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Encyclopedia > Mountain
Blue Ridge Mountains in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA

A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area, with a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill, but there is no universally accepted standard definition for the height of a mountain or a hill although a mountain usually has an identifiable summit. Mountains cover 64% of Asia, 36% of North America, 25% of Europe, 22% of South America, 17% of Australia, and 3% of Africa. As a whole, 24% of the Earth's land mass is mountainous. 10% of people live in mountainous regions. Most of the world's rivers are fed from mountain sources, and more than half of humanity depends on mountains for water.[1][2] Look up Mountain in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A mountain is a type of landform. ... Image File history File links Damavand_in_winter. ... Image File history File links Damavand_in_winter. ... The Congregation mosque of Damavand, built in 1409CE, has traces of Sassanid architecture in it. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 790 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From the top right hand corner of stonyman summit. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 790 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From the top right hand corner of stonyman summit. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... Shenandoah (daughter of the stars) is: a 1965 movie starring Jimmy Stewart: see Shenandoah_(movie) a river (see Shenandoah River) in the United States of America the valley through which that river runs: see Shenandoah Valley a national park in the Shenandoah Valley: see Shenandoah National Park a borough in... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A landform comprises a geomorphological unit, and is largely defined by its surface form and location in the landscape, as part of the terrain, and as such, is typically an element of topography. ... Hills redirects here. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


The adjective montane is used to describe mountainous areas and things associated with them.

Contents

Definitions

Ben Nevis, a 1344 m (4409 ft) munro, Grampian Mountains, Scotland
Ben Nevis, a 1344 m (4409 ft) munro, Grampian Mountains, Scotland

Some authorities define a mountain as a peak with a topographic prominence over a defined value: for example, according to the Britannica Student Encyclopedia, the term "generally refers to rises over 2,000 feet (610 m)".[3] The Encyclopædia Britannica, on the other hand, does not prescribe any height, merely stating that "the term has no standardized geological meaning".[4] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 431 KB) Ben Nevis, Scotland. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 431 KB) Ben Nevis, Scotland. ... Ben Nevis (Gaelic: Beinn Nibheis) is the highest mountain in Great Britain. ... There are at least two ranges of mountains called the Grampian Mountains or The Grampians: Grampian Mountains, Scotland Grampians in Grampians National Park, Australia And at least one range of hills: The Grampians in Nelson, New Zealand This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share... This article is about the country. ... In topography, prominence, also known as autonomous height, relative height or shoulder drop (in America) or prime factor (in Europe), is a concept used in the categorization of hills and mountains, also known as peaks. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ...


In the United Kingdom

In England and Wales the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has defined "mountain" (as a mass noun) as all land over 600 metres for the purposes of right to roam legislation.[5] This is a close metric equivalent of 2,000 feet (610 m). The Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 does not appear to draw this distinction, and in Scotland the term "mountain" is more subjective, often being used for hills exceeding 3,000 feet (914.4 m) listed as Munros. In the United Kingdom the term "hill" is commonly used for all hills and mountains, regardless of height.
The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for environmental protection, food production and standards, agriculture, fisheries and rural communities in England. ... It has been suggested that Count noun be merged into this article or section. ... The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 is a UK act of parliament which came into force on November 30, 2000. ... The Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 created a framework for responsible access to land and inland water, formalising the tradition in Scotland of unhindered access to open countryside, provided that care was taken not to cause damage or interfere with activities including farming and game stalking. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Munro (disambiguation). ...

Fowler Mountain of Connecticut, only 750 feet (229 m), is considered a mountain locally.
Fowler Mountain of Connecticut, only 750 feet (229 m), is considered a mountain locally.

Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym Connecticuter or Connecticutian[2] Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[4] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[5] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km...

In the United States

In the United States, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names lists hundreds of landscape features under 1,000 feet (305 m) (some as low as 100 feet) named as "mountains." This is true for all parts of the United States, including the west coast where such lofty ranges as the Cascade Mountains dominate. And yet the Board does not attempt to distinguish between such features as mountains, hills, or other prominences, and simply categorizes all of them as summit, regardless of what they are called or how high they are. However, the Board does list and categorize such low mountain ranges as the Mount Tom Range (with a high point of 1,200 feet; 366 m) as range.[1] The United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) is an American federal body whose purpose is to establish and maintain uniform usage of geographic names throughout the U.S. government. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Mount Adams in Washington state The Cascade Range is a mountainous region famous for its chain of tall volcanos called the High Cascades that run north-south along the west coast of North America from British Columbia to the Shasta Cascade area of northern California. ...


