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Encyclopedia > Muay Thai
Muay Thai
(มวยไทย)

Ram Muay before an amateur Muay Thai match
Also known as Thai Boxing, Pahuyuth
Style Stand-up fighting, Striking
Country of origin Flag of Thailand Thailand
Parenthood Muay Boran, Krabi Krabong
Famous practitioners Nai Khanom Tom, Tony Jaa, Diesel Noi, Apidej Sit Hrun, Ramon Dekkers
Olympic Sport No

Muay Thai (IPA: [/muai32 tʰai32/]; Thai: มวยไทย) literally Thai Boxing and also known as The Art of the Eight Limbs is the Thai name for a form of hard martial art practiced in several Southeast Asian countries including Thailand. It is known as Pradal Serey in Cambodia, Tomoi in Malaysia, Muay Lao in Laos and as a similar style called Lethwei in Myanmar. The different styles of kickboxing in Southeast Asia are analogous to the different types of Kung Fu in China or Silat in the Malay peninsula. The Thai military uses a modified form of Muay Thai called Lerdrit.[1] Look up mai tai in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Muay Thai Categories: GFDL images ... A kickboxing match showing the typical kicking distance. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Krabi Krabong is a Thai fighting system which makes use of various weapons and also incorporates the empty-hand techniques of Muay Thai. ... Panom Yeerum (Thai: ; Khmer: ចាភ្ំ យីរុាំ; IPA: ) born on February 5, 1976 in Surin Province, Thailand, better known in the West as Tony Jaa and in Thailand as Jaa Panom, is a Thai martial art film actor, choreographer and director. ... Dieselnoi Chor Thanasukarn, born Charin Sorndee in Tambon Huakoon on December 26, 1961, is a former Muay Thai fighter. ... Apidej Sit Hrun (born Narong Yaenprateep: September, 1941, in Samut Songkhram, Thailand) was one of the most legendary and distinguished Muay Thai fighters to ever enter the ring. ... The current version of this article or section is written in an informal style and with a personally invested tone. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Taijitu, the traditional symbol representing the forces of Yin and Yang. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Pradal Serey (; English: Khmer Boxing) is the name of the centuries old kickboxing martial arts of Cambodia. ... Tomoi is a Malaysian name for the South-East Asian martial art known in Thailand as Muay Thai, in Cambodia as Pradal Serey, and similar to an art from Myanmar known as Lethwei. ... BAMA LETHWEI Lethwei or Lethawae (Read as Let-whae, but quickly) ; also known as Burmese Boxing and Myanmar Traditional Boxing, is a form of kickboxing which originated in Myanmar (Burma). ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Alternative meaning: Kung Fu (TV series) Kung fu or gongfu (功夫, Pinyin: gōngfu) is a well-known Chinese term used in the West to designate Chinese martial arts. ... Look up Silat in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Malay Peninsula (Malay: Semenanjung Tanah Melayu) is a major peninsula located in Southeast Asia. ... Lerdrit is a Thai form of martial arts taught, and used by the Royal Thai Army. ...


Muay Thai has a long history in Thailand and is the country's national sport. Traditional Muay Thai practiced today varies slightly from the ancient art Muay Boran and uses kicks and punches in a ring with gloves similar to those used in Western boxing. Muay Thai is referred to as "The Science of Eight Limbs", as the hands, shins, elbows, and knees are all used extensively in this art. A master practitioner of Muay Thai thus has the ability to execute strikes using eight "points of contact," as opposed to "two points" (fists) in Western boxing and "four points" (fists, feet) used in the primarily sport-oriented forms of martial arts. This does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Kick (disambiguation). ... A jab In the context of unarmed combat or melee, a punch is a thrusting blow, esp. ... For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... A jab In the context of unarmed combat or melee, a punch is a thrusting blow, esp. ... For other uses, see Kick (disambiguation). ... A sideways Winiki elbow strike. ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ...

Contents

History

A Thai boxer praying during the Wai Kru before match.
A Thai boxer praying during the Wai Kru before match.

Various forms of kickboxing have long been practiced throughout Southeast Asia. Muay Thai's origin in Thailand can be traced back to its ancestor Muay Boran ("ancient boxing"). This was the form of unarmed combat probably used by Siamese soldiers in conjunction with Krabi Krabong, the weapon-based style [1]. The precedence Muay Thai and Muay Boran give to the kick is probably indigenous to Thailand and the surrounding area since Indian boxing as well as most southern Chinese styles use even low kicks sparingly. This may have come through the influence of the older Krabi Krabong wherein kicks are the dominant form of unarmed attack. Another influence from Thailand's weapon style can be seen in the pre-fight Wai Kru which is probably based on the sabre dance of Krabi Krabong. Neighbouring countries such as Cambodia or Myanmar also show signs of influence one way or the other. Eventually Muay Boran was divided to: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (351x800, 52 KB) This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License v. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (351x800, 52 KB) This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License v. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... For the country formerly called Siam see Thailand SIAM is an acronym for Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. ... Krabi Krabong is a Thai fighting system which makes use of various weapons and also incorporates the empty-hand techniques of Muay Thai. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Krabi Krabong is a Thai fighting system which makes use of various weapons and also incorporates the empty-hand techniques of Muay Thai. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Wai khru ram muay. ... Krabi Krabong is a Thai fighting system which makes use of various weapons and also incorporates the empty-hand techniques of Muay Thai. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...

  • Muay Korat (Northeast) emphasized strength. A technique like "Throwing Buffalo Punch" was used. It could supposedly defeat a buffalo in one blow.
  • Muay Lopburi (Center region) emphasized movements. Its strong points were straight and counter punches.
  • Muay Chaiya (South) emphasized posture and defense, as well as elbows and knees.
  • Muay Pra Nakorn (North) emphasized speed, particularly in kicking. Because of its faster speed, it was called as well "Ling Lom" (windy monkey or Loris).

There is a phrase about Muay Boran that states, "Punch Korat, Wit Lopburi, Posture Chaiya, Faster Thasao. (หมัดหนักโคราช ฉลาดลพบุรี ท่าดีไชยา ไวกว่าท่าเสา)". This does not cite its references or sources. ...


The practice of Muay Thai was later kept up largely by Buddhist monks who were the keepers and teachers of all arts both practical and spiritual. As every Thai man is compelled to live as a monk at least once in his life the art grew in popularity among common people, so much so that it was said that any man worth his salt would practice it. As well as continuing to function as a practical fighting technique for use in actual warfare, Muay Thai became a sport in which the exponents fought in front of spectators who went to watch for entertainment. This kind of muay contests gradually became an integral part of local festivals and celebrations, especially those held at temples. It was even used as entertainment to kings. A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by...


Eventually the previously bare-fisted fighters took to wearing lengths of rope wrapped around their hands and forearms. This type of match was called muay kaad chuek (มวยคาดเชือก).


Royal Muay

Muay gradually became a possible means of personal advancement as the nobility increasingly esteemed skillful practitioners of the art and invited selected fighters to come to live in the Royal palace to teach muay to the staff of the royal household, soldiers, princes or the king's personal guards. This "royal muay" was called muay luang (มวยหลวง).


