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Encyclopedia > Mozambique
República de Moçambique
Republic of Mozambique
Flag of Mozambique
Flag Coat of arms
Motto
none
Anthem
Pátria Amada
(formerly Viva, Viva a FRELIMO)
Capital
(and largest city)
Maputo
25°57′S, 32°35′E
Official languages Portuguese
Demonym Mozambican
Government Republic
 -  President Armando Guebuza
 -  Prime Minister Luísa Diogo
Independence
 -  from Portugal June 25, 1975 
Area
 -  Total 801,590 km² (35th)
309,496 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 2.2
Population
 -  2007 census 20.366.795 
 -  Density 25 /km² (178th)
65 /sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2005 estimate
 -  Total $27.013 billion (100th)
 -  Per capita $1,389 (158th)
HDI (2004) 0.390 (low) (168th)
Currency Mozambican metical (Mtn) (MZN)
Time zone CAT (UTC+2)
 -  Summer (DST) not observed (UTC+2)
Internet TLD .mz
Calling code +258
1 Estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected.

Mozambique, officially the Republic of Mozambique (Portuguese: Moçambique or República de Moçambique, pron. IPA: [ʁɛ'publikɐ dɨ musɐ̃'bikɨ]), is a country in southeastern Africa bordered by the Indian Ocean to the east, Tanzania to the north, Malawi and Zambia to the northwest, Zimbabwe to the west and Swaziland and South Africa to the southwest. It was explored by Vasco da Gama in 1498 and colonized by Portugal in 1505. By 1510, the Portuguese had control of all of the former Arab sultanates on the east African coast. From about 1500, Portuguese trading posts and forts became regular ports of call on the new route to the east. Mozambique (formerly often spelled in English as in Portuguese, Moçambique) most commonly refers to the country in southeastern Africa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mozambique. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Mozambique. ... Flag ratio: 2:3 The flag of Mozambique was adopted on May 1, 1983. ... Coat of arms of Mozambique The coat of arms of Mozambique, which was adopted in 1990, clearly recalls the former socialist government of the country. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogising the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognised either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Pátria Amada is the National Anthem of Mozambique, it replaced Viva, Viva a FRELIMO in 2002. ... Viva, Viva a FRELIMO (Portuguese: Long Live FRELIMO) was the national anthem of Mozambique from June 1975 to April 30, 2002. ... Image File history File links LocationMozambique. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Mozambiques major ethnic groups encompass numerous subgroups with diverse languages, dialects, cultures, and histories. ... Maputo is the capital of Mozambique. ... An official language is a language that is given a unique legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... List of Heads of State of Mozambique The official residence is the Palácio da Ponta Vermelha. ... President Armando Guebuza Armando Emílio Guebuza (b. ... List of Prime Ministers of Mozambique: Categories: Africa-related stubs | Politics stubs | Lists of office-holders | Politics of Mozambique ... Luísa Dias Diogo (born April 11, 1958) has been prime minister of Mozambique since February [[ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhJJjjhhhhhhhhhhaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhaaaaaaaaaaaaLuisa Diogo represents the party FRELIMO. In September 2005, she was the international guest speaker at the British Labour Party Conference. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here surface areas between 100,000 km² and 1,000,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... Gross domestic product (by purchasing power parity) in 2006 The Purchasing power parity (PPP) theory was developed by Gustav Cassel in 1920. ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... Map of countries by GDP (PPP) per capita for the year 2006. ... World map indicating Human Development Index (2006). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Coloured world map indicating Human Development Index (2006) (colour-blind compliant map) This is a list of countries by Human Development Index as included in the United Nations Development Programmes Human Development Report 2006, compiled on the basis of 2004 data. ... The metical (plural: meticais) is the currency of Mozambique. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Africa: Striped colours indicate countries observing daylight saving Central Africa Time, or CAT, is a time zone used in central and southern Africa. ... “UTC” redirects here. ... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... “UTC” redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .mz is the Internet country code top-level domain ( ccTLD) for Mozambique. ... A telephone number is a sequence of decimal digits (0-9) that is used for identifying a destination telephone line in a telephone network. ... Look up pronunciation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Vasco da Gama (disambiguation). ... 1498 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1505 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... 1500 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


It is a member of the Community of Portuguese Language Countries and the Commonwealth of Nations. Mozambique (Moçambique) was named after Muça Alebique, a sultan. The Community of Portuguese Language Countries (Portuguese: Comunidade dos Países de Língua Portuguesa, pron. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Mozambique

Between the first and fourth centuries CE, waves of Bantu-speaking people migrated from the west and north through the Zambezi River valley and then gradually into the plateau and coastal areas. The Bantu were farmers and ironworkers. Mozambiques first inhabitants were San hunter and gatherers, ancestors of the Khoisani peoples. ... The 1st century was that century that lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Map showing the approximate distribution of Bantu (dull yellow) vs. ... Zambezi River in North Western Zambia The Zambezi (also spelled Zambesi) is a river in Southern Africa. ...

The Island of Mozambique is a small coral island at the mouth of Mossuril Bay on the Nacala coast of northern Mozambique, first explored by Europeans in the late 1400s.
The Island of Mozambique is a small coral island at the mouth of Mossuril Bay on the Nacala coast of northern Mozambique, first explored by Europeans in the late 1400s.