Height

K2, 8,611 metres (28,250 ft),Karakoram Range,Pakistan.
K2, 8,611 metres (28,250 ft),Karakoram Range,Pakistan.

The height of a mountain is measured as the elevation of its summit above mean sea level. The Himalayas average 5 km above sea level, while the Andes average 4 km. The highest mountain on land is Everest, 8,848 metres (29,030 ft) in the Himalayas. Download high resolution version (1000x1333, 158 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1000x1333, 158 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... For other uses, see K2 (disambiguation). ... Karakoram- In the mountainious region of Gilgit-Baltistan or the Northern Areas of Pakistan, the Karakoram is one of the great Himalayan mountain ranges, with many of the highest and most daunting peaks of the world. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A topographical summit is a point on a surface which is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... For the movie Himalaya, see Himalaya (film). ... “km” redirects here. ... This article is about the mountain range in South America. ... Everest redirects here. ... For the movie Himalaya, see Himalaya (film). ...


Other definitions of height are possible. The peak that is farthest from the center of the Earth is Chimborazo in Ecuador. At 6,267 metres (20,560 ft) above sea level it is not even the tallest peak in the Andes, but because Chimborazo is very close to the equator and the Earth bulges at the equator, it is 2,150 metres (7,100 ft) further away from the Earth's center than Everest.[6] The peak that rises farthest from its base is Mauna Kea on Hawaii, whose peak is 10,200 metres (33,500 ft) above its base on the floor of the Pacific Ocean.[7] This article is about Earth as a planet. ... The inactive stratovolcano Chimborazo is Ecuadors highest summit. ... This article is about the mountain range in South America. ... World map showing the equator in red For other uses, see Equator (disambiguation). ... Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano in the Hawaiian Islands, one of five volcanoes which together form the island of Hawaii. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Even though Everest is the highest mountain on Earth today, there have been much taller mountains in the past. During the Precambrian era, the Canadian Shield once had mountains 12,000 m (39,370 ft)[8] in height that are now eroded down into rolling hills. These formed by the collision of tectonic plates much like the Himalaya and the Rocky Mountains. The Precambrian (Pre-Cambrian) is an informal name for the supereon comprising the eons of the geologic timescale that came before the current Phanerozoic eon. ... An era is a long period of time with different technical and colloquial meanings, and usages in language. ... Canadian Shield Canadian Shield Landform. ... The tectonic plates of the world were mapped in the second half of the 20th century. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ...


At 26 kilometres (85,000 ft) (Fraknoi et al., 2004), the tallest known mountain in the solar system is Olympus Mons, located on Mars and is an ancient volcano. Volcanoes have been known to erupt on other planets and moons in our solar system in our life-times (volcanoes on Venus for example, constantly erupt) and some of them erupt ice instead of lava. Several years ago, the Hale telescope recorded the first known live images of a volcano erupting on a moon in our solar system. This article is about the Solar System. ... This article is about the volcano on Mars and Solar Systems tallest mountain in Latin, For other uses, see Olympus (disambiguation). ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ...


Characteristics

High mountains, and mountains located closer to the Earth's poles, have elevations that exist in colder layers of the atmosphere. They are consequently often subject to glaciation and erosion through frost action. Such processes produce the popularly recognizable mountain peak shape. Some of these mountains have glacial lakes, created by melting glaciers; for example, there are an estimated 3,000 glacial lakes in Bhutan. A glaciation (a created composite term meaning Glacial Period, referring to the Period or Era of, as well as the process of High Glacial Activity), often called an ice age, is a geological phenomenon in which massive ice sheets form in the Arctic and Antarctic and advance toward the equator. ... For morphological image processing operations, see Erosion (morphology). ... The Matterhorn, a classic peak A pyramidal peak, or sometimes in its most extreme form called a glacial horn, is a mountaintop that has been modified by the action of ice during glaciation and frost weathering. ... The Seven Rila Lakes in Rila, Bulgaria are typical representatives of lakes with glacial origin A glacial lake is a lake with origins in a melted glacier. ...

