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Encyclopedia > Mr. Bungle
Mr. Bungle
Mr. Bungle live in 1999.
Mr. Bungle live in 1999.
Background information
Origin Humboldt County, California, United States
Genre(s) Experimental Rock
Avant-garde metal
Various others
Years active 1985–2000
Label(s) Warner Bros. Records
Slash
Associated acts Faith No More
Fantômas
The Dillinger Escape Plan
Secret Chiefs 3
Dieselhed
Peeping Tom
Tomahawk
Trevor Dunn's Trio-Convulsant
Umläut
Website www.mrbungle.com
Members
Mike Patton
Trey Spruance
Trevor Dunn
Danny Heifetz
Clinton "Bär" McKinnon
Former members
Theo Lengyel
Hans Wagner
Jed Watts

Mr. Bungle was an experimental rock/avant-garde metal group from Northern California. The band was formed in 1985 while the members were still in high school and was named after a children's educational film. Mr. Bungle released four demo tapes in the mid to late 1980s before being signed to Warner Bros. Records and releasing three full-length studio albums between 1991 and 1999. The band toured in 2000 to support their last album but as of 2004 is considered disbanded.[1] Although Mr. Bungle went through several line up changes early in their career, the longest serving members were vocalist Mike Patton, guitarist Trey Spruance, bassist Trevor Dunn, drummer Danny Heifetz, and Clinton "Bär" McKinnon on saxophone and woodwinds. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Humboldt County is a county located on the northwest coast of the U.S. state of California, on the Pacific Ocean. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Experimental rock or Avant rock is a type of art music based on rock and roll which experiments with the basic elements of the genre, and/or which pushes the boundaries of common composition and performance technique. ... Avant-garde metal or experimental metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music characterised by the use of innovative, avant-garde elements. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Warner Bros. ... Slash Records is a record label. ... FNM redirects here. ... Fantômas is an avant-garde metal band formed in 1998 in California, United States. ... The Dillinger Escape Plan (often called DEP or TDEP) is an American mathcore band from Morris Plains, New Jersey. ... Secret Chiefs 3, also known as SC3, is a group of musicians led by composer and producer Trey Spruance, former guitarist of Mr. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Peeping Tom is an upcoming collaboration album by Mike Patton. ... Tomahawk is an experimental alternative metal/alternative rock supergroup from the United States. ... Michael Allan Patton (born January 27, 1968) is an American musician, best known as the lead singer of the band Faith No More from 1988 to 1998. ... Preston Lea Spruance III or Trey Spruance (born 1969 in Eureka, California) is an American composer and musician. ... Trevor Dunn (born January 30, 1968 in Eureka, California)) is an American musician. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the U.S. politician, see Clinton D. McKinnon. ... Theobald Brooks-Lengyel (born 1970) was the alto-saxophonist of the influential experimental-rock band Mr. ... Experimental rock or Avant rock is a type of art music based on rock and roll which experiments with the basic elements of the genre, and/or which pushes the boundaries of common composition and performance technique. ... Avant-garde metal or experimental metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music characterised by the use of innovative, avant-garde elements. ... Northern California, sometimes referred to as NorCal, is the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. ... For other uses, see demo. ... Warner Bros. ... Michael Allan Patton (born January 27, 1968) is an American musician, best known as the lead singer of the band Faith No More from 1988 to 1998. ... Preston Lea Spruance III or Trey Spruance (born 1969 in Eureka, California) is an American composer and musician. ... Trevor Dunn (born January 30, 1968 in Eureka, California)) is an American musician. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the U.S. politician, see Clinton D. McKinnon. ...


Mr. Bungle were known for their distinctive musical traits, often cycling through several musical genres within the course of a single song. Many of their songs had an unconventional structure and utilized a wide array of instruments and samples. Live shows often featured members dressing up and an array of cover songs. An ongoing feud with Red Hot Chili Peppers frontman Anthony Kiedis escalated in the late 1990s, with Kiedis removing Mr. Bungle from a number of large music festivals in Europe and Australasia. Musical genres are categories which contain music which share a certain style or which have certain elements in common. ... This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ... In pop music a cover version is a new rendition of a previously recorded song. ... The Red Hot Chili Peppers are a Grammy-award winning American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1983. ... Anthony Kiedis (b. ... Australasia Australasia is a term variably used to describe a region of Oceania: Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean. ...


Even though they were signed to a major record label, the band never experienced significant commercial success during its lifetime and only released one music video. Nevertheless, Mr. Bungle achieved worldwide popularity due to a large cult following.[1]

Contents

History

Early days (1985–1990)

Mr. Bungle formed in 1985 in Eureka, California while the members were still in high school. The band initially consisted of Trevor Dunn, Mike Patton, Trey Spruance, Theo Lengyel, and Jed Watts. Watts was subsequently replaced by Hans Wagner, and he by Danny Heifetz, while Clinton "Bär" McKinnon joined in 1989.[2] The band's name was taken from Lunchroom Manners, a children's educational film which was featured in a Pee Wee Herman HBO special in the early '80s.[3] A puppet named Mr. Bungle was the main character and was used to teach children good manners and hygiene. In 1989 Faith No More bassist Billy Gould told Patton about a pornographic video called Sharon’s Sex Party, which also starred a character known as Mr. Bungle.[2] Motto: Eureka! - (I have found it!) Eureka shown within Humboldt County in the State of California Coordinates: , Country State County Humboldt Founded May 13, 1850 (settlement) Incorporated April 18, 1856 (town) Re-incorporated February 19, 1874 (city) Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Virginia Bass  - City manager David Tyson Area  - Total... An educational film is a film or movie whose primary purpose is to educate. ... Paul Reubens as Pee-Wee in Pee-wees Big Adventure. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... FNM redirects here. ... William David Gould (born April 24, 1963 in Los Angeles, California) is a musician and producer. ... Pornography (from Greek πορνογραφια pornographia — literally writing about or drawings of harlots) is the representation of the human body or human sexual behaviour with the goal of sexual arousal, similar to, but (according to some) distinct from, erotica. ...