Some time during the Ayutthaya Period, a platoon of royal guards was established, whose duty was to protect king and the country. They were known as Grom Nak Muay (Muay Fighters' Regiment). This royal patronage of muay continued through the reigns of Rama V and VII. The kingdom of Ayutthaya (Thai: ) was a Thai kingdom that existed from 1350 to 1767. ... His Majesty King Rama V of Siam, with his son, later King Rama VI (portrait in National History Museum, Bangkok) King Chulalongkorn the Great or Rama V (royal name Phra Chula Chomklao Chaoyuhua) (September 20, 1853 - October 23, 1910) was the fifth king of the Chakri dynasty of Thailand. ... His Majesty King Prajadhipok (Rama VII, royal name Phra Pokklao Chaoyuhua) (November 8, 1893 - May 30, 1941) was the seventh king of the Chakri dynasty, and was the last absolute monarch of Thailand. ...


The Muay Renaissance

The ascension of King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) to the throne in 1868 ushered in a Golden Age not only for muay but for the whole country. Muay progressed greatly during the reign of Rama V as a direct result of the king's personal interest in the art. The country was at peace and muay functioned as a means of physical exercise, self-defense, recreation, and personal advancement. Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


After the occurrence of a death in the ring, codified rules for Muay Thai were drawn up. These included the rules that the fighters should wear modern gloves and cotton coverlets over the feet and ankles. It was also around this time in the 1920s that the term Muay Thai became commonly used while the older form of the style was referred to as Muay Boran.


Legendary Heroes

Nai Khanom Tom was a famous practitioner of Muay Thai. Around 1774, he was captured along with other Thai prisoners, either in a skirmish or at the fall of the ancient capital of Siam of Ayutthaya. He was brought to Rangoon in Burma, where the Burmese King Mangra was holding a religious festival in honor of Buddha's relics. The festivities included many forms of entertainment. King Mangra was reported to be curious to see how the various fighting styles of Burma and other countries would compare. At one point, he wanted to see how Muay Boran would compare to the Burmese art Lethwei. Nai Khanom Tom was selected to fight against the Burmese champion. Nai Khanom Tom did a Wai Kru pre-fight dance which puzzled all of the Burmese. When the fight began, he charged out and, using punches, kicks, elbows, and knees, quickly pummeled the Burmese. Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... For the country formerly called Siam see Thailand SIAM is an acronym for Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. ... Ayutthaya (full name Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Thai พระนครศรีอยุธยา; also spelled Ayudhya) city is the capital of Ayutthaya province in Thailand. ... Yangnon or Rangoon is the largest city of Myanmar. ... Media:Example. ... BAMA LETHWEI Lethwei or Lethawae (Read as Let-whae, but quickly) ; also known as Burmese Boxing and Myanmar Traditional Boxing, is a form of kickboxing which originated in Myanmar (Burma). ... Wai khru ram muay (Thai: ไหว้ครูรำมวย) is an action of respect in Thai culture that is performed by participants in Thai fighting competitions. ...


The referee was reported to have stated that the Burmese opponent was distracted by the Wai Kru, so the knockout was invalid. The King then asked if Nai Khanom Tom would fight nine other Burmese champions to prove himself. He agreed and fought them all, one after the other with no rest periods between fights. The last Burmese was reputed to be a great boxing teacher. Nai Khanomtom defeated them all in a superior fashion. A referee is a person who has authority to make decisions about play in many sports. ...


King Mangra was so impressed that he remarked, "Every part of the Thai is blessed with venom. Even with his bare hands, he can fell nine or ten opponents. As his lord master was incompetent, the country was lost to the enemy. If his lord had been any good, there was no way the City of Ayutthaya would ever have fallen." It has been suggested that Snake poison be merged into this article or section. ...


He granted Nai Khanom Tom freedom along with either riches or two beautiful Burmese wives. Nai Khanom Tom chose the wives as he said that money was easier to find. He then departed with his wives for Siam. Other variations of this story had him also winning the release of his fellow Thai prisoners. His feat is celebrated every March 17 as "Boxer's Day" or "National Muay Thai Day" in his honor and that of Muay Thai's. is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Today, some have wrongly attributed the legend of "Nai Khanom Tom" to King Naresuan, who was once taken by the Burmese. However, Nai Khanon Tom and King Naresuan were almost two centuries apart. King Naresuan the Great (1555 - April 25, 1605, also sometimes called Naret or the Black Prince, Thai สมเด็จพระนเรศวรมหาราช) was king of Siam (today Thailand) from 1590 until his death in 1605. ...


There is also a legend of one Skeng Man Nang (ca. 700), a mutant child born with three legs. This deformaty made his parents abandon him, but he was taken in by a monastery in the north of the country. Here he was taught muay boran by the monks, and it soon became apparent that his extra leg gave him considerable fighting prowess against bipedal foes. Unfortunately, he committed suicide after becoming mentally unbalanced by the cries of "choi soi kap" ("three legged mutant" in ancient Thai). His existence only recently come to light, after the royal archives at Ayutthaya which were thought to have been destroyed by Burmese invaders were recovered. (Reference: Professor Peter Shaw, School of Oriental and African Studies, London)


The Tradition of Wai Khru

One of the most important traditions of Muay Thai is Wai Khru (Paying Respect to Teachers). In order to become a fully-fledged Muay Thai fighter, a person has to pass through a series of ceremonies. First comes the Initiation as a Trainee Fighter Ceremony (Kuen Khru), in which the khru muay accepts young fighters as his students and pledges to teach them to the best of his ability. After fighters have been accepted, they must demonstrate a good conduct, diligence and endurance, in addition to training as hard as they can, following implicitly all the teacher's rules It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Wai khru ram muay. ...


During their apprenticeship, young fighters will experience the second type of Wai Khru ritual, the Annual Homage-Paying Ceremony (Wai Khru Prajam Pee). This annual ceremony is usually held on Muay Thai Day (March 17) for young fighters to pay respect to their teachers and souls of teachers long passed away. The ceremony then progresses to the students honoring all the teachers present, who will mark sacred symbols on the fighters' forehead in order to bestow prosperity and success upon them - a custom known as jerm. The ceremony culminates with the third form of Wai Khru, the Ritual Dance of Homage (Wai Khru Ram Muay) performed by the fighters as a mark of respect. is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wai khru ram muay (Thai: ไหว้ครูรำมวย) is an action of respect in Thai culture that is performed by participants in Thai fighting competitions. ...


It is only when fighters have passed all these three milestones (initiation, training and participation in contests) that they are entitled to call themselves as real Muay Thai fighters. When fighters have satisfied their teachers on all these counts, then they can participate in the forth Wai Khru ritual, the Initiation as a Teacher Ceremony (Khrob Khru), which bestows on them the rank of khru muay and again involves a performance of the Ritual Dance of Homage.[2]


Approaching the Ring Rites (Kuen Suu Weitee)

In ancient times, Siamese people believed in the power of incantations and protective amulets, the common belief was that everything was ruled and inhabited by unseen spirits, and that places were either blessed or cursed. Because of these beliefs, it was necessary to perform special rites before a fighter entered the ring, asking the spirits' permission to do so. Siamese could refer to: A Siamese cat Siamese twins The Thai language Someone or something from Thailand This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... An amulet from the Black Pullet grimoire An amulet (from Latin amuletum, meaning A means of protection) or a talisman (from Arabic tilasm, ultimately from Greek telesma or from the Greek word talein wich means to initiate into the mysteries. ...