When Portuguese explorers reached Mozambique in 1498, Arab commercial and slave trading settlements had existed along the coast and outlying islands for several centuries. From about 1500, Portuguese trading posts and forts became regular ports of call on the new route to the east. Later, traders and prospectors penetrated the interior regions seeking gold and slaves. Although Portuguese influence gradually expanded, its power was limited and exercised through individual settlers and officials who were granted extensive autonomy. As a result, investment lagged while Lisbon devoted itself to the more lucrative trade with India and the Far East and to the colonization of Brazil. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1524x1000, 110 KB) Description: Ilha de Mozambique was first occupied by Portuguese explorers in the late 1400s. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1524x1000, 110 KB) Description: Ilha de Mozambique was first occupied by Portuguese explorers in the late 1400s. ... The Island of Mozambique is an island off the coast of Nampula province, Mozambique, that has been declared a World Heritage Site on the basis of its preserved architecture. ... Nacala on the northern coast of Mozambique is the deepest natural port on the east coast of Africa. ... Languages Arabic and other minority languages Religions Islam, Christianity, Druzism and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: , arabi) is a member of a complexly defined ethnic group who identifies as such on the basis of one or more of either genealogical, political, or linguistic grounds. ... The term Trader can refer to: In economics, a merchant, a retail business or one who attempts to generally buy wholesale and sell later at a profit In finance, someone who buys and sells financial instruments such as stocks, bonds and derivatives - see stock trader In marketing, Trader Classified Media... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Slave redirects here. ... Location    - Country Portugal    - Region Lisboa  - Subregion Grande Lisboa  - District or A.R. Lisbon Mayor Carmona Rodrigues  - Party PSD Area 84. ... The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ...


By the early twentieth century the Portuguese had shifted the administration of much of Mozambique to large private companies, like the Mozambique Company, the Zambezi Company and the Niassa Company, controlled and financed mostly by the British, which established railroad lines to neighboring countries and supplied cheap – often forced – African labor to the mines and plantations of the nearby British colonies and South Africa. Because policies were designed to benefit Portuguese immigrants and the Portuguese homeland, little attention was paid to Mozambique's national integration, its economic infrastructure, or the skills of its population. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The Niassa Company, in Portuguese the Companhia do Niassa, was a royal company in the Portuguese colony of Mozambique, that had the concession of the lands that include the present provinces of Cabo Delgado and Niassa. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... Fundamentally, a plantation is usually a large farm or estate, especially in a tropical or semitropical country, on which cotton, tobacco, coffee, sugar cane, or trees and the like is cultivated, usually by resident laborers. ...


Post-war period

After World War II, while many European nations were granting independence to their colonies, Portugal maintained that Mozambique and other Portuguese possessions were overseas provinces of the mother country, and emigration to the colonies soared. Calls for Mozambican independence developed apace, and in 1962 several anti-colonial political groups formed the Front for the Liberation of Mozambique (FRELIMO), which initiated an armed campaign against Portuguese colonial rule in September 1964. However, Portugal had occupied the country for more than four hundred years; not all Mozambicans desired independence, and fewer still sought change through armed revolution. Poverty was widespread, and the Portuguese maintained a policy of mandatory ("forced") labour up until the 1960s. FRELIMO initially established some "liberated" zones in Northern Mozambique, and the strength of the movement gradually grew over the ensuing decade. Combatants Mozambican Liberation Front Portugal Commanders Eduardo Mondlane (1962–69), Filipe Samuel Magaia (1964–66), Samora Moïses Machel (1969–75) António Augusto dos Santos (1964–69), Kaúlza de Arriaga (1969–74) Strength 15,000[1] 73,000 Casualties 25,000 10,000[2] The Mozambican War of... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... ...

As FRELIMO's political campaign gained coherence, its forces advanced militarily, controlling one-third of the area of Mozambique by 1969, mostly in the northern and central provinces. [1]

By 1974 the Portuguese army knew that, especially in Mozambique, the colonial wars were unwinnable . . . . [2]

After a socialist-inspired military coup in Portugal overthrew the dictatorship in 1974, Portugal affirmed its intention to grant independence to its remaining colonies. Mozambique became independent on June 25, 1975. History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After independence, FRELIMO rapidly established a one-party state allied to the Soviet bloc. FRELIMO eliminated religious schools and the role of tribal chiefs. During the Cold War, the Eastern Bloc (or Soviet Bloc) comprised the following Central and Eastern European countries: Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, East Germany, Poland, Albania (until the early 1960s, see below), the Soviet Union, and Czechoslovakia. ...