Soon after forming, the band's first demo, The Raging Wrath of the Easter Bunny, was recorded during Easter of 1986. It featured a fast, low-fi, death metal style, though it also utilized a trainwhistle, a saxophone, bongos, and a kazoo. The Raging Wrath of the Easter Bunny was followed by the demo Bowel of Chiley in 1987; this recording featured a different style incorporating the sounds of ska, swing, and funk. Bradley Torreano noted in All Music Guide that the recording was "essentially the sound of some very talented teenagers trying to make their love of jazz and ska come together in whatever way they can."[4] In 1988 Mr. Bungle released their third demo, Goddammit I Love America!, which was musically similar to Bowel of Chiley. Their final demo tape was OU818, released in 1989; this recording was the first to feature tenor sax player Clinton "Bär" McKinnon and drummer Danny Heifetz. OU818 combined songs from the earlier demos along with some new tracks having a heavier overall sound than the previous releases.[5][6] In 1989 Mike Patton landed the lead vocalist position with San Francisco's Faith No More, getting the job after Jim Martin of Faith No More heard him on a Mr. Bungle demo.[7] Patton decided not to break up Mr. Bungle, and continued to be a member of both bands simultaneously. Having established a strong following in Northern California, Mr. Bungle was signed to Warner Bros., who released their self-titled debut in 1991.[6] The Raging Wrath of the Easter Bunny is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... Bongos being played Bongos are a percussion instrument. ... For the visual effects software, Kazoo, see ZOO Digital Group. ... Bowel of Chiley is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... Goddammit, I Love America! is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... OU818 is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... FNM redirects here. ... Big Jim Martin (born James Martin, on 21 July 1961, in Hayward, California) played lead guitar in Faith No More from 1983 to 1993 and lead guitar with Anand Bhatt in the 2000s. ...


Self titled debut (1991–1994)

Their debut, Mr. Bungle, was recorded a year after Mike Patton was recruited into Faith No More and was produced by jazz experimentalist John Zorn. Released on August 13, 1991 the album contained several new songs and was similar in style to OU818. The record mixed metal, funk, ska, carnival music, and free jazz, but was normally described as "funk metal" by music critics.[5] Almost all the members went by obscure aliases in the album credits. To promote the album in some stores, a Mr. Bungle bubble bath was given away with copies of the record sold.[2] Mr. ... John Zorn (born September 2, 1953 in Queens, New York) is an American avant-garde composer, arranger, record producer, saxophonist and multi-instrumentalist. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Funk metal is a type of music that incorporates hard-driving heavy metal guitar riffs and the pounding bass rhythms characteristic of funk. ... The term has two distinct meanings, depending on whether the bubbles are in, or on top of, the bath water. ...


It received mostly positive reviews with journalist Bill Pahnelas calling it "an incredible musical tour de force, and hands down the best alternative rock record of the year so far".[8] On the style of the album, critic Steve Huey wrote in All Music Guide "Mr. Bungle is a dizzying, disconcerting, schizophrenic tour through just about any rock style the group can think of, hopping from genre to genre without any apparent rhyme or reason, and sometimes doing so several times in the same song."[9] His criticism of the album included commenting that it was "unfocused" and "a difficult, not very accessible record".[9]


The first track was originally called "Travolta"(sample ); however, the actor John Travolta took issue with this title and threatened legal action. With the encouragement of Warner Bros. the song name was changed and on later pressings of the album was called "Quote Unquote", which is also the title of an unauthorized John Travolta biography by Bob McCabe.[2] They created a video for "Travolta" and submitted it to MTV. However, the station refused to air the video because of images of bodies dangling on meat hooks.[10] Image File history File links QuoteUnquote_sample. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer, best known for his leading roles in films such as Saturday Night Fever, Grease and Pulp Fiction. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ...


The album sold well despite MTV refusing to air their video and a lack of radio airplay.[10] Following the release of the album the band toured North America building a large cult following. Their popularity was partly due to unique stage shows where they often performed with masks to hide their identities and playing unlikely cover songs during their concerts.[6][10]


Disco Volante (1995–1998)

 Music sample:

"Desert Search For Techno Allah" (1995) Image File history File links Desert_Search_For_Techno_Allah_sample. ...

Sample from Mr. Bungle's "Desert Search For Techno Allah" from the album Disco Volante. This track displays a blend of Middle Eastern music and Techno with the parts of the lyrics being taken from an old Arabic phrase.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Due to artwork delays and the band members' many side-projects, it was another 4 years before Disco Volante was released in October 1995.[5] This, their second major release, has a different tone and style to earlier Mr. Bungle recordings.[11] While the self-titled album was described as "funk metal", with Disco Volante this was replaced with the label "avant-garde" or "experimental."[10] This article is about the album. ...


The music was complex and unpredictable with the band continuing with their shifts of musical style. Some of the tracks were in foreign languages and would radically change genres mid-song. Featuring lyrics about death, suicide, and child abuse,[12] along with death metal, children's songs, and a Middle Eastern techno number, music critic Greg Prato described the album as having "a totally original and new musical style that sounds like nothing that currently exists".[13] Not all critics were impressed with the album, with The Washington Post describing it as "an album of cheesy synthesizers, mangled disco beats, virtuosic playing and juvenile noises", calling it "self-indulgent" and adding that "Mr. Bungle musicians like to show off their classical, jazz and world-beat influences in fast, difficult passages which are technically impressive but never seem to go anywhere".[14] Additionally, writer Scott McGaughey described it as "difficult" and was critical of its "lack of actual songs".[10] This article is about the musical genre. ... Childrens music provides an important and entertaining means of teaching children about their culture, other cultures, good behavior, facts and skills. ... For the comic book character previously known as Techno, see Fixer (comics). ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...