Even today, before entering the ring many fighters perform rituals. It is very much a matter of individual preference these days, with no prescribed rules. Some may kneel before the ring, others might pray with their khru muay or perform a series of repetitive movements, such as touching the ring ropes 3 times and avoiding the bottom stair before taking the first step up to the ring are actions thought to bring good luck!


Fighters always leap over the ropes into the ring, because the head is considered to be more important than the feet and therefore it has to stay always above the feet while entering the ring, then they will go to the center and pay respect (panom muae wai) in all four directions to the spectators.


Ritual Dance of Homage (Wai Khru Ram Muay)

Two young fighters doing the Wai khru ram muay.
Two young fighters doing the Wai khru ram muay.

Wai Khru Muay Thai is a tradition which goes back to ancient times, it is not an optional ritual or reserved for special occasions: the official Muay Thai regulations[2] specify that both fighters must perform the Wai Khru Ram Muay before each and every bout. It's a tradition in which fighters pay respect to their teachers, parents and things they hold sacred and pray for their safety and victory. The ritual have been developed in different ways, in different regions, even under different teachers and therefore it is theoretically impossible for two fighters to perform identical Wai Khru. Image File history File linksMetadata Muay_Thai_Kids. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Muay_Thai_Kids. ... Wai khru ram muay (Thai: ไหว้ครูรำมวย) is an action of respect in Thai culture that is performed by participants in Thai fighting competitions. ...


The Wai Khru is graceful and aesthtic ritual, both practical and spiritual. In a practical sense, it functions as a final pre-fight warm-up and gives the fighter some time alone before the fight to collect his thoughts. It can be divided into three main sections:

  • The Royal Homage Sequence

This was originally intended to show devotion to the King, going back to the days when fighters were selected to display their skills in front of him. It has three subsections: Prostration, Outstretched Arms and Act of Homage.

  • The Kneeling Sequence

This section is performed in a kneeling posture, one knee on the ground and the other leg out in front. the fighter pivots around on the spot to repeat the same sequence facing all four sides of the ring, a tradition which comes from Krabi Krabong. Krabi Krabong is a Thai fighting system which makes use of various weapons and also incorporates the empty-hand techniques of Muay Thai. ...

  • The Standing Sequence

In this section, the fighters go out from the center of the ring in one direction, to perform the Dramatic Interlude. Some fighters imitate the motions of "Rama Shooting an Arrow" from the Ramakien, a hunter, a soldier, or an executioner. Some fighters use this ritual to attempt to scare their opponents, commonly by stomping around them. But in a deeper sense, the fighter is expressing religious devotion, humility, and gratitude. Transcending both physical and temporal limitations, he opens himself to the divine presence and allows it to infuse his heart.[3] Figure of a giant at the golden chedi in Wat Phra Kaew Ramakien is Thailands national epic, derived from the Indian Ramayana epic. ...


Removal of the Head Circlet (Pitee Tod Mongkon)

After the Wai Khru is completed, the fighters return to their own corners for the Removal of the Head Circlet Ritual (Pitee Tod Mongkon). Fighter stands in his own corner, lowers his head and raises hands to his chest for panom mue wai pose, while khru muay standing outside of the ropes facing the fighter, raises his own hands to return the wai. A fighter maintains the posture while the teacher utters an incantation and blows three times on top of fighters' head before removing the Mongkon. On the completion of this ritual and after a review of the rules by the judge and a glove shake, the contest may begin.[4] Mong Kon is a type of headgear worn by Muay Thai athletes. ...


Muay Thai techniques

In its original form, Muay Thai consisted of an arsenal of nine weapons - the head, fists, elbows, knees and feet - known collectively as na-wa arwud. Although in modern Muay Thai, both amateur and professional, headbutting an opponent is no longer allowed. Muay Thai is unique in the way it uses all parts of the body, including the elbows and knees, for both training and competitions.[5] The top combatant can attack with headbutts while being held in the bottom combatants guard. ... A jab In the context of unarmed combat or melee, a punch is a thrusting blow, esp. ... A sideways Winiki elbow strike. ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ... For other uses, see Kick (disambiguation). ...


To strike and bind the opponent for both offensive and defensive purposes, small amounts of stand-up grappling are used: the clinch. Formal Muay Thai techniques are divided into two groups: Mae Mai or major techniques and Luk Mai or minor techniques. Muay Thai is often a fighting art of attrition, where opponents exchange blows with one another. This is certainly the case with traditional stylists in Thailand, but is a less popular form of fighting in the contemporary world fighting circuit. With the success of Muay Thai in mixed martial arts fighting, it has become the de facto martial art of choice for competitive stand-up fighters. As a result, it has evolved and incorporated much more powerful hand striking techniques used in western style boxing and the Thai style of exchanging blow for blow is no longer favorable. Note: when Muay Thai fighters compete against fighters of other styles (and if the rules permit it), they almost invariably emphasize elbow (sok) and knee (kao) techniques to gain a distinct advantage in fighting. Almost all techniques in Muay Thai use the entire body movement, rotating the hip with each kick, punch, and block. The rotation of the hips in Muay Thai techniques, and intensive focus on "core muscles" (such as abdominal muscles and surrounding muscles) is very distinctive and is what sets Muay Thai apart from other styles of martial arts. For other uses, see Grapple. ... Clinch fighting is the part of stand-up fighting where the combatants are in a clinch, typically using a clinching hold. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A kickboxing match showing the typical kicking distance. ... For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... A sideways Winiki elbow strike. ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ... The abdomen (from the Latin word meaning belly) is the part of the body between the pelvis and the thorax. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Punching techniques (Chok)

Young Thais fighting
Young Thais fighting
English Thai Transliteration
Straight Punch Mud Dhrong
Hook Mud Wjang San
Swing Mud Wijang Yao
Spinning Backfist Mud Wjang Glab
Uppercut Mud Seuy
Jump Punch Kra-dod Chok
Overhead Punch Mud Khouk

The Punch techniques in Muay Thai were originally quite simple being crosses and a long (or lazy) circular strike made with a straight (but not locked) arm and landing with the heel of the palm. Cross-fertilization with Western boxing and western martial arts mean the full range of western boxing punches are now used (jab, straight right/cross, hook, uppercut, shovel and corkscrew punches plus overhand or bolo punches). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In boxing, a cross is a counter-punch. ... A hook is a punch in boxing. ... Lead hand uppercut The uppercut (sometimes also referred to as the upper), is a punch used in boxing that usually aims at the opponents chin. ...


Muay Thai judges score punching techniques less highly than other strikes as they are generally less powerful than knee strikes or kicks and the fists are padded by gloves (while knees, elbows, shins, and feet are not).


As a tactic, body punching is used less in Muay Thai than other martial arts to avoid exposing the attacker's head to counter strikes from knees or elbows.