Conflict and civil war

Main article: Mozambican Civil War

The new government, under president Samora Machel, gave shelter and support to South African (ANC) and Zimbabwean (ZANU) liberation movements while the governments of first Rhodesia and later South Africa (at that time still operating the apartheid laws) fostered and financed an armed rebel movement in central Mozambique called the Mozambican National Resistance (RENAMO). Hence, civil war, sabotage from neighboring white-ruled states such as Rhodesia and the Apartheid regime of South Africa, and economic collapse characterized the first decade of Mozambican independence. Also marking this period were the mass exodus of Portuguese nationals and Mozambicans of Portuguese heritage, a weak infrastructure, and government nationalization of privately owned industries. During most of the civil war, the government was unable to exercise effective control outside of urban areas, many of which were cut off from the capital. An estimated 1 million Mozambicans perished during the civil war, 1.7 million took refuge in neighboring states, and several million more were internally displaced. On October 19, 1986 Samora Machel was on his way back from an international meeting in Zambia in the presidential Tupolev Tu-134 aircraft when the plane crashed in the Lebombo Mountains, near Mbuzini. There were nine survivors but President Machel and twenty-four others died, including ministers and officials of the Mozambique government. The United Nations' Soviet delegation issued a minority report contending that their expertise and experience had been undermined by the South Africans. Representatives of the USSR advanced the theory that the plane had been intentionally diverted by a false navigational beacon signal, using a technology provided by military intelligence operatives of the South African government (at that time still operating the laws of apartheid).[3] Machel's successor, Joaquim Chissano, continued the reforms and began peace talks with RENAMO. The new constitution enacted in 1990 provided for a multi-party political system, market-based economy, and free elections. The civil war ended in October 1992 with the Rome General Peace Accords, brokered by the Community of Sant'Egidio. Under supervision of the ONUMOZ peacekeeping force of the United Nations, peace returned to Mozambique. The Mozambican Civil War started in Mozambique during the 1970s following independence in 1975. ... US President Reagan and President Samora Machel of Mozambique Samora Moisés Machel (September 29, 1933 - October 19, 1986) was President of Mozambique from 1975 until he died eleven years later, when his presidential aircraft crashed in mountainous terrain where the borders of Mozambique, South Africa and Swaziland converge. ... For political parties with similar names in other countries, see Northern Rhodesian African National Congress and Zambian African National Congress. ... The Zimbabwe African National Union was a political party during the struggle for Rhodesias, ultimately Zimbabwes, independence, formed as a split from ZAPU. It won the 1980 elections under the leadership of Robert Mugabe, and eight years later merged again with Joshua Nkomos ZAPU to form Zanu... Southern Rhodesia, todays Zimbabwe. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... The Mozambican National Resistance (RENAMO; Portuguese: Resistência Nacional Moçambicana) is a conservative political party in Mozambique led by Afonso Dhlakama. ... The Mozambican Civil War started in Mozambique during the 1970s following independence in 1975. ... Southern Rhodesia, todays Zimbabwe. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... An Aeroflot Tu-134 sits on the tarmac The Tupolev Tu-134 (NATO reporting name Crusty) was a Russian twin-engined airliner, similar to the American Douglas DC-9. ... The Lebombo Mountains are a range of mountains in Southern Africa stretching from Hluhluwe in KwaZulu-Natal in the south to Punda Maria in the Limpopo Province in South Africa. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... D-VOR (Doppler VOR) ground station, co-located with DME. VOR, short for VHF Omni-directional Radio Range, is a type of radio navigation system for aircraft. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... Pres. ... The Rome General Peace Accords between the Mozambican civil war parties, the Frelimo (government) and the Renamo (rebels), put an end to the Mozambique Civil war. ... The church of SantEgidio, seat of the community of SantEgidio The Community of SantEgidio is a Christian community that is officially recognized by the Catholic Church as a Church public lay association. It claims 50,000 members in more than 70 countries. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ...


By mid-1995 the more than 1.7 million Mozambican refugees who had sought asylum in neighboring Malawi, Zimbabwe, Swaziland, Zambia, Tanzania, and South Africa as a result of war and drought had returned, as part of the largest repatriation witnessed in Sub-Saharan Africa. Additionally, a further estimated four million internally displaced persons returned to their areas of origin.


Foreign relations

While allegiances dating back to the liberation struggle remain relevant, Mozambique's foreign policy has become increasingly pragmatic. The twin pillars of Mozambique's foreign policy are maintenance of good relations with its neighbors and maintenance and expansion of ties to development partners. While allegiances dating back to the liberation struggle remain relevant, Mozambiques foreign policy has become increasingly pragmatic. ...


During the 1970s and the early 1980s, Mozambique's foreign policy was inextricably linked to the struggles for majority rule in Rhodesia and South Africa as well as superpower competition and the Cold War. Mozambique's decision to enforce UN sanctions against Rhodesia and deny that country access to the sea led Ian Smith's government to undertake overt and covert actions to destabilize the country. Although the change of government in Zimbabwe in 1980 removed this threat, the government of South Africa (at that time still operating under the laws of apartheid) continued to finance the destabilization of Mozambique. It also belonged to the Front Line States. Southern Rhodesia, todays Zimbabwe. ... The Rt Hon Ian Smith, Prime Minister of Rhodesia, 1964 (official portrait) Ian Douglas Smith GCLM ID (born 8 April 1919) was the Premier of the British Crown Colony of Southern Rhodesia from 13 April 1964 to 11 November 1965, and Prime Minister of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) from 11 November... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... Front Line States (FLS) was an organization established to achieve black majority rule in South Africa. ...


The 1984 Nkomati Accord, while failing in its goal of ending South African support to RENAMO, opened initial diplomatic contacts between the Mozambican and South African governments. This process gained momentum with South Africa's elimination of apartheid, which culminated in the establishment of full diplomatic relations in October 1993. While relations with neighboring Zimbabwe, Malawi, Zambia, and Tanzania show occasional strains, Mozambique's ties to these countries remain strong. The Nkomati Accord was a nonagression treaty signed in 1984 between Mozambique and the Republic of South Africa. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ...


In the years immediately following its independence, Mozambique benefited from considerable assistance from some western countries, notably the Scandinavians. USSR and its allies, however, became Mozambique's primary economic, military, and political supporters and its foreign policy reflected this linkage. This began to change in 1983; in 1984 Mozambique joined the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. Western aid quickly replaced Soviet support, with the Scandinavians countries of Sweden (EU Member since 1996), Norway, Denmark (EU Member since 1973) and Iceland. Plus Finland (EU Member since 1996) and the Netherlands within the European Union are becoming increasingly important sources of development assistance. Italy also maintains a profile in Mozambique as a result of its key role during the peace process. Relations with Portugal, the former colonial power, continue to play an important role as Portuguese investors play a visible role in Mozambique's economy. Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... ... “IMF” redirects here. ...