Disco Volante included influences from contemporary classical music, avant-garde jazz, electronic music pioneer Pierre Henry, Edgar Allan Poe, John Zorn, Frank Zappa, Penderecki, and European film music of the 1960s and 1970s such as those composed by Ennio Morricone and Peter Thomas.[10][13][15][16][17] In the broadest sense, contemporary music is any music being written in the present day. ... Avant-jazz (also known as avant-garde jazz) is a style of music and improvisation that combines elements of avant-garde art music composition with elements of traditional jazz. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Pierre Henry (born December 9, 1927 in Paris, France) is a French composer, considered a pioneer of the musique concrète genre of electronic music. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... John Zorn (born September 2, 1953 in Queens, New York) is an American avant-garde composer, arranger, record producer, saxophonist and multi-instrumentalist. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Krzysztof Penderecki (born November 23, 1933) is a Polish composer of classical music. ... A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... Ennio Morricone (born November 10, 1928; sometimes also credited as Dan Savio or Leo Nichols) is an Italian composer especially noted for his film scores. ... Peter Thomas is a German composer/arranger. ...


The album notes also contained an invitation to participate in an "unusual scam" - if $2 was sent to the band's address, participants would receive additional artwork, lyrics to the songs "Ma Meeshka Mow Skwoz" and "Chemical Marriage", and some stickers.[5] The vinyl release of this album shipped with a 7" by the then-unknown Secret Chiefs 3.[2] The vinyl release was also unique for having a song somewhat hidden in the grooves of the record, which partly explain the lyrics referring to it as a 'secret song' despite being a part of the song "Carry Stress in the Jaw". The 'secret song' was actually an internal reference to the fact that the song and all instrumentation was done without input from Trevor Dunn, who, when finding out about the song in the recording studio, added the vocal tracks mentioning that "I know the secret song now...they wouldn't tell me... but somehow I found out"[2] Secret Chiefs 3, also known as SC3, is a group of musicians led by composer and producer Trey Spruance, former guitarist of Mr. ...


Mr. Bungle supported this record with extensive tours through the United States, Europe, and Australia during '95 and '96, with the tours widening the group's fan base.[6] In 1996 Theo Lengyel retired as Bungle's original sax player and keyboardist due to creative differences.[5]


California (1999–2000)

 Music sample:

"Vanity Fair" (1999) Image File history File links Vanity_Fair_Sample. ...

Sample from Mr. Bungle's "Vanity Fair" from the album California. This clip illustrates one of Mr. Bungles Doo-wop inspired songs.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

After another 4 year break between albums, the band's third album, California, was released on July 13, 1999.[18] Ground and Sky reviews have described California as Mr. Bungle's most accessible[19][20] and while the genre shifts are still present,[21] they are less frequent, with succinct song formats resulting in an album that The Associated Press called more linear.[22] All Music Guide described the record as "their most concise album to date; and while the song structures are far from traditional, they're edging more in that direction and that greatly helps the listener in making sense of the often random-sounding juxtapositions of musical genres".[23] On the different style of this album, Mike Patton explained that to the band "the record is pop-y", before adding "but to some fucking No Doubt fan in Ohio, they're not going to swallow that."[24] The album was well received with music critic Robert Everett-Green stating "The band's newest and greatest album does not reveal itself quickly, but once the bug bites, there is no cure. The best disc of the year, by a length."[25] Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... California is a 1999 (see 1999 in music) album by the band Mr. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... For other uses, see No Doubt (disambiguation). ...


Additionally, the recording process for California became much more complex. The group chose to record the disc on analog rather than digitally[26] and some songs required several 24-track machines while utilizing more than 50 analog tracks.[22] As a result each song contains detailed layers of original samples, keyboards, percussion, and melodies.[10] The Tascam 85 16B analogue tape recorder can record 16 tracks of audio on 1 inch (2. ...


The album displays influences from Burt Bacharach and The Beach Boys, while blending lounge, pop, jazz, funk, thrash-metal, Hawaiian, Middle Eastern, kecak, and avant-garde music.[19][20][21][27][23] The band did 5 tours to support this record. For the most part, perhaps with the exception of the Sno-Core 2000 tour where they were often booed, the band did have success attracting an audience.[28][29] Burt Bacharach (IPA: ; born May 12, 1928) is an award-winning American pianist and composer. ... The Beach Boys is an American rock and roll band. ... The category Middle Eastern music refers to music from the Middle East and its different regions such as North Africa, the Levant and the Persian Gulf States. ... A Kecak dance being performed at Uluwatu, in Bali Kecak (pronounced: KEH-chahk, alternate spellings: Ketjak, Ketjack, and Ketiak), a form of Balinese music drama, originated in the 1930s and is performed primarily by men. ...


Mr. Bungle's end

Following the 2000 tour the band again went on hiatus. Rumors circulated that the band had dissolved, with some members stating that the band was “over” while others insisted it was just "in limbo".[5] In 2003 Patton alluded to the fact that the band would probably not record any more albums stating "I think it is over. The guys are spread all over the world and we don't talk to each other. I have not spoken to a couple of the guys since the last tour, years ago."[30] While no official break-up announcement ever materialized, a 2004 Rolling Stone interview confirmed Mr. Bungle had disbanded with Patton revealing “We could have probably squeezed out a couple more records but the collective personality of this group became so dysfunctional, this band was poisoned by one person's petty jealousy and insecurity, and it led us to a slow, unnatural death. And I'm at peace with that, because I know I tried all I could."[1] When asked about a possible reunion, Mike Patton said, "It could happen, but I won’t be singing. Some bridges have definitely been burned. It was a fun time and sometimes you just have to move on. I’ve got a lot on my plate now."[31] Trevor Dunn adds, on his website, "Bungle is dead and I'm happy about it" and that "the members of Mr. Bungle will never work together as such again".[32] Spruance,[33] Heifetz, and McKinnon[34] have been more optimistic; in response to a 'Mr. Bungle regrouping' question, Spruance stated “I hope so because that band could take over the fucking world if it wanted to."[33] This article is about the magazine. ...


