FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mrs. Miniver

Mrs. Miniver was a fictional English housewife created by Jan Struther in 1937 for a series of newspaper columns for The Times, later adapted into a movie. A stereotypical housewife A homemaker is a person whose prime occupation is to care for their family and home. ... 1937 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Times is a national quality daily newspaper in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of...

Contents

Origin

The Times columns were short reflections on everyday life, based in part on Struther's own family and experiences. While the columns started out as lighthearted domestic scenes where the outside world barely intruded, the approach of World War II slowly brought darker global concerns into Mrs. Miniver's world. One of the more memorable pieces appears near the middle of the series, where the Minivers get gas masks. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Book publication

The columns were first published in book form in 1939, shortly after the outbreak of war. Struther stopped the regular newspaper columns that year, but wrote a series of letters from Mrs. Miniver, expanding on the character's wartime experiences. These were published in later editions. 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The book became an enormous success, especially in the United States, where Struther went on a lecture tour shortly after the book's release. The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ...


Although the US was still neutral, the tribulations of the Miniver family as war with Nazi Germany arrived engaged the sympathy of the American public sufficiently that President Franklin D. Roosevelt credited it for hastening America's involvement in the war, and Winston Churchill claimed that it had done more for the Allied cause than a flotilla of battleships. Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, PC, FRS (November 30, 1874 – January 24, 1965) was a British statesman, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during World War II. At various times an author, soldier, journalist, and politician, Churchill is generally regarded as...


Film adaptation

The film adaptation of Mrs. Miniver was produced by MGM in 1942 with Greer Garson in the leading role and William Wyler directing. Under the influence of the American Office of War Information, the film attempted to undermine Hollywood's prewar depiction of England as a glamorous bastion of social privilege, anachronistic habits and snobbery in favour of more democratic, modern images. To this end, the social status enjoyed by the Miniver family in the print version was downgraded and increased attention was given to the erosion of class barriers under the pressures of wartime. MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... 1942 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Eileen Evelyn Greer Garson (September 29, 1904 – April 6, 1996) was an Academy Award winning actress, most known for being the leading lady in many pictures co-starring Walter Pidgeon. ... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 - July 27, 1981) was a gallant and award-winning motion picture director. ... The United States Office of War Information (OWI) was a government agency created during World War II to consolidate government information services. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion...


The film exceeded all expectations, grossing $5,358,000 in North America (the highest for any MGM film at the time) and $3,520,000 abroad. In Britain, it was named the top box office attraction of 1942. 555 of the 592 film critics polled by American magazine Film Daily named it the best film of 1942. World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is the third largest continent in area and in population after Eurasia and Africa. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...


Awards and nominations

The film won six Oscars:

It was nominated for another six Oscars: The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Best Actress is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Eileen Evelyn Greer Garson (September 29, 1904 – April 6, 1996) was an Academy Award winning actress, most known for being the leading lady in many pictures co-starring Walter Pidgeon. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Muriel Teresa Wright (born October 27, 1918) is an American actress. ... The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 - July 27, 1981) was a gallant and award-winning motion picture director. ... James Hilton (1900-1954, from cirrhosis of the liver aged 53) was a popular English novelist of the first half of the 20th century. ...

The Academy Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Walter Pidgeon (September 23, 1897 - September 25, 1984) was a Canadian actor. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Henry Travers (March 5, 1874 – October 18, 1965) is an actor. ... The Academy Award for Best Actress is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Dame May Whitty (June 19, 1865 - May 29, 1948) was a British theater and cinema actress. ... Douglas G. Shearer (November 17, 1899 - January 5, 1971) was a sound designer and director. ... Douglas G. Shearer (November 17, 1899 - January 5, 1971) was a sound designer and director. ...

See also

Mrs. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mrs. Miniver - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (625 words)
Miniver was a fictional English housewife created by Jan Struther in 1937 for a series of newspaper columns for The Times, later adapted into a movie.
Miniver was produced by MGM in 1942 with Greer Garson in the leading role and William Wyler directing.
Miniver is still presented as living a comfortable life at a house called Starlings; not in inner London but in an outer suburb along the river Thames.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m