Elbow techniques (dhee sork)

The elbow can be used in seven ways: horizontal, diagonal-upwards, diagonal-downwards, uppercut, downward, backward-spinning and flying. From the side it can be used as either a finishing move or as a way to cut the opponent's eyebrow so that blood might block his vision. The blood also raises the opponent's awareness of being hurt which could affect his performance. This is the most common way of using the elbow. The diagonal elbows are faster than the other forms, but are less powerful. The uppercut and flying elbows are the most powerful, but are slower and easier to avoid or block. The downward elbow is usually used as a finishing move.

English Thai Transliteration
Elbow Slash Sork Dhee
Horizontal Elbow Sork Dhad
Uppercut Elbow Sork Ngad
Forward Elbow Thrust Sork Poong
Reverse Horizontal Elbow Sork Wjang Glab
Spinning Elbow Sork Glab
Elbow Chop Sork Sap
Double Elbow Chop Sork Glab Koo
Mid-Air Elbow Strike Gra-dode Sork

There is also a distinct difference between a single elbow and a follow-up elbow. The single elbow is an elbow move independent from any other move, whereas a follow-up elbow is the second strike from the same arm, being a hook first with an elbow follow-up. Such elbows, and most other elbows, are used when the distance between fighters becomes too small and there is too little space to throw a hook at the opponent's head.


Kicking techniques (dhe)

English Thai Transliteration
Straight Kick Dhe Dhrong
Nutcracker Kick Dhe Paa Maak
Roundhouse Kick Dhe Dhad
Diagonal Kick Dhe Chiyang
Half-Shin, Half-Knee Kick Dhe Krueng Kheng Krueng Kao
Spinning Heel Kick Dhe Glab Lang
Down Roundhouse Kick Dhe Kod
Axe Heel Kick Dhe Khouk
Jump Kick Gra-dode Dhe
Step-Up Kick Yiep Dhe

The two most common kicks in Muay Thai are known as the teep (literally "foot jab,"), and the TAE(kick)chieng (kicking upwards in the shape of a triangle cutting under the arm and ribs) or angle kick. The Muay Thai angle kick has been widely adopted by fighters from other martial arts. The angle kick uses a rotational movement of the entire body. The angle kick is superficially similar to a karate roundhouse kick, but omits the rotation of the lower leg from the knee used in other striking martial arts like Karate or Taekwondo. The angle kick draws it's power entirely from the rotational movement of the body. Many Muay Thai fighters use a counter rotation of the arms to intensify the power of this kick. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Thai-style roundhouse kicks used to attack low and high targets. ... Kicker redirects here. ... Kicker redirects here. ... Kicker redirects here. ... Kicker redirects here. ... Thai-style roundhouse kicks used to attack low and high targets. ...


A Thai fighter uses this to his advantage, and if a round house kick is attempted by the opponent the fighter will block with his shin. Thai boxers are trained to always connect with the shin. While sensitive in an unconditioned practitioner, the shin is the strongest part of the leg for experienced Muay Thai fighters. The foot contains many fine bones and is much weaker. A fighter may end up hurting himself if he tries to attack with his foot.


Muay Thai also includes other varieties of kicking, such as the axe kick, side kick or spinning back kick etc. These kicks, depending on the fighter are utilized as to the preference of the fighter. It is worth noting that a side kick is performed differently in Muay Thai than the traditional side kick of other martial arts. In Muay Thai, a side kick is executed by first raising the knee of the leg that is going to kick in order to convince the opponent that the executor is going to perform a teep or front kick. The hips are then shifted to the side to the more traditional side kick position for the kick itself. The "fake-out" always precedes the kick in Muay Thai technique.


Knee techniques (dhee kao)[6]

English Thai Transliteration
Straight Knee Strike Kao Dhrong
Diagonal Knee Strike Kao Chijang
Curving Knee Strike Kao Kouwng
Horizontal Knee Strike Kao Dhad
Knee Slap Kao Dhob
Knee Bomb Kao Youwn
Flying Knee Strike Kao Loy
Step-Up Knee Strike Kao Yiep
  • Kao Dode (Jumping knee strike) - the Thai boxer jumps up on one leg and strikes with that leg's knee.
  • Kao Loi (Flying knee strike) - the Thai boxer takes step(s), jumps forward and off one leg and strikes with that leg's knee.
  • Kao Tone (Straight knee strike) - the Thai boxer simply thrusts it forward (not upwards, unless he is holding an opponents head down in a clinch and intend to knee upwards into the face). According to one written source, this technique is somewhat more recent than Kao Dode or Kao Loi.[citation needed] Supposedly, when the Thai boxers fought with rope-bound hands rather than the modern boxing gloves, this particular technique was subject to potentially vicious cutting, slicing and sawing by an alert opponent who would block it or deflect it with the sharp "rope-glove" edges which are sometimes dipped in water to make the rope much stronger. This explanation also holds true for some of the following knee strikes below as well.
  • Kao Noi (Small knee strike) - the Thai boxer hits the inside upper thigh (above the knee) of the opponent when clinching. This technique is used to wear down the opponent or to counter the opponent's knee strike or kick.

A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ...

Foot-thrust techniques (teep)

Foot-Thrusts also known as Push Kicks or literally "foot jabs" are one of the most common techniques used in Muay Thai. Teeps are different from any other Muay Thai technique in terms of objective to use. Foot-thrusts are mainly used as an offensive technique to block opponent's attacks, get him off-balance and destroy opponent's balance.[7]

English Thai Transliteration
Straight Foot-Thrust Teep Dhrong
Sideways Foot-Thrust Teep Kang
Reverse Foot-Thrust Teep Glab Lang
Slapping Foot-Thrust Teep Dhob
Jumping Foot-Thrust Gra-dode Teep

In Tae Kwon Do: A front kick, somewhat literarly translated from korean ap chagi, is widely regarded as the simplest kick of all. ...

The clinch

The fighter on the left has the dominant position in a front Thai clinch. (Note that both men are employing an improper hold upon the other. The proper clinch technique employs controlling the back and top of the opponents head, not the neck, which in fact is much harder to control. Additionally, both men are using improper hand position, as interlinking fingers is impossible with gloves and offers a very weak hold that is easily escaped.)
The fighter on the left has the dominant position in a front Thai clinch. (Note that both men are employing an improper hold upon the other. The proper clinch technique employs controlling the back and top of the opponents head, not the neck, which in fact is much harder to control. Additionally, both men are using improper hand position, as interlinking fingers is impossible with gloves and offers a very weak hold that is easily escaped.)

In Western Boxing, the two fighters are separated when they clinch, in Muay Thai however, they are not. It is often in the clinch where knee techniques are used. The front clinch should be performed with the palm of one hand on the back of the other and not as shown in the picture. There are three reasons why the fingers must not be intertwined. 1) In the ring fighters are wearing boxing gloves and cannot intertwine their fingers. 2) The Thai front clinch involves pressing the head of the opponent downwards, which is easier if the hands are locked behind the back of the head instead of behind the neck. Furthermore the arms should be putting as much pressure on the neck as possible. 3) You can injure your fingers if they are intertwined, and it is harder to release the grip if you want to elbow your opponent's head quickly. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 647 KB) Summary The fighter on the left has the double collar tie (Muay Thai clinch). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 647 KB) Summary The fighter on the left has the double collar tie (Muay Thai clinch). ... To clinch is to hold tightly. ...