Mount Olympus in Greece.
Mount Olympus in Greece.

Sufficiently tall mountains have very different climatic conditions at the top than at the base, and will thus have different life zones at different altitudes. The flora and fauna found in these zones tend to become isolated since the conditions above and below a particular zone will be inhospitable to those organisms. These isolated ecological systems are known as sky islands and/or microclimates. Tree forests are forests on mountain sides which attract moisture from the trees, creating a unique ecosystem. Very tall mountains may be covered in ice or snow. Image File history File linksMetadata Olympus_Litochoro. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Olympus_Litochoro. ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... The Life Zone concept was developed by C. Hart Merriam in 1889 as a means of describing areas with similar plant and animal communities. ... For the fantasy novel by L. Frank Baum, see Sky Island Sky islands are mountains in ranges isolated by valleys in which other ecosystems are located. ... Microclimate on rock located in intertidal zone on rock at Sunrise-on Sea Tree ferns thrive in a protected dell at the Lost Gardens of Heligan, in Cornwall, England, latitude 50° 15N A microclimate is a local atmospheric zone where the climate differs from the surrounding area. ... A coral reef near the Hawaiian islands is an example of a complex marine ecosystem. ...


Mountains are colder than lower ground, because the Sun heats Earth from the ground up. The Sun's radiation travels through the atmosphere to the ground, where Earth absorbs the heat. Air closest to the Earth's surface is, in general, warmest (see lapse rate for details). Air as high as a mountain is poorly warmed and, therefore, cold.[9] Air temperature normally drops 1 to 2 degrees Celsius (1.8 to 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) for each 300 meters (1000 feet) of altitude. The lapse rate is defined as the negative of the rate of change in an atmospheric variable, usually temperature, with height observed while moving upwards through an atmosphere. ...


Mountains are generally less preferable for human habitation than lowlands; the weather is often harsher, and there is little level ground suitable for agriculture. At very high altitudes, there is less oxygen in the air and less protection against solar radiation (UV). Acute mountain sickness (caused by hypoxia - a lack of oxygen in the blood) affects over half of lowlanders who spend more than a few hours above 3,500 meters (11,483 feet). This article is about modern humans. ... This article is about the chemical element and its most stable form, or dioxygen. ... For other uses, see Ultraviolet (disambiguation). ... Altitude sickness, also known as acute mountain sickness (AMS) or altitude illness is a pathological condition that is caused by lack of adaptation to high altitudes. ... Hypoxia is a pathological condition in which the body as a whole (generalised hypoxia) or region of the body (tissue hypoxia) is deprived of adequate oxygen supply. ...


A number of mountains and mountain ranges of the world have been left in their natural state, and are today primarily used for recreation, while others are used for logging, mining, grazing, or see little use of any sort at all. Some mountains offer spectacular views from their summits, while others are densely wooded. Summit accessibility ranges from mountain to mountain; height, steepness, latitude, terrain, weather, and the presence or lack thereof of roads, lifts, or tramways are all factors that affect accessibility. Hiking, backpacking, mountaineering, rock climbing, ice climbing, downhill skiing, and snowboarding are recreational activities typically enjoyed on mountains. Mountains that support heavy recreational use (especially downhill skiing) are often the locations of mountain resorts. Fun redirects here. ... For other uses, see Log. ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... Grazing To feed on growing herbage, attached algae, or phytoplankton. ... For other uses, see Road (disambiguation). ... A chairlift A chairlift is a type of aerial lift, which consists of a constantly moving loop of steel cable strung between two end terminals and generally over intermediate towers. ... An Aerial tramway in Italy. ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... This article is about backpacking in the wilderness. ... An open crevasse. ... Climbers on Valkyrie at the Roaches. ... Ice climbing is the recreational activity of climbing ice formations such as icefalls, and frozen waterfalls. ... Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... Snowboarder dropping a cornice. ... Mountain Resort, Chengde Mountain Resort, Chengde The Mountain Resort (Chinese: 避暑山庄; pinyin: Bìshǔ Shānzhuāng; literally: Mountain Resort for Avoiding the Heat) or Ligong (Chinese: 离宫; pinyin: Lígōng, the Qing Dynastys summer palace) situated in the city of Chengde in Hebei Province, China, is the worlds...