After the dissolution of Mr. Bungle the members have gone on to numerous different projects. Mike Patton co-founded the record label Ipecac Recordings[35] and is involved with several other ventures, most notably the bands Fantômas,[36] Tomahawk,[37] and Peeping Tom.[38] He acted in the motion picture Firecracker[39] and did voice work in the movie I Am Legend; performing the infected creatures screams and howls.[40] Trey Spruance is involved with various bands, including Secret Chiefs 3 and Faxed Head. Trevor Dunn joined Patton in Fantômas as well as forming his own jazz band, Trevor Dunn's Trio Convulsant; he also occasionally played bass with Secret Chiefs 3.[10][41] Danny Heifetz’s projects included playing with Secret Chiefs 3 and in a country/punk band called Dieselhed;[10] he now resides in Sydney, Australia, and plays in outfits such as The Tango Saloon and The Fantastic Terrific Munkle.[42][43] Clinton McKinnon also played with Secret Chiefs 3; he now lives in Melbourne, Australia, and plays with The Ribbon Device [44] and UMLäUT. Ipecac Recordings is an independent record label based in Orinda, California. ... Fantômas is an avant-garde metal band formed in 1998 in California, United States. ... Tomahawk is an experimental alternative metal/alternative rock supergroup from the United States. ... Peeping Tom is an experimental collaboration album by Mike Patton. ... Firecracker is a film directed by Steve Balderson. ... I Am Legend is a 2007 American post-apocalyptic science fiction film directed by Francis Lawrence and starring Will Smith. ... Secret Chiefs 3, also known as SC3, is a group of musicians led by composer and producer Trey Spruance, former guitarist of Mr. ... This article needs cleanup. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ...


In a 2008 interview with Rock-A-Rolla Magazine([1]) Trey Spruance stated that Mr Bungle "had at least one more record to go" and that he has "lots of material for it still", but that he is not eager to be in a "band situation" with Mike Patton again.


Style and influence

All Music's Greg Prato described Mr. Bungle's music as a “unique mix of the experimental, the abstract, and the absurd”,[6] while Patrick Macdonald of The Seattle Times characterized their music as "harsh, grating, unstructured, blasting, squeaky, speedy, slow, eerie and strangely compelling".[12] Distinctive features of the music were the utilization of numerous different instruments, unusual vocals, and the use of unpredictable song formats along with a number of different musical genres. The majority of the music and lyrics were written by Patton, Dunn, and Spruance, with McKinnon and Heifetz occasionally contributing.[45][46] Greg Prato stated they "may be the most talented rock instrumentalists today, as they skip musical genres effortlessly, while Mike Patton illustrates why many consider him to be the best singer in rock".[13] Not all have agreed with one reviewer calling the band the "most ridiculously terrible piece of festering offal ever scraped off the floor of a slaughterhouse".[47] While journalist Geoffrey Himes criticized the band by stating "the vocals are so deeply buried in the music that the words are virtually indecipherable" and described the music as "aural montages rather than songs, for short sections erupt and suddenly disappear, replaced by another passage with little connection to what preceded it".[14] The Seattle Times is the leading daily newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ...


Mr. Bungle would incorporate unconventional instruments into their music including tenor sax, Jew's harp, xylophone, glockenspiel, clarinet, ocarina, piano, organ, bongos, and woodblocks.[16] Journalist John Serba commented that the instrumentation "sounded kind of like drunken jazz punctuated with Italian accordions and the occasional Bavarian march, giant power chord, or feedback noise thrown in"[47] Overlaying this was Mike Patton’s vocals, who often used death metal growls, crooning, screeching, gurgling, or whispering. The arrangement of their songs was also idiosyncratic, often lacking a structured song format and rotating through different genres ranging from slow melodies to thrash-metal.[22] New York Times journalist Jon Pareles described it as music that “leaps from tempo to tempo, key to key, style to style, all without warning”.[48] Similarly critic Patrick Macdonald commented "In the middle of hard-to-follow, indecipherable noise, a relatively normal, funky jazz organ solo will suddenly drift in".[12] Jews harp, from an American Civil War camp near Winchester, Virginia A modern jews harp A metal Jews harp (demir-xomus) from Tuva The Jews harp, jaw harp, or mouth harp is thought to be one of the oldest musical instruments in the world; a musician...


Some of the genres they utilized include heavy metal,[23] funk,[23] free jazz,[23] surf rock,[19] punk,[48] klezmer music,[48] ska,[10] kecak,[27] avant-jazz,[21] folk music,[49] noise rock,[21]pop,[23] doo-wop,[49] funk metal,[27] electronica,[50] swing music,[23] space age pop and exotica,[23] death metal,[23][49] rockabilly,[23][27] bossa nova,[23] progressive rock,[20] country and western,[23] Circus Music [23] and even video game and cartoon music.[27] Heavy metal redirects here. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Klezmer (כלזמיר) is a musical tradition which parallels Hasidic and Ashkenazic Judaism. ... This article is about the genre. ... A Kecak dance being performed at Uluwatu, in Bali Kecak (pronounced: KEH-chahk, alternate spellings: Ketjak, Ketjack, and Ketiak), a form of Balinese music drama, originated in the 1930s and is performed primarily by men. ... Avant-jazz (also known as avant-garde jazz) is a style of music and improvisation that combines elements of avant-garde art music and composition with elements of traditional jazz. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Merzbow Einstürzende Neubauten Sonic Youth Melt Banana Lightning Bolt Neptune Noise rock describes one variety of post-punk rock music that became prominent in the 1980s. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... Funk metal is a type of music that incorporates hard-driving heavy metal guitar riffs and the pounding bass rhythms characteristic of funk. ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ... For other uses, see swing. ... Space age pop is a general and loosely based term for a music genre associated with certain American composers and songwriters in the Space Age of the 1950s and 1960s - hence the name. ... Martin Dennys breakthrough album, Exotica Exotica is a musical genre, named after the 1957 Martin Denny album of the same title, popular during the late 1950s to mid 1960s typically with the suburban set who came of age during World War II. The musical colloquialism exotica means tropical ersatz... This article is about the musical genre. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... For other uses, see Bossa nova (disambiguation). ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Country music, once known as Country and Western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... Entrance of the Gladiators (Czech: Vjezd gladiátorů, German: Einzug der Gladiatoren) is a military march composed in 1897 by the Czech composer Julius Fučík. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Cartoon (disambiguation). ...