A correct clinch also involves your forearms pressing against the other fighter's collar bone while your hands are around the opponent's head rather than his neck. The general way to get out of a clinch (not the one pictured) is to push the opponents head backwards or elbow him, as the clinch requires both participants to be very close to one another. Additionally, the non-dominant clincher can try to "swim" his arm underneath and inside his opponent's clinch, establishing him as the now dominant clincher.


Muay Thai has several other variants of the clinch, including:

  • arm clinch, where one or both hands controls the inside of the defender's arm(s) and where the second hand if free isin the front clinch position, this clinch isused to briefly control the opponent beforeapplying a knee strike or throw
  • side clinch, one arm passing around the front of the defender with the attacker's sholder pressed into the defender's arm pit and the other arm passing round the back which allows the attacket to apply knee stikes to the defender's back or to throw the defender readily
  • low clinch, with both controlling arms passing under the defender's arms, which is generally used by the shorter of two opponents
  • swan-neck where one hand around the rear of the neck is used to briefly clinch (before a strike) an opponent.

[citation needed]


Defence against attacks

Defences in Muay Thai are categorised in 6 groups:

  • Blocking - defender's hard blocks to stop a strike in its path so preventing it reaching its target, (eg the Shin Block described in more detail below)
  • Redirection - defender's soft parries to change the direction of a strike (eg a downwards tap to a jab) so that it misses the target
  • Avoidance - moving a body part out of the way or range of a strike so the defender remains in range for a counter-strike, eg defender moving the front leg backwards from the attacker's low kick: then immediately counter-attacking with an angle kick: or defender laying the head back from the attacker's high angle kick: then immediately counter-attacking with a side kick from the front leg:
  • Evasion - moving the body out of the way or range of a strike so the defender has to move close again to counter-attack, eg defender jumping back from attacker's kicks
  • Disruption - Pre-empting an attack. eg with defender using disruptive techniques like jab, teep or low angle kick (to the inside of the attacker's front leg) as the attacker attempts to close distance
  • Anticipation - Defender catching a strike (eg catching an angle kick to the body) or countering it before it lands (eg defender's low kick to the supporting leg below as the attacker iniates a high angle kick).

Defence against attacks — punches and kicks

Defensively, the concept of "wall of defence" is used, in which shoulders, arms and legs are used to hinder the attacker from successfully executing his techniques. Blocking is a critical element in Muay Thai and compounds the level of conditioning a successful practitioner must possess. Low and mid body roundhouse kicks are normally blocked with the upper portion of a raised shin. High body strikes are blocked with the forearm/glove, elbow/shin. Mid section roundhouse kicks can also be caught/trapped, allowing for a sweep or counter attack to the remaining leg of the opponent. Punches are blocked with an ordinary boxing guard and techniques similar, if not identical, to basic boxing technique. A common means of blocking a punch is using the hand on the same side as the oncoming punch. For example, if an orthodox fighter throws a jab (being his left hand), the defender will make a slight tap to redirect the punch's angle with his right hand. The deflection is always as small and precise as possible to avoid unnecessary energy expenditure and return the hand to the guard as quickly as possible. Hooks are most often blocked with a motion most often described as "combing your hair," raising the elbow forward and effectively shielding the head with the forearm, flexed bicep, and shoulder. More advanced Muay Thai blocks are usually counters, used to damage your opponent before he can attack again. Thai-style roundhouse kicks used to attack low and high targets. ... Thai-style roundhouse kicks used to attack low and high targets. ... A takedown is a martial arts and combat sports term for a technique that involves off-balancing an opponent and forcing him or her to the ground, typically with the combatant performing the takedown landing on top. ...


Conditioning

A fighter doing some heavy bag work in a training camp in Thailand.

Like most competitive full contact fighting sports, Muay Thai has a heavy focus on body conditioning. Muay Thai is specifically designed to promote the level of fitness and toughness required for ring competition. Training regimens include many staples of combat sport conditioning such as running, shadowboxing, rope jumping, body weight resistance exercises, medicine ball exercises, abdominal exercises, and in some cases weight training. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1365, 583 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1365, 583 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Conditioning is a psychological term for what Ivan Pavlov described as the learning of conditional behavior. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Running (disambiguation). ... Shadowboxing is an exercise used in the training for combat sports, especially, as its name implies, in boxing. ... An 1800 depiction of jumping rope A jump rope, rope skipping, skipping rope or skip rope is the primary tool used in the game of skipping played by children and many young adults, where one or more participants jump over a spinning rope so that it passes under their feet... Female internees practicing calisthenics in Manzanar. ... The abdomen (from the Latin word meaning belly) is the part of the body between the pelvis and the thorax. ... This article is about strength training using weight (gravity) to generate resistance to contraction. ...


Training that is specific to a Muay Thai fighter includes training with coaches on Thai pads, focus mitts, heavy bag, and sparring. The daily training includes many rounds (3-5 minute periods broken up by a short rest, often 1-2 minutes) of these various methods of practice. Thai pad training is a cornerstone of Muay Thai conditioning which involves practicing punches, kicks, knees, and elbow strikes with a trainer wearing thick pads which cover the forearms and hands. These special pads are used to absorb the impact of the fighter’s strikes and allow the fighter to react to the attacks of the pad holder. The trainer will often also wear a belly pad around the abdominal area so that the fighter can attack with straight kicks to the body at anytime during the round. A jab In the context of unarmed combat or melee, a punch is a thrusting blow, esp. ... For other uses, see Kick (disambiguation). ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ... A sideways Winiki elbow strike. ...


Focus mitts are specific to training a fighter’s hand speed, punch combinations, timing, punching power, defense, and counter-punching are also used to practice elbow strikes. Heavy bag training is a conditioning and power exercise that reinforces the techniques practiced on the pads. Sparring is a means to test technique, skills, range, strategy, and timing against a partner. Sparring is often a light to medium contact exercise because competitive fighters on a full schedule are not advised to risk injury by sparring hard. Specific tactics and strategies can be trained with sparring including in close fighting, clinching and kneeing only, cutting off the ring, or using reach and distance to keep an aggressive fighter away. Muay Thai (IPA: [/muai32 32/]; Thai: ) (Thai Boxing) is the Thai name for an indigenous form of martial art practiced in several southeast Asian countries including Cambodia (where it is Pradal Serey), Myanmar (where it is generally known as Lethwei ), Vietnam (where it is known as Vo Tu Do), and... Strikes to the head while wearing thick boxing gloves carry limited knockout power. ... A clinch (also called a stand-up grappling position)is a general martial arts and combat sports term for a grappling position where both combatants are standing, with atleast one combatant grappling the other. ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ...


Due to the rigorous fighting and training regimen (some Thai boxers fight almost every other week) professional Muay Thai fighters have relatively short careers in the ring. Many retire from competition to begin instructing the next generation of Thai fighters. Most professional Thai boxers come from the lower economic backgrounds and the fight money (after the other parties get their cut) is sought as means of support for the fighters and their families. Very few higher economic strata Thais join the professional Muay Thai ranks; they usually practise the sport as amateur Muay Thai boxers.


