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Encyclopedia > Mr. Magoo
Mr. Magoo and McBarker
Mr. Magoo and McBarker

Mr. Quincy Magoo is a cartoon character created at the UPA animation studio in 1949. Voiced by Jim Backus (also famed in popular culture for his role as Thurston Howell III in the 1960s sitcom Gilligan's Island), Quincy Magoo is a wealthy, short-statured retiree who gets into a series of sticky situations as a result of his nearsightedness, or latent myopia, compounded by his stubborn refusal to admit the problem. Affected people (or animals) consequently tend to think that he is a lunatic, rather than just being nearsighted. In later cartoons he is also an actor, and generally a competent one except for his visual impairment. Image File history File links MagooAndDog. ... Image File history File links MagooAndDog. ... United Productions of America, better known as UPA, was an animation studio of the 1940s through 1970s, and a distributor of Japanese films from Toho Studios from the 1970s onward. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Gilmore Backus (February 25, 1913 in Cleveland, Ohio - July 3, 1989 In Los Angeles, California) was a radio, television, film actor, character actor, and voice actor. ... Thurston Howell III was the name of a character on the 1960s television show Gilligans Island. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... For the NES (Nintendo Entertainment System) video game, see The Adventures of Gilligans Island. ... For other uses, see Myopia (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

Mr. Quincy Magoo's first appearance was in the theatrical short cartoon The Ragtime Bear (1949), scripted by Millard Kaufman. His creation was a collaborative effort; animation director John Hubley is said to have partly based the character on his uncle Harry Woodruff [1], and W.C. Fields was another source of inspiration. Columbia was reluctant to release the short, but did so, only because it included a bear. However, audiences quickly realized that the real star was Magoo, one of the few "human" cartoon characters ever produced in Hollywood at the time. The short became a box-office success. John Hubley, who created Magoo, handed the series completely over to creative director, Pete Burness. Under Burness, Magoo would win two Oscars for the studio with When Magoo Flew (1955) and Magoo's Puddle Jumper (1956). Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Millard Kaufman (b. ... John Hubley (May 21, 1914 – February 21, 1977) was an animator and animation director known for both his formal experimentation and for his emotional realism which stemmed from his tendency to cast his own children as voice actors in his films. ... W. C. Fields (January 29, 1880 - December 25, 1946) was an American comedian and actor. ... John Hubley (May 21, 1914 – February 21, 1977) was an animator and animation director known for both his formal experimentation and for his emotional realism which stemmed from his tendency to cast his own children as voice actors in his films. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... When Magoo Flew is a 1954 short animation by Stephen Bosustow that won an Academy Award for Short Subjects (Cartoons) in 1954 Near sighted Mr. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On talk shows, Backus often told the tale of how he originally discovered Magoo's voice when he put on a fake rubber nose that pinched his nose slightly, giving it the nasal sound. He was only able to perform the voice with the help of the rubber nose for some time, but eventually learned how to recreate it without its assistance. He would usually pull out the nose (or a facsimile, since the original had been lost some years before) and put it on and break into the familiar voice.[citation needed]


In the 1955 film Rebel Without A Cause, Jim Stark, played by James Dean, made a bitterly sarcastic remark about children ("Drown 'em like puppies!") imitating the voice of Mr. Magoo. This is an interesting example of metafiction, since Jim Stark's father was portrayed by Jim Backus, who even taught Dean how to do the voice properly. Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Rebel Without a Cause is a 1955 film directed by Nicholas Ray that tells the story of a rebellious teenager who comes to a new town, meets a girl, defies his parents, and faces the local high school bullies. ... For the film, see James Dean (film). ... Look up metafiction in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In 1957, the record album Magoo in Hi-Fi was released. Side 1 consisted of a dialog between Magoo and his nephew Waldo taking place while Magoo was attempting to set up his new sound system. Music on the album was composed and conducted by Dennis Farnon and his orchestra. Side 2, the Mother Magoo Suite, was a series of musical pieces which included two solos by Marni Nixon. Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... High Fidelity is also the title of a book by Nick Hornby and a film directed by Stephen Frears, based upon Hornbys book. ... Marni Nixon (born February 22, 1930) is a singer whose renown for dubbing the singing voices of featured actresses in movies earned her the sobriquet The Ghostess with the Mostess. She was born Margaret McEathron in Altadena, California and began singing at a young age in choruses. ...


In 1959, Mr. Magoo starred in 1001 Arabian Nights, directed by Jack Kinney, UPA's first feature-length production. Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jack Kinney (March 29, 1909 - February 9, 1992) was an animator, director and producer of animated shorts. ...


In the 1960s, UPA transferred its attention to television, and began producing the series The Mr. Magoo Show for the character. Because of the demands of the television industry, UPA was forced to churn out cartoons at a far greater quantity than the studio had done for theatrical release; the quality of these cartoons was thus criticized in some circles though they also had a decent fan following.[citation needed] The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ...


However, one bright moment in the UPA television era came with Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol, a shortened but largely faithful retelling of Charles Dickens's tale. It is considered to be a holiday classic of the 1960s, ranking alongside A Charlie Brown Christmas and How the Grinch Stole Christmas!.[2] The special inspired production of an animated TV series entitled The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo, which placed Magoo as an actor in other well-known stories. After an introduction in Magoo's backstage dressing room, Magoo was depicted in such roles as The Count of Monte Cristo, Merlin in an upbeat retelling of the story of King Arthur, Friar Tuck in Robin Hood, and Puck in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Mr. ... Dickens redirects here. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... For the album, see A Charlie Brown Christmas (album). ... This article is about the Dr. Seuss book. ... Mr. ... The term dressing room may be applied to different places. ... The Count of Monte Cristo (French: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo) is an adventure novel by Alexandre Dumas. ... Merlin dictating his poems, as illustrated in a French book from the 13th century For other uses, see Merlin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... The friar took Robin on his back Illustration by Louis Rhead to Bold Robin Hood and His Outlaw Band: Their Famous Exploits in Sherwood Forest Friar Tuck is a companion to Robin Hood in the legends about that character. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Look up puck in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ...