Types of mountains

The Matterhorn, the classical pyramidal peak
The Matterhorn, the classical pyramidal peak

Mountains can be characterized in several ways. Some mountains are volcanoes and can be characterized by the type of lava and eruptive history. Other mountains are shaped by glacial processes and can be characterized by their glaciated features. Still others are typified by the faulting and folding of the Earth's crust, or by the collision of continental plates via plate tectonics (the Himalayas, for instance). Shape and placement within the overall landscape also define mountains and mountainous structures (such as butte and monadnock). Finally, many mountains can be characterized by the type of rock that make up their composition. More information on mountain types can be found in List of mountain types. The Matterhorn (German) or Cervino (Italian), (French: Mont Cervin or Le Cervin) is perhaps the most familiar mountain in the European Alps. ... The Matterhorn, a classic peak A pyramidal peak, or sometimes in its most extreme form called a glacial horn, is a mountaintop that has been modified by the action of ice during glaciation and frost weathering. ... This article is about volcanoes in geology. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... Austrias longest glacier, the Pasterze, winds its 8 km (5 mile) route at the foot of Austrias highest mountain, the Grossglockner A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... Old fault exposed by roadcut near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. ... Very tight folds. ... The tectonic plates of the world were mapped in the second half of the 20th century. ... Butte near Sedona, Arizona A butte is an isolated hill with steep sides and a small flat top. ... A monadnock or inselberg is an isolated hill, knob, ridge, or small mountain that rises abruptly from a gently sloping or virtually level surrounding plain. ... This article is about the geological substance. ... Mountains can be characterized in several ways. ...


Geology

Chomo Lonzo Makalu Mount Everest Tibetan Plateau Rong River Changtse Rongbuk Glacier North Face East Rongbuk Glacier North Col north ridge route Lhotse Nuptse South Col route Gyachung Kang Cho Oyu Press hyperlinks (or button to enlarge image)

The Himalayan mountain range with Mount Everest.
The Himalayan mountain range with Mount Everest.

A mountain is usually produced by the movement of lithospheric plates, either orogenic movement or epeirogenic movement. The compressional forces, isostatic uplift and intrusion of igneous matter forces surface rock upwards, creating a landform higher than the surrounding features. The height of the feature makes it either a hill or, if higher and steeper, a mountain. The absolute heights of features termed mountains and hills vary greatly according to an area's terrain. The major mountains tend to occur in long linear arcs, indicating tectonic plate boundaries and activity. Two types of mountain are formed depending on how the rock reacts to the tectonic forces – block mountains or fold mountains. Download high resolution version (1000x662, 416 KB)The Himalayan mountain range with Mount Everest as seen from the International Space Station looking south-south-east over the Tibetan Plateau. ... // Orogeny (Greek for mountain generating) is the process of mountain building, and may be studied as a tectonic structural event, as a geographical event and a chronological event, in that orogenic events cause distinctive structural phenomena and related tectonic activity, affect certain regions of rocks and crust and happen within... Epeirogenic or continent forming movements, act along the radius of the earth. ... Igneous rocks (etymology from Latin ignis, fire) are rocks formed by solidification of cooled magma (molten rock), with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ...


The compressional forces in continental collisions may cause the compressed region to thicken, so the upper surface is forced upwards. In order to balance the weight, much of the compressed rock is forced downwards, producing deep "mountain roots". Mountains therefore form downwards as well as upwards (see isostasy). However, in some continental collisions part of one continent may simply override part of the others, crumpling in the process. Isostasy is a term used in Geology to refer to the state of ice above stasy and is angravitational equilibrium between the Earths lithosphere and asthenosphere such that the tectonic plates float at an elevation which depends on their thickness and density. ...


Some isolated mountains were produced by volcanoes, including many apparently small islands that reach a great height above the ocean floor. Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ...