Kickboxing

Muay Thai, along with savate, karate, and taekwondo heavily influenced the development of kickboxing in Japan, Europe, and North America. However, unlike Muay Thai, many kickboxing competitions do not allow elbow strikes, knee strikes, or kicks below the waist (especially to the testicles). These rule changes have led some martial artists to consider kickboxing a 'watered down' version of Muay Thai, if even that. Savate (pronounced ), also known as boxe française, French boxing, French Kickboxing or French Footfighting, is a French martial art which uses both the hands and feet as weapons and combines elements of western boxing with graceful kicking techniques. ... For other uses, see Karate (disambiguation). ... Taekwondo (also, Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-Do, or Tae Kwon-Do) is a martial art and combat sport originating in Korea. ... Kicking to left side Kickboxing refers to sport-fighting using kicks and punches and sometimes throws and bows representing a certain martial art or can be practiced for general fitness, or as a full-contact sport. ... A sideways Winiki elbow strike. ... A knee (technically referred to as a knee strike) is a martial arts and combatives term for a strike with the knee. ... For other uses, see Kick (disambiguation). ... Human male anatomy The testicles, known medically as testes (singular testis), are the male generative glands in animals. ...


Mixed martial arts

Starting in the 1990s, Muay Thai has enjoyed a boost in popularity worldwide as it has been very effective in mixed martial arts fights, such as those held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) and PRIDE Fighting Championships. Mixed martial artists such as Marco Ruas (of Ruas Vale Tudo), Wanderlei Silva, Anderson Silva and Mauricio "Shogun" Rua (of the Chute Boxe Academy) have combined many striking elements of Muay Thai with grappling, submission, and choking elements from Judo, Wrestling, or Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu into a hybrid synthesis that has been highly effective in defeating practitioners of "pure" martial arts, at least in a sports-centered context. Other fighters that have used Muay Thai as their primary style in mixed martial arts include Duane "Bang" Ludwig, Kit Cope, and Spencer Cooper. Shoot-fighters and professional wrestlers who have trained and been influenced by Muay Thai include Satoru Sayama (the original Tiger Mask and founder of shooto), and Yoshiaki Fujiwara. Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ... This article covers the organization itself. ... PRIDE Fighting Championships (PRIDE or PRIDE FC for short) was a mixed martial arts organization based in Japan. ... For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ... Marco Ruas is a former professional martial arts fighter and instructor. ... Wanderlei Cesar Silva, (born July 3, 1976 in Curitiba, Brazil) is a Brazilian mixed martial arts (MMA) fighter, who has competed in Japans PRIDE Fighting Championships and the American based Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC). ... This article is about the mixed martial artist. ... Mauricio Milani Shogun Rua (born November 25, 1981[3] in Curitiba, Brazil) is a mixed martial arts fighter, and the winner of the PRIDE Fighting Championships 2005 Middleweight (205lb) Grand Prix. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Grapple. ... Two wrestlers clinching. ... The lateral vascular neck restraint is a very potent chokehold. ... This article is about the martial art and sport. ... Ancient Greek wrestlers (Pankratiasts) Wrestling is the act of physical engagement between two unarmed persons, in which each wrestler strives to get an advantage over or control of their opponent. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hybrid martial arts (also known as hybrid fighting systems) refer to martial arts or fighting systems that incorporate techniques and theories from several particular martial arts. ... Duane BANG Ludwig (August 4, 1978-) is an American kickboxer and MMA fighter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Mixed martial arts or MMA is a term for the combat sport in which two competitors attempt to achieve dominance over one another by utilizing three general tactics: striking, finishing holds, and control. ... ... Satoru Sayama (born November 24, 1957) is a Japanese professional wrestler, best known as the original Tiger Mask. ... Tiger Mask (Japanese: タイガーマスク) began as a manga in 1968 and was later adapted into a successful anime series in 1969. ... Shooto logo ISC logo This article deals with the martial arts organization, for the baseball pitch, see gyroball. ... Yoshiaki Fujiwara (藤原喜明 Fujiwara Yoshiaki) is a Japanese professional wrestler who has worked for New Japan Pro Wrestling, Pro Wrestling ZERO-ONE, and UWF. // Fujiwara was the first graduate of the New Japan Pro Wrestling dojo (Mr. ...


The rules

Muay Thai is practiced in many different countries. There are different rules depending on what country the fight is in and under what organization the fight is arranged. These rules, however, are gathered from the rules section of the World Muay Thai Council's web site. This is not the complete rulebook, but it contains a selection of the most important or most interesting rules.


Weight divisions

Category Weight (up to)
Super Heavyweight 209 lb+ (95 kg+)
Heavyweight 190 lb+ (86 kg+)
Cruiserweight 190 lb (86 kg)
Light Heavyweight 175 lb (79 kg)
Super Middleweight 168 lb (76 kg)
Middleweight 160 lb (73 kg)
Junior Middleweight 154 lb (70 kg)
Welterweight 147 lb (67 kg)
Junior Welterweight 140 lb (64 kg)
Lightweight 135 lb (61 kg)
Junior Lightweight 130 lb (59 kg)
Featherweight 126 lb (57 kg)
Junior Featherweight 122 lb (55 kg)
Bantamweight 118 lb (54 kg)
Junior Bantamweight 115 lb (52 kg)
Flyweight 112 lb (51 kg)
Junior Flyweight 108 lb (49 kg)
Mini Flyweight 105 lb (48 kg)

According to rule 8, section 2, the minimum weight to compete is 100 pounds (45 kg). In amateur boxing, the super heavyweight division is a weight class division for fighters weighting in excess of 91 kilograms (200. ... For the mixed martial arts division of the same name, see Heavyweight (MMA). ... Cruiserweight is a weight class in boxing where previously contestants weighed between 176 and 190 pounds. ... In boxing, the light heavyweight division is the weight division between cruiserweight over 175 pounds (79. ... A weight division in professional boxing, first established in the 1980s but made popular in the 1990s by British superstars Chris Eubank and Nigel Benn who took over from Thomas Hearns and Sugar Ray Leonard as long-reigning WBO and WBC world Super-Middleweight champions respectively. ... Middleweight is a division, or weight class, in boxing. ... Welterweight is a weight class division in combat sports. ... // The lightweight is the 130 pounds (59 kilograms) to 135 pounds (61 kilograms) weight class in the sport of boxing. ... Featherweight is a weight class division in the sport of boxing and wrestling (Greco-Roman). ... The term bantamweight usually refers to a class in boxing or boxers who weigh between 112 and 118 pounds. ... Flyweight is a class in boxing which includes fighters weighing less than 112 lb (51 kg) but above 108 lb (49 kg). ...


Boxing gloves

Category Weight (up to)
Junior Middleweight and upwards 10 ounce (280 grams)
Featherweight - Welterweight 8 ounce (230 grams)
Mini Flyweight - Junior Featherweight 6 ounce (130 grams)

Wai kru, ram muay and round definition

Prior to the start of the first round, both fighters shall perform the Wai Kru (obedience to the teacher), and Ram Muay (boxing dance), accompanied by the appropriate Thai traditional music, incorporating the Ching (cymbal), Klong khaek (tom-tom) and pi Java (Thai reed pipe). A Muay Thai match shall consist of five rounds, 3 minutes per round with a 2 minute break between each round. Any stoppage during the match for any reason, will not be counted as part of the 3 minute round time. Pi is the generic term for any of a variety of quadruple reed oboes used in the traditional music of Thailand. ...