In the late 1970s, Mr. Magoo appeared in a new Saturday morning CBS television series called What's New Mr. Magoo?. This series was made under license by the DePatie-Freleng studio, as UPA had by this time ceased in-house cartoon production. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... DePatie-Freleng Enterprises (sometimes abbreviated to DFE) was a Hollywood-based animation production company, active from 1963 to 1981. ...


In 1997, during a fad for live-action films based on cartoon characters, Mr. Magoo was portrayed by Leslie Nielsen in a live-action Mr. Magoo feature film. It failed to find critical or popular success, in part because many support groups for the disabled protested it on behalf of the blind (although Magoo is not actually blind – he simply refuses to wear glasses for his nearsightedness). For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Leslie William Nielsen OC (born February 11, 1926) is a Canadian born American comedian and actor. ... Mr. ...


Classic Media/Sony Wonder began issuing the Mr. Magoo cartoon series on DVD in 2001, beginning with Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol. Classic Media, Inc. ... Sony Wonder logo Sony Wonder was the childrens music and home video arm of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... This article is about the year. ...


Mr. Magoo helped advertise the General Electric line of products throughout the 1950s and 60's.[3] In 2005, Mr. Magoo became the spokesman of the optical retail store Sterling Optical. Magoo also was featured in a series of commercials for Stag Beer in the 1960s. GE redirects here. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A spokesperson (person could be replaced with the gender of the person), or spokesmodel is a person who speaks on behalf of others, but is understood not to be necessarily part of the others (e. ... Griesedieck Brothers Beer is a historic St. ...


Mr Magoo's catchphrase was "Oh Magoo, you've done it again!"


Mr. Magoo is an alumnus of Rutgers University. The reason behind this is that his creators wanted him to be "a college alumnus who was still fired up with the old school spirit [and they felt] Rutgers was the embodiment of the 'old school tie' in America."[4]


Characters

  • Mr. Quincy Magoo - An elderly, bald man whose eye-sight is failing, though he either does not know it or is too stubborn to do anything about it (voiced by Jim Backus).
  • Waldo - Magoo's nephew (voiced during the original UPA theatrical films era, first by Jerry Hausner, then Daws Butler, then later by Casey Kasem in the 70s series).
  • Angesis McBarker - Magoo's dog, appeared only in the 70s cartoon series, What's New, Mr. Magoo?, voiced by Frank Welker (mainly known for his vocal talents in popular cartoon series like Scooby-Doo and Transformers).
  • Mother Magoo - Magoo's "momma", Linda.
  • Charley - Magoo's Chinese houseboy. Charley's depiction as a Chinese stereotype was controversial. The character was prone to unusual misuses of English, such as referring to himself in the third person as "Cholley", and calling Mr. Magoo "Bloss" instead of "Boss". In the late 1960s, episodes featuring Charley were dropped from the series and his character was never mentioned again.
  • Grandma "Granny" Magoo.
  • Prezley - Waldo's "partner in crime" in the 1960 cartoon.
  • Bowser - Magoo's dog (really a Siamese cat).
  • Wheeler and Dealer - two children Magoo often babysits.

James Gilmore Backus (February 25, 1913 in Cleveland, Ohio - July 3, 1989 In Los Angeles, California) was a radio, television, film actor, character actor, and voice actor. ... Daws Butler in 1976. ... Kemal Amin Casey Kasem, (born on April 27, 1932, in Detroit, Michigan) is an American radio personality and voice actor. ... Franklin W. Welker (born March 12, 1946) is an American voice actor. ... Houseboy, a term not in widespread use today due to a pejorative connotation, is a male servant who performs domestic or personal chores, as in: Houseboy, an American slang term that originated in WWII describing a native boy who helped a soldier preform basic responsibilites like cleaning, laundry, ironing, shoe... The Siamese is one of the first distinctly recognised breeds of Oriental cat. ...

Theatrical cartoon shorts

For a complete list of theatrical Mr Magoo cartoons, see List of Mr. Magoo cartoons

The following Mr. Magoo cartoons were either nominees for or recipients of the Academy Award for Best Short Subject (Cartoons): This is a list of UPA theatrical featuring Mr. ... // The Academy Award for Animated Short Film is an award which has been given by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as part of the Academy Awards every year since the 5th Academy Awards, covering the year 1931-32, to the present. ...

  • 1950: Trouble Indemnity
  • 1952: Pink and Blue Blues
  • 1955: When Magoo Flew (winner)
  • 1956: Magoo's Puddle Jumper (winner)

References

  1. ^ Letter from Hubley. Kaufman claimed in a 2007 interview that the character was based on his uncle[1].
  2. ^ Hill, Jim (November 28, 2006). Scrooge U: Part VI -- Magoo's a musical miser. JimHillMedia.com. Retrieved on 2006 12-25.
  3. ^ General Electric advertisement featuring Mr. Magoo. Life Magazine December 14, 1959
  4. ^ Rutgers timeline Rutgers University. Accessed 2008-01-05.

External links

  • The Big Cartoon DataBase entry for Magoo
  • UPA: Mavericks, Magic, and Magoo
  • The Columbia Crow's Nest
  • Don Markstein's Toonopedia: Mr. Magoo page
  • Toon Tracker's Mr. Magoo Page
The Big Cartoon DataBase (BCDB) is an online database of information about animated cartoons, animated movies, animated television shows and cartoon shorts. ...

 
 

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