Mr. Bungle’s style has influenced many recent funk and metal bands, most notably Korn, whose guitarists utilize what they have dubbed the "Mr. Bungle chord".[1] Brandon Boyd of Incubus also cited Mr. Bungle as an influence.[51] Although, Patton has stated that he considers it an insult when people cite him as a forefather of Korn and Limp Bizkit, stating "I feel no responsibility for that, it's their mothers' fault, not mine."[52] This article is about the band. ... Fingering for an open-position C Major chord (with the 5th, a G note, in the bass) played on a six-string acoustic guitar. ... Brandon Boyd (born February 15, 1976, in Van Nuys, California) is the lead vocalist of the alternative rock band Incubus. ... This article is about the US rock band. ... This article is about the band. ... Limp Bizkit is an American nu metal band from Jacksonville, Florida. ...


Stage shows

Mike Patton in costume live in 1991
Mike Patton in costume live in 1991

Mr. Bungle were known for their stage shows, where the band members would dress up in costumes and masks, often wearing a uniform of mechanic's jumpsuits along with masks such as Madonna, Richard Nixon, Darth Vader, an executioner's hood, or plastic clown or gimp masks.[15] Bassist Trevor Dunn explained that initially the reason for the dressing up was to assure anonymity.[53] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Dress-Up is a game played mainly by children. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... Nixon redirects here. ... For information on this characters appearance in the Star Wars prequel trilogy, see Anakin Skywalker. ... A woman in chains with bondage hood A bondage hood (also called a gimp mask) is a fetishistic hood. ...


The shows for the California tours, while still involving various members in costumes, were largely devoid of the masks and outfits due to the increased demands of the music.[22][54] Mike Patton explained "This stuff is much harder to play, I was trying to do piano lines and I'm completely fumbling them because the leather bondage mask is stretching my face so tight that my eyes weren't lining up with the eye holes."[55] Often the theme was related to California with palm tree props and the band members wearing beach party outfits including Hawaiian shirts and khaki pants.[22][56] Occasionally, the band would simply appear in black suits with white dress shirts or dress up in chef costumes, cowboy suits, or as the Village People.[47][57] Authentic Aloha shirts are dull in color and are adorned with traditional Hawaiian quilt patterns. ... Khaki is a common material in military uniforms Khaki is a type of fabric or the colour of such fabric. ... Village People were a concept disco group formed in the late 1970s. ...


Throughout their career Mr. Bungle also performed numerous covers in their live shows, ranging from tiny snippets to whole songs. The covers were by a wide variety of artists and genres encompassing movie scores by Ennio Morricone, Henry Mancini, and John Williams, pop songs by Elton John and Jennifer Lopez, hip hop by Public Enemy and Ol' Dirty Bastard, to punk and metal songs by Dead Kennedys, Metallica, and Slayer.[2] // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Ennio Morricone (born November 10, 1928; sometimes also credited as Dan Savio or Leo Nichols) is an Italian composer especially noted for his film scores. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... For the meteorologist of The Weather Channel, see The Weather Channel (United States). ... Public Enemy, also known as PE, is a hip hop group from Long Island, New York, known for their politically charged lyrics, criticism of the media, and active interest in the concerns of the African American community. ... ODB redirects here. ... Dead Kennedys is a punk band from San Francisco, California. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... For other uses, see Slayer (disambiguation). ...


Anthony Kiedis feud

Mr. Bungle is known to have had a bad relationship with the Red Hot Chili Peppers' frontman Anthony Kiedis.[2] The feud began when Kiedis saw singer Mike Patton performing with Faith No More and accused him of imitating his style. Kiedis stated “Yeah I watch that 'Epic' video, and I see him jumping up and down, rapping, and it looked like I was looking in the mirror. The thing is, I had no problem with him personally. I mean, I love 'The Real Thing,' and I liked his vocals on that record. I mean, when I heard the record I noticed subtle similarities, but when I saw that video it was like, 'Wait a second here, what the fuck?".[2] Mr. Bungle took offense to Kiedis' comment, sarcastically threatening Kiedis in the press. In the early nineties, Patton met with Kiedis and the feud seemed to have ended.[2] The Red Hot Chili Peppers are a Grammy-award winning American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1983. ... Anthony Kiedis (b. ... FNM redirects here. ...