Scoring

1.1. Points will be awarded for a correct Thai Boxing style, combined with hard and accurate strikes.


1.2. Points will be awarded for aggressive and dominating Muay Thai skill.


1.3. Points will be awarded for a fighter actively dominating his opponent.


1.4. Points will be awarded for the use of a traditional Thai style of defense and counter-attack.


The maximum score for each round is 10 points, the loser scoring either 9, 8 or 6


Fouls

18.1. Biting, eye gouging, spitting, or head butting.


18.2. Wrestling, back or arm locks or any similar judo or wrestling hold.


18.3. Deliberately falling on his opponent.


18.4. Holding the ropes for any reason.


18.5. Swearing or the use of abusive language during the match.


18.6. Knocking out or injuring his opponent after the referee has ordered the match to stop for any reason.


18.7. Deliberately striking the groin area.


To be penalized by the deduction of 1 point for each time committed.


A boxer who has been hit in the groin, may request a 5 minute break before continuing the match.


Drug usage

The use of drugs or stimulants, either before or after the fight is strictly forbidden. Any user will be disqualified. The sole drug allowed for the prevention of bleeding is epinephrine 1:1000 topically and must be administered under doctor's directions. “Adrenaline” redirects here. ...


In popular culture

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

Movies

Ong-Bak, one of the films that have promoted Muay Thai and Muay Boran.
  • In 2004, Muay Thai boxer Asanee Suwan was named best actor at the Thailand National Film Association Awards for his portrayal of Parinya Charoenphol (affectionately known as Nong Thoom in Thailand) in Beautiful Boxer. The movie tells the true-life story of a man who masters Muay Thai in order to realize his dream of becoming a woman.
  • The 1971 Shaw Brothers Studio film, Duel of Fists, is set in Bangkok's Lumpini Boxing Stadium and stars Ti Lung as a Muay Thai boxer who is the long-lost brother of a Hong Kong martial artist, portrayed by David Chiang.
  • Recently the films Ong-Bak, Tom-Yum-Goong (The Protector in the US, Warrior King in the UK), and Born to Fight helped to popularize Muay Thai. Ong-Bak demonstrates some techniques of the older style of Muay Thai - Muay Boran and Tom-Yum-Goong illustrates the fighting style of the Thai Royal Bodyguards (Jaturongkabaht, circa 1400-1700s) - Muay Koshasan (Elephant Boxing style). Muay Koshasan is also known as Muay Chang Tumlai Roang - (Smashing Elephant Boxing style) in that it emphasizes a lot of throwing, crushing, and breaking of joints and limbs.
  • The film Muay Thai starring Jason Willis is set in Evansville, Indiana, about one of the best upcoming Thai fighters in 2006.
  • The film Chok Dee starring Dida Diafat who plays himself in this semi-fictional story of his life. The film covers a lot of the training that is used in the camps in Thailand.
  • The film Kickboxer starring Jean Claude van Damme is about a young fighter who learns Muay Thai to avenge his brother, who was paralyzed by the current champion/thug.

Image File history File links Ong-Bak. ... Image File history File links Ong-Bak. ... The Thailand National Film Association Awards is a Thai film industry ceremony held annually by the Federation of National Film Associations of Thailand. ... Parinya Kiatbusaba, or Nong Thoom as shes called, wasnt a newcomer to the world of Muay Thai, having honed her skills for a number of years in a Chiang Mai training camp. ... Parinya Kiatbusaba or Parinya Charoenphol (born 1981), more popularly known as Nong Thoom, Nong Toom or Nong Tum, is probably the best-known kathoey (male-to-female transgendered person) in Thailand. ... This article is about the Hong Kong movie studio. ... Duel of Fists (Quan Ji or Kuen gik) is a 1971 Hong Kong martial arts film directed by Chang Cheh and starring David Chiang and Ti Lung. ... Location within in Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governer Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ... This article is on the Chinese dragon. ... David Chiang (June 29, 1947)(realname:姜偉年) is a Chinese actor. ... Ong-Bak: Muay Thai Warrior (2003) is an action film from Thailand in the mold of old school Jackie Chan-styled kung-fu flicks. ... Tom-Yum-Goong (Thai: ต้มยำกุ้ง; IPA: , distributed as Warrior King in the UK, as The Protector in the US) is a 2005 Thai martial arts film starring Tony Jaa. ... Kerd ma lui (English title: Born to Fight) is a 2004 Thai action film directed by Panna Rittikrai. ... Ong-Bak: Muay Thai Warrior (2003) is an action film from Thailand in the mold of old school Jackie Chan-styled kung-fu flicks. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Tom-Yum-Goong (Thai: ต้มยำกุ้ง; IPA: , distributed as Warrior King in the UK, as The Protector in the US) is a 2005 Thai martial arts film starring Tony Jaa. ... Jason Willis (born July 26, 1980 in Los Angeles, California) is an American football wide receiver with the Washington Redskins. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Jean-Claude Van Damme (born Jean-Claude Camille François Van Varenberg in Sint-Agatha-Berchem, in the Brussels-Capital Region, on October 18, 1960), is a Belgian martial artist and actor who is most known for his action movies. ...

Television

  • The History channel took a deep look into the history and fighting techniques in Muay Thai on their show Human Weapon.

Human Weapon is a weekly television show on The History Channel that premiered on July 20, 2007. ...

Video games

  • In Capcom's Street Fighter video game series, the character Sagat is a Muay Thai master and a national hero in Thailand. His student Adon is also a practitioner.
  • In Namco's Tekken video game series, the character Bruce Irvin uses this style.
  • In SNK's King of Fighters video game series, the character Joe Higashi is a user of Muay Thai even though he is Japanese.
  • In the video game series Mortal Kombat, Jax uses Muay Thai.
  • Zack from Tecmo's Dead or Alive fighting game series uses a self-taught version of Muay Thai.

Screenshot of Street Fighter (arcade version). ... ‹ The template below (Vg-in-universe) has been proposed for deletion. ... Adon Adon is a character from the Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Tekken is a fighting game and is first of the series of the same name. ... Bruce Irvin is a character in the Tekken fighting game series. ... The King of Fighters ), or KOF for short, is a fighting game series by SNK that debuted in 1994. ... For other uses, see Mortal Kombat. ... Major Jackson Briggs, better known as Jax, is a fictional character in the Mortal Kombat fighting game series. ... The phrase Dead or Alive can refer to the following in addition to its common usage on bounties where it is a capture condition: For the New Wave band from Liverpool, see Dead Or Alive (band). ...

