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Encyclopedia > Mountain film

A mountain film is a film genre that focuses on mountaineering and especially the battle of man against nature. Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Although the first mountain film, depicting the ascent of the Mont Blanc by the American climber Frank Ormiston-Smith, was released in 1903, the genre is most associated with the German bergfilme released in the 1920s. Some critics describe the German mountain film as an indigenous national / cultural genre, comparable to the American western. This article is about the Alpine mountain. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The 1920s is a decade that is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ...


The most important director of mountain films was Dr. Arnold Fanck. According to an essay by Doug Cummings in the DVD release of the landmark bergfilm "The Holy Mountain" (1926), Fanck saw his first motion picture in 1913, and after serving in World War I, purchased a rare 500-frames-per-second Ernemann camera, taught himself to shoot on location during an expedition to climb the Jungfrau, taught himself to edit on his mother's kitchen table, and distributed the finished product himself. The film was eventually called "The Wonders of Skiing" (1919) and was an instant success. The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Arnold Fanck (born 6 March 1889 in Frankenthal, Germany; died 28 September 1974 in Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany) was a pioneer of the German mountain film. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Jungfrau (German: virgin) is the highest peak of a mountain massif of the same name, located in the Bernese Oberland region of the Swiss Alps, overlooking Grindelwald. ...


The young interpretive dancer Leni Riefenstahl was mesmerized by Fanck's fifth feature, "Mountain of Destiny" (1924) and successfully pursued Fanck and his star Luis Trenker, convincing them to make her the star of "The Holy Mountain". It took three days to write and over a year to film on location in the Alps. This started Riefenstahl's own career as a filmmaker. Fanck went on to produce the ski-chase "White Ecstasy" (1930) with Riefenstahl and legendary Austrian skier Hannes Schneider, then in turn served as Riefenstahl's editor on her 1932 film "The Blue Light", which brought her to the attention of Adolf Hitler. The popularity of the German mountain films waned, then disappeared, in the run-up to World War II. Riefenstahl, 1931 Helene Bertha Amalie Leni Riefenstahl (August 22, 1902 – September 8, 2003) was a German film director, dancer and actress, and widely noted for her aesthetics and advances in film technique. ... Luis Trenker (actually Alois Franz Trenker) October 4, 1892 in St. ... Johannes Schneider (1890-April 25, 1955) or Hannes Schneider was an Austrian Ski instructor of the first half of the twentieth century. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Mountain films pose unusual difficulties for the filmmaking process; although parts can and have been shot in studios, filming on location is a longstanding tradition. Concerns include low temperatures, variable weather, and the objective dangers of the mountain environment. Directors may "cheat" by filming the actors in a less dangerous area, such as on the slopes of a ski resort, and intersperse with shots of the real location taken with a telephoto lens.


Although experienced climbers are often used, in roles ranging from consulting to standing in for the actors, the resulting film may not seem particularly logical to an audience knowledgeable about climbing. For instance, a rescuer in the film may take a hard but dramatic-looking route, even though in real life time is of the essence, and rescuers will always go by the easiest available route. Rock climbers on Valkyrie at The Roaches in Staffordshire, England. ...


The International Alliance for Mountain Film is an organization committed to the future of mountain film, comprised of members from some of the most important mountain film festivals in the world, along with the Museo della Montagna staff in Torino, Italy. Founding members of the alliance included film festivals in Autrans, France; Banff, Canada; Cervinia, Italy; Graz, Austria; Lugano, Switzerland; Les Diablerets, Switzerland; Torello, Spain; and Trento, Italy. They were joined a few months later by festivals from Dundee, Scotland; Kendal, England; Poprad, Slovakia; Telluride, U.S.A. and Teplice in the Czech Republic. The Banff Mountain Film Festival is an annual presentation of short films and documentaries about mountain culture, sports and environment. ... Mountainfilm in Telluride (MTF) is America’s premier festival of mountain, adventure, cultural and environmental film and video, held annually over Memorial Day weekend in the box canyon town of Telluride, Colorado. ...


According to the website for the Alliance, "the Alliance determines that one of its first priorities is to inform audiences and filmmakers about the global film festival opportunities. As well, information is shared on films, programming and technology, promotion and ticketing and funding challenges. An agreement emerges to take every opportunity to cross-promote mountain film festivals around the world and to meet twice a year at member festival events."


Examples

Leni Riefenstahl as Junta Das Blaue Licht (eng. ... Cliffhanger is a 1993 action movie directed by Renny Harlin and starring Sylvester Stallone and John Lithgow. ... Vertical Limit (2000) is an action movie/thriller directed by New Zealander Martin Campbell (GoldenEye, No Escape) starring, among others, Chris ODonnell, Bill Paxton, Robin Tunney and Scott Glenn. ... Touching the Void is a book by Joe Simpson recounting the true story of Simpsons and Simon Yates disastrous and near fatal attempt to climb the 6,344 metre (20,813 foot) Siula Grande in the Peruvian Andes in 1985. ...

External links

  • A German site

  Results from FactBites:
 
Film And Mountain (723 words)
Film and Mountain answers production problems whilst filming - mountains, cliffs, high structures, snow and ice, arctic cold or any other harsh and potentially hazardous environment.
All Film and Mountain personnel are internationally qualified Mountain Guides whose skills combined with many years experience and knowledge of the film industry and its demanding requirements put us in a unique position to offer this service to the FILM, ADVERTISING and TELEVISION industry.
Experience organising all of the mountain filming on the BAFTA award winning film "Touching the Void", the Bond "Die another Day" second unit in Iceland or with Kenneth Brannagh on the "Shackleton" Channel 4 Drama in Greenland.
Mountain film - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (411 words)
A mountain film is a film genre that focuses on mountaineering and especially the battle of man against nature.
Although the first mountain film, depicting the ascent of the Mont Blanc by the American climber Frank Ormiston-Smith, was released in 1903, the genre is most associated with the German bergfilme released in the 1920s.
Mountain films pose unusual difficulties for the filmmaking process; although parts can and have been shot in studios, filming on location is a longstanding tradition.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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