However, in 1999 Mr. Bungle's album California was scheduled to be released on June 8, but Warner Bros. Records pushed it back so as not to coincide with the Red Hot Chili Peppers similarly titled album, Californication, which was to be released on the same day. This reignited the old feud with Kiedis having Mr. Bungle removed from a series of summer festivals in Europe; as the headlining act at the festivals The Chili Peppers had final word on the bands that would appear.[2][30] Patton stated “Our agent was in the process of booking these festivals, and it was becoming apparent that we'd landed some pretty good ones—one in France, another one in Holland, some big-name festivals. Turns out someone's holding a grudge! We were booted off several bills, including a really big festival in Australia, specifically because Anthony Kiedis did not want us on the bill. He threatened to pull the Chili Peppers if Mr. Bungle was on the bill. Now, rationalize that one! That's so fucking pathetic! I mean, this guy's selling a million records! We are not even a speck of dust on this guy's ass! What's the fucking problem?"[58] Trey Spruance added "We were booked, months in advance, to do eleven festival dates in Europe. Come Summer, we get a call from the three biggest of those festivals, all of them the same day, saying that we can't play, because the headlining band retains the right to hire and fire whomever they wish. We found out it was the Red Hot Chili Peppers, so our manager called their manager to find out what the hell was going on, and their manager was very apologetic, and said, 'We're really sorry, we want you to know this doesn't reflect the management's position, or the band's for that matter, it's Anthony Kiedis who wants this.'"[59] California is a 1999 (see 1999 in music) album by the band Mr. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Warner Bros. ... Singles from Californication Released: May 25, 1999 Released: September 14, 1999 Released: January 11, 2000 Released: June 19, 2000 Released: 2000 Californication is the seventh studio album by American alternative rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers, released on June 8, 1999 on Warner Bros. ...


As a result, Mr. Bungle parodied the Red Hot Chili Peppers in Detroit, Michigan on Halloween of 1999. Patton introduced each Mr. Bungle band member with the name of one of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, before covering the songs "Give It Away", "Around the World", "Under the Bridge" and "Scar Tissue", with Patton deliberately using incorrect lyrics. Mr. Bungle also satirized many of the mannerisms of the band, mocking heroin injections and on-stage antics. Kiedis responded by having them removed from the 2000 Big Day Out festival in Australia and New Zealand,[2][30] stating “I would not have given two fucks if they played with us there, but after I heard about some Halloween show where they mocked us and read another interview where Patton talked shit about us, and I was like, you know what, fuck him and fuck the whole band."[2] A parody (pronounced ), in contemporary usage, is a work created to mock, comment on, or poke fun at an original work, its subject, or author, by means of humorous or satiric imitation. ... Detroit redirects here. ... This article is about the holiday. ... Give It Away is a song by the Red Hot Chili Peppers released in 1991 on the album Blood Sugar Sex Magik. ... Around the World is a single released off the Red Hot Chili Peppers 1999 album Californication. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Scar Tissue is the Red Hot Chili Peppers first single from their album Californication. ... The Big Day Out (BDO) is an annual music festival that tours Australia and New Zealand which originated in Sydney in 1992. ...


The feud continued with Dunn describing the Chili Peppers on his personal webpage as "that stupid white band that does horrible cover versions of black musicians". He also criticized their bass player Flea stating "Flea, in all seriousness, really isn't that good. I mean c'mon Red Hot Chilli Peppers were vaguely interesting in the late 80s, but Christ they fucking suck, they suck".[32] Michael Peter Balzary (born October 16, 1962 in Melbourne, Australia), better known by his stage name Flea, is the bassist for the alternative rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers. ...


Discography

This is a discography for the American experimental rock band Mr. ...

Demo tapes

The Raging Wrath of the Easter Bunny is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... Bowel of Chiley is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... Goddammit, I Love America! is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... OU818 is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ...

Studio albums

Mr. ... Warner Bros. ... This article is about the album. ... Warner Bros. ... California is a 1999 (see 1999 in music) album by the band Mr. ... Warner Bros. ...

Band members

Line-Ups

(1985-1987)
  • Mike Patton - vocals, keyboards, samples
  • Trey Spruance - guitar, keyboards
  • Trevor Dunn - bass
  • Jed Watts - drums
  • Theo Lengyel - saxophone, keyboards
(1987-1989)
  • Mike Patton - vocals, keyboards, samples
  • Trey Spruance - guitar, keyboards
  • Trevor Dunn - bass
  • Hans Wagner - drums
  • Luke Miller - horns
  • Theo Lengyel - saxophone, keyboards
(1989-1996)
  • Mike Patton - vocals, keyboards, samples
  • Trey Spruance - guitar, keyboards
  • Trevor Dunn - bass
  • Danny Heifetz - drums
  • Clinton "Bär" McKinnon - reeds
  • Theo Lengyel - saxophone, keyboards
(1996-2000)
  • Mike Patton - vocals, keyboards, samples
  • Trey Spruance - guitar, keyboards
  • Trevor Dunn - bass
  • Danny Heifetz - drums
  • Clinton "Bär" McKinnon - reeds

Martin Fosnaugh and Scott Fritz made brief appearances as Jew's harpist and trumpet player on the first demo tape; Scott Fritz also played trumpet on Bowel of Chiley. Additional musicians often performed and recorded with them. Percussionist William Winant toured with Mr. Bungle in 1995 and 1996 and again in support of California, in 1999. Ches Smith filled in for William Winant at a few shows. The first leg of the California tour also included keyboardist Jeff Attridge, who was later replaced by James Rotundi. Ches and James toured with the band full-time for Sno-Core 2000 and the Australian tour in support of California.[2] Jews harp, from an American Civil War camp near Winchester, Virginia A modern jews harp A metal Jews harp (demir-xomus) from Tuva The Jews harp, jaw harp, or mouth harp is thought to be one of the oldest musical instruments in the world; a musician... Trumpeter redirects here. ... For other uses, see demo. ... William Winant is a percussionist. ...