Block mountains are created when large areas are widely broken up by faults creating large vertical displacements. This occurrence is fairly common. The uplifted blocks are block mountains or horsts. The intervening dropped blocks are termed graben: these can be small or form extensive rift valley systems. This form of landscape can be seen in East Africa, the Vosges, the Basin and Range province of Western North America and the Rhine valley. These areas often occur when the regional stress is extensional and the crust is thinned. USGS image In physical geography and geology, a horst is the raised fault block bounded by normal faults. ... USGS image A graben is a depressed block of land bordered by parallel faults. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  Geographic East Africa, including the UN subregion and East African Community East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... Vosges is a French department, named after the Vosges mountain range. ... Basin and Range index map - USGS The Basin and Range Province is a particular type of topography that covers much of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico that is typified by elongate north-south trending arid valleys bounded by mountain ranges which also bound adjacent valleys. ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rhine (disambiguation). ... Geologic provinces of the world (USGS) In geology, a crust is the outermost solid shell of a planet or moon. ...


The mid-ocean ridges are often referred to as undersea mountain ranges due to their bathymetric prominence. Oceanic Ridge Oceanic crust is formed at an oceanic ridge, while the lithosphere is subducted back into the asthenosphere at trenches. ...


Where rock does not fault it folds, either symmetrically or asymmetrically. The upfolds are anticlines and the downfolds are synclines; in asymmetric folding there may also be recumbent and overturned folds. The Jura mountains are an example of folding. Over time, erosion can bring about an inversion of relief: the soft upthrust rock is worn away so the anticlines are actually lower than the tougher, more compressed rock of the synclines.


See also

. ... Mount Everest, the highest mountain on earth. ... Image File history File links Redirect_arrow_without_text. ... URL redirection, also called URL forwarding, domain redirection and domain forwarding, is a technique on the World Wide Web for making a web page available under many URLs. ... Expansion can have several meanings, including: In physics: Expansion of space, thermal expansion In computer hardware: an Expansion card In computer programming: In-line expansion In computer gaming: an expansion pack In mathematics: polynomial expansion or the expansion of a graph An expansion team in sports. ... Mountains like Hymettus have a Latinized Greek origin Hymettos. ... For exotic financial options, see Mountain range (options). ... This is a list of mountain ranges organized alphabetically by continent. ... An open crevasse. ... This is a list of ski areas and resorts around the world. ... This is a list of mountains ordered by their topographic prominence. ...

Gallery

References

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Mountains
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  1. ^ International Year of Freshwater 2003. Retrieved on 2006-12-07.
  2. ^ The Mountain Institute. Retrieved on 2006-12-07.
  3. ^ Mountain -- Britannica Student Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2007-01-08.
  4. ^ Mountain -- Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - The online encyclopedia you can trust!. Retrieved on 2007-01-08.
  5. ^ http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-countryside/consult/access/statut.htm
  6. ^ The 'Highest' Spot on Earth? : NPR
  7. ^ Eruptions of Hawaiian Volcanoes [USGS]
  8. ^ Clark, Bruce W. (1999). "Geologic History", Making Connections: Canada's Geography. Scarborough, Ontario: Prentice Hall Ginn Canada, pp. 95. ISBN 0-13-012635-7. 
  9. ^ Why is it colder in the mountains than in the valley?
  • Fraknoi, A., Morrison, D., & Wolff, S. (2004). Voyages to the Planets. 3rd Ed. Belmont: Thomson Books/Cole.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Look up Mountain in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Brokeback Mountain - Rotten Tomatoes (0 words)
Though deeply flawed, Brokeback Mountain does break new ground in some respects and is worth seeing in some form (probably DVD for most) at least once.
Brokeback Mountain is about as close to perfection as it's possible to come in modern Hollywood.
Brokeback Mountain coaxes audiences to walk several hundred miles in its characters' shoes, luring us with the scent of forbidden fruit and rewarding us with the sumptuous taste of complex storytelling.
Mountain - Leslie West Mystic Fire (794 words)
Mountain is back on the road again and will be doing several Hippefest shows this summer from 07/18/07 thru 08/09/07.
This Mountain DVD was Recorded Live at the Mystic Theater on August 2002, in thunderous 5.1 surround sound.The DVD-9 offers viewers state-of-the-art features, including the multi-angle "Quad Split" which condenses the seven camera shoot into a full rotation of four cameras on the screen simultaneously.
Mountain Live In Paris DVD Limited Signed Edition Legendary Rock band Mountain has released a limited edition of their "Live In Paris" DVD filmed in 1985 when the band were special guests on the Deep Purple European tour.
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