See also

K. 1 is a designation given to two works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in the original Köchel Verzeichnis. ... This is a list of notable male kickboxers. ... This is a list of female kickboxers. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Kraitus, Panya (ed.) (1992), Muay Thai The Most Distinguished Art of Fighting; "The History and Development of Muay Thai". Transit Press: Phuket, p. 2
  2. ^ Prayukvong, Kat (ed.) (2006), Muay Thai: Living Legacy; Vol. 1: "The Concept of Wai Khru". Spry Publishing Co., Ltd: Bangkok, p. 72.
  3. ^ http://www.wmtc.nu/html/wmc03_mtwaikru.html "Wai Khru - Origins and Explanations of the Ritual"
  4. ^ Prayukvong, Kat (ed.2) (2006), Muay Thai: Living Legacy; Vol. 1: "Pre-Contest Rituals". Spry Publishing Co., Ltd: Bangkok, p. 88.
  5. ^ Prayukvong, Kat (ed.2) (2006), Muay Thai: Living Legacy; Vol. 1: "Muay Thai Weapons". Spry Publishing Co., Ltd: Bangkok, p. 141.
  6. ^ http://sprypublishing.com/ch7.pdf "Muay Thai Weapons"
  7. ^ http://www.muaythailesson.com/basic_attack.html "All resources for Muay Thai training"

References

Books and articles

  • Kraitus, Panya (1992), written at Phuket, Muay Thai The Most Distinguished Art of Fighting, Transit Press, ISBN 974-86841-9-9
  • Boykin, Chad (2002), written at Boulder, CO, Muay Thai Kickboxing - The Ultimate Guide to Conditioning, Training and Fighting, Paladin Press, ISBN 1-58160-320-7
  • Belmar, Peter (2006), written at New York, NY, Thai Kickboxing For Beginners, Lulu Press, ISBN 978-1-4116-9983-0
  • Prayukvong, Kat (2006), written at Bangkok, Thailand, Muay Thai: A Living Legacy, Spry Publishing Co., Ltd, ISBN 974-92937-0-3

External links

International Associations and Federations

World Muay Thai Council (WMC) http://www.wmcmuaythai.org/
World Boxing Council Muay Thai (WBC Muay Thai) http://www.wbcmuaythai.com/
International Federation of Muay Thai Amateurs (IFMA) http://www.ifmamuaythai.org/
World Kickboxing Association (WKA) http://www.kickboxing-wka.co.uk/
International Sport Karate Association (ISKA) http://www.iska.com/
International Kickboxing Federation (IKF) http://www.ikfkickboxing.com/
International Kickboxing Association (IKAS) http://www.ikaskickboxing.com/index.php

WBC logo mark “WBC” redirects here. ... The World Kickboxing Association (WKA) is the first professional kick boxing organization which was founded by Howard Hanson who is a founder of kickboxing in America. ... The International Sport Karate Association (ISKA) is one of the international bodies regulating karate and kickboxing matches. ...

National associations

Flag of Argentina Muay Thai Argentina (MTA) http://www.muaythaiargentina.com/
Flag of Australia Oceania MuayThai Federation (OMF) http://www.oceaniamuaythai.com/
Flag of Barbados Unified Martial Marts Academy of Barbados (UMMA) http://www.umaabarbados.com/
Flag of Belarus Muay Thai Belarus http://muaythai.org.by/
Flag of Belgium Belgian Kickboxing & Muay Thai Organisation (BKBMO) http://www.bkbmo.be/
Flag of Canada Canadian Thai Boxing Sanctioning Body (CASK) http://www.kickboxingcanada.org
Flag of Curaçao Curaçao Martial-Arts Federation (CUMAFE) http://www.baassports.com/
Flag of the Czech Republic Czech Muay Thai Association (CMTA) http://www.czechmuaythai.cz/
Flag of Denmark Danish Muay Thai Federation (DMTF) http://www.nakmuay.com/
Flag of England England Muay Thai Federation (EMF) http://www.englandmuaythai.co.uk/
Flag of Finland Muay Thai Association of Finland (MTAF) http://www.muaythai.fi
Flag of France World Kickboxing Association (French WKA) http://www.wka-france.fr/
Flag of France International Sport Karate Association (French ISKA) http://www.iska.fr/
Flag of France French Muaythai Federation (FFMDA) http://www.ffmda.com
Flag of Germany Muay Thai Germany (MTBD) http://www.mtbd.de/
Flag of Greece Greek Muay Thai Federation http://www.epaggelmaties.gr/nikaia/eomt/
Flag of Greece Hellenic Amateur Muay Thai Federation (EOMTK) http://www.muaythai.gr/
Flag of Hong Kong Hong Kong Muay Thai Association http://www.hkmuaythai.org/
Flag of Indonesia Muay Thai Indonesia (AMI) http://www.muayindonesia.org/
Flag of Ireland Allstyles Kickboxing Association of Ireland (AKAI) http://www.kickboxing.ie/
Flag of Italy Italy Muay Thai Federation (FIMT) http://www.boxethai.it/modules/news/
Flag of Kazakhstan Muay Thai Federation of Kazakhstan http://www.muaythai.kz/
Flag of Latvia Latvian Kick-Thai Boxing Federation (LKTA) http://www.kickboxing.lv/
Flag of Lithuania Muay Thai Lithuania http://www.muaythai.lt/
Flag of the Netherlands Muay Thai Federation Netherlands (MON) http://www.m-o-n.nl/
Flag of Peru Muay Thai Peru (MTP) http://www.muaythaiperu.com/
Flag of the Philippines Amateur Thai Boxing Association of the Philippines (ATBAP) http://welcome.to/ATBAP
Flag of Portugal Portugese Thai Boxing Association (FPPFF) http://www.angelfire.com/pq/fppff/
Flag of Russia Russian Thai Boxing Federation (RTBF) http://www.rtbf.ru/
Flag of Scotland Scottish Muay Thai Council (SMTC) http://www.scottishmuaythaicouncil.co.uk
Flag of Scotland The Scottish Thai Boxing Association (STBA) http://www.muaythaiscotland.com/
Flag of Singapore Muay Thai Singapore http://muaythai.sg/
Flag of Spain Spanish Muay Thai Association (AEMT) http://usuarios.lycos.es/muaythaiab/asociacion.htm
Flag of Sweden Swedish Muay Thai Federation (SMTF) http://www.swedishmuaythai.nu/
Flag of Syria Syrian Muay Thai Association http://www1.freewebs.com/yazpro-/
Flag of Thailand The Sports Authority of Thailand (SAT) http://www.sat.or.th/sat.en/
Flag of Ukraine Ukraine National Thai Boxing Federation of Muay Thai http://www.muaythai.org.ua/index.php
Flag of the United States Thai Boxing Association of the USA http://www.thaiboxing.com
Flag of the United States United States Muay Thai Association (USMTA) http://www.usmta.com
Flag of Wales Wales Thaiboxing http://www1.thaiboxingwales.com/

  Results from FactBites:
 
Thailand's Thai Boxing - Muay Thai (1760 words)
Muay Thai, along with soccer, is certainly the most passionately followed sport in the country.
Muay Thai is fought in five three-minute rounds with two-minute breaks in between.
Thai boxing can be classified into two major types, the first is muay lak which puts the emphasis on caution and patience, and is very rare nowadays.
Muay thai (468 words)
Muay Thai, also known as Thai boxing, is a martial art originally from Thailand.
The military style of Muay Thai is called Lerdrit, while today's "sport Muay Thai" slightly varies from the original art and uses kicks and punches in a ring and with gloves similar to those used in boxing.
Muay Thai heavily influenced the development of kickboxing, which was later created in Japan, Europe and North America.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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