David Shea also provided Turntables on the first album, Mike Patton sampled these contributions live


Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d Prato, Greg (8 December 2004). Mr. Bungle Go Kaput: Patton blames California rockers' split on personality clashes. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Negele S, Don S, Scott H, Fogel C, Wall Sl, Kennedy HL. Mr. Bungle FAQ. www.bunglefever.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-23.
  3. ^ Lunchroom Manners (1960). Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2008-02-23.
  4. ^ Torreano, Bradley. Bowel of Chiley Review. All Music. Retrieved on 2008-01-07.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Mr. Bungle Biography. www.bunglefever.com (2004). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  6. ^ a b c d e Prato, Greg. Mr. Bungle Biography. All Music. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  7. ^ Faith No More Biography. www.fnm.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  8. ^ Pahnelas, Bill (4 September 1991), “Mr. Bungle's carnival is sure nothing to laugh at”, Richmond Times-Dispatch: C6 
  9. ^ a b Huey, Steve. Mr. Bungle Album Review. All Music. Retrieved on 2007-06-16.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j McGaughey, Scott (September 1999). The Unclassifiable and Ever-Evolving Music of Mr. Bungle. Perfect Sound Forever Online Music Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  11. ^ Koha, Nui Te & L'Estrange, Cameron (17 October 1996), “Faith falls to Bungle music”, Daily Telegraph: 54 
  12. ^ a b c Macdonald, Patrick (14 December 1995), “Mr. Bungle: Way, Way Out There”, The Seattle Times: H9 
  13. ^ a b c Prato, Greg. Disco Volante Review. All Music. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  14. ^ a b Himes, Geoffrey (24 November 1995), “Bungle's Jumble Of Sounds”, The Washington Post: N20 
  15. ^ a b Joost, Wesley. The Bungholes Of Mr. Bungle. Goblin Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  16. ^ a b Disco Volante Review. CMJ-NMR. Retrieved on 2007-05-24.
  17. ^ Eichler, Bob (27 February 2004). Disco Volante Review. Ground and Sky. Retrieved on 2007-05-29.
  18. ^ Mr. Bungle, California. Warner Bros. Records (1999). Retrieved on 2007-05-22.
  19. ^ a b c Eichler, Bob (4 April 2004). California Review. Ground and Sky. Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  20. ^ a b c Wu, Brandon (12 April 2004). California Review. Ground and Sky. Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  21. ^ a b c d Kurutz, Steve. California Review. All-Music Guide Expert Review. Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  22. ^ a b c d e Mike Patton: A Singer With Energy. CNN.com (13 October 1999). Retrieved on 2007-05-23.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Huey, Steve. California Review. All Music. Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  24. ^ Rodriguez, Kenn (19 November 1999), “Mr. Bungle's latest album will take fans by surprise”, Albuquerque Journal: E15 
  25. ^ Everett-Green, Robert (27 December 1999), “Woodstock died and Mr. Bungle flew”, The Globe and Mail: R4 
  26. ^ Condran, Ed (18 February 2000), “It's A Bungle Out There But Success Can Be Had On Any Terms They Want”, The Record: 018 
  27. ^ a b c d e Paluzzi, Nick (27 April 2004). California Review. Ground and Sky. Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  28. ^ Fernandez, Roger. Mr. Bungle Biography. Bungle Grind. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  29. ^ Fong, Erik (July 1-14 2003). Trey Spruance Interview. Perfect Pitch Online. Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  30. ^ a b c Canak, Danny (2 July 2003). Bungle No More? Mike Patton Interview. Absolut Metal. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  31. ^ Lasik, Brett (17 November 2005). Rocker Mike Patton Explodes In Firecracker. Giant Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  32. ^ a b Dunn, Trevor. Your Questions/ My Answers. Trevor Dunn Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  33. ^ a b Canak, Danny (31 July 2004). Trey Spruance of Mr. Bungle interview. Musicdish. Retrieved on 2007-06-12.
  34. ^ Buttfield, Brett. Bar McKinnon interview. dB Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  35. ^ Ipecac Recordings: About. Ipecac Recordings Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  36. ^ Fantômas Biography. Ipecac Recordings Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  37. ^ Tomahawk Biography. Ipecac Recordings Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  38. ^ Peeping Tom Biography. Ipecac Recordings Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  39. ^ Firecracker Official Site. Dikenga Films. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  40. ^ Harris, Chris. "Mike Patton Hits The Big Screen, Voicing 'I Am Legend' Baddies And Scoring 'Perfect' Indie Flick", MTV Networks, 2007-12-13. Retrieved on 2008-01-03. 
  41. ^ Trevor Dunn's Trio Convulsant Biography. Ipecac Recordings Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  42. ^ The Tango Saloon Biography. Ipecac Recordings Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  43. ^ Shand, John (1 July 2006), “Cartoon Jazz: The Fantastic Terrific Munkle”, Sydney Morning Herald: 13, <http://www.jazzgroove.com/recordings/jgr031/index.html>. Retrieved on 5 May 2007 
  44. ^ The Ribbon Device Biography. The Ribbon Device Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  45. ^ Mr. Bungle (1995), Disco Volante Album Credits, Warner Bros. Records 
  46. ^ Mr. Bungle (1999), California Album Credits, Warner Bros. Records 
  47. ^ a b c Serba, John (8 February 2000), “Sno-Core Tour smacks the fans silly”, The Grand Rapids Press: C4 
  48. ^ a b c Pareles, Jon (11 November 1999). Mr. Bungle Music Review; Between the Cackles, Alienation and Apocalypse. New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-06-16.
  49. ^ a b c Gilbertson, Jon (4 February 2000), “Eclectic Mr. Bungle stays in the mix by pushing limits”, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel 
  50. ^ Eichler, Bob (4 April 2004). Disco Volante Review. Ground and Sky. Retrieved on 2007-06-16.
  51. ^ Azerrad, Mike (March / April 2002). Mike Patton Interview. Revolver. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  52. ^ Weatherford, Mike (15 October 1999), “Mr. Bungle serving up pop music from Mars”, The Las Vegas Review-Journal: 32J 
  53. ^ Brown, G. (20 March 1992), “Mr. Bungle to show its face at Gothic”, Denver Post: 3-E 
  54. ^ Gadino, Dylan. Leap From Faith: Mike Patton strikes again with Mr. Bungle. Rockpile Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-05-24.
  55. ^ Rose, Lisa (5 November 1999), “Mike Patton interview”, The Star-Ledger: 9 
  56. ^ Mr. Bungle, California Tour Concert Review. Metal Judgment (11 August 1999). Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  57. ^ Joost, Wesley. Bungle-icious: Mr. Bungle live at Sno-core. Goblin Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  58. ^ Stratton, Jeff (20 October 1999). Mike Patton Of Mr. Bungle. A.V. Club. Retrieved on 2007-06-26.
  59. ^ Johnson, Neala (16 March 2000), “Red-hot Animosity”, Herald-Sun: 47 