Mozambique is a member of the Non-Aligned Movement and ranks among the moderate members of the African Bloc in the United Nations and other international organizations. Mozambique also belongs to the African Union (formerly the Organization of African Unity) and the Southern African Development Community. In 1994, the Government became a full member of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, in part to broaden its base of international support but also to please the country's sizable muslim population. Similarly, in early 1996 Mozambique joined its Anglophone neighbors in the Commonwealth. It is the only nation to join the Commonwealth that was never part of the British Empire. In the same year, Mozambique became a founding member and the first President of the Community of Portuguese Language Countries (CPLP), and maintains close ties with other Lusophone states. Anthem Let Us All Unite and Celebrate Together [1] Administrative Centre Largest city Cairo, Egypt Working languages Arabic English French Portuguese Swahili Membership 53 African states Leaders  -  Chairman John Kufuor  -  Alpha Oumar Konaré Establishment  -  as the OAU May 25, 1963   -  as the African Union July 9, 2002  Area  -  Total 29... Flag of the Organisation of African Unity, later also used by the African Union. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The flag of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) OIC redirects here. ... Look up Anglophone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The Community of Portuguese Language Countries (Portuguese: Comunidade dos Países de Língua Portuguesa, pron. ... A Lusophone is someone who speaks the Portuguese language natively or by adoption. ...


Provinces and districts

Mozambique is divided into ten provinces (provincias) and one capital city (cidade) with provincial status. The provinces are subdivided into 129 districts (distritos). Districts are further divided in "Postos Administrativos" (Administrative Posts) and these in Localidades (Localities) the lowest geographical level of central state administration. Since 1998, 33 "Municípios" (Municipalities) have been created in Mozambique. Mozambique is divided into 11 provinces: Cabo Delgado Gaza Inhambane Manica Maputo (city) Maputo Nampula Niassa Sofala Tete Zambezia Categories: Provinces of Mozambique ... There are 128 districts in Mozambique: Alto Molocue Ancuabe Angoche Angónia Balama Báruè Bilene Macia Boane Buzi Cahora-Bassa Caia Changara Chemba Cheringoma Chibabava Chibuto Chicuacuala Chifunde Chigubo Chinde Chiúre Chiuta Chókwè Cuamba Dondo Eráti Funhalouro Gilé Gondola Gorongosa Govuro Guijá Guro Gurué Homoine Ibo... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... Province is a name for a secondary, or subnational entity of government in most countries. ... Local government areas called districts are used, or have been used, in several countries. ...

  1. Cabo Delgado
  2. Gaza
  3. Inhambane
  4. Manica
  5. Maputo (city)
  6. Maputo
  7. Nampula
  8. Niassa
  9. Sofala
  10. Tete
  11. Zambezia

Cabo Delgado is a province of Mozambique. ... Gaza is a province of Mozambique. ... Inhambane is a province of Mozambique located on the coast in the southern part of the country. ... Manica is a province of Mozambique. ... Maputo is the capital of Mozambique. ... Maputo is a province of Mozambique. ... Categories: Stub | Provinces of Mozambique ... Niassa is a province of Mozambique. ... Sofala is a province of Mozambique. ... Tete is a province of Mozambique. ... This article is about the Mozambican province. ... Image File history File links Mozambique_Provinces_numbered_300px. ...

Geography

Satellite image of Mozambique, generated from raster graphics data supplied by The Map Library
Satellite image of Mozambique, generated from raster graphics data supplied by The Map Library

At 309,475 square miles (801,590 km²), Mozambique is the world's 36th-largest country (after Pakistan). It is comparable in size to Turkey. Map of Mozambique Satellite image of Mozambique, generated from raster graphics data supplied by The Map Library Topographic map of Mozambique Location: Southern Africa, bordering the Mozambique Channel, between South Africa and Tanzania Geographic coordinates: Map references: Africa Area: total: 801,590 km² land: 784,090 km² water: 17,500... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1277x1968, 2691 KB) ECW to TIFF to PNG (compression level 9). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1277x1968, 2691 KB) ECW to TIFF to PNG (compression level 9). ... Suppose the smiley face in the top left corner is an RGB bitmap image. ... Satellite image of Congo, generated from raster graphics data supplied by The Map Library. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ...


Politics

Mozambique is a multi-party democracy under the 1990 constitution. The executive branch comprises a president, prime minister, and Council of Ministers. There is a National Assembly and municipal assemblies. The judiciary comprises a Supreme Court and provincial, district, and municipal courts. Suffrage is universal at eighteen. Politics of Mozambique takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of Mozambique is both head of state and head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... List of Heads of Government of Mozambique Affliations:- FRELIMO = Frente da Libertação de Moçambique (Liberation Front of Mozambique, authoritarian/socialist, renounces Marxist-Leninism 30 Jul 1989) RENAMO = Resistencia Nacional Moçambicana (Mozambican National Resistance) Categories: Politics of Mozambique ... The unicameral Assembly of the Republic is Mozambiques legislative body. ...


