPIMUDs are levelless and classless, focusing instead on skills, crafts, as well as role-playing against the world or environment, often going as far as to request their players to engage in role-play with inanimate creatures and objects. Such dedication to role-playing, in addition to creating a vivid experience for other players, is often rewarded by staff members who invisibly monitor the game. A character class represents a characters archetype and career in many role-playing games. ...


Out-of-character communications are mostly restricted if present at all. This contrasts with other forms of mud role-playing styles such as storytelling and freestyle mushes in which role-play is conducted between players and OOC communications are more important.


A community portal dedicated to RPIMUDs can be found at [4].


Complex combat MUDs

A Complex combat MUD is a MUD with a more complicated battle system (hence the name). Generally, it means that a game does not have an automated fighting system - rather, there is a system of balances and timers which require constant user input to function. When coupled with an affliction or stancing system or some other sort of tactical fighting mechanism, this can be a very engaging and exciting way of doing combat. Others see it as needlessly complex and cumbersome.


Another distinguishing feature of complex combat MUDs is that they sometimes allow client-side triggers and scripting (often considered an unfair advantage in other games), since the game mechanics ensure that writing a script to handle fighting would be extremely difficult, but some more basic scripts make fighting more accessible for participants, and add an extra dimension to combat. A mud client is a software used to connect to a MUD. Generally a mud client is a very basic telnet client that lacks VT100 terminal emulation and the capability to perform telnet negotiations. ...


Psychology of MUDs

Dr. Sherry Turkle, Ph.D. of Sociology of Science at MIT, developed a theory in her book "Life on the Screen" that the constant use (and in many cases, overuse) of MUDs allows users to develop different personalities in their environments. She uses examples, which date back to the text-based MUDs of the mid-1990s, showing college students who simultaneously live different lives through characters in separate MUDs, up to three at a time, all while doing schoolwork. The students claimed that it was a way to "shut off" their own lives for a while and become part of another reality, one that Turkle claims could present a psychological problem of identity for today's youths. Sherry Turkle (born 1948) is a clinical psychologist and a professor of Science, Technology and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Social interactions of people and their consequences are the subject of sociology studies. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ...


Turkle also explores the ideas of the use of bots in MUDs. She references the Turing Test developed by Alan Turing, stating that bots could be considered truly intelligent if they were able to convince a human user speaking to the bot that the bot was actually human. Turkle presents the troubling ideas of sexual deviancy involved with this, that someone posing as a bot could "trick" someone into believing that they were a bot and allowing them to engage in sexual activity online. Turkle wonders aloud if this could be considered at the worst rape and at the very least an invasion of privacy. Bot may refer to: Internet bot: a type of computer program Larval Bot Kill Bot Bot, Tarragona: a small municipality in the comarca (county) of Terra Alta, Tarragona province, Catalonia, Spain video game Bot, see Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, small, bloblike creatures that jump about and have no... The Turing test is a proposal for a test of a machines capability to perform human-like conversation. ... Alan Turing is often considered the father of modern computer science. ...


See also

A mud client is a software used to connect to a MUD. Generally a mud client is a very basic telnet client that lacks VT100 terminal emulation and the capability to perform telnet negotiations. ... A MUD tree or multi-user dungeon tree is a hierarchical display of derived code from source code packages. ... A mobile is a non-player character (NPC) or monster in a MUD (also used in other computer role-playing games such as MMORPGs). ... Players interacting in Ultima Online. ... The login screen from M*U*S*H, the centre of development for PennMUSH. A MUSH (sometimes said to be an abbreviation for Multi-User Shared Hack, Habitat, Holodeck, or Hallucination, though these are backronyms) is a text-based online social medium to which multiple users are connected at the... // A MOO (MUD object oriented) is a type of MUD and is a text-based online virtual reality system to which multiple users are connected at the same time. ... The talker is a kind of chat system that was originally based on MUDs. ... Online Creation (OLC, sometimes also referred to as Online Coding), or Online Building is a feature of MUDs that allows users to edit world data while simultaneously playing the game. ...

References

  1. ^ Early MUD History.
  2. ^ The Dragon Ate My Homework
  3. ^ Escape from the Dungeon
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ [2]
  6. ^ [3]

External links

MUD rankings and listings

  • Top Mud Sites: Ranking of the most popular MUDs
  • Most Popular MUDS: Ranking of the most popular MUDS
  • mudlists.com: Large selection of available online RPGs
  • Mud Connector.com: Extensive list of available MUDs and related resources
  • German Muds: Website with MUDs in German language
  • MUD Planet: Large selection of MUDs

MUD history and studies

  • Some history and reviews from Richard Bartle's "Interactive Multi-User Computer Games" report
  • Confessions of an Arch-Wizard Mud History: Michael Lawrie's account of the early years of MUD and MIST
  • Virtual(ly) Law: The Emergence of Law in LambdaMOO
  • The MUDline: A timeline of MUD history up to 1995.
  • A Classification of MUDs by Martin Keegan, Grandmaster Data Services Ltd, Cambridge, UK
  • Early MUD history
  • Sherry Turkle has studied MUDs academically.
  • The Unofficial MUD2 Homepage.
  • HEARTS, CLUBS, DIAMONDS, SPADES: PLAYERS WHO SUIT MUDS Richard Bartle examines and categorizes the types of play and players found on MU* systems.
  • Online World Timeline - Raph Koster's timeline of significant events for the development of virtual worlds.

MUDs of historical interest

  • A working version of MUD.
  • www.mud2.com and www.mudii.co.uk: live versions of its descendant, MUD2.
  • Avatar. Moria and Oubliette are also available.
  • IgorMud.org - One of the earliest LPMuds still running
  • MorgenGrauen - One of the earliest LPMuds in German language. Still running.

MUD2 is the latest incarnation of Richard Bartles pioneering multi-user dungeon. ...

Snippet and source code repositories

  • MudBytes.net: MUD code repository and discussion.
  • Mud Magic.com: MUD software downloads, discussion, game listings, and documentations.
  • ftp.game.org: Hierarchal archive of MUD source code

Other resources

  • Erwin S. Andreasen: Home of the MUD Personality Test, 16k MUD competition, and other resources.
  • Jargon File: The Jargon File's entry on MUDs.
  • Mapping MUDs: 3-Dimensional modelling of a MUD

Life on the Screen: Sherry Turkle

  • LPUniversity Foundation: LPC Community Website
  • The Area Archives: A repository for mud areas.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Multi-User Dungeon - definition of Multi-User Dungeon in Encyclopedia (1618 words)
The first MUDs appeared in 1978, and their popularity escalated in the USA during the 1980s, when (relatively speaking) cheap, home personal computers with 300 to 2400 baud modems enabled role players to log into multi-line BBSes.
In Europe at around the same time, MUD development was centered around academic networks, particularly at the University of Essex where they were played by many people, both internal and external to the University.
They chose the acronym MUD to stand for Multi-User Dungeon, and was designed to be a multi-user version of another PDP-10 game called Dungeon (or DUNGEN due to the six character filename limit), which was later commercially released by Infocom under the original development code name Zork.
Mud - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (227 words)
Mud, a liquid or semi-liquid mixture of water and soil, or sediment, is commonly referred to as mud.
Geologically speaking, mud is a mixture of water and particles of silt and clay.
Mud, in the construction industry, is wet stucco or cement.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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