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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Grand Rapids Press is a daily newspaper published in Grand Rapids, Michigan. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is a daily morning broadsheet printed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... The Las Vegas Review-Journal, also known as the R-J, is published in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Denver Post is a daily newspaper published in Denver, Colorado. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... The Star-Ledger is the leading newspaper in New Jersey. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Herald Sun is a tabloid newspaper in Melbourne, Australia, published by The Herald and Weekly Times Ltd, a subsidiary of Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ...

External links

  • Mr. Bungle.com official site
  • Caca Volante news and archives
  • Mr Bungle Discography Mr Bungle Discography And Pressing Information
  • Bunglefever fan site, including biography, discography, lyrics, pictures and more
  • Archive.org hosts the Coronet educational film Lunchroom Manners, in which a puppet named Mr. Bungle teaches children how to behave at lunch. The first two minutes of audio are featured on Mr. Bungle's self-titled CD.
Michael Allan Patton (born January 27, 1968) is an American musician, best known as the lead singer of the band Faith No More from 1988 to 1998. ... Adult Themes for Voice is an album recorded by Mike Patton (vocalist for Faith No More, Mr. ... Pranzo Oltranzista is Mike Pattons second solo project. ... Mr. ... This article is about the album. ... California is a 1999 (see 1999 in music) album by the band Mr. ... The Raging Wrath of the Easter Bunny is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... Bowel of Chiley is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... Goddammit, I Love America! is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... OU818 is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... FNM redirects here. ... The Real Thing is the third album released by Faith No More in 1989. ... Angel Dust, released in 1992 (see 1992 in music), was the fourth studio album by U.S. rock band Faith No More, and the second to feature vocalist Mike Patton, as well as the final with guitarist Big Jim Martin. ... King for a Day. ... Album of the Year, released in 1997 (see 1997 in music), was the sixth and final studio album by Faith No More. ... For other albums with the same name see Live at Brixton Academy. ... Video Croissant was Faith No Mores 2nd VHS release. ... Who Cares a Lot? is a compilation album from Faith No More, released in 1998. ... Epic And Other Hits is a compilation album released by Faith No More in 2005. ... The Platinum Collection is a compilation album released by Faith No More in 2005. ... Fantômas is an avant-garde metal band formed in 1998 in California, United States. ... Fantômas is the debut album by Mike Pattons supergroup by the same name. ... The Directors Cut is an album by Mike Pattons supergroup Fantômas. ... Millennium Monsterwork 2000 is a live album by Fantômas and The Melvins which was released in 2002 through Ipecac Recordings. ... Delìrium Còrdia is the third full-length album by Fantômas. ... Suspended Animation is an album by Mike Pattons supergroup Fantômas. ... Animali In Calore Surriscaldati Con Ipertermia Genitale/Cat in Red is the name of the split record Fantômas and Melt-Banana released in 2005 through Italian record label, Unhip Records. ... Tomahawk is an experimental alternative metal/alternative rock supergroup from the United States. ... Tomahawk is the debut album by Mike Pattons supergroup of the same name. ... Mit Gas is a 2003 album by Tomahawk. ... Anonymous is the third studio album by Tomahawk. ... Peeping Tom is an upcoming collaboration album by Mike Patton. ... Peeping Tom is an experimental collaboration album by Mike Patton. ... She is the only release by the Masami Akita and Mike Patton collaboration Maldoror. ... Music to Make Love to Your Old Lady By is the debut album of Lovage, released in 2001. ... Irony is a Dead Scene is an EP by Dillinger Escape Plan with Mike Patton, released on August 27, 2002 (see 2002 in music). ... Long awaited collaboration between Mike Patton and John Kaada. ... General Patton vs. ... Mondo Cane is an upcoming album by Mike Patton, Aldo Sisillo and Roy Paci. ... John Zorn (born September 2, 1953 in Queens, New York) is an American avant-garde composer, arranger, record producer, saxophonist and multi-instrumentalist. ... Michael Allan Patton (born January 27, 1968) is an American musician, best known as the lead singer of the band Faith No More from 1988 to 1998. ... Preston Lea Spruance III or Trey Spruance (born 1969 in Eureka, California) is an American composer and musician. ... Trevor Dunn (born January 30, 1968 in Eureka, California)) is an American musician. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the U.S. politician, see Clinton D. McKinnon. ... Theobald Brooks-Lengyel (born 1970) was the alto-saxophonist of the influential experimental-rock band Mr. ... The Raging Wrath of the Easter Bunny is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... Bowel of Chiley is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... Goddammit, I Love America! is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... OU818 is a tape-only self-released album by Mr. ... Mr. ... This article is about the album. ... California is a 1999 (see 1999 in music) album by the band Mr. ... FNM redirects here. ... Secret Chiefs 3, also known as SC3, is a group of musicians led by composer and producer Trey Spruance, former guitarist of Mr. ... The Dillinger Escape Plan (often called DEP or TDEP) is an American mathcore band from Morris Plains, New Jersey. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Peeping Tom is an experimental collaboration album by Mike Patton. ... Tomahawk is an experimental alternative metal/alternative rock supergroup from the United States. ... Fantômas is an avant-garde metal band formed in 1998 in California, United States. ... John Zorn (born September 2, 1953 in Queens, New York) is an American avant-garde composer, arranger, record producer, saxophonist and multi-instrumentalist. ... Eyvind Kang (b. ... William Winant is a percussionist. ...

 
 

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