In the 1994 elections. Joaquim Chissano was elected President with 53% of the vote, and a 250-member National Assembly was voted in with 129 FRELIMO deputies, 112 RENAMO deputies, and nine representatives of three smaller parties that formed the Democratic Union (UD). Since its formation in 1994, the National Assembly has made progress in becoming a body increasingly more independent of the executive. By 1999, more than one-half (53%) of the legislation passed originated in the Assembly. Elections in Mozambique gives information on election and election results in Mozambique. ... The Mozambican Liberation Front (FRELIMO, pronounced fray-LEE-moo; Portuguese: Frente de Libertação de Moçambique) is a political party that has ruled Mozambique since independence in 1975. ... The Mozambican National Resistance (RENAMO; Portuguese: Resistência Nacional Moçambicana) is a conservative political party in Mozambique led by Afonso Dhlakama. ... The Democratic Union can be: Croatian Democratic Union Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina Mongolian Democratic Union This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


After some delays, in 1998 the country held its first local elections to provide for local representation and some budgetary authority at the municipal level. The principal opposition party, RENAMO, boycotted the local elections, citing flaws in the registration process. Independent slates contested the elections and won seats in municipal assemblies. Turnout was very low.


In the aftermath of the 1998 local elections, the government resolved to make more accommodations to the opposition's procedural concerns for the second round of multiparty national elections in 1999. Working through the National Assembly, the electoral law was rewritten and passed by consensus in December 1998. Financed largely by international donors, a very successful voter registration was conducted from July to September 1999, providing voter registration cards to 85% of the potential electorate (more than seven million voters).


The second general elections were held December 3-5, 1999, with high voter turnout. International and domestic observers agreed that the voting process was well organized and went smoothly. Both the opposition and observers subsequently cited flaws in the tabulation process that, had they not occurred, might have changed the outcome. In the end, however, international and domestic observers concluded that the close result of the vote reflected the will of the people. Voters lining up outside a Baghdad polling station during the 2005 Iraqi election. ...


President Chissano won the presidency with a margin of 4% points over the RENAMO-Electoral Union coalition candidate, Afonso Dhlakama, and began his five-year term in January 2000. FRELIMO increased its majority in the National Assembly with 133 out of 250 seats. RENAMO-UE coalition won 116 seats, one went independent, and no third parties are represented.


The opposition coalition did not accept the National Election Commission's results of the presidential vote and filed a formal complaint to the Supreme Court. One month after the voting, the court dismissed the opposition's challenge and validated the election results. The opposition did not file a complaint about the results of the legislative vote.


The second local elections, involving thirty-three municipalities with some 2.4 million registered voters, took place in November 2003. This was the first time that FRELIMO, RENAMO-UE, and independent parties competed without significant boycotts. The 24% turnout was well above the 15% turnout in the first municipal elections. FRELIMO won twenty-eight mayoral positions and the majority in twenty-nine municipal assemblies, while RENAMO won five mayoral positions and the majority in four municipal assemblies. The voting was conducted in an orderly fashion without violent incidents. However, the period immediately after the elections was marked by objections about voter and candidate registration and vote tabulation, as well as calls for greater transparency.

Mozambique's president, Armando Guebuza.
Mozambique's president, Armando Guebuza.

In May 2004, the government approved a new general elections law that contained innovations based on the experience of the 2003 municipal elections. Image File history File links Armando_Guebuza_2005. ... Image File history File links Armando_Guebuza_2005. ...


Presidential and National Assembly elections took place on December 1-2, 2004. FRELIMO candidate Armando Guebuza won with 64% of the popular vote. His opponent, Afonso Dhlakama of RENAMO, received 32% of the popular vote. FRELIMO won 160 seats in Parliament. A coalition of RENAMO and several small parties won the 90 remaining seats. Armando Guebuza was inaugurated as the President of Mozambique on February 2, 2005. RENAMO and some other opposition parties made claims of election fraud and denounced the result. These claims were supported by international observers (among others by the European Union Election Observation Mission to Mozambique and the Carter Center) to the elections who criticized the fact that the National Electoral Commission (CNE) did not conduct fair and transparent elections. They listed a whole range of shortcomings by the electoral authorities that benefited the ruling party FRELIMO. However, according to EU observers, the elections shortcomings have probably not affected the final result in the presidential election. On the other hand, the observers have declared that the outcome of the parliamentary election and thus the distribution of seats in the National Assembly does not reflect the will of the Mozambican people and is clearly to the disadvantage of RENAMO.


The Reporters Without Borders' Worldwide Press Freedom Index 2006 ranked Mozambique 45th out of 168 countries. Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is a French origin international non-governmental organization that advocates freedom of the press, founded by its current general-secretary, Robert Menard. ...


Economy

Women in Mozambique with maize.
Women in Mozambique with maize.
Main article: Economy of Mozambique

The official currency is the New Metical (as of 2006, 1 USD is roughly equivalent to 25 Meticals), which on January 1, 2007 replaced old Meticals in rate thousand to one. The old currency will be redeemed by the Bank of Mozambique until the end of 2012. US dollar, South African rand and recently also Euro are also widely accepted and used in business transactions. The minimum legal salary is around 60 dollars per month. Mozambique is member of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). The SADC free trade protocol is aimed at making the South African region more competitive by eliminating tariffs and other trade barriers. Image File history File links Gnome_globe_current_event. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (720x1088, 95 KB) Uploaded on February 24, 2005 by babasteve Source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (720x1088, 95 KB) Uploaded on February 24, 2005 by babasteve Source: http://www. ... Economy - overview: At independence in 1975, Mozambique was one of the worlds poorest countries. ... The metical (plural: meticais) is the currency of Mozambique. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Bank of Mozambique (Portuguese: ) is the central bank of Mozambique. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 Code ZAR User(s) Common Monetary Area: Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, and Swaziland Inflation 5. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A trade barrier is general term that describes any government policy or regulation that restricts international trade, the barriers can take many forms, including: Import duties Import licenses Export licenses Quotas Tariffs Subsidies Non-tariff barriers to trade Most trade barriers work on the same principle: the imposition of some...


Rebounding growth

The resettlement of war refugees and successful economic reform have led to a high growth rate: the average growth rate from 1993 to 1999 was 6.7%; from 1997 to 1999 it averaged more than 10% per year. The devastating floods of early 2000 slowed GDP growth to 2.1%. A full recovery was achieved with growth of 14.8% in 2001. In 2003, the growth rate was 7%. The government projects the economy to continue to expand between 7%-10% a year for the next five years, although rapid expansion in the future hinges on several major foreign investment projects, continued economic reform, and the revival of the agriculture, transportation, and tourism sectors. More than 75% of the population engages in small scale agriculture, which still suffers from inadequate infrastructure, commercial networks, and investment. However, 88% of Mozambique's arable land is still uncultivated. Refugees arrive in Travnik, central Bosnia, during the war, 1993. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Inflation

The government's tight control of spending and the money supply, combined with financial sector reform, successfully reduced inflation from 70% in 1994 to less than 5% in 1998-99. Economic disruptions stemming from the devastating floods of 2000 caused inflation to jump to 12.7% that year, and it was 13% in 2003. The Mozambique's currency, the Metical, devaluated by 50% to the dollar in 2001, although in late 2001 it began to stabilize. Since then, it has held steady at about 24,000 MZN to 1 U.S. dollar. New Metical replaced old Meticals in rate thousand to one on January 1, 2007 bringing the exchange rate to 25 (new) MZN to 1 USD. The metical (plural: meticais) is the currency of Mozambique. ... Devaluation is a reduction in the value of a currency with respect to other monetary units. ... The metical (plural: meticais) is the currency of Mozambique. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Economic reforms

More than 1,200 state-owned enterprises (mostly small) have been privatized. Preparations for privatization and/or sector liberalization are underway for the remaining parastatal enterprises, including telecommunications, energy, ports, and the railroads. The government frequently selects a strategic foreign investor when privatizing a parastatal. Additionally, customs duties have been reduced, and customs management has been streamlined and reformed. The government introduced a value-added tax in 1999 as part of its efforts to increase domestic revenues. Plans for 2003-04 include Commercial Code reform; comprehensive judicial reform; financial sector strengthening; continued civil service reform; and improved government budget, audit, and inspection capability.[citation needed] Nationalization or nationalisation is the act of transferring assets into public ownership. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Improving trade imbalance

An old 1000 meticais note, prior to redenomination on 1 July 2006

Imports remain almost 40% greater than exports, but this is a significant improvement over the 4:1 ratio of the immediate post-war years. In 2003, imports were $1.24 billion and exports were $910 million. Support programs provided by foreign donors and private financing of foreign direct investment mega-projects and their associated raw materials, have largely compensated for balance-of-payments shortfalls. The medium-term outlook for exports is encouraging, since a number of foreign investment projects should lead to substantial export growth and a better trade balance. MOZAL, a large aluminum smelter that commenced production in mid-2000, has greatly expanded the nation's trade volume. Traditional Mozambican exports include cashews, shrimp, fish, copra, sugar, cotton, tea, and citrus fruits. Most of these industries are being rehabilitated. As well, Mozambique is less dependent on imports for basic food and manufactured goods because of steady increases in local production. Image File history File links Mil_meticais. ... Image File history File links Mil_meticais. ...


Demographics

Traditional fishing boat in Mozambique.
Traditional fishing boat in Mozambique.

The north-central provinces of Zambezia and Nampula are the most populous, with about 45% of the population. The estimated four million Makua are the dominant group in the northern part of the country; the Sena and Shona (mostly Ndau) are prominent in the Zambezi valley, and the Shangaan (Tsonga) dominate in southern Mozambique. Other groups include Makonde, Yao, Swahili, Tonga, Chopi, and Nguni (including Zulu). Bantu people comprise 99.66% of the population, the remaining 0.34% include Europeans 0.06% (largely of Portuguese ancestry), Euro-Africans 0.2% (mestiço people of mixed Bantu and Portuguese heritage), and Indians 0.08%.[4] During Portuguese colonial rule, a large minority of people of Portuguese descent lived permanently in almost all areas of the country, and Mozambicans with Portuguese blood at the time of independence numbered about 250,000. Most of these left the region after its freedom in 1975. The remaining minorities in Mozambique claim heritage from Pakistan, Portuguese India and Arab countries. There are also some 7,000 Chinese. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1089x720, 139 KB) Description: Off the northern coast of Mozambique lies the island the country is named after - Ilha de Mocambique. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1089x720, 139 KB) Description: Off the northern coast of Mozambique lies the island the country is named after - Ilha de Mocambique. ... Mozambiques major ethnic groups encompass numerous subgroups with diverse languages, dialects, cultures, and histories. ... The Makua are the largest ethnic group in northern Mozambique. ... Shona (IPA: ) is the name collectively given to several groups of people in Zimbabwe and western Mozambique. ... -1... The Shangaan (Vatsonga or Vitsonga) are a large group of people living mainly in southern Mozambique in Maputo and in Gaza Province; there is also a large Shangaan grouping in Limpopo Province in South Africa. ... The Makonde are an ethnic group in southeast Tanzania and northern Mozambique. ... 9 to 10 year old boys of the Yao tribe participating in circumcision and initiation rites (March 2005). ... The Swahili are a people and culture found on the coast of East Africa, mainly the coastal regions and the islands of Kenya and Tanzania, and north Mozambique. ... The Chopi are an ethnic group of Mozambique. ... For the cattle breed see Nguni cattle. ... Languages Zulu Religions Christian, African Traditional Religion Related ethnic groups Bantu Nguni Basotho Xhosa Swazi Matabele Khoisan The Zulu (South African English and isiZulu: amaZulu) are a South African ethnic group of an estimated 17-22 million people who live mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Map showing the approximate distribution of Bantu (dull yellow) vs. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Languages Predominantly Spanish, (with a minority of other languages), while Mestizos speaks Portuguese Religions Christianity (Predominantly Roman Catholic, with a minority of Protestant and other Religions) Related ethnic groups Other Spanish people, Italian people, French people, Portuguese people, Amerindian, African people, Austronesian people, Hispanics and Latinos Mestizo (Portuguese, Mestiço... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Portuguese India (Portuguese: or Estado da Índia) was the aggregate of Portugals colonial holdings in India. ... Languages Arabic and other minority languages Religions Islam, Christianity, Druzism and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: , arabi) is a member of a complexly defined ethnic group who identifies as such on the basis of one or more of either genealogical, political, or linguistic grounds. ...


Despite the influence of Islamic coastal traders and European colonizers, the people of Mozambique have largely retained an indigenous culture based on small-scale agriculture. Mozambique's most highly developed art forms have been wood sculpture, for which the Makonde in northern Mozambique are particularly renowned, and dance. The middle and upper classes continue to be heavily influenced by the Portuguese colonial and linguistic heritage. The Makonde are an ethnic group in southeast Tanzania and northern Mozambique. ...


Portuguese is the official and most widely spoken language of the nation, because Bantus speak several of their different languages (most widely used of these are Swahili, Makhuwa, Sena, Ndau, and Shangaan — these have many Portuguese-origin words), but 40% of all people speak it — 33.5%, mostly Bantus, as their second language and only 6.5%, mostly white Portuguese and mestiços, speak it as their first language. Arabs, Chinese, and Indians speak their own languages (Indians from Portuguese India speak any of the Portuguese Creoles of their origin) aside from Portuguese as their second language. Most educated Mozambicans speak English, which is used in schools and business as second or third language. This article is about the language. ... The Makua language is a language belonging to the Niger-Congo family, spoken by 5 million Makua people, who live north of the Zambezi River in Mozambique. ... Ndau is one of the shona dialects. ... The Tsonga or Xitsonga language is spoken in southern Africa by the Tsonga people, also known as the Shangaan. ... Portuguese creoles are creole languages which have been significantly influenced by Portuguese. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Education

Under Portuguese rule, educational opportunities for poor Mozambicans were limited; Most of the Bantu population was illiterate, and many could not speak Portuguese. In fact, most of today's political leaders were educated in missionary schools. After independence, the government placed a high priority on expanding education, which reduced the illiteracy rate to about two-thirds as primary school enrollment increased. Unfortunately, in recent years school construction and teacher training enrollments have not kept up with population increases. With post-war enrollments reaching all-time highs, the quality of education has suffered. All Mozambicans are required by law to attend school through the primary level. After grade 7, students must take standardized national exams to enter secondary school, which runs from 8th to 10th grade. Secondary school students study Portuguese, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, History, Geography, Physical Education, Technical Drawing, and English (which all schoolchildren begin in grade 6). Another round of national exams after grade 10 allows passage into pre-university school (grades 11 and 12), in which students have the opportunity to study all of the former subjects (minus Physical Education) plus Philosophy and French. Space in Mozambican universities is extremely limited; thus most students who complete pre-university school do not immediately proceed onto university studies. Many go to work as teachers or are unemployed. There are also institutes specializing in agricultural, technical, or pedagogical studies which students may attend after grade 10 in lieu of a pre-university school, which give more practical educations. A lot of children of Mozambique don't go to primary school, because they have to work for their families' subsistence farms for a living. Under the colonial regime, public educational opportunities for poor Mozambicans were limited; 93% of the Bantu population was illiterate and many could not speak Portuguese. ...


Religion

According to the 1997 Second General Population and Housing Census, the religions of the polled population were as follows: 24.2% identified themselves as Roman Catholic; 24.25% claimed to not be affiliated with a religion; 18.7% adhering to Zionism (an African form of Christianity); 17.8% of the population were cited as Muslims; 11.45% as other non-Catholic Christians; 3.6% as "other". For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Zionism is a key movement within the African Initiated Churches and is particularly strong in southern Africa; research in 1996 suggested that 40% of all black South Africans belonged to a Zionist church. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...


The Roman-Catholic church has established twelve dioceses (Beira, Chimoio, Gurué, Inhambane, Lichinga, Maputo, Nacala, Nampula, Pemba, Quelimane, Tete, and Xai-Xai - archdioceses are Beira, Maputo and Nampula). Statistics for the dioceses range from a low 7.44% Catholics in the population in the diocese of Chimoio, to 87.50% in Quelimane diocese (2006 official Catholic figures). The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ...


Muslims are particularly present in the North of the country. They are organised in several "tariqa" or brotherhoods (of the Qadiriya or Shadhuliyyah branch). Two national organisation also exist - the Conselho Islamico de Mocambique (reformists) and the Congresso Islamico de Mocambique (pro-sufi). There are also important Indo-Pakistani associations as well as some Shia and particularly Ismaili communities.


Among the main Protestant churches are Igreja União Baptista de Moçambique, the Assembleias de Deus, the Seventh-day Adventists, the Anglican Church of Mozambique, the Igreja do Evangelho Completo de Deus, the Igreja Metodista Unida, the Igreja Presbiteriana de Moçambique, the Igreja de Cristo and the Assembleia Evangélica de Deus. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is also present as well as the Jehovah's Witnesses and the Brazilian Igreja Universal do Reino de Deus.[citation needed] Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist... For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... The Seventh-day Adventist Church (SDA), colloquially referred to as the Adventists, is an evangelical Protestant Christian denomination that grew out of the prophetic Millerite movement in the United States during the middle part of the 19th century. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Christ is the English term for the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Music

Main article: Music of Mozambique

Mozambique has distinct styles of music and distinct patterns of use of instruments. Some of the music styles fall into the classification of Lusophone musical culture. Mozambique is a former Portuguese colony, and its native folk musics have been highly influenced by Portuguese forms. ... Portugal and its former colonies are linked musically by the shared influence of fado, a bluesy form of music derived from itinerants in Lisbon. ...


See also

This page aims to list articles on Wikipedia that are related to Mozambique. ... Telephones - main lines in use: 90,000 (2001) Telephones - mobile cellular: 287,000 (2002) Telephone system: general assessment: fair system but not available generally (telephone density is only 16 telephones for each 1,000 persons) domestic: the system consists of open-wire lines and trunk connection by microwave radio relay... Membership badge of the Liga dos Escuteiros de Mo̤ambique The Liga dos Escuteiros de Mo̤ambique (LEMo), the national Scouting organization of Mozambique, was founded in 1960, and became a member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement in 1999. ... Below is a list of conservation areas in Mozambique Transfrontier Parks Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park - Peace park which consists of the Limpopo National Park (Mozambique), Kruger National Park (South Africa) and Gonarezhou National Park (Zimbabwe) Lubombo Transfrontier Conservation Area - Peace park which consists of Maputo Elephant Reserve and Futi Corridor... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Public holidays in Africa Public holidays in: Algeria ʉۢ Angola ʉۢ Benin ʉۢ Botswana ʉۢ Burkina Faso ʉۢ Burundi ʉۢ Cameroon ʉۢ Cape Verde ʉۢ Central African Republic ʉۢ Chad ʉۢ Comoros ʉۢ Democratic Republic of the Congo ʉۢ Republic of the Congo ʉۢ C̫te dIvoire (Ivory Coast) ʉۢ Djibouti ʉۢ Egypt ʉۢ Equatorial Guinea ʉۢ Eritrea ʉۢ Ethiopia ʉۢ Gabon ʉۢ The Gambia ʉۢ Ghana ʉۢ Guinea ʉۢ Guinea-Bissau... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ...

References

This article contains material from the CIA World Factbook which, as a U.S. government publication, is in the public domain. The World Factbook 2007 (government edtion) cover. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  1. ^ James H. Mittelman, Underdevelopment and the Transition to Socialism: Mozambique and Tanzania. 1981, London, Academic Press. p.38.
  2. ^ Colin Darch, Worlb Bibliographical Series: Mozambique. 1987; Oxford; Clio. Introductionh, pp. xviii, xix.
  3. ^ Special Investigation into the death of President Samora Machel. [[Truth and Reconciliation Commission (South Africa)|]] Report, vol.2, chapter 6a. Retrieved on June 18, 2006.
  4. ^ "Mozambique". CIA World Factbook. Retrieved 22 May 2007.

is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Abrahamsson, Hans Mozambique: The Troubled Transition, from Socialist Construction to Free Market Capitalism London: Zed Books, 1995
  • Cahen, Michel Les bandits: un historien au Mozambique_, Paris: Gulbenkian, 1994
  • Pitcher, Anne Transforming Mozambique: The politics of privatisation, 1975–2000 Cambridge, 2002
  • Newitt, Malyn A History of Mozambique Indiana University Press
  • Varia, "Religion in Mozambique", LFM: Social sciences & Missions No. 17, Dec. 2005

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Government

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Business, Investment and Legal Information

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Economics, Trade and Development

  • USAID Trade & Investment Project

Observing politics

  • Mozambique Political Process Bulletin
  • Special Report on Mozambique 2004 Elections by the Carter CenterPDF (1.65 MiB)
  • Final Report of the European Union Election Observation MissionPDF (388 KiB)

“PDF” redirects here. ... A mebibyte (a contraction of mega binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, abbreviated MiB. 1 MiB = 220 bytes = 1,048,576 bytes = 1,024 kibibytes 1 MiB = 1024 (= 210) kibibytes (KiB), and 1024 MiB equal one gibibyte (GiB). ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...

News

  • The Mozambique News Agency - AIM Reports
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Forums

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Overviews

  • BBC News Country Profile - Mozambique
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Directories

  • Open Directory Project - Mozambique directory category
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Tourism

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Geographic locale
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  Results from FactBites:
 
allAfrica.com: Mozambique (896 words)
The Sena Company, which owns Mozambique's largest sugar plantation, at Marromeu, on the south bank of the Zambezi, is losing half a million US dollars a year because of theft of sugar cane.
Mozambique is "committed to the deepening of multi-party democracy and to the culture of peace and progress", declared President Armando Guebuza on Thursday.
Malawi, Zambia and Mozambique hope to navigate the mighty Zambezi river's waterways by 2009 as an alternative and cheap transport route for imports and exports from and to the three southern African countries.
Mozambique - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3327 words)
In Mozambique, the military decision to withdraw occurred within the context of a decade of armed anti-colonial struggle, initially led by American-educated Eduardo Mondlane, who was assassinated in 1969.
Mozambique's decision to enforce UN sanctions against Rhodesia and deny that country access to the sea led Ian Smith's regime to undertake overt and covert actions to destabilize the country.
Mozambique is a member of the Non-Aligned Movement and ranks among the moderate members of the African Bloc in the United Nations and other international organizations.
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